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tv   CNN Newsroom With Fredricka Whitfield  CNN  October 11, 2014 7:00am-11:01am PDT

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be making statements on the ebola screenings. and we're starting with the breaking news on the battle against isis. >> the militants are advancing on multiple fronts in iraq and syria. we know the situation is so desperate in a key iraqi province outside baghdad now that leaders there are leading for u.s. troops to come to the rescue immediately. saying isis seized control of 80% of the province. >> if they succeed they will control a huge area of the iraq and syria where the fate of the city hangs in balance. >> and cnn global affairs lieutenant kernel james reese is also with us. first talk to us how real the fears are that baghdad could fall? does it feel to be imminent
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there. >> >> no, christi. it is important to stress that baghdad doesn't appear to be under threat at the moment. keeping in mind saz sprawling city of 9 million. and the majority certainly would not welcome isis. where they are making progress is of course in anbar province, iraq's largest province. provincial officials tell me more than 80% is under isis control and they continue to expand. we understand now the town of hadifa is now completely surrounded by isis. some good news, apparently what we hear from also provincial sources, a police official, that this afternoon there was a
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strike on a large isis convoy by coalition aircraft describing many military vehicles including two apcs being struck in that hit. but by and large the worries are the iraqi military simply isn't capable of keeping isis back. we heard this provincial official appealing to government in baghdad to get the americans to deploy ground troops but the iraqi government has rejected that and certainly it is a political hot potato for the obama administration. but fact of the matter is the iraqi army doesn't appear to be up to the job. they are plagued with corruption. a lot of soldiers who simply pay their commanding officers to allow them not to go to the front lines, to go back home while everybody else is up at the front lines.
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and in fact one militia leader, pro government militia leader told me as far as they are are concerned the iraqi army in anbar is just play acting. >> thank you. >> aaron, defense secretary chug hagel. he know he is talking about the situation in anbar. what are we hearing from him. >> acknowledging the situation sz a tough. listen to those comments. >> anbar province is in trouble. we know that. the united states and coalition partners are helping and assisting the iraqi security forces t peshmerga and the kurds. as i have said, the president has said, all the senior officials have said, it is a
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difficult effort. it is going to take time. it won't be easy. >> now, as u.s. officials have talked about this over the past weeks and months, it seems that they were taking incremental steps beginning with some reconnaissance missions, then taking on a campaign of air strikes, then training syrian rebels as well as iraqi troops so they could send in ground troops. but it doesn't seem as though us officials expected this kind of intense fight this early. >> want to get to lieutenant colonel reese. colonel we understand it is more difficult to reclaim territory that is taken than it is to keep someone from taking the territory in the first place. should the u.s. send in troops to protect anbar? >> i'll tell you. i've been coming in and out of iraq now since 2003 as a soldier
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and when i got out in '07 running companies and doing stability operations if for iraqis. and the short answer is if we don't want the lines on the map to change here pretty drastically we are going to have to put ground troops on? >> we heard from the pentagon spokesman, admiral john kirby we need to begin steeling ourselves for reality that kobani will call and other areas will fall. is this one that the u.s. should accept will fall as well? >> i think what you are seeing is yes. kobani probably has a good chance of falling. i said yesterday i think the turks have a moral obligation to get in there and fight but they are not going to do that until they have an idea what the coalition is going to do with assad. and assad is the center of gravity in this whole piece. but again if we don't get in there and stop isis and delay what they are needing to do the lines arent eon the map will wi
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change drastically. >> if the anbar falls into the control of isis, and many on the ground believe 80% is under their control. does that name a different strategy going forward. >> no different strategy yet but what i would point is that we've heard other the past month that twice the chairman of the chiefs of staff has said we how would recommend ground troops. but wave again and again they keep reiterating they are not going to send in american ground troops. however this is becoming a hot debate. we have heard from some republicans even who say that is not realistic. at some point they are going to have to consider it. but here is the political reality. the midterm elections are just three weeks away. and while we have seen american
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support in polls for big air strikes in iraq and syria, there is not yet the support for ground troops. but that could be a debate that heats up after the midterm elections in congress. christi and victor. >> to the white house. lieutenant kernel, thank you as well. >> aren't we want to take you live as we are listening to the port authority of the new york and new jersey. jfk airport has begun that you are ebola screenings today. let's listen. >> or through one of the affected countries our officers, customs and border protections will provide the cdc -- will provide a cdc fact sheet outlining the signs and symptoms of ebola. and the passengers is then directed to a private area where the individual complete it is a cdc questionnaire and contact information. customs and border protection has authorized and coordinated
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medical staff that will take the traveler's temperature and assess if it is within a normal range. right now united states coast guard corpsman will be providing that but eventually we are contracting very quickly with professional medical staff to do that. well if the traveler has a fever or other symptoms or has been exposed to ebola, customs and border protection will refer that traveler to the centers for disease control for a public health assessment and then from there the cdc determine ws whetr the traveler can continue on or taken to a hospital . cdc continually evaluates and update ours guidance to the front line personnel regarding ebola. background information on the outbreak, impacted regions, origin, pathology, mode of
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transmission, symptoms, all of these operational procedures and precautions for processing passengers showing signs of illness. a cdc quarantine officer is locate at the headquarters. they facility the requests for information between our organizations. additional the centers for disease control and prevention can provide a "do not board" notification regarding individuals who are considered to be effective with a highly contagious disease and present a threat to public health. once passengers arrive in the united states they are subject to additional measures. as part of every --. conduct observation of travelers
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that includes monitoring them for signs of illness and notification to cdc or other local public health entities. our officers are trained and have been for many years in illness recognition by the cdc and they look for those signs and if the traveler is identified with a sign of communicable disease of public health significance, that traveler is isolated from the traveling public, referred to the cdc regional quarantine officering or as i said other local public health authorities. the cdc maintains jurisdiction. personnel may be called upon to help with enforcement for the cdc's determinations and we stand ready to help. cdc has distributed health
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advisories to travelers arriving in the united states from those ebola-effected countries. the advisories provide the traveler with information on ebola, the health signs to look for. and information for their doctor should -- >> all right. we are listening to authorities there at jfk international airport. as they are talking about the protocols they have implemented just today, these new screen togs t ings to try to mitigate ebola symptoms from getting pat intin gates of the airport. they will then pass people onto the cdc and other measures. we're going find out if these measures are really helping. >> we'll have allison cossack standing by. and cnn safety analyst david suessy. is this hype are or will it
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. one major u.s. airport stepping up the fight against ebola. jfk, the first airport in the country to begin enhanced screenings for the deadly virus. >> and next week four others join jfk. >> the goal is to stop anyone with possible symptoms from getting beyond airport gates into the general public. let's bring in allison cossic live at the airport. also david stussy with us as well. you first allison, what are you seeing this morning. >> so far we haven't heard of
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any flights coming from line bl, guinea or sierra leone. but what is going to happen is anyone on the flight, whether they started there or made a connection, once they land here at jfq they go into extra screening. they are put into a predetermined area to have their temperatures taken and they are also going to be asked questions about where they have traveled and have they had any contact with anybody with ebola. if they find a red flag they will go on to a quarantined area and further evaluation. but if they find there are no symptoms they will go ahead and be asked to leave contact information and be on their way. the question many people have is what happens after they leave? we all know ebola has a 21 day incubation period. and so what if you leave here from the airport and suddenly
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two days later you have a fever, that this only does so much. christi and victor. >> how effective do you think these screenings are going to be david? >> i think they will be very effective once they have gotten to the other four airports because of the fact those four airports handle about 94% of all of the flights into those effected countries. i think it will be effective. >> and do you think that they are going to be able to -- once if they find somebody who has -- has a temperature, how do they determine, we talked about this tiered approach. they are going from cvp to cdc. to local authorities. how monitored can those individuals be? >> well that is a difficult question. because of the fact that you don't know at what point it is contagious or if it's been noted. a lot of what this system relies on is information which is given
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us to from the passenger himself which as we know with the previous passenger is now deceased. he didn't say that on on his application that he had been exposed when indeed he knew he had been exposed. so those are the kind of questions that will have to take more in-depth investigations. but the cdc and the world health organization and the other organizations are working closely on this to tighten it down as much as they can. but as with any safety program it is almost impossible to catch 100%. but if you only catch 1%, it is worth it. >> it is. what about different strains of the virus, david? >> well, i'm not a doctor, and i can't really answer that question specifically. but i can talk about the safety and measures to take sure that it doesn't, that any of the strains don't come into the country. and this is really unprecedented christi. it is something i'm not aware of
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the faa ever doing before nor the national civil aviation committee doing before. they have standard procedures for cleaning airplanes afterwards and that kind of thing. but there really hasn't been anything like this before. so we are learning as it goes. >> and allison want to ask you really quickly, is there any concern that these further screenings could strain operations at the airport? >>. >> it doesn't look that way. when you think about it, we're hearing only about 150 people per day come here from those three countries and here to the u.s. so you split that out into all five airports and it really doesn't seem like it would throw things down too much. >> allison and david, thank you both. reports of another massive hack. cyber criminals are apparently leaking thousands of the snap
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another massive breech of privacy this weekend, this time possibly carting teens and kids. >> stolen picks and videos from
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snap chat. and many include racy or nude selfies. >> let's bring in business correspondent samuel burke. so many snap chat users are just kids. thousands of these stolen images then could be potentially child pornography, yes? >> yeah. before i get into any of the details of the hacking, let's just take a step back and look at the ages of the average snap chat user. in fact 50% of all snap chat users are between the ages of 13 and 17. half of probably the 100 million active users. between 13 and 17. teen being the operative word there. it looks like third party apps for hacked. so if we are talking you may be using the official snap chat
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app. and i may be using an unofficial ones. and those apps allow mow to save the pictures and it appears the third party apps were hacked and maybe how the 100,000 images have been leaked online. >> so when we talk about the potential for problems here, this could be -- this could fall under child pornography. >> absolutely. and keep in mind a lot of people say they are 13 when they are using apps like snap chat and may by less than 13. so we could be seeing images of children, pre teens, teens being leaked here without a doubt because really the heart of the base are the pre teens and teens. >> is everybody who sends a message using snap chat, the service, is everybody at risk? >> in theory, everybody is at risk but probably not. it is probably only people who were using these third party apps but then again you don't know if you have been snap
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chatting and the other person on the other end has been using it. so everybody at risk? in theory. but it loose like only a hundred thousand images. if you are one of the people who's image has been leaked you may spend the rest of your life trying to get these images taken down off other websites. >> good hefx heavens. samuel burke, thank you so much. >> isis militants on the march in a beseeieged province just outside the iraqi capital. and leaders there say they need u.s. troops on the ground and need them now. for retirement. but when we start worrying about tomorrow, we miss out on what matters today. ♪
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10,000 fighters to the region which is just ten miles from baghdad. that is fuelling fears about the fate of iraqi's capitol. jfk beginnings advanced screening for ebola today. the first of five airports to target travelerers from hard hit countries such as guinea, liberia and sierra leone. in the meantime an nbc news crewman is under a mandatory quarantine order now after violating a voluntary order to stay in isolation for 21 days. and in streets of hong kong they have set up shower stalls and the homework areas. protests could go on for another two weeks. >> they now serve together on the supreme court but back when
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elena keegan was working in the white house she recommended john roberts. robert who you know now is chief justice. he was in private law practice at the time. fwl. and a new jersey high school and community is dealing with allegations of hazing and sexual assault this morning. six football players from sayreville war memorial high school were taken into custody yesterday accused of assaulting younger teammates. the players range from 15 to 17 and they are being held at a detention facility pending a hearing and the football season has been canceled for the school. rumors are running wild all over whose in charge of north korea. kim jong-un missed a major celebration yesterday honoring
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his father and grandfather. and has not been seen in public for weeks. actually leading to questions on his health and grip on power. there is speculation that this woman, his younger sister is now in charge. professor joins us. good to have you. how significant was kim jong-un's no-show at this event yesterday. >> leaders have missed this event before but this is the first time kim jong-un has missed it. and what's really interesting about this event is that for the first time there were flower bouquets send to kim jong-un. which is very unusual. suggesting his health is not good. >> and this is a regime that they would say he would get 50
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holes in one in a row, just infallible and invincible to even admit that he had some health problem. that's why he's not in the public eye. wouldn't they say typically he is in intense study or something like that. >> well they have the explain his long absence. more thon a month now he hasn't been seen in public. and saying he is off working hard is not going to cut it. so they have to admit. they haven't given any details there is something more serious but won't say exactly what it is. >> how would we know even if there is a coupe. >> if there was we would like be seeing some military maneuvers or a lock doup in the capital. and we don't see evidence of that so far. the regime has gone out of its way to insist that kim jong-un is in charge and in control and in the country.
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so there is no indication at that point he is not in power. >> well we did see few unusual moves from the military. we saw representative go to south korea and talk about possibly restarting the talks between north and is south korea. we saw the 40 propaganda balloons. could that be some evidence of something out of whack? >> it depends really on what condition kim jong-un is in right now. if he's debilitated and can't really run the country, then there will be people scrambling around to make decisions to put policy in to place. but i think sending the high ranking general and two ore top leaders to south korea was a until that in fact kim jong-un is in charge and we can go forward with the policy decisions. >> how credible do you think the claim rls the possibility that kim's younger sister is in kroll or at least speaking for him?
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>> well this is a family system a family dynasty and the only way to get anything done is through the ruling family and the top leader. the closer you are to kim jong-un the more access to power of you. and i think it is credible she is the one relaying decisions to him and from him and possibly also really running the show while he is recuperating from what ails him. >> i wonder are those inside the dprk aware of how much this is causing a stink in the rest of the world not seeing kim jong-un? >> i don't know. ordinary people don't get to see him anyway. he's in the media or on television and hear about him all the type. it's hard to say how much your average north korean on the street really understands the significance of kim jong-un being absent. but i think that there is concern within the elite that he
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is not being seen and that major decisions can't be made without his presence. and i would think that reason the ranks of the leadership there is growing concern that he's got to come out and show his face before long. >> it is absolutely bizarre. and profession charles armstrong. i thank you for helping us understand a little more about the family and the government there. >> you're welcome. right now on the streets of downtown st. louis, protesters are getting together to demand an end to police violence. >> what sparked this weekend of resistance as it is being called? and how law enforcement is responding. [ male announcer ] if you're taking multiple medications, does your mouth often feel dry? a dry mouth can be a side effect of many medications
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demonstrators are gathering right now, preparing to take to the streets of downtown st. louis for what organizers are calling a the weekend of resistance. >> after the second shooting of a black teen by a white officer in as many months here and that
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sparked protests again even though the police say the teen shot only them first. hundreds gathered yesterday in the rain you see here. calling for end to police violence. >> stephanie elam joins us in st. louis. the initial protests were violent but we understand more peaceful tonight. >> caller: some have been violent, not all have been. out here this morning you can see people are valgalvanized an starting to come together to prepare if this morning march and the tone we're hearing is they really want the focus to remain on mike brown, the loss of his life t relationship with the police officers and the community is something they really want people to remember and not to forget what happened in august even as things start to get a little -- excuse me, cooler, here in st. louis.
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>> stephanie i want to give you a second to catch your breath there. i know that is difficult. but this was from last night. >> um-hmm. a view of what we saw last night. peaceful there. you know, where people were close to. we saw pictures online of protesters facing off with some of those police officers. but i understand there was announcements made if you touch an officer will arrest. >> right. and amazing fwli no arrests last night. so you see this and somehow they managed to break away and keep things calm. and that is one of the things a lot of organizers, even the family of mike brown. this is reginald joining me. he lives in ferguson, actually in the same apartment complex as where mike brown lived. and tell me why are you out here so early? why is this so important to be
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here. >> vitally important. we have people from all across the united states to stand in one accord for just nis this matter. we nyse justice for michael brown and justice if for community. >> and you feel like coming out here and demonstrating is making an impact. >> we are not going to stop addressing the matter until we get some resolve. we'll be here. >> reginald we appreciate you talking. but as you can see this is one person who lives in ferguson a lifelong resident of the st. louis, and he feels very important for everyone to come out here and have their voices heard on this issue. >> hopefully it will continue to be peaceful throughout the weekend as well. stephanie, thank you so much. nevada has now become the 26th state where same sex marriage is legal. we'll talk to the state senator and his partner, who became the first to say i do. she inspires you.
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>> they did not waste any time. [ applause ] >> look at that. they were the first same sex couple married in nevada and they are joining us from las vegas now. congratulations gentlemen. >> thank you, thank you very much. >> i want to start with the proposal. why then? why that moment? >> it just seemed like the right time to do it. something we had discussed for quite some time when and if it became legal in our state what we would do. and it did. and it just seemed like the perfect time to do it amongst friends in that room that night.
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>> you seemed extraordinarily calm when it happened. did you know it was coming? >> that was for me? >> yeah. >> sorry. the ear piece, i could barely hear. no i didn't know it was coming. actually we were just going there to celebrate with everyone else. and when he got on stage and was speaking with the folks about the accomplishment and thanking everyone and someone said, do it, do it. and he did it. >> there that moment. and now you get to relive it over and over on national television. and las vegas posted an ad now you can say "i do" to one more thing. and i understand you played a role in making this happen for nevada. because at the end of the day
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this could be big business. >> we believe so. the numbers even in the last legislati legislative session we looked at numbers and we are the marriage capital of the world. so adding this demographic to those numbers we believe we'll see a big boom here in our state. >> i want to say with you but put on your senator atkinson hat but i want to speak about the importance of same-sex marriage quite possibly soon being the law in 35 states. >> well, you know, that is -- it's significant. i think people wished and hoped that the supreme court would just go ahead and do it and make it legal throughout all of our states and so we don't have to continue to go through these battles and states don't continue to have to go through these legal battles. i think it is phenomenal. we've always said that the deep
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south and some of those states would be the states that had the toughest time passing this law but they will come on board i'm quite confident, as other states come on board. they are not going to want to feel left behind and feel like they are the only ones that's not doing it. look, it is what it is. it is marriage equality. people should be able to marry the one they love and states that are going to be viewed as not in line with that are probably going to be left behind in a lot of different categories. and so i think just feel like it is time and we're moving in that direction. >> so senator, we know that in the public eye and in public office you probably get more e-mail and letters than we can count about anything and everything. what do your constituents say to this? >> i will tell you, i have been overwhelmed by the positive feedback i have received from my constituents. even last year when i came out
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on the senate world and told the world, i was black, i was gay, and proud. i received a lot of responses from people just all over the world. and this has been the same thing. i've told woody that it felt like it was april 22, 2013 all over again. so it's felt that way. and anyone i have heard from inside my district, they have all been very very positive. again, i think times are changing. we are lucky. we are blessed to be a part of something this historic and something in our state, where people are very accepting. >> well senator atkinson, woody howard, congratulation and thinking for sharing the moment and this time with us. >> thank you. >> thank you for having us on we appreciate it. >> thank you gentlemen. >> good to see them. >> yeah. so getting fit, it is not easy. understatement. but especially if you are in a wheelchair. because luckily this week's cnn
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you know each week we are shining the spotlight on the top ten cnn heroes of the 2014. >> when this week's honoree learned about the lack of access e based by those with disabilities. he got to work the best way he knew how. meet ed norton. >> when i'm running i feel limitless. being in motion makes me feel free. when you are really pushing yourself that is when you really feel alive. but there are millions of people around the world that are facing severe limitations. they can't be independent. they can't live their lives. i've spent years training olympic athlete, football player, body builders. one day a young guy, newly spinal cord injured came in
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asking for hem. at first i didn't know what to do but working together we made tremendous progress. before you knew it my phone rang off the hook. and i opened a gym designed to fit their needs. i provide strength and conditioning training for people with disabilities. people come to me when they are at their lowest. you come to the gym, and all of a sudden you have a natural support network. >> in 1971, i broke my back. and i've been in a wheelchair ever since. thanks to ned, i keep my upper body strength at a maximum. i've been able to live a full life. >> i never worry about what they can't do. i worry about what they can do. >> i can do it, ned. >> yes you can.
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good job. i'm building then up stronger so they can go out and live life thick loo they are supposed to. >> go to cnn heros.com online or on your mobile device to vote for ned or one of the other nine nominees for here row of the year. >> a huge weekend for college football. the tigers lid my nick marshall to take on number three, mississippi state in the nfc west division lead. >> the battle may be lost or won inside the red zone. and mississippi state's athletic director has already asked fans to keep their cow bells in check. come on. kickoff is at 3:30 eastern. >> go make some great memories today.
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>> certainly. thank you for watching but stay here because there is much more ahead in the next hour of the cnn news room. >> hey there guy. i brought my cow bell all the way from new york. now i have to go back and explain o t sarks why i had it. the 1 1xz hour of news ram starts right now. the militant group isis bearing down on two key locations in iraq and syria this as leaders plead for the u.s. to end ground forces. live team coverage straight ahead. also a rally is getting under way in st. louis, the latest in a series of protests days after a teenager is shot and killed. it's rekindled solume of the anr
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for michael bruin's eddeath. and we are following breaking news this morning. isis fighters are advancing on two fronts threatening key areas in iraq and syria. at this hour isis is closing in on baghdad, anbar province, just west of baghdad is undertack. officials are begging for the u.s. to send ground troops immediately to safe the province from imminent collapse. and the syria across the border from turkey a situation there is just as dire. we are at the. anbar is asking for u.s. troops
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but the request isn't coming from baghdad but anbar itself. >> caller: th they told us for ground troops to stop the onslaught of isis which in recent weeks advise steadily gained ground. in fact they are basically about 20 miles to the west of baghdad at this point. we understand from sources here in baghdad that they haven't received that request and it is also well known the iraqi government has had the position for quite some time that they don't want u.s. ground troops in iraq. and certainly the obama administration has made it clear they don't intend to send them. so that really raises the question what is going to be done to save anbar province? which is the biggest in iraq,
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from isis? now i spoke to the head of intelligence in anbar and he told us as many as 10,000 fighters from syria and iraq have been dispatched to anbar. it appears the focus of their efforts is not baghdad itself. we've been to the defensive perimeter in baghdad. but it is a series of towns and cities along the euphrates river. had ar ha hadifa we've been told is completely surrounded, cutoff from supplies. the garrison of the army has been made an urgent appeal to baghdad to send equipment, reinforcements, splicupplies. but as we've seen in the past,
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the shortcomings, whether incompetent or corruption, they have repeatedly failed to come to the rescue of these besieged garrison, which eventually get overrun. isis captures all of their equipment and ammunition. so not a bright picture here in baghdad. >> and it looks as if isis is turning its attention away from fighting the syrian president and looking to these provinces. what about the new government in baghdad? a new prime minister, a new president, how vulnerable are they now that isis has made this advance so close to them? >> well it is important to keep in mind that baghdad is a majority shiite city. a sprawling city of more than 9 million people which would be probably far more than isis could handle, until now. whether it's in syria or iraq
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they have basically focused efforts and have been able to take control of places where there is a sympathetic sunni majority, which has been alienated from the government in baghdad. so for isis to take over baghdad would be a tall order. the problem isn't taking over. the problem is urban terrorism. there is almost every day one or more car bomb, suicide bombing in baghdad and the iraqi security officials believe isis is behind it. even though the shiite majority city, there are areas where there is a sunni majority. and there are sympathizers to isis. so it's problem of the forces on the outside of isis pressing in but also sleeper cell, so to speak, inside baghdad. >> ben, thank you so much. next we go to nick peyton walsh on the border with turkey.
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>> reporter: certainly doesn't seem to be the case. in the last few minutes we've seen tracer rounds fired towards the border where dusk is falling fast. the outstanding two question being how many civilians are still trapped inside kobani. behind me a town that isis and kurd issue militants have been fighting over for well over weeks. and how close are isis to their main goal of capturing the key crossing point between syria and turkey. it is clearly the goal to try and circle those kurd issue militants inside the down. we saw some kurdish fighters far to the east significanting it is probably is the case and -- it seems some kurdish civilians maybe fighters have been coming
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out in the past few hours. we spoke to turkish military putting them on a truck and driving them away. it's clear isis is successful in using artillery to advance. it's been a bitter day in terms of explosions in that city. as i say ground it seems changing fast, reasonably quickly. sometimes it does move back again into kurdish control. very complicated days ahead though. the key question is the case as the u.n. say that there are 10,000 civilians still inside the down. we can't see them from the vantage point we're at. and as this comes to potentially a head in the days ahead, the fate of these people is unclear. paramount in the international community's mind and the pressure on turkey to permit some of them out in the humanitarian corridor. >> and turkey has not wanted to
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put ground forces inside syria. if isis controls that critical crossing point, where turkey change its strategy? will they fight to keep them out of their country? how is that a game changer? >> reporter: well turkey doesn't want to insert ground forces a in the particular stage. there might be discussions. and perhaps a buffer zone, making a certain territory safe for refugees and as it stands now, off to my left there are about a dozen turkish military vehicles on a hill watching this unfold. they are simply not involved. we saw a shell land close to one just a few hours. they didn't seem to react. they are simply changing shift around here and i think many are wondering what will they do for
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those civilians trapped inside. >> we now turn to the white house and erin mcpike. serious concern for anbar province in iraq. what is he saying. >> reporter: hewe've heard from hagen and others in the admission and all are saying as the very dire situation. now, they are saying they expect this and it is true that we heard from the administration over the past month or so that this would be a very long fight and be very tough. but it doesn't seem as though they expected to be so difficult and so intense so soon. it seemed they were doing this in an incremental way with reconnaissance and then air strikes and training troops as well as the moderate syrian
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rebels and they thought they had more time. they were buying time with this kind of campaign. but what we are hearing from officials is they are acknowledging as the very tough situation on the ground. >> now with anbar suggesting -- sorry. now that anbar is asking for ground troops, the u.s. says they don't want that. when does that begin to change? when do they begin to think that baghdad might be at sufficient risk that the game has to alter? >> deb, this has been a very controversial issue over the past month. we have seen in polls that a majority of americans do support air strikes in both iraq and syria in big numbers. the terrain has shifted very rapidly. but there is not yet support for ground troops. and we've heard from president obama, secretary of state john kerry as well as hagel and they
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have said again and again no ground troops. we also heard from high profile and visible republican speakers. and they have suggested it is not realistic that kmeamericans cannot commit ground troops. the political reality is midterm elections are just three weeks away and this is unlikely a fight they want to have. after the elections are over and congress comes back in session i suspect we'll see a much more heated debate whether or not the u.s. has to send in ground troops. >> erin mcpike at the white house. thank you. and the streets are filling up in st. louis right now. stephanie elam is live. >> reporter: we are out here and you can see people are starting to gather here. a lot of people hugging it out. a lot of people talking, coming together. very diverse group of people. we'll tell you more about what's going on in st. louis as this weekend of resistance continues.
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right now, passenger screenings for ebola are beginning at jfk airport in new york. the fist of five airports that will get enhanced screenings around the country. public health officials trying to prevent ebola from entering the united states. allison is at jfk and who are exactly are they looking for? somebody like duncan would not have even been caught. so who are they looking for? >> they are looking for anybody whose on a flight or conducting flight that came from one of the three countries, considered the hot zones of ebola. incident guinea or sierra leone or liberia. and to screen before they get into the general population. what is essentially going to happen is they are going to see
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officials know ahead of time these flights are coming in. the passengers will be led to a designated area where their temperatures will be taken. also they will be asked several questions including what their travel was like. have had v they had any contact with anyone with bole. if there are no red flags they will be allowed to leave. they are going to be asked however to leave contact information and going to be asked to go ahead and monitor their fevers for the next 21 days and keep a log of those. if any red flags are spotted those folks will move to a quarantined area. and be further evaluatings. even with these, the cdc admits this is not magic. >> the screening procedure would not necessarily have caught the patient in dallas as indicated
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and no part of entry or exit will supplant the for local and public health departments, clinics, hospitals to be prepared to detect a case might it occur. >> this is not the only airport that is going to have these screenings. they include dulles, o'hare and newark liberty international. >> all right. allison kosik. thank you. and the question everyone is wondering is will these screenings actually work? we're bringing in analyst and former inspector general for the department of transportation. and these new screen us would not have detect ed the previous illness. he didn't have symptoms.
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>> we're dining wide search for a small number of people. we're talking about approximately 150 travelers a day. so the u.s. nod not been wanting to effectively ban travel. so they are doing the screening. and if you are not showing a temperature or other symptoms they will be let two. it does have the potential to catch some people and that part is very good. we must do something. we simply can't leave the public health to the discretion of people taking temperatures in africa. we have to do something here but i do think it would have been more effective to stop the travel of these 150 people per day. >> at la guardia they said look,
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there are inadequate precautions. how do we know what to do? do you think there should be no emphasis on how you decontaminate a plane? there in the bathroom or public areas where a lot of people touch things? >> the cdc issued guidelines about three weeks ago as how to clean a plane, which is interesting because they don't have any experience cleaning planes. and they said for example bleaching. well you can't bleach carpets or seats. and the whoeg whole thing is you get people off the plane. the cleaners oedon't have very long to clean the plane and try to get the plane out there in sometimes as little as a half hour. so you don't really have time. by the time the last person is off the plane long before the screening by the cdc is done those cleaners have to be on the
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plane. and we really need to take them into consideration. a plane is like a small flying city. it is not just the pilot the flight attendant asks the passengers. it is the cleaners and caterers and people who empty the bathrooms and supply the water. there is a city around each plane. >> and you have to wonder what happens if somebody does test positive for a fever and that plane is already up in the air, what to you do? >> lots of questions. mary, thank you so much. and still ahead a rally in st. louis today is bringing up familiar emotions.
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it is called the weekend of resistance and thousands are expected to attend. that was the rallying cry "don't shoot" for the kick off to the event in ferguson, missouri, and the michael brown the black teenager who died at the hands of a white police officer. the protests come days after another white officer in nearby st. louis fatally shot a black teenager who was armed. stephanie, protesters are making their way there for day two of this weekend of resistance. what is the mood? >> reporter: true deb.
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and we've been out here long before people were getting here this morning. and if you look, you can see that it is a growing crowd. it is a diverse crowd. it is a multigenerational crowd. there is men, there is woman here. and it is something that may actually surprise some people to see how these folks are coming together. i'm watching people actually pick up trash here in the park while they are gathering. they are hugging each other. they are holding signs that they have taken time to make and gather here for this. but these people are galvanized to do this. we've seen that yesterday there was a down pour and people were still coming out here in the down pour so have their voices heard. so people are motivated and don't want this topic of racial profiling or the issues that they say they have between the community here and st. louis police department that those don't go away. but i got to tell you they are not just from missouri here. i saw some people from oakland and state likes illinois and
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kansas. so people coming from other regions to be part of this. >> quickly, the people behind you in the yellow vests, who are they? >> reporter: some hoof them are organizers. and they are groups coming all together in one place. we've heard about ferguson in october and different names for it. but all of it together organizing for people to come out here today. a concerted effort to make this happen. >> thank you stephanie. coming up our top story isis moving near baghdad. one of the leaders is asking u.s. the to send in ground troops. we break down the options next. but first, anthony boar deign gives the details on his first tripe to south american
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count right of way paraguy. >> what is paraguay like? one of those places i've always wanted to go and i always get it confused with the uruguay. >> paraguay we know almost nothing about it. it's the place that germans hid out in after the war and had a succession of the incredibly lurid, over the top like insane military dictatorships. really lampoonable ugly stuff. my great grandfather jean bourdain disappeared in that area. he. so i went to look into this question and while doing that looked into paraguy, which is at various times seen as sort of a
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yutopia for colonists. >> what drew people there. >> the promise of unlimited wealth and agricultural land. and the primary language is not spanish or portuguese. it's quaranine. they ordered all citizens to intermarry and as best as possible mix or eradicate the stain of their european heritage. >> it's very interesting. >> it is. and it is a mixed, very mixed culture. and a very remote one. i mean who goes to paraguay? also a very friendly loving one with great food and a lot to do.
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welcome back everyone. i'm debra. several new jersey high school football players are the charged
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with assault. accuse odd the hazing freshman. days after the school's entire season was canceled. sexual aggravated result and criminal restraint. seven players face charges. six already in custody. a mayor had to cancel halloween this month. eric frein is on the loose since september and police fear that costumes and disguises could give frein cover and a possible way to escape. they don't want to ruin the event for all so there will be an event held at a nearby school. and a troubling security breach concerning millions of teenagers and parents around the world. stolen snap chat photos and videos. the photos sharing snap chat insists its servers were not
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hacked. at least one-third party site with access was compromised. images sent through the snap chat app are supposed to disappear in a few seconds making it a very popular tool for sending nude images. the camera man effected be bole was in mabd tear quarantine. fellow crew members violated an agreement for self confinement but emphasize that the crew remains symptom free. other stop story t war on ice. and isis fighters are closing on in baghdad. anbar province just to the west is under attack. i up to 10,000 troops have been sent from syria to mosul. and the troops are begging for tous send ground troops
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immediately. the situation is dire nor the border of the turkey. outnumbered and outgunned despite numerous air strikes from coalitions forces. a former white house advicer from iraq joins us. a big question some have been asking. where is turkey? they have already told the u.s. that unless the u.s. fights against president -- they are not. >> the reason they are not defending is geopolitically it is not to their advantage. the kurdish people for the lo longest period of time have wanted to expand and grow their own nation, if you will. and they have no desire to see that happen. so it is tot the long term to see assad of syria fall clz of course aligned with iran whose
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for the turks and the sunnis in the region the long term threat so they are sitting back and wait to see what unfolds first. >> i want to play a clip from turkey's prime minister. take a listen. >> here we are ready do everything if there is a clear strategy that after isis that we can be sure that our border will be protected. we don't want the regime anymore on our border pushing people towards turkey. we don't want other terrorist organizations to be active there. >> so what do you make of that? he is saying we are not going to get involved in no one else does. does that mean that kobani will fall and then escalate the situation with all the coalition forces having to go in down the road? >> exactly. i'm afraid that kobani is going to fall. we are looking at a possible
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massacre of a magnitude yet to be seen, ununfortunately. and it could be one of these situations again where the president steps in and decides to heighten the military tempo and our activity in the area. but yes, i'm afraid kobani will fall unless anything is done by the united states. there is no getting around that. and what the minister, or the president of turkey is addressing is is the fact of the kurdish state again. we does not want to see a kurdish state expand and grow. >> looking at the map that we've got up right now it is fascinating. because turkey is borpded by
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a rally is happening right now in st. louis where protesters are gathering all week to gain justice for michael brown. the black teenager shot to death by a white police officer darren wilson. protesters want officer wilson arrested and also want the da off the case because he is biased. even though he is an elected official. and protests are
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expected considering the violence that happened before is there message getting lost? >> yes. completely and totally lost. when cryou burn down a qdoba an throw rock the police cars and others your message is totally and completely lost. and there is an infints mall number of people here this weekend. these guys, their message -- they are doing a disservice to their message. >> what is the message then? what do they want to say? >> well that is a very good question. they say don't shoot. but yet a few days ago you had a teenager shoot three times at a police officer. the police officer might have been killed if the gun didn't jam. they say black lives matter
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except when la tee shah williams gets shot in the eye at the convenient. and they are basically saying no indictment, no peace. they are basically saying we will riot if this police officer does not get indicted. i don't know what they want. >> and i've spoke on the a number of lawyers down there and they are not convinced had officer will actually be indicted because of the circumstances how this all went down. specifically you have had no one has heard from darren wilson yet. how does it play out if in fact the grand jury says we simply can't. and and doesn't matter who the da or the prosecutor is if the grand jury doesn't have enough evidence. >> this crowd has already indicted and convicted and wants officer wilson executed. we don't know the facts. we don't know what happened. only a few people in st. louis
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county, part of the grand jury know the facts. when the facts come out let's digest fact and let's like civilized people figure out what was the best way to go about it. maybe it was a good shooting maybe it was a bad shooting. we don't know. the reason this is all happening is because there is no leadership. we don't have a mayor, don't have a county executive. we don't have a governor. with e have no leadership out here. everybody wants to be the next al sharpton. nobody wants to be the next martin luther king, jr. >> there is a lot of distrust of the police officers. do you think that's been resolved in any way? have steps been made to maybe improve that even minimally? >> well we do know that ferguson wrote off all of their warrants. the city of st. louis wrote off
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all of their warrants. i think we are trying. i think the story of the police violence or brutality is a real issue. but when you are speeting at police officers, throwing feces at them saying racially insensitive things to african american officers, not where the conversation starts. >> the protesters have been told if this they lay a hand on any police officer they will be charged with assault. we thank you for your time. and the question, where where in the world is kim jong-un. we'll take you through some of the theories about what's happened to this north korean dictator missing in action. it's tough, but i've managed. but managing my symptoms was all i was doing. so when i finally told my doctor, he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief.
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that's mysteriously out of the public eye. those are some of the factors and concerns in north korea. brian todd looks at the deepening mystery and why it matters here in the u.s. brian? >> reporter: deborah, the anxiety over what's going on inside this regime is heightened. kim jong-un is mia and his absence from public view resonates all the way to washington. a u.s. intelligence official tells cnn it's concerning that kim jong-un is out of sight. the north korean leader didn't show up at the much-anticipated anniversary of the founding of the ruling workers' party, but
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he did send flowers. >> to skip an event which honors your father and your grandfather is a serious breach of protocol, unless there's some really good reason. i think right now that kim jong-un is suffering under not only a physical disability, but a political one as well. >> reporter: is kim's power eroding? is he under threat from inside? senior u.s. officials tell cnn there's no indication kim has been completely sidelined or is in very bad health. but videos showing him limping and recent reports of an ankle or leg injury to kim only lead to more questions. >> why not have him just sitting down behind a desk or behind something to project? >> unless he's suffering a severe injury of some sort, i don't think that there should be some intrinsic reason why they don't present him in some kind of a public mode, even if it can't show him walking and being very, very active. >> reporter: south korean officials say the regime appears to be operating normally and there are no signs of unusual
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military activity inside north korea, often a signal of upheaval. south korea's defense minister also says they have reason to believe kim jong-un is staying at a home near an elite hospital in pyongyang, with his wife and his sister. his younger sister is said to be gaining stature inside the regime. most analysts downplay rumors that she's in charge while her brother's absent. but if kim jong-un is keeping her close by, could he and his sister be threatened? >> it may not be so much an issue of her personal security and well-being, so much as it is, he's got to have some kind of a reliable channel near him. >> but adding to the tension, an exchange of gunfire across the border. when south korean activists released these balloons filled with anti-north korean literature, north korea gunners fired at them. south korea responded with their own machine gun rounds. there were no injuries in that incident, but it was the second exchange of fire dween the two sides this week after a confrontation at sea.
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now analysts say the longer that kim jong-un's public absence continues, the more worrisome it is for south korea, japan, and the u.s. this is a dangerous regime with nuclear, chemical, biologcal weapons, long-range missiles and right now, no one's sure who's running the place. deborah? >> brian todd for us, thank you. what do you think could happen next with north korea? we'll get some insight now from gordon chang, a daily beast contributor, and author of the book "nuclear showdown: north korea takes on the world." you were just in the brian todd piece. and it was very interesting, you said, a clear violation of protocol that he didn't turn up to this big festival honoring his father. what is going on there? because his uncle was recently executed. so all is not good in north korea. >> no, it certainly isn't. you know, this is north korea, so any scenario could be possible. but i think that we're seeing too many events that suggest that there is not only a physical problem that kim jong-un has, but a political one as well.
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he missed two events last week to honor both his father and his grandfather, and you know, there have been so many perjures, unexplained deaths, killings over the last four years, this is just a regime in turmoil. so i think that at some point, and this could have been at the end of last year, kim jong-un lost a lot of his authority. >> it's interesting, because over the last three years, kim reportedly replaced over half of the country's top leadership. do you think that mean he was under threat, that he feared those who were closest to him and he wanted to bring in those who he could trust? >> he wanted to do that, but he didn't have an opportunity while his father was alive. the founder of north korea took two decades to train his son, kim jong-il to lead the country. kim jong-un, the current leader, only had about two years. he didn't have the opportunity to learn how to run this regime, which is a very complex balancing act, and he didn't have an opportunity to put his people into place. so you saw this massive turnover after he took over, and that has
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caused a lot of resentment and a number of people were killed. and in this regime, blood demands blood. so those people who lost relatives and friends and supporters have retaliated in the worst possible manner. and that's why i think you have this regime right now that is in difficulty and especially, i think, kim jong-un, has sort of been sidelined and has been for months. >> and very quickly, you say, blood demands blood. there are reports that he and his sister are somewhere in a home near an exclusive hospital. is it a possibility that they even may be under some form of house arrest? >> i agree with that. that's a real possibility. because it would be normal for his wife to be with him at his hospital side, but not for his sister. and that suggests that someone's trying to lock down the kim regime, the kim family. and that is certainly not a good sign. >> all right. gordon chang for us, thank you so much. we appreciate that. we'll be keeping an eye on this big story. thank you. well, isis is threatening two key cities in two different
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countries. we have the latest on the breaking news coming up at the top of the hour. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you outlive your money? uhhh. no, that can't happen. that's the thing, you don't know how long it has to last. everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive.. confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor can get the real answers you need. well, knowing gives you confidence. start building your confident retirement today. lactaid® is 100% real milk? right. real milk. but it won't cause me discomfort. exactly, because it's milk without the lactose. and it tastes?
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at 17, pakistan's malala yousafzai became the youngest winner of the nobel peace prize. she was shot by the taliban two
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years ago for promoting education for girls in pakistan. >> my story, i want to tell other children all around the world that they should stand up for their rights. they should not wait for someone else. and their voices are more powerful, their voices, it would seem that they're weak, but at the time when no one speaks, your voice gets so louder that everyone has to listen to it, everyone has to hear it. so it's my message to children all around the world that they should stand up for their rights. >> what a brave girl. well, india's kailash satyarthi also won the nobel peace prize. we have much more just ahead in the "newsroom". it all starts right now. and breaking news this hour as isis fighters advance on two key fronts. in iraq and syria. here's what we know as those
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militants advance near baghdad. officials from anbar province claim that isis dispatched as many as 10,000 fighters there. iraqi officials tell cnn that the situation in anbar, which is just ten miles west of baghdad, is, quote, very bad. the anbar provincial council is asking for the u.s. to send ground forces to stop the isis advance. across the border in northern syria, the situation is just as bad. fighters claiming isis has been outnumbered and outgunned. recovering the battle against isis from baghdad to the white house. let's first begin with ben wedeman in baghdad. ben, how close to baghdad are the isis fighters? >> reporter: well, actually, they're in baghdad, according to iraqi security sources. they believe there are many sleeper cells in the city, and that is why we see almost on a daily basis, one or two suicide bombings, car bombs, going off in the capitol. but the immediate threat to
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baghdad, of course, is from the outside. they're in a place at the moment, we understand, just about 8 miles from baghdad international airport, we were out on the baghdad defensive perimeter the other day. we were told by iraqi officials there at the moment, isis is just conducting hit-and-run attacks on that defensive perimeter. but really, the really danger is along the euphrates river, just to the northwest of baghdad, where we've seen isis taking, for instance, just a few days ago, the town of heat. they've also, they've apparently today surrounded the town of haditha, also on the euphrates river. that city particularly important, because it is right near a very large dam from where much of the water from baghdad comes. now, several weeks ago, u.s. and coalition air strikes on isis in that area prevented the takeover
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of that dam. but, of course, now their hold on that area is beginning to look very shaky. we understand from the pentagon, that they did drop supplies, ammunition, water to some beleaguered iraqi outposts, iraqi army outposts in the area. but that doesn't seem to be quite enough. as you mentioned, the anbar provincial council is asking baghdad to get american troops to deploy in anbar, to stop the onslaught of isis, but the baghdad government says they haven't received that request. and in the past, baghdad has been adamant about not allowing u.s. combat troops in iraq and the obama administration basically says the same thing. that they have no intention at this point to deploy u.s. troops here. >> you know, ben, you talk about these sleeper cell cells, you t about these car bombs in baghdad. obviously, isis uses terror to
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control people. are they able, once they go into these towns, to actually hold them? you've got to think, baghdad has 9 million people. certainly, isis doesn't have that many forces. how are they able to take all these different areas and control them at the same time? >> reporter: at the moment, when you speak to security officials here, people from the army, the government, there is not the impression that anybody expects isis to come marching into baghdad. not only is it a city of 9 million people, a sprawling city, but it's also a city with a shia majority, which would be extremely difficult for isis to hold. its most fertile areas where it controls are those where there's a sunni majority, a majority that traditionally has been alienated in recent years from the government in baghdad. so there's not an immediate worry that somehow they're going to be taking over the iraqi capital. the problem is that they are
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increasingly present around the city, to the south, to the west, and to the north as well. so that's the real problem is, that simply they're getting awfully close to the city and close to the airport as well. >> all right. ben wedeman, certainly, a huge risk there. we appreciate it. thank you. and now let's bring in aaron mcpike. she joins us live from the white house. anbar province is asking for american boots on the ground. let's be clear, baghdad, the capital, they say they're not making that kind of request. so what are you hearing from the white house? is there a different message calling out of anbar than there is from baghdad, for example? are they not in sync? >> reporter: essentially what we are hearing from all corners of the administration is that they are in this battle, they are in the for the long haul for this fight and they realize it is going to continue to be difficult as it is now. i want to play something for you that state department spokeswoman marie heart said
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just yesterday. listen. >> we didn't think that as soon as we started air strikes and taking out their fighters and their positions and their tanks that they would just stop fighting. they've shown themselves to be brutal, aggressive. that's why we're taking the fight to them. no one thought as soon as they took air strikes they would stop fighting. >> we also heard from deputy national adviser tony blinken yesterday, and he said expect there to be more situations like the one in kobani. his words were, "expect more kobanis." so what they are saying is that this is going to continue as they continue this fight. now, as we know from as the administration has been talking about this over the last month or so, their first goal was to begin reconnaissance missions and then take on a big campaign of air strikes. it seems as though they expected a long air strike campaign to buy them time, but, obviously, isis is fighting back so brutally and it is a bigger
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problem than they may have expected, because then the last step is to train iraqi troops wells syrian rebels, and that was going to take months and secretary of state john kerry at one point said, it could take a year or years. >> you really have to wonder, in looking at it all, erin, whether or not the administration rethinking the effectiveness of the air strikes and whether those targeted strikes are really weakening isis or whether isis is showing a new resolve. erin mcpike at the white house for us, thank you. and happening right now, passenger screenings for ebola are beginning at jfk airport in new york. it is the first of five airports that will get these enhanced screenings around the country. public health officials are trying to prevent another ebola-infected person from entering the united states. alan kosich is following the story for us. >> reporter: a new line of defense in safeguarding the u.s. from the threat of ebola. five u.s. airports, beginning today with new york's jfk
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international, screening passengers who arrive from affected countries in west africa. >> we're stepping up protection for people coming into this country and for americans related to travel. >> reporter: the additional protection includes checking passengers for symptoms, asking them questions about their travel history, and taking their temperatures with non-contact infrared thermometers. >> we expect to see some patients with fever, and that will cause some obvious and understandable concern at the airports. >> reporter: that heightened concern already on display this week when a us airways passenger apparently joked, i have ebola, you're all screwed. unamused, crews in full hazmat gear
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and a weekend resistance is happening now in st. louis. supporters of michael brown, the unarmed black teenager who died at the hands of a white police officer, they're trying to call attention to what they say is racial profiling and police violence nationwide. cnn's stephanie elam takes us inside the rally. stephanie? >> reporter: deb, we've seen a diverse group of people gathering here this morning. we've seen multi-generational,
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we've seen multi-racial groups coming out today. we've seen them hugging, we've seen them cleaning up the park as well. gathering here this morning, all in an effort to, they say, keep the focus on justice, and to remember all that has happened since mike brown was killed in the beginning of august. i've seen signs saying that all lives matter. i've seen signs saying that we need more justice here. and they're also talking a bit about the relationship between police forces and communities. because the people here, while we've seen people from ferguson and st. louis, they're all not all people from this area. we've seen people from oakland. also people from illinois. i've seen people who have come from kansas as well. all supporting the message saying that there is a problem between the relationship of communities and the police forces where they live. and that this is a nationwide problem that needs to be addressed, and they hope by continuing through this weekend, that they can keep the focus on that issue and thoughfully that there will be some change, deb. >> all right.
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stephanie elam for us there in ferguson. thank you. and still to come, she admits that she missed a key security briefing to attend a fund-raiser instead. but now north carolina senator kay hagan, she's firing back on her critics. rn comes creeping up on you... fight back with relief so smooth... ...it's fast. tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue ...and neutralizes stomach acid at the source. ♪ tum, tum tum tum... smoothies! only from tums. and cialis for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment is right. cialis is also the only daily ed tablet approved to treat symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medicines, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take cialis if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. do not drink alcohol in excess. side effects may include headache, upset stomach, delayed backache or muscle ache. to avoid long term injury, get medical help right away for an erection lasting more than four hours. if you have any sudden decrease or loss in hearing or vision, or any allergic reactions like rash, hives,
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well, cocktails over
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national security. that's the choice that republicans say senator kay hagan made when she missed a recent classified briefing on national security issues to attend a fund-raiser. now the north carolina democrat is fighting back. here's dana bash. >> reporter: democrat kay hagan is striking back with this new ad. >> hagan has a 98% voting attendance record on the armed sf services committee. >> reporter: a rapid response to her opponent. >> days later, the armed services committee holds a meeting on national threats. senator kay hagan, absent. >> reporter: the neck and neck race is reported that hagen miss adds key senate meeting earlier this year on threats to the u.s., including isis, attending a fund-raiser instead. >> senator hagen put a cocktail fund-raiser on park avenue ahead of a classified briefing, where these threats were being discussed. >> reporter: this after news that she acknowledged missing 27 out of 49 armed services hearings for other senate
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business. the reality is that officers often miss briefings and hearings for lots of reasons. hagan notes she did attend a key hearing last month, asking a key question. >> do you see the presence of radicalized westerners fighting with isis and the corazon as a threat to the u.s.? >> reporter: and agan's gop opponent, thom tillis, the speaker of the north carolina house, has missed so much work to campaign two local papers called on him to resign. >> i've chaired numerous counterterrorism hearings. >> reporter: still, hagan's absence from an isis-related briefing strikes a sensitive core, since gruesome beheadings have made isis a very real voter concern. it also speaks to the voterish of 2014, washington not doing its job and it's playing out in campaigns all across the country. democrats are using it too. listen to what duck democrat allison lur
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allis allison lunder gen grimes told me about her opponent. grimes is trying to deal with another big 2014 issue, democrats dragged down by an unpopular president. but she got twisted up over a basic question, did she vote for barack obama? >> i was actually in '08 a delegate for hillary clinton and i think that kentuckyians know i'm a clinton democrat through and through. i respect the sanctity of the ballot box and i know that the members of this editorial board do as well. >> so you're not going to answer? >> again, i don't think that the president is on the ballot, as much as mitch mcconnell might want him to be. >> that was dana bash reporting. thanks, dana. well, isis has its grip on a town that's visible from the border with turkey. turkey's hearing the calls to tackle isis head-on. we'll go to the border next to see just how dire the situation is today.
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anbar province, which is just west of baghdad, is under attack. up to 10,000 isis troops have been sent from syria and mosul and rerouted to this particular area. officials in anbar are begging for the u.s. to send ground troops immediately to save the province from what they call imminent collapse. and also in the besieged town of kobani, syria, which is across the border with turkey, the situation there is described as just as dire. a fighter is claiming that isis has them outnumbered and outgunned. nick paton walsh is the border with syria. >> reporter: new special envoy says that there could be as many as 10,000, maybe more, civilians trapped on the other side of the turkish border behind me in that town of kobani. we haven't seen ourselves from our viewpoint here evidence necessarily to that effect, but the key here is as this conflict moves so fast, who controls that border crossing behind me down there. we're hearing from kurdish fighters that isis could be as little as 800 meters away from
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it, and we have in fact still seen ourselves some kurdish fighters just over towards the eastern side down there, suggesting isis are far from their goal of controlling that main exit from the civilians are effectively encircling those civilians still inside. but there is constant heavy machine gun fire and explosions during the day and the sense of a conflict in the city shifting increasingly westward. that's key, because it's reducing the area in the northwest of the city that the kurds still, it seems, control. there's very little exit for them to the north. the turkish military seem to have closed the border and isis advancing to the west. we could be in the closing days here, certainly, possibly less. a lot of fear, though, to work out how many civilians are trapped nil stihl inside and how many can get out. deb? >> nick paton walsh, thank you. some hundred thousand refugees have already fled that city. and as isis continues to gain ground, critics are questioning the effectiveness of the air strikes and if they're worth the
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price tag. cristina alesci takes a look at the number. >> the u.s. is spending millions of taxpayer dollars to destroy ooh isis, and in the process, destroying millions of dollars worth of man-made military equipment. this is equipment that the u.s. left behind or sold to the iraqi government during its last campaign in the region. vehicles like humvees that were later captured by isis. so now the u.s. is flying jets that cost between $22,000 and $62,000 an hour, carrying $30,000 bombs to destroy humvees worth about $250,000. 49 in total since attacks began in august. some of the other targets include less expensive equipment, like pickup trucks and guard towers. not only does america have to destroy the gear, but analysts now say the u.s. may eventually have to replace it. that's so the iraqi military can secure its own borders. but those are future costs. right now, the pentagon says the u.s. is spending between $7.5 and $10 million a day. that's a drop in the bucket
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compared to the $500 billion the pentagon requested for next year's budget. but you've got to keep in mind, america is early in its campaign. if it escalates the level of its operations significantly by ramping up air strikes and sending in 25,000 troops as some analysts recommend, the bill rises to $1.8 billion a month. in new york, i'm cristina alesci. >> and thank you, krcristina. i'm joined now by ryan crocker with texas a&m. and ambassador crocker, is it ti time, everybody keeps asking this, but is it time finally to consider some sort of boots on the ground to stop this advance? >> well, thank you for having me. >> of course. >> i think it's been clear all along, you cannot win a war against a determined opponent on
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the ground from the air. and this is what we're seeing. at the same time, we cannot over dramatize that it's not waterloo and the battle of ghettysburg rolled into one. it is not a strategic route. it is obviously a significant humanitarian crisis. and it will be a major propaganda victory for the islamic state if they are able to take it. what they are telling us is you can't stop us with your air campaign. more significantly, that's what we're seeing in anbar. haditha, and i think, not too far from now, the provincial capital of kobani. >> and ambassador, you know, one thing, though, are we seeing a shift in isis? isis has now rerouted a number of its forces that brought them from areas in syria that were
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fighting bashar al assad's regime there. now they are here in kobani. they are in the anbar province. is this a shift in isis' strategy and it is a -- is it, essentially, a logistical shift, or is it a propaganda shift on some levels? >> reporter: i think it's both. in anbar, they are tightening up their lines, they are consolidating territory. they want all of anbar. and they are well on the way to getting it. as i said, i think it's a matter of time for haditha and eventually the capital of row manny. kobani is a propaganda fight, simply to show because all of the world's media is on this as though it were the battle of the century. so that, for them, is propaganda. if they can show that they can take kobani in spite of our air
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strikes, they win a major propaganda victory. but, again, i just have to say, you cannot win a fight like this only from the air. you cannot do it. >> yeah. dianne feinstein, the senator from california was right some weeks ago when she said, it takes an army to beat an army. >> yeah, there's no question about that. and it's going to be very interesting to see the sort of breakdown and the assessment afterwards, as to how effective these air strikes were, and in fact, whether any ground was actually gained. all right. ambassador ryan crocker, thank you so much for us on the phone there for us. well, up next, did a police officer go too far? >> we're about to get so the by the police. ahhh! [ screaming ] >> next, our legal experts join us to debate a lawsuit against this officer who's accusing him of using excessive force. ttle reluctant to try new things. what's wrong with trying new things?
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well, by now you have most likely seen the video. an indiana police officer smashing a window and then tasing a man and pulling him out of the car. all in front of two young children in the backseat. the family is now suing the officer for excessive force. susan candiotti reports that this officer has been sued before. >> yolanda, have you seen that video? >> absolutely. oh, my goodness. it just brings back memories. >> reporter: yolanda gray does more than cringe seeing this video of police smashing in a car window after a couple is stopped for not wearing seat belts. [ screaming ] >> oh, [ bleep ]!
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>> reporter: it shows hammond, indiana, police using a stun gun on passenger jamal jones after he refuses to get out of his girlfriend's car during a 13-minute standoff. two children are in the backseat. yolanda gray recognizes the officer shattering the window. >> that's the guy, the same one that tackled me, the one that busts the glass open. oh, my gosh. oh, my goodness, the baby's crying. i heard my baby crying. she was standing in the street. >> reporter: in 2006, gray and her family were pulled out of their car moments after leaving their driveway. no one told them why. police ordered her husband to get out of the car. he complied. this is where it happened? >> this is exactly where it happened. they asked he to get out of the car. i get out of the car with my hands up, and the one that tackled me came from this side of the street and as i was almost where i needed to be, he tackled me.
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i never saw him coming. >> reporter: gray says she was bruised and manhandled after being put down on the street. according to court papers, police say she refused to get out of the car and when she did, started running before police tackled her. >> my eldest son jumps out of the car, screaming, that's my mom, that's my mom! he was put into a choke hold and a gun put on his head. >> reporter: and your other son? >> my other son was taken out of the car and he was handcuffed. >> reporter: and your daughter? >> my daughter, they didn't even -- no one attended to the baby. >> reporter: turns out she and her lawyers say it was a case of mistaken identity, that police were allegedly looking for a man who she says looked nothing like her husband. yet gray's husband was charged with disorderly conduct and they were both also charged with resisting an officer. she says she declined a plea offer before trial. >> they said they would give us one last chance if we would just write a letter of apology, they
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would drop all of the charges. >> reporter: and you said? >> absolutely not. >> reporter: the couple was acquitted and sued the same officer, two others, and the city on a civil rights claim. they settled out of court. so when she heard and saw the class shattering innocent a few weeks ago, it hit home. what kind of memories does this bring back to you? >> oh, the most horrific memories. my kids' innocence were taken that day. >> reporter: a lot of people are asking, why didn't the man just get out of the car and get out of the car and it might have ended the whole thing? >> i am enraged every time someone makes that comment, because they have no idea. and we did everything that they asked, but the moment that we got out, that was when the horrific harassments started. >> reporter: cnn has been unable to reach the police department for comment on the 2006 case. the officer who grey says tackled her, coincidentally, the
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same one seen breaking the class in this separate incident, also could not be reached. in a statement issued this week, police said the window was broke because officers were concerned for their safety after the passenger reached for a backpack in the rear seat and refused lawful orders to get out of the car. susan candiotti, cnn, hammond, indiana. >> after watching that video, it will be very difficult to get out of any car when a police officer asks you. i want to bring in our legal guys, avery friedman, ba civil rights attorney and law professor is in cleveland. so avery, let me ask you, the most recent case, there are two sides. the officer says jones did not get out of the car when ordered, that he reached into the backseat. but was this excessive force in your eyes? the way he used that device to shatter the window. and then he tased him in front of children. >> well, remember also, that
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deb, this is a seat belt stop. and the reality is that it's clearly excessive force. one of the standards is, does the behavior shock the conscience of the reasonable person? of course it does. the second issue is proportionality. this is a seat belt stop. and again, this wasn't instantaneous, it was 13 minutes. and i have to tell you something, if linda mahon and jamal jones wouldn't have filed this case on their own, i would have hitchhiked to hammond, indiana, to bring this suit. it is really objectively outrageous and the case is going to wind up going to a federal jury. >> and you look at the video. that is being filmed by a child in the backseat. and richard, you know, what's fascinating, also, about this is that the woman, lisa, was actually on the phone with the police department saying, i am afraid, i don't want to get out of the car, here's what's going on. so why didn't anybody intercede? and also, did this police officer even have the right to ask a passenger for his
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identification if this was a seat belt stop? >> that's the thing here. i mean, how do you say, cha-ching? because at the end of the day, they're going to play a lot of money to this family. the question is, will it be a verdict or will they settle this case? but, this was a simple seat belt stop. they put spikes under the tires so the car couldn't get away. they questioned the driver, they questioned the passenger, then they asked the passenger for i.d. he says, i don't have my license. as he reaches to grab a piece of paper and wants to hand it to the officer through the window, he doesn't want to roll the window down. they say, take the window down, he says, no, take my information, that's when they go crazy. they say they felt that they were in fear. they felt that their lives were in fear because of his actions. meanwhile, the driver is on the phone giving a play by play to the police. the 14-year-old daughter in the backseat is videotaping the incident. and had they had the technology of image keeper going at this time, they would have had a documented gps coordinates, time, date, everything, sent to
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a certified server. i mean, it's admissible evidence here. i don't know how you get around the taping of this thing. i don't know how you get around the conduct, tasing -- it's fortunate he didn't get shot. >> but, avery, what happened in ferguson. some people are saying, you know, that's intimidating police and police are going to sort of hold back. you do not see the police holding back in this case, and they're suing the officers for malice, that they were aggressive, had no reasonable basis to question the passenger in the car. what is going on in these police officers' minds? >> well, i think what's going on is, you have a situation where you've got too much coffee and you have too many doughnuts. because that's the only reasonable explanation for the behavior. and i've got to tell you, deb, i represent police officers, well, at least the good ones. you don't see this. linda mahon was on her way to the hospital, because her mother was dying.
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and a good officer will actually recognize what's going on, not only stop it, but escort people to the hospital. i've seen it time and time again. this is way out of line. i don't agree with richard on one thing. i don't think it's about cha-ching cha-ching. >> no, but now it is. now it is. now the passengers in the car -- >> -- doing justice. >> if there was aggressive, and it appears -- but richard, what defense do the police officers have, given that this woman was on the phone with the police department, saying, i don't want to get out of the car, i am afraid. what does it come down to? >> it's not going to -- that's not going to fly as a defense here. they have an obligation to listen to instructions by an officer of the law. and the fact that things have been happening in ferguson and throughout the country and are making headlines today, that doesn't give you a free pass to ignore a directive from a police officer. so they're going to be -- i think what's going to happen is, as this case unfolds, you're going to hear that a police officers had a description of an individual that matched the
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description of the passenger, and that's why they took the extra steps to get information from him. they did not need a reasonable suspicion to ask them to get out of the car, if they feared for their safety. >> all right, well, listen -- ultimately, ultimately, it's the images of the videotape and this videotape is actually very, very hard to work. it's very hard to hear this screams of the children. it's very hard to hear this woman saying, i am afraid! richard herman, avery friedman, thank you. >> nice to see you. >> you too. >> take care. and parents, listen up. because if your teen uses a popular photo sharing app called snapchat, yeah, you're going to hear what we have to say. hackers claim to have obtained hundreds of thousands of images and they might share them this weekend. financial noise
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cybercriminals claim that they stole hundreds of thousands of snapchat photos and videos. now, the primary users of the photo sharing app are teenagers and they often, believe it or not, share nude selfies that are supposed to disappear in just a few seconds. but now the hackers could release some of those images for the world to see, perhaps even as early as this weekend. joining us now is david kennedy, the principle security consultant at trusted s.e.c.,
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and cnn law enforcement analyst, tom fuentes. david, it's important to note that hackers broke not into snapchat, per se, but into third party apps that make snapchat easier to use. so it's not snapchat. but here's the thing, aren't those images supposed to disintegrate once they're viewed? isn't that what makes snapchat so popular? you take it, you send it, and then it's gone? >> that's the intention of snapchat and why people end up using it. unfortunately, what happens is you get developers outside of snapchat that create code and write different applications. and in this case, it looks like it originated from a third party called snap save, which is a popular site to be able to browse snapchat through a web interface. and then hackers broke into that and stole over 100,000 videos and pictures that we see today. it's really bad. >> and you know, tom, look, one of the big problems here is that the main users are 13 and 17 years old. they see this as a safe way to send racy pictures. and there are a lot of them, because if you're 13 and 17 years old, you know, your whole
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life is prettmuch an instagram picture. but a lot of what's expected to be leaked could contain images that are very, very inappropriate. does this border, perhaps, on child porn? >> oh, it absolutely does. you know, it's one thing if interaged minors are sending these messages to each other, but if it gets into a website like snap save and somebody else hacks into it, or the person receiving the original message can screen save and keep an image of themselves, even though it's supposed to disintegrate on snapchat, they can still keep it and transmit to somebody else. and if they transmit it like that, they're transmitting child pornography, essentially. especially if it becomes adults that get it. if a young girl is dating a 17-year-old or 18-year-old boy and sends a selfie like that and he does something else with it or sends his own back, that's transmitting child pornography and if it's an adult, they can be criminally charged.
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>> so, david, these images are expected to leak on an online forum. it's the same online forum that leaked nude celebrity photos from icloud. does this -- you know, does this hacking really mean that just, don't do it. don't take the pictures. we heard that jennifer lawrence, the actress, she said that putting those images online was a sex crime. is there any such thing as privacy? >> well, when you put things on technology, you have to have an expectation that there is the possibility for it to be hacked. and this isn't just a local thing in the united states. i'm actually in malta, which is southwest of rome in the smart city, and there are discussions here on hacking. so it's a global problem that we see happening all over the place. and it's something that if you put your information on there, even if it's something that touts being secure or that your information should be instantly deleted, you shouldn't necessarily trust it, because you really don't know where that information is going, what types of avenues it's going under. don't do it on your technology or phone, do it in the privacy of your home or anywhere else.
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and it's horrible what happened to jennifer lawrence and all the other folks out there, but you really shouldn't be putting that type of data in your phone. you should be looking at other means to transfer that. >> there's no question. jennifer lawrence said, look, she was in a committed, loving relationship and so she was sharing images of herself with her boyfriend, not with the whole world. tom, these cyberhackers keep coming back. they keep finding vulnerabilities that effectively exploit people. why haven't they been caught? >> well, in some cases, they're closing down their website as soon as it becomes public that they use that website. and just the proliferation worldwide of this, it's nearly possible for the authorities to prevent hundreds of thousands of images from being transmitted from a number of websites globally. you know, it's difficult enough to shut down gee haddy websites, much less these type of websites. >> and jennifer lawrence said something very interesting. she said, you know what, anybody who accessed those photographs, shame on them. shame on them. they shouldn't be looking at those, they were private. so, anyway, tom fuentes, david kennedy, we thank you.
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>> you're welcome. >> thank you so much. thanks, deborah. >> of course. still ahead, the southern islands of japan are getting hit by a massive drenching typhoon. how long is this typhoon going to last? and a live look at st. louis where protesters are marching to demand justice for michael brown. more details, ahead.
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well, it may no longer be a super typhoon, but typhoon vongfong is still massive and soaking parts of japan, including okinawa. alexandra steel joins me. it's a slow-moving system. is that creating concerns about flooding? >> absolutely. it was a super typhoon, 185, stand, down to 85, but still, it is still quite a beast in terms of the amount of rain we're seeing and also the winds. although we have seen significant structural weakening with this thing. so that is certainly the good news. but still, already, we've seen about 9 to 13 inches of rain on okinawa and also wind gusts to 11 miles per hour. rain accumulations for the most part, the heaviest to the west of that, but here, we're going to watch this thing move north, move northeast, and then make its way towards tokyo, but certainly, a lot weaker state, no question about it. the winds still pretty intense,
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though. we're going to see winds 50, 60, 70 miles per hour. as we go through monday, the axis of the winds moves north and east towards tokyo. that's a monday night affair. but the winds certainly, much less than what they've been and even what they are now. so there's the track. and we're going to watch it move towards tokyo. but certainly, we've seen a lot of weakening, deb, but we will see and already have seen about 10 and 20 inches of rain and more wind. >> all right. one to watch. at least it's not a supertyphoon. thank you. 85-mile-an-hour winds. who thought that would be refreshing. alexandra steel, thank you. each week, we are shining a spotlight on the top ten cnn heroes of 2014. when this week's honoree learned about the lack of access for fitness training for people with disabilities in his city, he got to work the best way he knew how. meet ned norton. >> when i'm running, i feel limitless. being in motion makes me feel free. when you're really pushing
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yourself, that's when you really feel alive. but there are millions of people around the world that are facing severe physical limitations. they can't be independent. they can't live their lives. i spent years training olympic athletes, football players, body builders. one day, a young guy, newly spinal cord injured, came to the gym asking for help. at first, i didn't know what to do, but we just worked together and we made tremendous progress. take a breath, reach out, reach out. bring it back. before you knew it, my phone rang off the hook. people asking for help. bring it up. so i opened a gym designed to fit their needs. ready to go to work? >> heck yeah! >> for the past 25 years, i've provided strength and conditioning training for people with disableds. >> push! stretch up. nice job. >> people come to me when they're at their lowest. up, up, up, hold it, rack it. >> i feel much better now! >> you come to the gym and all of a sudden you have a natural
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support network. >> in 1971, i broke my back and i've been in a wheelchair ever since. >> that's it, tom. >> thanks to ned, i keep my upper body strength at a maximum. i've been able to live a full life. >> i never worry about what they can't do. i worry about what they can do. >> i can do it, ned! >> yes, you can. >> good job! >> i did up to ten! >> i'm building them up, building them stronger, so they can go out and live life like they're supposed to. hello, everyone. i'm deborah feyerick and here's what's happening right now. well, breaking news. two key locations in danger of falling to isis and now there is word that there may be 10,000 terrorists on the move, heading towards baghdad. we're live there next. plus, the fight against ebola in full swing. new safety precautions just
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going into place at one of the nation's busiest airports. also, a look live at st. louis, where a weekend protest is underway. the big question, will today's rally remain peaceful? we're live, on the ground. and we begin with the militant group, isis. it continues its assault on two key fronts this hour, making advances in both iraq and syria. coalition air strikes are ongoing, but the militants don't seem to be slowing down. here's what we know. officials from anbar province claim that isis dispatched as many as 10,000 fighters there. the anbar provincial council is asking for the u.s. to send ground forces to stop the isis advance. hours ago, coalition air strikes killed more than 30 isis militants west of ramadi. u.s. and allied war planes had been hitting isis targets in syria and iraq since yesterday, striking a command and control facility, a staging building, a fighting position, and two small units north of kobani. on the turkish border with
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syria, reports that the city of kobani is also in a very bad position. the kurds fighting isis are greatly outnumbered. let's bring in cnn's ben wedeman in baghdad, where there's concern that isis is closing in on iraq's capital city. >> actually, they're in baghdad, according to iraqi security sources. they believe there are many sleeper cells in the city, and that is why we see almost on a daily basis, one or two suicide bombings, car bombs, going off in the capital. but the immediate threat to baghdad, of course, is from the outside. they're in place at the moment, we understand, just about eight miles from baghdad international airport, we were out on baghdad defensive perimeter the other day. we were told by iraqi officials there that at the moment, isis is just conducting hit-and-run attacks on that defensive perimeter, but really the real danger is look the euphrates
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river, just to the northwest of baghdad, where we've seen cyst isis taking, for instance, just a few days ago, the town of heat. they've also, also, apparently today surrounded the town of haditha also on the euphrates river. that city particularly important, because it is right near a very large dam from where much of the water from baghdad comes. now, several weeks ago, u.s. and coalition air strikes on isis in that area prevented the takeover of that dam, but, of course, now their hold on that area is beginning to look very shaky. we understand from the pentagon that they did drop supplies, ammunition, water to some beleaguered iraqi outposts, iraqi army outposts in the area. but that doesn't seem to be quite enough. as you mentioned, the anbar provincial council is asking baghdad to get american troops
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to deploy in anbar, to stop the onslaught of isis. but the baghdad government says there haven't received that request. and in the past, baghdad has beened a manhattan about not allowing u.s. combat troops in iraq and the obama administration basically says the same thing. that they have no intention at this point to deploy u.s. troops here. >> ben wedeman, thank you so much. well, is it time to rethink the strategy against isis? let me bring in cnn military analyst, lieutenant colonel rick franco francona, and as we just heard, there are up to 10,000 troops headed to the anbar area. that is on the doorstep of baghdad. the question, where the iraqi troops? why haven't they been able to push these fighters back? >> that's the question of the day, and in spite of all this american air power and coalition air power that's being brought to bear, the iraqi army still
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has not been able to dislodge the isis fighters from virtually anywhere. everywhere they've tried to go, except the mosul dam and hang ton to the dam of that hee haditha, the iraqi army has pretty much failed miserably. an iraqi officer said the leadership is all but gone. so we're seeing says taking advantage of this. and you brought up a very good point, was being able to move 10,000 fighters from mosul to baghdad. so that's 250 miles. consider that they're doing that at the same time they're running a battle in kobani, which is 500 miles away from baghdad. so their command and control is still fairly effective, despite the pounding they've taken from the air. >> but let's talk about that. why aren't these air strikes aiming directly at these fighters? they've got to be moving with caravans, convoys, you know, those are the kinds of things that satellites could pick up
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from the air in the desert. so why aren't there more direct strikes on the fighters themselves? >> yeah, good point. and you know, you can pick these up from drones, from all the other reconnaissance aircraft. and also the pilots themselves are flying armed reconnaissance. in other words, they're fully armed and looking for targets on the roads. but isis has taken to moving on the back roads. they're also moving at night. they're trying to space themselves out, move when they know we're not in the area. we can't be over every area at one time. they're pretty aware of when we're flying and we're not flying that many sordys. if you look at the sordy count, it sounds high, but it's really not. 400 air strikes over these couple of weeks is nothing compared to the normal ops tempo that we in the air force are used to. so we're not putting the resources that we have to good use. >> i want to talk about that in just a moment.
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but you've got between 8,000 and up to 30,000 isis fighters. where's the vulnerability? don't they overextend themselves to the point where they wear themselves down, or is this a matter of getting troops on the ground, getting them in there to fight what perhaps could be a weakened isis? >> this is what we're seeing is asymmetric warfare at its finest. they're using everything they have to their advantage and to our disadvantage. they're moving on the ground in small units, doing these hit-and-run tactics and they're dispersing themselves, mixing themselves up in the civilian population, blending in very well. we're trying to do this in 30,000 feet. it's very difficult to do that. when the pilots are overkobani andch wh watching the fighting, can see the fighting but can't tell the good guys from the bad guys. and once day get within 30,000 meters of each other, you can't put bombs down without eyes on the target. so without people on the ground
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to control this, it's very difficult to be effective in close quarters. >> so not only are they chameleons blending into the general populous, but that's another way they control them. lieutenant colonel rick francona, thank you for your insights. and happening right now, passenger screenings for ebola are happening at jfk airport in new york. it's the first of five airports that will get enhanced screenings around the country. public health officials are trying to prevent another ebola-infected person from entering the united states. let's bring in alison kosik who's at jfk today. alison, do they really believe they can stop somebody who might be infected from entering the united states simply by taking their temperature? >> reporter: deb, i think what you're seeing is the cdc coming out and really setting those expectations and saying, you know what, the screenings that they put into effect starting here at jfk are really just one layer of what they're trying to do, to try to keep someone who may have ebola from leaving the airport and getting into the general population.
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so what's happening here today, as what will happen at four other airports starting on thursday here in the u.s., is once these passengers who come from some of these hot zone areas where ebola has really ravaged their countries in guinea, sierra leone, and liberia is these passengers are going to be let off to a designated area, to have their temperatures taken. they're going to fill out questionnai questionnaires, they'll be asked questions about their travel. if they've had any contact with anybody who has ebola. if everything checks out, they will be allowed to go ahead on their way. however, they will be asked to hand over their contact information. also, to log their temperatures for another 21 days. and that gets to your point. the question of whether or not this is really effective. and that really is a good question. and it's something that the cdc realizes something that's being asked. i want to hear you what one official said earlier. >> this screening procedure, for example would not necessarily have caught the patient in dallas as indicated.
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and no port of exit or port of entry or airline response procedure will supplant the need for state and local public health departments, clinics, hospitals, to be prepared to detect a case might it occur. >> reporter: and in duncan's situation, the man in dallas who you remember, his situation was, he didn't show any signs of being sick when he was at the airport. only after he left the airport did he exhibit those signs. and that is the criticism or the worry that many people have, deb. >> yeah, there's no question. because you can answer a question, but if you don't answer it truthfully, then, obviously, it's going to make it much more difficult to track, though it sounds as if, at least, the health care workers will have a list of people that they can follow up with. all right, alison kosik, thanks so much. and folks from around the nation are rallying in st. louis. it is a weekend of resistance. when folks think about what they get from alaska,
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happening now. a weekend of resistance rally in st. louis. supporters of michael brown, the unarmed black teenager who died at the hands of a white police officer are calling attention to what they say is racial profiling and police violence nationwide. cnn's jason carroll is at the rally and jason, you were there on the ground in the early days of the ferguson riots. people now, from as far away as the west coast, how are these different? what are you feeling? what are you sensing? >> reporter: well, still sensing the same anger that we saw out here weeks ago. this justice for all rally is about to get underway in this park here that you see. i'm going to do a bit of a pivot here. if you turn around, you can see they're just now starting to file into the park here as things get underway. these are some of the demonstrators, several hundred of them, that started several blocks up this way.
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they're now making their way into the park here, where they're going to be holding this rally. the rally going to be taking place for several hours. the protests so far this morning have been peaceful. the protesters, you can see, carrying all sorts of signs, chanting, "no justice, no peace." peaceful protest this morning. we saw some demonstrations last night in front of the ferguson police department. that was peaceful as well. they're out here in support of michael brown, but also the 18-year-old that was shot and killed by an off-duty st. louis police officer on wednesday night. police saying that myers fired first, fired three shots at the officer, the officer returned fire. myers' parents, deborah, do not believe that narrative. they believe that myers was unarmed. i spoke to his parents yesterday. they are still grieving for the loss of their only child. >> it's the worst pain ever.
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shouldn't no parent have to put their kid away. kids is supposed to bury their parents. he was my only child. my only baby. he was my baby. and they took him away from me. >> reporter: a mother very much -- a mother very much in pain there. the myers' family calling for peaceful demonstrations, whether it be today or tomorrow or going forward. as for this demonstration, the folks plan to be out here in this park, deborah, for several hours. deborah? >> and jason, you look at the case of myers, it's a little bit different, because police there saying he did have a gun, michael brown did not. although the officer in that case saying he reached for the officer's gun. what is it that the protesters really want to communicate? what is their message to everyone? >> reporter: well, it's
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interesting that you use the word communication, because the perspective that i get from being here on the ground is that there is no real communication with most of the people here. whatever people may believe, they're entrenched in their beliefs. whether it be those who support the police department, many of those people, most of them white, feel as though they can't express that point of view without being called a racist. on the flip side of this, you have many in fact african-american community, who do not trust the police, who feel like white people aren't listening to what they have to say. so when it comes to communication, again, i find that to be an interesting word, because i feel like people are expressing their points of view, but i'm not sure one side is really listening to what the other side has to say. and throughout all of that, the facts, whatever the facts may be, seem to be getting lost in many ways, between all the rhetoric and all the protesters going back and forth. and people like that, who obviously have very strong points of view, but a point of
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view that people don't hear. that's someone who's angry. but the facts get lost in all the anger. >> all right. jason carroll for us there on the ground. we know that you're busy working your contacts and your sources there. thanks so much. and some of the protests that happened this week got very violent. that's because some folks don't trust the police. many of them, in fact. so how do you bridge that gap? we're going to talk about that, coming up next.
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and this is a live look at protesters rallying in st. louis, missouri, today, days after another black teenager was shot and killed, this time by an off-duty police officer. i'm joined now by cedric alexander, the deputy chief operating officer of public safety in dekalb county, georgia. he's also the president of the national organization of black law enforcement executives. he's been working with law enforcement in ferguson amidst all these protests. you're seeing a general mistrust of police officers all across the country. is that a fair statement? >> that is a fair statement. i'm starting to hear a lot of that coming from across the country, not necessarily because of the situation in ferguson, but we think about and look at the last number of incidents
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that we've seen where there's been contact that has been very troubling between police and community. >> and are we talking about white officers and black officers as well? >> we're talking about officers. >> officers in general. >> so why now? why is this anger and outrage at how people are being treated -- was it just something that needed a window to open up? >> i think you have to put it into historical context. for a long time now, there have always been challenges between particularly communities of color and the police. and as we move forward, and even though we've seen some great advances in the profession, in the relationship building, there's still an undercurrent of concern here. what we saw stemming from ferguson and everything post-that, anything that looks similar to some question around the police, people are questioning it now. they're not feeling good about it any longer. so we've got to really get a message out. we've got to start talking about this issue. because, number one, you've got to have police in your community.
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and police have to have communities that trust them as well too. so, as one of your guys was saying on the ground there in ferguson a few moments ago, it's all about communication. there's totally a lack of that that's occurring right now. >> so when we look at what's happening, why do you think -- you know, ferguson appears to be making some effort to smooth things over. but how long is that going to take? i mean, this is clearly, we're talking about a problem that has been decades, generations in the making. >> absolutely. >> this doesn't fix itself overnight. >> no, it doesn't, because it's been unattended for a very, very long time in that community and other communities as well too. so what we have to remember is that in order to fix that relationship, it's going to take some time. which makes it very difficult in ferguson, of course, is the fact that you have a community that is outraged going back to the michael brown shooting. nothing has changed in that community one way or the other. but we all have to be patient and wait for an outcome in the judicial system.
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whether we trust that system or not, that is the system we have in this country. but until then, people are feeling a lot of anger, a lot of angst. we're continuing to see incidents that occur across the country, that continues to fuel that. and i will say, as i've been saying for the last couple of weeks, is that what every police department in this country and every community in this country need to do right now, whether you have a great relationship with your police department or not, is that you need to set down and you need to start talking about these anxieties and fears so that we can reduce that and start trusting each other again, or maybe for the first time. >> right. and ignoring it will not make it go away. it's all about communication. thank you so much. we appreciate your time on this saturday today. and we turn to isis, which has now a grip on a town visible from the border with turkey. turkey is hearing the calls to tackle isis head hobb. we'll go to the border next to see just how dire the situation is at this moment. it's a bit like asking if they want a big hat...
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nick paton walsh is at turkey's border with syria. >> reporter: new u.n. special envoy to the syria convoy said there could be more than 10,000 or more civilians tracked on the other side of the turkey border in that town of kobani. we haven't seen evidence ourselves to that effect. but the key fear is as this conflict moves so fast, who controls that border crossing down there. we're hearing from kurdish fighters that isis could be as little as 800 meters away from it. and we have still seen some kurdish fighters just over towards the eastern side down there, suggesting isis are for from their goal of controlling that main exit from the civilians effectively encircling those kurds and civilians still inside that particular area. but as you can hear behind me, there is constant heavy machine gun fire and explosions during the day, at the center, really of a conflict in the city shifting increasingly westward. that's key, because it's reducing the area in the northwest of the city, that the
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kurds still, it seems, control. there's very little exit for them to the north. the turkish military seem to have closed the border and isis advancing to the west. we could be in the closing days here, certainly, possibly west, a lot of fear, though, to work out how many civilians are trapped still inside and how many, in fact, can get out. deb? >> nick paton walsh, thank you. and from isis back to the ebola crisis and a new assessment from the cdc. no matter what we can do, we can't get the risk to zero. we're all worried. up next, we'll celebrate ebola fact from fiction. millions of . and for many, it's a struggle to keep your a1c down. so imagine - what if there was a new class of medicine that works differently to lower blood sugar? imagine, loving your numbers. introducing once-daily invokana®. it's the first of a new kind of prescription medicine that's used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. invokana® is a once-daily pill that works around the clock to
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well, the first person diagnosed with ebola in the u.s. died earlier this week. and worldwide, the number of ebola-related deaths tops 4,000. the crisis is keeping a lot of us up at night. but the fact is, it is not that easy to contract ebola. once you have it, though, the virus moves quickly and mercilessly through your body. >> reporter: the clock ticking from the moment the ebola virus enters the body. the disease not easy to contract, only carried in bodily fluids, blood, saliva, mux, sweat, tears, see men, vomit,
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urine, or fee ceassees. and it can only enter the body through direct contact with cuts or abrasions or through the eyes, nose, mouth, throat, or reproductive or begans. people can also get infected by eating meat from or coming in contact with infected animals. it can survive in a dried state on doorknobs or countertops. if the fluid remains wet and at room temperature, it can survive for days outside the body. most people get it through contact with bodily fluids of patients or the deceased. but when is someone with ebola actually contagious? the short answer, when they start to show symptoms. those symptoms, though, can take from 2 to 21 days to kick in. in other words, a person could travel and interact with others for days, weeks without passing on the virus. the average incubation period is 8 to 10 days. the early symptoms of the
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disease, fever, weakness, muscle pain, headache, and sore throat are often mistaken for the flu, malaria, typhoid fever or dysentery. but then things get worse. vomiting, bloody diarrhea, also internal and external bleeding, skin rashes and purple spots on the skin. once the symptoms set in, the person is contagious and has 6 to 16 days to either beat the virus or die. the death rate, high, 50 to 90% chance of death, depending on the strain and access to medical care. if an infected patient with a strong immune system gets proper care, the chance of surviving goes up. but if they survive, the virus could remain in the see men for up to three months. and if you survive, you have immunity for at least ten years, but what's still unknown, if you're immune from other strains of ebola. answers and questions for a frightening disease.
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>> so that is the real deal about ebola. but it's easy to get caught up in the fear and the worry. we're joined by a panel of doctors to separate fact from fiction. dr. alexander garza is associate dean at the st. louis university college of public health and social justice. also with me, dr. mark rut. he is chief of the division of infectious diseases at the university of nebraska medical center, where a journalist is being treated. plus, seema yaz minute, staff writer "the dallas morning news." she's a former cdc disease detective. dr. yasmin, do you think that the fear factor is unnecessarily driving up both the cost of protecting the u.s. against ebola but also the general fear. a lot of people believe that if somebody is near you, that they're contagious. >> there's so many misconceptions about ebola, deb, and understandably, it is a very scary disease, and we're seeing it in west africa, where so many thousands of people have died, very painful and horrific
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deaths. so we understand that. but it's really important to keep a perspective on this. we keep hearing about dallas, where i am right now. it's being called ground zero for ebola. it really isn't. ground zero is west africa. so any of our fear, anxiety, and concern has to remain focused on west africa, as long as the epidemic continues there, there will be imported cases in the u.s. and in parts of europe. >> and dr. rut, you're the chief of infectious diseases at nebraska university medical center, where the nbc photo journalist is being treated for ebola. clearly, west africa, as yasmin said, the epicenter of all of this, but what is your facility able to learn from the mistakes in dallas, both to recognizing and treating and making sure everything is contained? >> yeah, deb, so as an academic medical center, i think really part of our mission is to learn from these cases. and so, clearly, we're trying to learn as much as we can from the two cases that we've cared for in our biocontainment unit,
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using investigational agents and immune serum to try to buy time for our patients until their own immune system kicks in. but we're also learning from this case in dallas that these patients can show up in our emergency department ifs they travel to those endemic areas and we have to be able to quickly recognize those cases and screen them and get them into the appropriate care. but as your piece has already documented, this is not a particularly contagious virus and it's something that people need to keep in perspective. there are a lot of other risks in their lives that are probably greater right now than ebola, although everybody's focused on it. >> everybody's focused on it, obviously, because it is so devastating, if you do contract it. dr. garza, it was very interesting, i was speaking to a number of people in the liberian community in new york city and they said the death of mr. duncan has actually frightened them. that they're not so sure that even if they do run a fever, that they're actually going to go to the hospital to get treated. that presents a whole another layer of issues in terms of
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trying to contain this, does it not? >> and i think that speaks to the whole idea of not trying to stigmatize that either come from these countries such as liberia, sierra leone, but also not trying to be a little bit overboard with going out and looking actively for ebola in those cases where it doesn't fit the case definition. so just because you're from liberia, if you haven't traveled there in the last three weeks, you don't fit the case definition for ebola. so there should be no reason for people to suspect that they are a case. >> although some of the people actually say that even if they get visitors, they're not necessarily going to let people know that either. so there are a lot of different challenges that are being faced. dr. rupp, your hospital right now has somebody who has ebola. is there any pushback from the nurses or the doctors? are they a little bit concerned, even though they're incredible professionals, are they worried? >> well, deb, i think as you pointed out, you have to have a
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healthy respect for this virus, but the folks who are caring for this patient here, our doctors, our nurses, the whole care team, you know, is taking the appropriate precautions. we're very confident that we're caring for this patient safely and we're not at great risk. >> dr. yasmin, you said something very interesting, which is, look, you know, the people -- west africa is ground zero. it's not dallas, it's not other places, even though the fear that it's coming to the west has obviously taken root. but do you believe that these new screening measures will, in fact, be able to protect people who may have been exposed to the virus? >> so, deb, if we look historically, when we've tried to do this, before, other countries have attempted fever screening. for example, canada and parts of asia in 2002 and 2003, it was attempted again with swine flu. and it didn't make a big impact with those two epidemics. we've not tried this before in the u.s., so it remains to be seen how it will unfold here. it's really adding another layer of a public health intervention, so 100% of people flying out of
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liberia, sierra leone and guinea are currently screened for a fever, but it's a very tricky virus to try to track. because of the fact that people can carry it and not even show symptoms for 21 days. >> and i was on the plane coming here the other day and i was a little bit concerned to be in the bathroom. i didn't want to touch anything, because it can live on surfaces. i wasn't necessarily worried about the person sitting ten rows behind me, i was worried that they'd been in a facility where maybe they'd touched something and could have potentially exposed others. how do you control that? >> well, that's hard to control. because, look, we live in a world filled with microbes and viruses and we also live in a global society where we travel around the world at a moment's notice. and so, really, i think the key, though, there is education about the virus want how you contract, and how difficult it is to contract it, as well. >> well, dr. garza, dr. seema
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yasmin, dr. mark rupp, we'll all be looking to you over the course of the next months for your insights and guidance to keep this under control. thank you so much. we really appreciate it. and ahead, disturbing allegations in a closely watched california congressional race involving a candidate considered to be a rising star in the gop ranks. we'll hear from the accuser, coming up. i sure hope so. with healthcare costs, who knows. umm... everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor.... can get the real answers you need. start building your confident retirement today. no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right.
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congressional races of the midterm election involving a man considered a new hope for the republican party. well, now it is getting ugly, with claims that the openly gay gop candidate harassed a staffer. we want to warn you, this next story has some graphic content. it is not suitable for children. cnn investigative reporter, chris frates, sat down exclusively with the accuser. >> for individual freedom. >> reporter: carl demaio is a rising republican star. backed by heavyweight congressional leaders like mitch mcconnell and john boehner. even endorsed by michael bloomberg. he's positioned as a gop candidate for a new generation. >> carl dimaio, a new generation republican -- >> reporter: after losses in 2012, top republicans concluded in a review they must recruit more minority candidates. it's a problem demaio helped solve. look at how a local newspaper described him in its endorsement. "a gay man who will chip away at party's image as intolerant and
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inflexible." national media has repeatedly declared demaio a candidate to watch. demaio first came on to the national scene when he lost to democrat bob filner in the race for san diego mayor. but filner was forced to step down after 18 women claimed sexual harassment. demaio had tried to make filner's behavior a campaign issue. >> any mayor who's going to insist on zero tolerance, when it comes to the issue of sexual harassment. >> but now demaio's being tested by allegations about his own sexual misbehavior and accusations of harassment. it's an issue that escalated this week when he was asked about it at a campaign news conference. >> absolutely untrue. >> reporter: the allegations come from a former campaign staffer who shot down on camera with cnn. todd bossniche said he joined demaio's campaign last year, eager to work for a candidate who shared his values and like himself is an openly gay republican. but he says he was fired after complaining about demaio's aggressive sexual behavior.
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>> he asked me to come over to his office, which is in the back, and when i came over to his office, his door was open, and he was masturbating. >> and so what did you see when you walked in? >> i came over he was looking at me. >> so, there was no mistaking what was happening? >> there was no mistaking whatsoever. >> reporter: bosnich who became the campaign's policy director says dimaio would repeatedly find him alone and make inappropriate advances, massaging and kissing his neck and groping him. he sels it staays it started on after drinks with a staff at a local bar. he said he got a ride back to his car. >> we were making small talk on the way back and when he pulled up to my car he reached over to my lap and grabbed my crotch. and i flipped out and i pushed his hand away. >> reporter: how did it make you feel? >> um, i just was shocked because i'd never had anyone do
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something like that to me especially in a position of authority and trust. and at the time i just figured, well, maybe he was drunk and blew it off. but he progressively and progressively the inappropriate touching and incidents continued from there. >> reporter: it was several more months according to bosnich before he mentioned the behavior to the campaign manager. >> the campaign manager who, you know, laughed it off that that's just the way carl is and if i felt that uncomfortable i should have let him know i'm a gay man. >> reporter: he was essentially saying to you, well, it was your fault. >> exactly. he's implying it's my fault, it's incumbent on me to stop carl dimaio from these behaviors and i was really offended. >> reporter: a few weeks later bosnich said he confronts demaio. >> my main point he could stop or drop out of the race was my
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main point. it was a couple days later that the campaign manager called me into his office and said that carl lost his trust in me and termina mated me. he offered me a position in the county republican party and also told me to sign a nondisclosure agreement in exchange for $50,000. >> reporter: was that hush money? >> you know, i'll let it speak for itself. >> reporter: how did you look at it? >> i took it as an attempt to bribe me to keep my silence. >> reporter: bosnich says he left the campaign without taking any money or signing any papers. he recorded an interview with a local conservative radio station outlining his allegations. that interview never aired. but cnn obtained a copy of that recording. after hearing it we took bosnich's allegations directly to demaio catching up to him after a campaign news conference. he says you were inappropriate
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in the office, that you would touch him, kiss him, grab his butt -- >> all i can say is the police department -- >> reporter: let me finish the litany. and he also says that you went out for drinks with the staff, you drove him home -- >> all untrue. all of it untrue. >> reporter: you grabbed his crotch. he denied the claims saying they are a cover story of a plagiarist and suspected criminal. >> this is a person who was let go by our campaign manager for plagiarism of taking a report from a national journal and passing it off as his own work. he was terminated. he admitted that he plagiarized. he apologized for plagiarizing and when we told him he was no longer welcome in the staff and in the campaign office even as a volunteer he left. days later he broke in. >> reporter: demaio says the san diego police department is investigating bosnich for breaking into demaio's campaign
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headquarters smashing commu ini and breaking phone lines. >> he got caught for damage he did to the campaign and now he's manufacturing in essence a cover story to explain away his actions. it's unfortunate. it's untrue. and my hope is that the police department will hold him accountable for his actions against our campaign. >> reporter: and you can provide us with the evidence -- >> oh, absolutely. absolutely. >> reporter: -- that shows both the break-in and -- >> absolutely, absolutely. >> reporter: -- and both the evidence that would refute his claims here that you were somehow inappropriate. >> why don't you come back to the office and we'll talk you through every single e-mail and text message. i think you'll be satisfied. >> reporter: we were taken to the campaign headquarters and briefly shown some documents or materials and wouldn't let us copy them or describe them to you and they did not on their own refute bosnich's claims. police said they investigated
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the break-ins and sent the findings to the district attorney's office. four months later police still haven't charged anyone with a crime and they refuse to discuss the case on camera or name any potential suspects. did you break in carl demaio also office? >> no, i did not. >> reporter: he denies he was the one that plagiarized from the "national journal." >> we tried to get answers from the demaio campaign. first they demanded to talk to my bosses and had a tom gop consultant take over that call accusing cnn of going on a pawrm witch hunt. >> reporter: when we followed up with a detailed list of questions including whether the campaign manager knew about bosnich's complaints the campaign then hired two high-powered washington attorneys who asked for even more time and more information about what cnn had. cnn followed up with a second detailed letter laying out the information they requested. the next day cnn finally got a
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response from the lawyers. contact the campaign with your questions. back to square one. their statement was almost exactly what they said when we first asked about it. this is not the first time demaoi has been accused of sexually inappropriate behavior. last year a fellow city council men said he caught him masturbating in a city restroom twice. it's a claim he denies even taking a polygraph test to support his denial. >> this lie crossed the line. it's so gross. it's so untrue it's so humiliating that it demands a response. >> reporter: now todd bosnich has taken an independent lie detector test to support his allegations. >> it corroborated my account of being sexually harassed by carl de demaio. >> reporter: bosnich's attorney gave us a copy of the results and it says no deception
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indicated. next we go to the white house and what president says about the developments in iraq.
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hello, everyone, i'm deborah feyerick, thanks for joining us

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