Skip to main content

tv   New Day Sunday  CNN  October 12, 2014 3:00am-4:31am PDT

3:00 am
. good morning, i'm christi paul. >> texas health officials confirmed a second case of ebola here in the u.s. >> the infected patient is a health care worker in dallas who treated thomas eric duncan. duncan died wednesday after contracting the virus in liberia. >> according to texas health officials, the worker reported a low fever friday night and was isolated at that point for testing. the hospital confirmed the preliminary test results overnight and said this, "we knew a second case could be a reality and we've been preparation for the possibility.
3:01 am
we're broadening our team in dallas and working with extreme diligence to prevent further spread." >> officials interviewed the patient and are now trying to identify anyone else who may have been exposed. cnn's senior medical correspondent has been in dallas covering the ebola fight and she joins us now by phone. elizabeth, they say a second case they knew could be a possibility. could be a reality. do we know exactly what the preparations from the diagnosis of thomas eric duncan to this point have been? >> i think that what health care workers have been trying to figure out ever since this first case is what do we do if there is a next case in terms of we need a whole new crew of people now to do contact tracing. contact tracing is when you ask the person, who did you have contact with while you were
3:02 am
contagious? then you need to keep track of the people for 21 days. so they're already doing this for 48 of duncan's contacts. and now they need to do this for all of this worker's contacts. there is not easy thing, keeping track of large numbers of people, taking their temperature twice a day, making sure they don't get in their car and leave town is a lot of work. there is also a staff of people from the centers for disease control in dallas helping with this for duncan's contacts. now they need to do the same thing for this health care worker's contacts. >> were you surprised to hear it was somebody who treated him and not his fiancee or children who he was in direct contact with for several days prior to 5:bei admitted to the hospital? >> i'm not surprised. all of us have been into the hospital at some point. just to think about how close doctors, nurses, other health care workers get to you when
3:03 am
they treat you, they're touching you, they're right there. you know, they're likely coming in contact with your bodily fluids. there is not surprising to me. what i'm hoping the hospital is doing right now is thinking through what kind of contact and on what date which is the really important part did this worker have their contact with duncan? if this was on the first visit that duncan had to the hospital, this is yet more evidence that hospitals need to, one, that when someone comes in with a fever, take the travel history and you need to take precautions right away to protect your staff. because, as we know, they didn't ask. if this happened once they knew he had ebola, then there is something wrong with the system they're using to protect their workers. we don't know which one it is. >> how is this second case, the person's relationship to duncan as a health care worker change how the workers at this hospital
3:04 am
will now be caring for this colleague essentially? >> again, it depends when the contact was. if this health care worker got sick from the first time duncan went in, when they didn't know they were looking at ebola, i don't know that it changes anything about the kind of care that this worker will get. if the health care worker got sick when everyone knew that duncan had ebola, that means that there's something wrong with how they are protecting workers, something wrong with the gear that they're wearing, the way they're putting it on, the way they're taking it off. it indicates that there could be a problem there. i'd be interested to know, it just says in this press release, i'm reading it, you can read it along with me guys and check me, i don't believe it says that this person has been hospitalized at texas health presbyterian. it just says they've been hospitalized. i would definitely want to know where this person has been
3:05 am
hospitalized. is this person at the same hospital duncan was in? the same place where the worker worked? or did this person go to a different hospital? >> yeah, that's a really good point, actually. as you're reading through this press release with us as well, is there anything specific that stands out to you? i mean i'm reading that we knew a second case could be a reality. we've been preparing for the possibility. should we believe there could be a third case? >> yes. i mean, that's the issue with ebola or any infectious disease it s i it's not just that one c it's who did that original case give it to? this is very concerning. this is very, very concerning. i really hope that they do a really diligent job with contact tracing. the cdc works towards that goal. they train people to make it
3:06 am
happen. and you just really, really have great hope for their contact tracing process. you hope they get all of the health care worker's contacts. you hope they follow up thoroughly. because you miss one person and it's concrete that the cdc says they go out and start a whole new line of transmission. so that's what comes to my mind. they better do a 110% thorough job of tracing duncan's contacts and tracing this person's contacts. >> because i think what makes this different, don't you think, than duncan is we know thomas eric duncan contracted it in west africa. this is the first case that was contracted here in the u.s. >> yeah. >> that's exactly right. it's similar with the nurse who contracted it from the priest. so you're right. this is the first time that someone has contracted ebola in the united states. i think sometimes that when we first heard about ebola, it
3:07 am
seemed like this strange scott uk disease in a far away land. what this shows you is that we're not immune. >> all right. elizabeth, stay with us. we want to bring in david sanders, he's an associate professor of biological sciences at purdue university. he's with us on the phone as well. good to have you with us this morning. unfortunately under these circumstances, i would would have picked up with where we left off that this is the first case of ebola contracted here in the united states. is there some medical difference? is this just a psychological difference for people who are following what's happening with this virus? >> i think there is a difference because this is a transmission that occurred under circumstances where we hope it wouldn't occur. we know there are going to be people who are infected with africa who are going to be traveling to other places.
3:08 am
that we know will happen. we don't expect that our health workers are going to be affected. when i say we don't expect it, it is something that they are putting themselves at risk in treating such patients. and we understand that. there hasn't been transmission to u.s. workers. it's extremely concerning. again, i share the concern as to whether this occurred before the patient was identified as an ebola patient or afterwards. that's going to be a very important piece of information for us to evaluate how to go forward. >> david, are you concerned at all that it was contracted in the u.s. that it would be the exact same strain? what is the possibility of having different strains and having to treat different? >> it's almost certainly the
3:09 am
same ebola. i mean that's -- that's not a concern. it's going to be the ebola strain that is the same. >> do you know how many -- we talk about the experimental treatments and that those actual ly have helped many people. i think what is frightening to most people is the fact that thomas duncan was in the united states and being treated in the united states and he still died. do you know will these experimental treatments that we've been hearing about be something that is used on this next -- this second case? >> i don't know in particular. i must say that the experimental treatments have had success in animals. they really haven't been tested thoroughly in humans. and i don't think we have enough information to be able to say whether any of them have or have not been effective now. we simply don't have numbers &
3:10 am
the patient tracing to be able to make any definitive statements about that. >> david, this press release we received from the cdc says that this person tested positive for ebola in a preliminary test. can you compare and contrast the preliminary test and confirmed test? is that just sim antemantics? >> preliminaries just means that they did it once and it was positive and they're repeating it again. there are other possible tests. but what it just says is that, again, as scientists, we're always careful about our statements and it's probably occurred once that they were able to figure out it was
3:11 am
positive. they assure themselves this is a positive result. but it sounds likely that it's positive and it's going to stay positive. >> there's no chance, you think, that once they try to confirm it they can say oh, this was a mistake, it's not really ebola. >> no chance. these analysis nowadays are pretty specific. and, you know, unless there was some kind of contamination, i don't know whether it's the same lab where they did the first analysis which you know raises a possibility, very small possibility of contamination of the samples. but these we know are fairly robust. it will be reaffirmed as the cdc does their own independent
3:12 am
analysis. >> the press release was from the texas department of state health services, not. cdc. we're waiting to get more from them. this is coming from the texas department of state health services, this preliminary test proven that one additional person now tested positive for ebola according to this testing of the state health laboratory in austin. thank you so much. elizabeth cohen, thank you as well. we'll stay on top of this breaking news. now this the first case contracted here in the united states. isis, another big story we're following with breaking developments there is on baghdad's doorstep. the obama administration insists the iraqi capital is safe from the terror group. we'll take you live to baghdad next.
3:13 am
woman: everyone in the nicu -- all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment.
3:14 am
i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. at massmutual we're owned by our policyowners, and they matter most to us. if you're caring for a child with special needs, our innovative special care program offers strategies that can help. this is kathleen. setting up the perfect wedding day begins with arthritis pain and two pills. afternoon arrives and feeling good, but her knee pain returns... that's two more pills. the evening's event brings laughter, joy, and more pain... when jamie says... what's that like six pills today? yeah... i can take 2 aleve for all day relief. really, and... and that's it. this is kathleen... for my arthritis pain, i now choose aleve. get all day arthritis pain relief with an easy-open cap. press your tonguenture, against it like this. it moves unlike natural teeth.
3:15 am
do you feel it? it can happen with every denture. introducing new fixodent plus true feel. it helps keep dentures firmly in place. with a smooth formula, free of flavors and colorants. so you get a closer feeling to natural teeth. new fixodent plus true feel. fixodent. and forget it.
3:16 am
defense secretary says the u.s. is doing what it can to help drive back isis in syria and iraq. but the terror group appears to be advancing on two major fronts. they seized control of much of a town right on turkey's doorstep despite air strikes earlier today. there are also fears anbar province could soon fall to isis. it's police chief has just been killed in a roadside bombing. secretary hagel insists baghdad is secure. >> iraqi security forces are in full control of baghdad, continue to strengthen their positions in baghdad. we continue to help them with air strikes, with our assistance
3:17 am
and our advisors which i have at the direction of president obama added to our numbers there. >> cnn senior national correspondent ben wiedeman is in baghdad. he says they're in full control of baghdad. does that corresponde with what you are seeing on the ground? >> it is corresponding to the extent that they're capable of doing it. of course, yesterday evening we saw two very large car bombs going off within baghdad itself. so there is always the danger of violence within the city caused by sleeper cells. the perimeters of baghdad do appear to be well defended at the moment. the situation in anbar is increasingly grim. overnight the chief of police in anbar province was killed by a roadside bomb north of ramadi.
3:18 am
and thou that it now that city 24-hour kerr fcurfew. anybody that steps outside their door will be shot by the iraqi police and army. meanwhile, in baquba, there were two bombs. one was a suicide bomber and one a detonated car bomb killing 20 people, wounding more than 30. so, yes, baghdad seems to be relatively safe and i underscore relative. but the situation in anbar and other parts around the capital is definitely not very good. victor? >> ben, if isis takes control of anbar and the reporting up to this point has been 80% is under the control of isis and they start to control the water ways
3:19 am
and the roads in, would that not then be a defactor control of the capital if you control what is in and out and what is the impact there? >> well, what we see is that isis has a presence to the west, to the north, to the south of baghdad but not to the east. so it's not that baghdad will be completely surrounded and cut off. the problem is, of course, that baghdad international airport to the west of the capitol abuts anbar province and essentially there are ice sis forces within eight miles of the airport. at the moment, we understand there are good electronic counter measures there. that is where some of the u.s. apache helicopters are based. there are u.s. advisors around working with iraqi army and the defensive perimeter of baghdad. but certainly if isis is able to
3:20 am
take full control of anbar province, they could make life very difficult in the capital. victor? >> all right, ben wedeman reporting live. thank you so much. we want to get more perspective on this with cnn military analyst retired lieutenant colonel rick francona. thank you so much. first of all, rick, you wrote in your blog that hopes are dwindling that u.s. air strikes are going to stop the isis momentum. how dire do you think the situation is really? >> i think it's pretty bad. we were hoping that the air power could stop the iraqi -- i'm sorry, the isis advance long enough for the iraqi military to reorganize itself, get its command structure back in order and then go back on offensive and try to retake some of these position that's they lost. if you look at the tchltd the v
3:21 am
successful in taking town after town. there are actions in anbar province are still on going. yes, the air power has been ineffective in stopping that. i think people are beginning to realize the iraqi army on the ground is totally ineffective. >> pierre, let's talk about the airport that victor was just talking to ben about a second ago. u.s. apache helicopters are there if isis takes control of the airport, what does that mean for baghdad? >> it makes things very difficult. it makes things very difficult for the american air campaign because a lot of the helicopters are operating out of that very airport. and secondly, it makes it much more difficult to control baghdad. i completely agree isis is unlikely to take baghdad in one go. but they do have the opportunity as your precentse presenter sai
3:22 am
control of water and lay siege on the city. and that would make life very, very difficult in bad baghdad. >> we know baghdad is a city of nine million people. i want to read you something from a centcom spokesman yesterday. it says isf continues to maintain firm control of the city. there's no imminent threat of an effective isil offensive. the isf continue to conduct operations to engage the elements and push back with support of u.s. air strikes when necessary. they are adamant that baghdad is secure. but let's be honest. isis has been so grossly underestimated. it was back in january that president called them a jv team. how can the coalition be so certain that baghdad will have a force to withstand the isis surge if it happens?
3:23 am
>> yeah, that's -- i think we've continued to underestimate isis and what they're able to do. i think ben had a very good point there. they are to the north of the city, west of the city, south of the city. if you look at their operations, it looks like they're trying to encircle the city. they'll get into a problem in the east. they'll get into more of the shia areas. but this is typical of what isis does. they like to surround their targets, lay siege to them and then begin a campaign of suicide bombings. we're starting to see the suicide bombings already. they have their sights on baghdad. we know that from the literature. they want establish baghdad as the capital. iraqa in syria is a temporary situation for them. their eyes are on baghdad and they're going to begin to go toward baghdad until they're stopped. >> peter, do you think that the coalition has a good gauge of how many isis fighters there really are right now? >> i think it's very difficult. you already see with the air strikes that the lack of intelligence that exists on isis
3:24 am
both in syria and iraq is really stunning. a lot of missions are flown and abandoned essentially without any targets being fired at because there's no information. because the situation developed so quickly, it's not possible to develop that kind of nitty-gritty understanding that you need in order to really not only contain but roll back an organization like isis. and, yes, i do agree it's an organization that has expanded so quickly it's hard to know exactly how many people are with them. >> lastly, if isis takes kobani in syria and control anbar that, is 350 miles of territory that they've gained. if they establish a calipit, what does that mean? >> we can't afford to let them have all this territory. they have a lot of people in their organization from the baath party in iraq.
3:25 am
they know how to run a country. they want to set this up as a pseudo country. they're going to do. that but to the point peter was making, these guys, they're effectively command and controlling forces 350 miles apart. i think we are underestimating them and they are trying to establish this state and, you know, you have to say they're doing a fairly good job. >> all right. colonel, so appreciate your insthigt morning. thank you for being with us. this is a conversation we're going to be continuing throughout the morning. keeping a close eye right now on a new confirmed case of ebola in dallas. the very first one contracted here in the u.s. we've learned this morning that a health care worker who treated thomas eric duncan is the one that contracted this virus. we'll have more on that. also this morning, frightening moments for passengers on a u.s. airways jet. imagine dropping 26,000 feet in a matter of seconds. go ahead and put your bag right here.
3:26 am
have a nice flight! traveling can feel like one big mystery. you're never quite sure what is coming your way. but when you've got an entire company who knows that the most on-time flights are nothing if we can't get your things there too. it's no wonder more people choose delta than any other airline.
3:27 am
you know.... there's a more enjoyable way to get your fiber. try phillips fiber good gummies. they're delicious and an excellent source of fiber to help support regularity. mmmm. these are good! the tasty side of fiber. from phillips you know your dentures can unlike natural teeth. try new fixodent plus truefeel. this smooth formula helps keep dentures in place. it's free of flavors and colorants for a closer feeling to natural teeth. fixodent. and forget it.
3:28 am
3:29 am
it was a nerve-racking day in the air for us airways. they had a problem onboard two flights and understandably these problems left passengers shaken. >> a hydraulic problems forced one to make an emergency landing in charlotte, north carolina. nonest 28 passengers or four crew members were injured. but in the other incident, an air bus a-320, they lost cabin pressure. this is video from the moment that it happened. and after. they made a rapid dissent.
3:30 am
one passenger home improvement tv personality danny lipford, he caught the momentary crisis on his cell phone. here is cnn's rosa flores. >> reporter: good morning. imagine this. kids screaming and passengers in pain from their ears popping. that's how one passenger described the rapid dissent to 10,000 feet on a flight from new york to charlotte, north carolina, on saturday. passenger danny lipford shot this video after the oxygen masks deployed simultaneously. he said that it was a very dramatic event. now after that, the pilot let everyone know that the plane had just gone down from 36,000 feet to 10,000 feet. >> everything seemed normal at that point and then every one of the oxygen masks dropped and, you know, i've been on hundreds and hundreds of flights before. you always hear about that. you get the instructions about it but never have actually seen
3:31 am
that. and so it was a little startling whether all of them dropped at the exact same time are w. no real announcement ahead of time. when the masks are dropped, it was very, very quiet. nobody was alarmed. everybody was looking around and the whole crew handled everything extremely well. >> danny also says everyone was surprisingly calm. the plane landed normally, airline personnel were at the gate to answer passenger questions. emts were also on hand. according to us airways, 146 passengers were onboard and no one was hurt. the maintenance team is evaluating the plane, no word on the cause of the pressurization issue. following breaking news this morning. >> texas health officials have now confirmed a second case of ebola here in the u.s. if confirmed by the cdc, this would be the first time that someone actually contracted the
3:32 am
deadly virus inside the united states. and here's what we know. the infected patient is a health care worker in dallas who treated thomas eric duncan. >> duncan died wednesday, remember, after contracting the virus. he did so in liberia. now according to texas health officials, the worker reported a low fever on friday night and was isolated for testing at that point. the hospital confirmed the preliminary test results overnight and said this, "we knew a second case could be a reality and we've been preparing for this possibility. we're broadening our team in dallas and working with extreme diligence to prevent further spread." zbl officials interviewed the patient and are trying to identify anyone else who may have been exposed. >> we'll have more in just a moment. sea captain: there's a narratorstorm cominhe storm narrator: that whipped through the turbine which poured... surplus energy into the plant which generously lowered its price
3:33 am
and tipped off the house which used all that energy to stay warm through the storm. chipmunk: there's a bad storm comin! narrator: the internet of everything is changing how energy works. is your network ready?" creeping up on you... fight back with relief so smooth... ...it's fast. tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue ...and neutralizes stomach acid at the source. ♪ tum, tum tum tum... smoothies! only from tums.
3:34 am
no sign of him yet. keep looking. [ narrator ] their mission: to get richard sherman his campbell's chunky soup. hi, baby! hi, mama! take us home! wow! it's new chunky beer-n-cheese with beef and bacon soup. beer... cheese... beef... bacon... ♪ i love it. and mama loves you. [ all ] awwwwww! it fills you up right. into one you'll never forget. earn triple points when you book with the expedia app. expedia plus rewards.
3:35 am
♪ ♪ ben! well, that was close! you ain't lying! let quicken loans help you save your money. with a mortgage that's engineered to amaze!
3:36 am
we follow this breaking news
3:37 am
this morning. texas health officials confirmed a second case of ebola here in the u.s. and if confirmed by the cdc, which is where it goes next, this will be the very first time someone has contracted the deadly virus inside america. >> here's what we know this morning. this infected patient is a health care worker in dallas who treated thomas eric duncan. duncan died wednesday after contracting the virus in liberia. >> according to texas health officials, the worker reported a low fever on friday night and was isolated then for testing. the hospital confirmed the preliminary test overnight with this statement saying "we knew a second case could be a reality and we have been preparation for the possibility. we're broaden our team in dallas and working to prevent first spread." >> he liz beth cohen has been in dallas covering the fight against ebola. she's with us throughout this hour by phone. elizabeth, we heard from the secretary of hhs.
3:38 am
we heard from the texas lieutenant governor that duncan's case and the handling of it was led by county officials. considering some of the missteps, the problems, do we expect the state or the cdc to take a larger role in handling this case? >> that will be interesting to see. the cdc traditionally let state and local governments run investigations. it's not the cdc's place to always take the lead. they really defer to the state. so it will be interesting to see if now the cdc says okay, there are things that are concerning here. we're going to come in and take more of a commanding presence here. >> it's so important to know when this health care worker took care of mr. duncan. if it was done before they
3:39 am
realized he had ebola, that is a mistake we knew about. if the contact was after it was known he had ebola, that's a whole different ball game. that means some things didn't go the way it was supposed to. >> all right. if i recall correctly, you sometimes had a hard time extracting information about how thomas eric duncan had been treated. do we know, does he ever get that experimental treatment? do you think that same treatment will be available to this next case? >> he did eventually get an experimental treatment. it was about ten days into his illness. getting a treatment ten days into ebola is not ideal. you want it to be much earlier than that. and other patients in the united states got their experimental treatment much earlier than that. it will be interesting, we don't
3:40 am
know where the second patient is being hospitalized. it's a decision that patient has to make with the drt. do you want an experimental treatment and if so, which one do you want? that is strange to say do you want an experimental treatment, you would think that everyone would raise their hands. but these experimental treatments have not been proven to work in people. they, in fact, could do harm to people. so the problematic part of duncan's care is he told me they wanted an experimental treatment. they begged for one. and it took six days in the hospital to get one. >> elizabeth cohen, thank you so much. we're going to take a quick break and have more in just a moment. >> okay, thanks.
3:41 am
3:42 am
bonjour. comment ce va? bonjour. comment ce va? due cappuccini, per favore. domo... arigato? arigato united flies to more destinations than any other airline. namaste. over 5100 daily flights to nearly 60 countries. namaste. plus, over 230 us cities. dessert? pee-can pie. pecan? yeah. okay. in any language, that's...gateway to the world friendly. i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn. because it gives me... zero heartburn! prilosec otc. the number 1 doctor-recommended frequent heartburn medicine for 9 straight years. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn.
3:43 am
3:44 am
isis fighters are developing a stranglehold on two key areas in iraq. anbar province in iraq, leaders are pleaing fpleading to stop a run. it will be dangerously close to baghdad. and chuck hagel insists iraqi forces are in full control of the capital. but -- >> anbar province is in trouble. we know that. >> if isis threatens baghdad airports, the deterioration could increase quickly. now let's go across the border into syria in kobani.
3:45 am
isis fighters control a large chunk of the u.s. sayair strikes have not stopped the fighting. what is the situation like there? can the kurds pull out and do they have the resources to do that? >> at this stage, it's been awfully quiet for most of the morning. one of the fighters inside kobani is telling us there were fierce clashes happening in the early hours of the morning. they believe the fighters are saying the concern that isis is perhaps planning some sort of an attack, some sort of major assault since they seem to be at it stage. the turkish military just right
3:46 am
before we were coming up. [ inaudible ] >> turkey doesn't have the cover they need for a military operation. perhaps in a regulation not too long ago, authorizing cross border military operations. turkey, however, at this stage saying it is not going to be militarily involved. it wants to see a broader operation being put together. they're not only concerned with the threat that isis poses but also on the heels of the regime. that is not something the u.s. and allies are willing to consider going after the regime.
3:47 am
we have a situation where when it comes to kobani and the plight of the syrian kurdish population, they're increasingly acting as if they're pawns in the broader political game that is being played out here. >> arwa damon, we'll try to get a better connection and answers about the humanitarian crisis there. arwa, thank you so much. yes, a second case now of ebola confirmed here in the u.s. now health officials are racing to try to figure out who else might have been exposed. stay close. this is kathleen. setting up the perfect wedding day begins with arthritis pain and two pills. afternoon arrives and feeling good, but her knee pain returns... that's two more pills. the evening's event brings laughter, joy, and more pain... when jamie says... what's that like six pills today? yeah... i can take 2 aleve for all day relief. really, and... and that's it. this is kathleen... for my arthritis pain, i now choose aleve.
3:48 am
get all day arthritis pain relief with an easy-open cap.
3:49 am
once there was a girl who even in her laundry room. with downy unstopables for long-lasting scent. and infusions for softness. she created her own mix, match, magic. downy, wash in the wow.
3:50 am
3:51 am
3:52 am
i've been able to live a full life. >> i never worry about what they can't do. i worry about what they can do. >> i can do it, ned. >> yes, you can. good job. >> i did 10. >> i'm building them stronger so they can live life like they're supposed to.
3:53 am
your customers, our financing. your aspirations, our analytics. your goals, our technology. introducing synchrony financial, bringing new meaning to the word partnership. banking. loyalty. analytics. synchrony financial. enagage with us. ghave a nice flight!r bag right here. traveling can feel like one big mystery. you're never quite sure what is coming your way. but when you've got an entire company who knows that the most on-time flights are nothing if we can't get your things there too. it's no wonder more people choose delta than any other airline.
3:54 am
if you were a denture? take this simple test. press your tongue against it. like this. ahh! it moves, unlike natural teeth. did you feel it? it can happen with every denture. introducing new fixodent plus truefeel. it helps keep denture firmly in place, with its smooth formula free of flavors and colorants. so you get a closer feeling to natural teeth. new fixodent plus truefeel. fixodent. and forget it. a single ember that escapes from a wildfire can travel more than a mile. that single ember can ignite and destroy your home or even your community
3:55 am
you can't control where that ember will land only what happens when it does get fire adapted now at fireadapted.org
3:56 am
following breaking news about the second case of ebola in texas. we'll talk more about that in a moment. because we're also learning this morning that the nbc news crew who worked with infected ebola patient ashko mukpo is under
3:57 am
mandatory screen after violating a agreement to stay in isolation for 21 days. >> he worked for the network in liberia. according to hospital officials, muk mukpo's health is improving. he is now able to eat solid food and given an experimental drug and blood transfusion. >> a nurse's assistant in spain who is the first person to contract the deadly virus outside africa is now listed in stable but serious condition. this is according to hospital officials there. sources tell cnn the woman is conscious and she is talking. and five of the nation's busiest airports, they're all scheduled to unveil an enhanced ebola screening by thursday. jfk was the first airport in the country yesterday to unveil the new screening measures. we have more now. >> reporter: additional screening for ebola has begun here at jfk international airport. it means that passengers coming from ebola customs in guinea,
3:58 am
sierra leone and liberia will be walked to a different area and screened. here's how the process will work. they'll be brought to a designated area. each passenger will have temperature taken. they'll be asked questions about the travel. they'll be asked even if they've been in contact with someone who is sick with sikh. if given the all clear, they will be asked to leave their contact information with officials and they'll be asked to leave to go ahead whether they leave to keep a log of their temperatures for 21 days. now if there are any red flags, passengers will be taken to a quarantine zone for further evaluation. but interestingly enough, even as this screening begins, the cdc recognizes that it's not foolproof. >> no matter how many of the procedures are put into place, we can't get the risk to zero. that will not be the case. but this additional layer should add a measure of security and assurance to the american public. >> the enhanced screening here at jfk international airport is considered a pilot program that
3:59 am
will be rolled out to four other airports here in the u.s. on thursday. those include dulles international, newark, o'hare international and hartsfield jackson in atlanta. >> all right. thank you. thank you for starting your morning us with. >> we have much more on the breaking news coming up in the next hour of "new day." it starts right now. wishing you all a good morning. >> let's talk about that breaking news out of texas. health officials there have confirmed the second case of ebola here in the u.s. and if confirmed by the cdc, here's what is important about this, it will be the first time someone has contracted the deadly virus inside the united states. >> the infected patient is a health care worker in dallas who worked to treat thomas eric duncan. duncan died wednesday after contracting ebola in liberia. >> according to texas health officials, the worker reported a
4:00 am
low fever on friday night and at that point was isolated so they could do more testing. the hospital confirmed the preliminary test results overnight with this statement. "we knew a second case could be a reality and we've been preparing for this possibility. we're broadening our team in dallas and working with extreme diligence to prevent further spread." >> officials have interviewed the patient and are now trying to identify anyone else who may have been exposed. they scheduled a news conference for 8:30 eastern, so 90 minutes from now. of course, we'll bring that to you as it happens. we have david sanders from purdue university with us. it's good to have you with us this morning as we try to understand this. first case contracted in the u.s. of this ebola virus. the question we've been trying to understand all morning is when likely this health care worker contracted this virus from thomas eric duncan? we don't have the answer yet.
4:01 am
but understanding the isolation environment, it is more likely that this was the first visit? the ambulance driving? the second check? n.? or is there enough exposure isolation that he could have it. >> let's hope it was the former and not the latter. i don't know any more -- have any more information about it than you do. i would be very concerned if it were when the patient had been identified as ebola patient, that there was a break down. but this can happen. i mean this is something that we have to be prepared for. it's something that we discussed and i think one thing we have to be thinking about is that it may not be that every single hospital is, in fact, prepared for this. we may have to think about regional centers that are best prepared to deal with ebola patients. i think that's something we
4:02 am
really have to take into consideration. >> cnn medical xpocorrespondent elizabeth cohen is joining us as well. is there enough containment that this health care worker could have contracted the virus then? >> anything is possible and certainly we've seen health care workers in africa and in spain become exposed even though they were using -- they said they were doing everything that they were supposed to do to protect themselves. i think the comment that the doctor just made, i think it's really important. it may not be that every hospital is cut out to do this as well as every other hospital. it may be that the cdc needs to step in and say, you know what? when people -- when one of these contacts develop a fever, we want them to go here. name a specific place that has experience dealing with
4:03 am
infectious diseases. all hospitals have experience in infectious diseases but a hospital specially trained to deal with ebola patients. i think that is something that might be discussed at pretty high levels at this point. >> david in, a press release that they released early this morning when this was actually discovered late last night, they said we're broadening our team in dallas. who do you think that means they would bring in? >> i think the idea is that they have to do more contact tracing. that that's an essential part of what has to be done now. they don't have to just deal with the contracts of the first patient. they have to have -- look at the contacts of the second person as well. i think they may also be wanting to have a review of they're containment facilities to make sure they're adequate. i have to say, you know, health care workers who are working with these patients are really
4:04 am
performing heroic deed and they should be protected to the best of our ability. we need to be sure if there are any problems in the system that they're correcting. >> elizabeth, i have a copy of the detailed hospital checklist. it goes for pages and pages of things that must be checked off and resources that shoe covers, gloves, gowns, how much of this would this hospital or any hospital speaking about texas press bete presbyterian or any other have already and how much would they have to make sure it's not transferred from a hk woealth c worker? >> it's not about the stuff so much. of course, you need the right stuff. you need the right protective gear, all of that. it's about the mindset of the hospital. hospitals, i'm starting to say
4:05 am
that hospitals don't have a fabulous track record at being -- at protecting their workers and always protecting patients from infections. people die in large numbers from infections they acquire in the hospital. in other words, you come in without an infection and then they die of an infection they got there. it is a real problem. and hospitals got much better. but it is a real problem. some hospitals have a terrible track record just with doctors and nurses washing their hands. it is really about not the stuff that's part of it, but it is also about what is going on in their heads. i think this is hopefully a wakeup call to u.s. hospitals that they have got to be better at handling these kinds of issues. >> dr. sanders, i know you were part of a report that found a train of ebola that has the potential to enter a person's airway. how does that happen? is that the strain that we're seeing here in the u.s.? >> so we are talking about ebola
4:06 am
zaire. it does have the inherent capacity to enter into airway cells from the air wayside. that's correct. we have no evidence that is how ebola is currently being trans mitted. i want to reassure everybody. we have no evidence that is happening now. but i have been trying to emphasize that this is something that could happen in the future. and if the epidemic in africa is not suppressed, that raises the possibility of that happening. we have no evidence of that happening currently. >> no evidence that it could be airborne. that we cannot rule out the possibility? >> it is a -- i'll just say the cell biology of ebola is consistent with the possibility of it going airborne. that is not an impossibility. people have compared it and said hiv has never gone airborne. that cannot happen. hiv cannot go airborne for a variety of scientific reasons. ebola can. it has an inherent capacity to
4:07 am
do that even though once again i must emphasize we have no evidence that that's how it's transmitted currently. >> so the folk just joining us this morning, the texas department of state health services tells us this morning that there is a second case of ebola confirmed in america. this person is a health care worker at texas health presbyterian hospital who provided care for the ebola patient we know now as thomas eric duncan. tested positive for ebola in a preliminary test at the state public health laboratory in austin. we'll continue to learn as much as we can about this. we know that the texas health resourc resources spokesperson confirmed that a press conference will happen at 8:30 eastern. so a little less than an hour and a half from now. dr. david sanders and elizabeth cohen, thank you both. we'll be speaking with you throughout the morning. >> thank you both. >> now we want to remind you thursday four of the nation's
4:08 am
busiest airports are going to join jfk is rolling out the new ebola screenings. this is an effort to prevent the deadly virus from getting through airport gates and into the general public. >> jfk became the first airport in the country to implement the new procedures yesterday. officials are targeting passengers traveling from hard hit countries, guinea, sierra leone and liberia. >> the cdc warns there is still a risk. >> no matter how many of these procedures are put into place, we can't get the risk to zero. >> officials say screening will impact about 150 travelers per day. >> passengers can expect to have their temperatures read by trained medical professionals and be asked questions about their travel history. >> we'll continue to follow the breaking news of the first case of ebola contracted inside the u.s. but we want to get you caught up on another big story as well.
4:09 am
>> besieged syrian town strangely quiet this morning we've been told. kobani, they've been under relentless attack by isis. the terrorist group is eyeing a key province in the south near baghdad. we're going live to the iraqi capital. stay close. if you can clear a table without lifting a finger... you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec®. muddle no more™.
4:10 am
4:11 am
into one you'll never forget. earn triple points when you book with the expedia app. expedia plus rewards. that are acidic...ds we all have risk of acid erosion. there's only so much enamel, and everybody needs to do something about it now if they want to preserve their teeth. i recommend pronamel. it helps strengthen the tooth and makes it more resistant to acid breakdown.
4:12 am
the isis threat in iraq and syria is growing this morning. >> the terror group is poised to take control of a huge stretch of territory from the perimeter of iraq's capital to northern syria. that is 350 mile. >> despite new u.s.-led air strikes overnight, isis fighters
4:13 am
are tightening grip on the syrian city of kobani. they also pose a threat to the vast anbar province. the leaders are pleaing for u.s. ground troops. a u.s. official says that is not going to happen. an air strike killed 30 suspected isis militants in the province yesterday. >> the new england washington insists baghdad is safe even with isis on the city's doorstep. we're covering this from multiple angles. ben wedeman is in the iraqi capital. erin mcpike is at the white house. given the situation in baghdad right now, do you feel the city -- do the people there feel the city is secure? >> no, they don't. but it's not a threat from outside from the possibility of isis forces invading or taking over the capital. the worry here is of things like car bombs. there were two car bomb last
4:14 am
night in the northern -- two northern suburbs, kill more than 40 people, wounding many others. and this is long been the concern of iraqi security forces. isis -- baghdad is not fertile territory for isis. it has a shia majority but there is a city where there are sleeper cells, people sympathetic to isis who ared to to conduct this bombing come pain in the iraqi capital. outside of the capital, the situation is increasingly grim. overnight the head of police in anbar province was killed in a roadside bombing. now ramadi, the city where he operated out of, is under a 24-hour occur to y24 24-hour kecurfew. isis has also surrounded the town of haditha on the euphrates
4:15 am
river. as we heard yesterday, the anbar council is appealing for american troops to be deployed in anbar. one of the head of the council telling us that he believes as many as 10,000 isis fighters have been dispatched to anbar from syria and northern iraq. so situation in baghdad very tense but stable in anbar very grim. >> all right. ben, you know, so erin, i want to go to you at the white house. he's talking about how they are some pleaing for u.s. troops. we have colonel rick francona and other experts who continually said throughout the weeks at some point there is going to be most likely need to be some sort of ground movement from a coalition perspective. is there any indication that the president is willing to switch his stance and consider u.s. troops? n. a coalition fashion to go
4:16 am
into iraq? >> no. the administration is not changing its stance that there will be no american ground troops. they have said over time that their duty to be coalition forces in some fashion and train iraqi and syrian forces, the syrian rebels, that is. but as far as the situation in baghdad, we are hearing from the administration that they are saying baghdad itself is safe despite the fact that much of iraq is seeing these problems and that anbar province specifically is a dire situation right now. but we did hear defense secretary chuck hagel push back on this a little bit. i want you to listen here to those comments. >> iraqi security forces are full control of baghdad, continue to strengthen their positions in baghdad. we continue to help them with air strikes, with our assistance
4:17 am
and our advisors which i have at the direction of president obama added to our numbers there. >> now remember that part of the reason that the situation in iraq is what it is right now is that president obama has said himself that these iraqi forces have not kept up their end of the bargain, that they've been weaker than they expected over the last ten years or so. i would also point out that remember that although there are not ground troops, there are american forces there on the ground in security roles and especially there in baghdad. >> all right. i want to ask you about that, ben. thank you, erin. there are -- at one point we know there were hundreds of u.s. citizens there, private contractors, diplomats in addition to the u.s. military personnel. based on what happens outside of baghdad, do you see any indication in a those people would have to be extricated from the city at some point?
4:18 am
>> not under the current circumstances. as i said, baghdad itself, the defenses seem to be fairly robust. we were on the western perimeter of the defensive belt around baghdad. and it does seem that there are adequate numbers of troops well aimed and well armed. we're told they're well trained. so the threat to baghdad is nor from the inside in terms of bombings to the car bombings that have become quite frequent. but at the moment it doesn't appear that there is any immediate threat to those americans at the u.s. embassy, the contractors or the u.s. advisors at the moment. >> all right, ben wedeman and erin mcpike, thank you both. >> of course, we're keeping a close eye on a new confirmed case of ebola in dallas.
4:19 am
>> yes, we learned this morning that a health care worker who treated thomas eric duncan has now contracted the virus. we'll have much more on that whether we come back. stay with us. i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn. because it gives me... zero heartburn! prilosec otc. the number 1 doctor-recommended frequent heartburn medicine for 9 straight years. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. it's about getting to the finish line. in life, it's how you get there that matters most. like when i found out i had a blood clot in my leg. my doctor said that it could travel to my lungs and become an even bigger problem. so he talked to me about xarelto®. >>xarelto® is the first oral prescription blood thinner proven to treat and help prevent dvt and pe that doesn't require regular blood monitoring or changes to your diet. for a prior dvt i took warfarin, which required routine blood testing and dietary restrictions. not this time. while i was taking xarelto®, i still had to stop racing, but i didn't have to deal with that blood monitoring routine.
4:20 am
>>don't stop taking xarelto®, rivaroxaban, unless your doctor tells you to. while taking xarelto®, you may bruise more easily and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. xarelto® may increase your risk of bleeding if you take certain medicines. xarelto® can cause serious bleeding, and in rare cases, may be fatal. get help right away if you develop unexpected bleeding, unusual bruising, or tingling. if you have had spinal anesthesia while on xarelto®, watch for back pain or any nerve or muscle related signs or symptoms. do not take xarelto® if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. tell your doctor before all planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions such as kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is proven to reduce the risk of dvt and pe, with no regular blood monitoring and no known dietary restrictions. treatment with xarelto® was the right move for me. ask your doctor about xarelto® today.
4:21 am
4:22 am
a single ember that escapes from a wildfire can travel more than a mile. that single ember can ignite and destroy your home or even your community you can't control where that ember will land only what happens when it does get fire adapted now at fireadapted.org breaking news on the second confirmed ebola case in the u.s. now. >> initial tests show a dallas health care worker who treated a
4:23 am
patient who died from ebola last week now has the virus. cnn global affairs analyst joins us live from washington. kimberly, this is the first case contracted in the u.s. it makes me think back to what we heard from the director of the cdc a couple years ago. i want to quote him accurately. "in the 30 years i've been working in public health, the only thing like this that i've seen has been aids." a lot of people think that is alarmist. a lot of hospitals are gearing up for what could be the second or third or more cases. >> groood morning. you know what? this tells me that u.s. health workers have to be on their game to stop this. now we don't know if this health worker came in contact with the patient before he was diagnosed or afterwards. but fit was before, what it outlines is that every health worker as patients are coming in
4:24 am
say with flu symptoms, malaria like symptoms, as the winter draws on, you're going to have a lot of coughs and colds. they have to think about every person that comes in with a fever, could this person be carrying ebola? and think about it even overseas in africa where health workers have been trained and are wearing some of the suits to help them protect themselves from the virus. the virus is being trans mitted there. it's going to happen back here. >> you know, we are reading this press release and they're saying that they're broadening their team in dallas. who do you think they may be bringing in in that regard? >> well, they're really going to have to knuckle down on training everyone who is in an emergency room setting who will be dealing with someone coming in, training them in how to maintain a certain distance from anyone who might have these symptoms. and the moment the symptoms are identified, then you have to
4:25 am
take measures like wiping everything down, just -- you're going to have to start presuming that someone may be infected with the ebola whereas before people would have thought oh, that's happening over there. the other thing this brings home to me is those thousands of u.s. troops who have gone in to build up a new health infrastructure system to combat ebola on the ground, it shows no matter how good your training sore what you're looking out for this virus can find a way to get through. >> you know, you use the phrase there that is happening over there. i want to pull that thread a little bit. up to this point we were talking about banning flights from these three countries that have been inflicted with this disease. and now this is the first case trans mitted inside the country. is that just a psychological difference that it's not contracted in liberia but in dallas? or do we expect to see logistical changes as well in response to that difference? >> well, i think the
4:26 am
psychological difference is important in that it will make this more serious for people back here. people that might have been thinking of this as happening overseas and there is a way to stop it simply by saying no traffic from these three different countries. you can't keep it over there. you got to start thinking about personal responsibility both in the hospitals and also just as a person traveling to and from those kind of places. what can i do to make sure i'm not helping transmitt this disease? and also, you know, it's also the scary part of this. this isn't airborne, but if you sneeze and that sneeze goes on a door knob, there is the technical possibility that virus has jumped. it is a lot scarier to me than hearing about the aids virus. >> yeah. and that's what we heard from
4:27 am
thomas creeden. he said we have to work now so this is not the world's next aids. speaking specifically about the response in the three countries have have been affected. we booked you to talk about isis, thank you for rolling with us to talk about the breaking news this morning. >> good to be with you. >> thank you. >> so what could cause -- talking about another big story happening this weekend, a usair jumbo jet to drop thousands of feet in just a matter of seconds? >> guess what? nervous moments caught on a passenger's cell phone. we're going to show that to you and explain. >> and we're continuing to follow the breaking news this morning, the second u.s. case of ebola, the first contracted inside the united states. ♪searching with devotion ♪for a snack that isn't lame ♪but this... ♪takes my breath away
4:28 am
dad,thank you mom for said this oftprotecting my future.you. thank you for being my hero and my dad. military families are uniquely thankful for many things, the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. if you're a current or former military member or their family, get an auto insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. are the largest targets in the world, for every hacker, crook and nuisance in the world. but systems policed by hp's cyber security team are constantly monitored for threats. outside and in. that's why hp reports and helps neutralize more intrusions than anyone... in the world. if hp security solutions can help keep the world's largest organizations safe, they can keep yours safe, too. make it matter.
4:29 am
narrator: these are the skater kid: whoa narrator: that got torture tested by teenagers and cried out for help. from the surprised designers. who came to the rescue with a brilliant fix male designer: i love it narrator: which created thousands of new customers for the tennis shoes that got torture tested by teenagers. the internet of everything is changing manufacturing. is your network ready?
4:30 am
ifyou may be muddlingble withrough allergies.nger... try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec®. muddle no more™. press your tonguenture, against it like this. it moves unlike natural teeth. do you feel it? it can happen with every denture. introducing new fixodent plus true feel. it helps keep dentures firmly in place. with a smooth formula, free of flavors and colorants. so you get a closer feeling to natural teeth. new fixodent plus true feel. fixodent. and forget it.

105 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on