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tv   New Day  CNN  October 17, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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nurse, nina pham, the first person to contract ebola inside the u.s. has been arrived at the nih in bethesda, maryland and released a stirring video message from before leaving her isolation unit at dallas health presbyterian. the cdc confirms fellow infected nurse, amber vinson may have been sick when she flew from ohio on monday. that means that health officials have to track down passengers on that flight. all of this as the nation's leading health officials came under heavy scrutiny at a fiery hearing on capitol hill. there's a lot going on this morning on the ebola front so our coverage begins in akron, ohio, with national correspondent susan candiotti. good morning, susan. >> good morning, alisyn and chris. here in northeast ohio, 12 people have been quarantined for having contact with nurse vinson. and health officials are putting a shout-out for anyone who might have had contact with vinson on
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saturday afternoon, when she was in a bridal shop for just three hours. meantime, we are also hearing from her fellow nurse, nina pham, for the very first time. overnight, the first critical care nurse to contract ebola arriving at the national institutes of health clinical center in maryland. 26-year-old nina pham, transferred from texas health presbyterian in part because of concerns about the limited number of qualified people to care for her. >> i'm really proud of you. >> for the first time we're hearing from pham while in isolation. the texas hospital releasing this video of a doctor thanking her for taking care of the now deceased liberian, thomas duncan. this on the heels of a shocking revelation -- that the second nurse to contract the virus may
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have a been feeling ill since she left dallas. flying to cleveland last friday. >> we can't rule out the fact that she might have had the start of her illness on friday. >> a federal official tells cnn 29-year-old amber vinson said she felt fatigue, muscle aches and malaise while she was in ohio and on the flight home. but, amber's uncle says, it's not true. >> she felt fine, she felt well until tuesday morning. >> the cdc now expanding their outreach to all passengers on board both frontier airlines flights, to and from cleveland. and anyone with potential risk will be actively monitored. vinson's family said she felt she put no one in danger and she called a texas health official, who told her the cdc said it was okay to fly. >> if in hindsight someone decides that there should have been flight restrictions, that's fine. but to misrepresent and to say
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restrictions were in place when they actually weren't, is inappropriate. >> it was while in ohio for a bridesmaids fitting, according to vinson's uncle where she first learned that nurse nina pham tested positive for the deadly disease. the bridal shop owner says vinson did not look sick at all. >> she was probably here, about three hours, maybe. i had no idea that anything was wrong with her. >> and this is interesting -- the bridal shop owner told me she had a personal visit again from health officials, to her home last night. and they went through a role-playing scenario with her where she demonstrated exactly how much interaction she had with nurse amber vinson. as a precaution, that store owner is closing her shop for the time being. back to you, alisyn. >> nerve-wracking for her, we're sure, susan candiotti, thank you very much. texas health presbyterian hospital says transferring the
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two nurses for specialized ebola treatment is the right move. this as another nurse who works there should administrators should be ashamed. she said she and her colleagues were asked to treat thomas eric duncan without the proper equipment or training. cnn's elizabeth cohen is following the developments from dallas, what's the latest there? >> there are no more ebola patients here, alisyn. one transferred out last night and the other transferred out the night before. at a congressional hearing yesterday, a hospital executive was grilled about how prepared this hospital was to treat ebola patients. >> your hospital received the first cdc health advisory about ebola on july 28th. was this information given to your emergency room personnel and was there any actual person-to-person training at texas presbyterian for the staff at that time? yes or no? >> was given to the emergency department. >> was there actual training?
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>> no. >> now, in a press release yesterday, the hospital said it was best for everyone if the nurses were transferred out. now, a cdc doctor who spent time in this hospital told me, this hospital is two-thirds empty because people are scared to come here. because of ebola. certainly that is an untenable situation for the hospital to do for very long. obviously they are losing money. the hospital says they wanted to transfer the nurses out to prepare for what might come next. certainly, cdc director tom friedan has said don't be surprised if there are more ebola patients who took care of thomas eric duncan at this hospital. chris? >> that's a very important point that you made there, elizabeth. two-thirds empty. just goes to show that confidence often follows competence and that hospital has to show it can take care of the situation and that will really flow through to a lot. thank you for the reporting this morning, appreciate it. a big part of this situation is becoming political, right? and the politics of this may be
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shifting. president obama is now says he will consider appointing a czar to oversee the government's response to the scary virus, the real place to fight ebola is in africa of course. and the president is authorizing the deployment of the national guard to west africa, but is standing firm against a travel ban. he said he's not philosophically opposed to one. let's figure out what that means. let's bring in senior washington correspondent joe johns from the white house with the latest. >> two or three headlines from the white house overnight on the issue of ebola. the president meeting with his team, talking in an extended session with reporters in front of a camera saying that it is a good idea, at least to consider someone to spearhead the efforts against ebola. the other headline i think that's important is the issue of a travel ban. the president as you said, did not think it is something that he is philosophically opposed to. nonetheless, he said, he does think that at this stage, the
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united states government should stay with the issue of screening. screening people who are coming in and out of the country. because there are concerns here at the white house, and elsewhere, that people who want to come from the hot zone into the united states, might actually go underground. underground. so that they won't be detected. when they want to come to the united states. the third issue is the issue of reservists. the president has signed an executive order now, allowing up to 4,000 individuals from the national guard, from the reservists to be made available to the pentagon, to be sent to africa, to deal with the situation. they have not set any type of a timetable for those people to go. nonetheless, they want to make that available so that the pentagon can do some planning. chris? >> all right, joe, thank you very much for keeping us on the latest. let's do some more discussion about what this all means, alisyn. >> we have learned this morning that a health worker who may have, that's a quote, handled
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lab specimens from thomas eric duncan has been self-monitoring on board a cruise ship in the caribbean. the state department says the person has of ebola. what's going on here? how can the virus be contained if the people who may have been exposed are traveling the world? joining us to discuss all of this is dr. amish adulja, a expert from the infectious disease society of america and the regional school of public health, dr. joseph mccormick, he helped investigate the first ebola epidemic in central africa. dr. mccormick, let me start with you. someone is on a cruise ship, that is as we know a petry dish. w how do you feel about that? >> the whole issue of self-monitoring is very disappointing. those people who have been in contact with material specimens or with the patient should have
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been under active monitoring and certainly should have been under travel ban. >> dr. adalja, is it time for anyone from texas presbyterian to stop traveling? >> i really think that we don't really know what happened with this infection control lapse and this exposure may be much wider, because dr. friedan is thinking we may expect more health care workers to test positive. so i think everybody at texas health presbyterian has to assess their exposure risks to mr. duncan's body fluids and they should be self-monitoring and not moving around. >> if it's up to the person to think about their exposure and to decide on their own, that's why we're having all of these inconsistencies, isn't it? does there need to be a rule? >> right, right. i think what we do need to think about doing that from, with an official through an official decr decree, maybe by the hospital or the local health authorities. until we understand exactly what
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the breach was and know how many people really are at risk. right now it hasn't been announced how the nurses were infected. >> so i want to talk about amber vinson, she's the second nurse from dallas to be diagnosed. because there are conflicting reports about what her condition was on the plane when she came back from cleveland to dallas. so this morning, there are some official who is say that she was experiencing symptoms while she was in cleveland. let me tell you what those were. they say she felt fatigue, she felt muscle ache and she felt malaise. help us understand this, dr. mccormick. those symptoms are not any that emit body fluids. if she was feeling malaise and muscle aches, is she contagious or not? >> no. and i think that's what we have to remember. this -- and i think the fundamental issue is, you are at risk when you are in contact with bodily fluids from someone who is overtly ill. so does that mean you don't have initial symptoms when you start to develop ebola?
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of course you do. but that doesn't mean you're infectious, and let's just keep in context here, that i think sunday is the final 21 days for all of those people, who were in contact with mr. duncan before he was admitted to the hospital. >> his family and friends. >> and the people who were at the hospital. that he was seen, who saw him in the emergency room. >> the first time. >> that's right. the first time. none of those people have become infected. i think we have to all remember that. >> dr. adalja, this is what her uncle, amber vinson's uncle, disputes the reports that she was symptomatic and feeling sick on her flight back from cleveland to dallas. here's what he told don lemon last night. >> amber has directly told me, is that she felt fine, that she felt well until tuesday morning. tuesday morning she woke up,
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felt that she should take herself in. she checked her temperature, it was actually below the threshold. she was 100.3. >> see, dr. adalja, this is what's so confuse together average american. then why, if as dr. mccormick says, nobody needs to be worried if she wasn't if there were no bodily fluids on the plane, nobody needs to be worried. why then are officials contacting everyone on the plane to make sure that they now start self-monitoring? >> there's a generalized panic. these are two health care worker infections that shouldn't have occurred. as dr. mccormick said, she wasn't infectious, because the symptoms that she was having weren't ones that caused her to emit body fluids, that's the only way you can get infected with ebola. what you're seeing is people going above and beyond, because they're trying to quell the general panic going on in the population. understandably. because there are, is conflicting messages,
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legitimatemy, thelegitimate ly, because the story keeps shifting. >> herein lies the rub, are we kwelg public panic by contacting everyone on the plane and by the ripple effect that stems from one of these cases? or are we helping? are we helping or hurting? >> i think the answer is yes. because for some people, we're going to be calming them down. for other people, they're going to continue to have panic, because they look at pictures from west africa, and they're terrified. >> other people are going to be reassured. >> we thank you for all the information, thank you so much for being here. >> let's go over to michaela for more. vice president joe biden's son was discharged from the navy back in february after sources say he tested positive for cocaine. hunter biden has released a statement admitting that he is embarrassed by his actions and that he respects the navy's decision, but he is not
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specifically addressing why he was discharged. the 44-year-old is now a managing partner at an investment firm. isis on the president's agenda this afternoon. he will hold a closed-door meeting with the vice president and the national security council. in recent days the u.s. has ramped up air strikes against the terrorist group. as part of operation inherent resolve. sources tell cnn the recent action has helped kurdish fighters gain ground in kobani. the new york city medical examiner revealing the official cause of death for joan rivers. a therapeutic complication during surgical procedures. the 81-year-old comedienne died from brain damage caused by a lack of oxygen. since rivers' death was not classified a homicide this could complicate efforts to bring criminal charges against the doctors who performed the procedures. cheering coming from the west -- the san francisco giants are going to the world series, winning the national league pennant in dramatic fashion.
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a three-run walk-off home run by ishikawa, the giants take the nlcs in five games, facing the american league champion, kansas city royals in game one of the world series tuesday night in kansas city. go gigantes. >> we have a little bit of a situation here. luckily i'm out of it. >> you're in the middle. >> you got perrera from the west coast, sympathies are obvious, but you got camerota's husband from kansas city is wearing royal blue. >> i didn't realize that this was going to be a source of tension. >> it's happening. but the thing is, we love each other despite this. >> chris wants to stir it up. >> my husband son his own. >> see how women do this? take my hand. see how we do this. we violated man law, i appreciate that. >> the giants win the pennant, and it's one of the most famous
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lines in sports announcing, from back in the day. the giants win the pennant. it was big on m.a.s.h., the tv show, i look forward to the tension. meanwhile, nurses in texas are outraged by what they call a lack of protocol in the hospital where two colleagues contracted ebola. are health care workers getting what they need to stay safe? we'll ask the head of the nurse's union. and hospital officials made their case and got angry responses if members of congress. this isn't just about outrage, it's about facts. and we have an interview with the woman you just saw, the whistle-blowing nurse, who said texas health presbyterian violated quote, the basic principles of medical care. is she at risk of losing her job? i've had surgery, and yes, i have occasional constipation.
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and runny nose. ♪do the walk of life ♪yeah, you do the walk of life need to lower your blood sugar? ask your doctor about farxiga and visit our website to learn how you may be able to get every month free. welcome back, nina pham, the first nurse who contracted ebola from thomas eric duncan arrived overnight at the national institutes of health in maryland to continue her treatment. and right now, it looks good. she walked onto the plane herself. that's a good sign. it comes on the heels of explosive comments from another nurse, claiming texas health presbyterian hospital did not follow protocols, if they even
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had protocols in the first place. the hospital of course flatly denies that take. pam cipriani is the president of the american nurse's association and joins us this morning from washington, d.c. it's good to have you with us this morning. we don't want to get caught up too much in just one hospital. so let me start this by asking the question that may matter more. do you think that texas presbyterian is that different from the situation that hospitals all over this country would have found themselves in, if they had been hit with a case of ebola out of the blue? >> i don't think they're significantly different. think without any of us having firsthand experience with treating an ebola patient. there was bound to be some type of learning curve. >> i'm sure you're hearing it much more. but we are hearing from nurses and health care workers all over the country who are saying -- hey, we're just starting to get ready now. we weren't getting ready before. we didn't have any hazmat suits,
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i don't know what to do they're just starting to talk to us about it. did we get caught by surprise? >> over the last few months, again, hospitals have begun preparing. think you're absolutely right. the training is ramping up. we all know a lot more than we did know a couple of weeks ago. but i think it's important to recognize, too, that the initial screening tools and the ability to assess a patient coming into our emergency departments and clinics was really the first wave of training that was necessary. and then waves of training for those individuals that would then care for patient that we've truly believed would need to be tested and then ruled out as positive for ebola. so it's unrealistic to think that every single individual in every hospital would have been trained by now. >> the proof is in the pudding, also, right, pam? you now hear about hospitals all over the country, doing more in doing more in what they're doing, obviously it's in response to what happened in texas. obviously they weren't ready themselves, right? we definitely have been learning, and the american
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nurse's association has been in close contact with the cdc. we're calling for very clear guidelines, making sure that we know exactly what changes need to occur. additional recommendations on the extent of personal protective equipment. because we've learned that the two really important ingredients are again, screening patients, putting them in isolation as quickly as we believe there might be any risk and adequate education and practice, so that individuals know how to use the protective equipment. and make sure that we do have full body coverage. >> let's talk about brianna aguerre specifically and what she says about texas presbyterian. does it concern you that the hospital management is fighting back against what she says? >> our goal is really to make sure that staff feel very comfortable talking with their management. you know, again i think everyone's stress level is probably extremely high. everyone is concerned that if there was not adequate training, it put nursings and other front-line procedures in harm's
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way. this is a good hospital. i hope that they have been able to open the dialogue and will continue to resolve any kind of conflict swiftly. this is a really important way for to us make sure that nurses' needs are heard and at the same time we're keeping them safe and they can safely take care of other patients. >> if you were working in texas presbyterian, would you feel confident to treat someone with ebola? >> i believe they have also learned and have begun or already put in place the requirements that are necessary to safely care for a patient. but again, we would want to have that group on a daily basis talking about what are the precautions? how well, how comfortable are the staff? do they feel they've had the training. if not, i believe they would have a responsibility to stop, regroup, make sure that everyone is prepared. and if not, defer taking any additional patients. >> do you believe everybody has to be ready is a really workable way to do this or should we have specialized centers like some of the bigger states are doing now.
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like new york is going to pick a certain number of hospitals and have those set up and ready to go. but everybody has to be able to diagnose, but not necessarily treat. is that the smarter way to go? >> this is a public health issue. and so there has to be a level of readiness. again, being able to screen individuals who come in. have you traveled from west africa, do you have a fever? what other symptoms do you have? that initial front-door readiness, i think has to be in place in all institutions. just because we know we get better with practice and experience. i believe there will be continuing discussion about whether we need to have a limited number of facilities, whether it's one in each state or in specific regions. i think still under discussion. our hope really as you can imagine, is that there is a small number of patients who end up having ebola in this country. so that we won't really have to worry about every institution dealing with a patient coming across their threshold. >> it's the secondary infections we're really worried about. if you break it down.
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it's not that we're going to see a lot of people coming into the country with ebola. it's that will our health care providers, workers, get hurt, get infected by treating them. and what matters most is the confidence of the men and women who will be doing that work. where is your membership on this? what are you hearing? how shaken are they? >> i think everyone is concerned. however, what we do know, and this has been reinforced, is if we have really thorough education, and we're using a buddy system and we're training where people actually are practicing putting on and taking off the personal protective equipment appropriately and that we have full body coverage, then we've proven in places like emory and nebraska, and nih and montana, that patients can be safely taken care of. we've been using universal precautions for years to prevent the spread of other deadly diseases. we've done that well. ebola has created some different challenges because of the lack of clarity initially about the extent of body protection that
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was needed. and as you've said, you know, what we found is there was probably a delay in training and perhaps not really recognizing the seriousness with which we needed to ramp up from basic, what we call droplet precautions to a higher level of protection. >> we're certainly dealing with it now and we see the facts, nigeria figured out how to do it. they figured how to do it safely in tents in west africa. certainly the united states should be able to do it and not have to learn it on the job, pam cipriani, thank you very much. stay in touch with us about your membership. >> thank you. it comes down to the big interview with the nurse from texas presbyterian who gave a very different sense of reality of what was going on in that hospital. >> chris there are shocking charges from a nurse in texas who cared for the ebola-stricken colleague. she says she sounded the alarm bells, but hospital supervisors ignored her warnings. wait until you hear what she told cnn about ebola-contaminated waste in the
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hospital hallways. and a powerful category 4 hurricane packing 144-mile-per-hour winds barrelling toward bermuda. the island could take a direct hit this afternoon. we're tracking it.
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half past the hour, here's a look at your headlines. breaking overnight -- hundreds of police in hong kong storming the site where pro democracy
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protesters have camped out now for weeks. they were armed with wire cutters and riot shields, those police tore down tents and dismantled barricades. our cnn team on the ground said most protesters did not put up a fight. it's unclear how the actions will affect talks ongoing on long-term reforms, which could begin again next week. oscar pistorius will learn his sentence on tuesday. for killing his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. the legal battle wrapped up this morning for prosecutors calling for ten years in prison for the former olympian. the defense argues pistorius' disability would make him vulnerable in prison. famed author, john grisham now apologizing for comments he made to a british newspaper concerning child pornography and sex offenders. grisham sparked outrage with his remarks about overly harsh prison sentences in cases involving child pornography. now in a statement on his facebook page. grisham said he never intended
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to show sympathy for those convicted of sex crimes, especially the molestation of children. tell you about something that is happening once in a million years this event will unfold near mars this weekend, a comet, the size of a mountain, is expected to come within a scant 87,000 miles of the red planet. the comet, called sighting spring, will travel at 126,000 miles per hour. which i believe is over the speed limit. it is making its first known visit to our solar system. nasa's robotic explorers are positioned to protect themselves and witness the incoming comet. officials aren't sure what they'll be able to capture because there will be all of this cosmic dust kicked up from the comet's tail. you might be aebl to see it with a telescope if you're in the southern hemisphere. once in a million. >> those are pictures? they look like a bob ross painting. >> well, also. >> what is the solar speed limit?
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>> it depends on who you ask? >> hard to get pulled over. back to the latest in the ebola crisis. two of three people in spain who were thought to have had the virus have tested negative but they will be quarantined and tested again just to be safe. as others await results. our nic robertson is in madrid with more. what's the latest in spain, nic? >> one of the people awed mitted to the homt yesterday, a third person, missionary who had been in liberia, no results back from the test that he had. he had ebola fever-like symptoms tland is also another person, another aid worker, working for the red cross in the canary islands, admitted to hospital yesterday. spanish health officials say still waiting for test results to come back on him. two people living with him also at the hospital in the canary islands under observation.
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at the moment, it looks like two people here, first test negative. still waiting in a couple of days to see what the second tests will look like. chris? >> all right, nic, thank you very much. we'll check back in with you. so you let us know what's going on over there. over here, a little more to the east than south, there's a big hurricane bearing down. specifically on bermuda. let's get to chad myers. how hard will it hit? where will it hit? and then what? >> i see the eye going right over the island nation of bermuda. here's a live shot here from ptz tv.com. you can see the wind blowing some of the trees, we're still hundreds of miles away from where this storm is going to make landfall. something else i'm watching this morning, chris, is the eye seems to be getting smaller. think of an ice skater at the olympics when she pulls her arms in, she spins faster. we could get more spin. like they need that, the wind is 130 miles per hour here. the waves are 40 feet high, the storm surge will be at least ten
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feet from all directions. moving right over bermuda as either a category 4 where we are now, 130 miles per hour, and the forecast is for it to die a few miles per hour. but 115. here's exactly what bermuda looks like. here's the island nation of bermuda. for a while as the eye goes over the island, we're going to get waves from this way. and then as the eye goes by, the waves are going to be coming from this way. so both sides of the island will get surge. certainly there will be damage in bermuda. we don't know how much. if the eye tightens up it will be significantly worse. >> all right. chad, we'll be watching it. you always have to. even if it doesn't hit, the effects usually go beyond what's expected. so chad, thank you very much. there are some stunning charges from the whistle-blowing nurse who cared for an ebola-infected colleague at texas presbyterian hospital. you need to hear both sides of this. you heard from the management yesterday. her accusations about the hospital and readiness in general? pretty stunning. we have an interview with her, up ahead, she's very emotional. you'll want to see it.
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{door unlocking} hey, what's up? (door closing) how's it going? what are you doing? i can't believe you're watching this without me. we agreed we'd catch up on everything tonight. if i did this to you, you'd murder me in my sleep. you know what? just watch it by yourself. (sighs) i can't not know when i know that you know. the latest episodes of the top 100 shows are preloaded and ready to watch with xfinity on demand. we still can't be sure what
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was really going on. inside texas health presbyterian hospital. we heard one version from management yesterday before congress, right? now you can hear from a staffer who helped treat ebola patient there and fellow nurse, nina pham. she is brianna aguerre. she said the hospital did not give staff training or even give them adequate protection. she tells anderson cooper when she finally did get hazmat gear, it left a big chunk of her neck exposed. take a listen. >> you were involved in the treatment of nina pham. what was that like? what was the protective gear that you yourself wore? >> on the day that i took care of her, it was my first time being involved and in the care of any potential or confirmed ebola case in my hospital. and you know, they asked me if i had been in there, if i had been trained. and i said no, i have not.
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>> what was the gear they gave you? >> i went over there, i had the infectious disease department and some representative from the cdc there telling us what to put on. and they were going over the different changes they made. because you know, they before they were putting on three pairs of gloves, now they were putting on two. and they were saying, this is the system, we've moved to now. and it was, it was a tyvex suit. a white, tyvex suit. what i assume was a hazmat suit. it was only available in one size, it didn't fit us all and other people were given yellow dupont suits. and i'm not sure which one is superior to another. they're not exactly designed the same. but depending on your size, you know, you had to fit which one, get which one fit you.
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so we had that suit on. a pair of surgical boot covers, just cover your shoes and then a taller pair of surgical boot covers that go up to either mid calf or almost to my knee. and then we had on a pair of long gloves, about to here, taped to the tyvex suit. and then another pair of long gloves on over the top of that. so a total of two. we had a hood on. over our head. both types of suits had a hood that just went around here. and it came to a zip at the base of our necks. we had on a papper machine, a form of airborne isolation. that is a machine you hook around your waist. it leads by a tube up to a hood. that sits on the base, the crown of your head and goes, covers
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your face with a shield and goes under your chin. and then because the zipper of the suit was a, a source of you know, contamination, we had an apron on covering that zipper seam, so no bodily fluids or anything could penetrate that and go to our underlayer of clothing. >> but your neck, was your neck exposed? >> absolutely. >> yes. >> what part of your neck? >> well the zipper ended about here on me. and the hood ended about hee on me. and you know, this part right here made a triangle that was open. it was, it was completely open. and the very first time that they were instructing me how to put this on, is exactly the point when i said -- why would my neck be exposed? i just told them, why would an
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area so close to my mouth and my nose, why would that be exposed? and they didn't have an answer. >> was there any follow-up when you raised objections? to what is clearly a ridiculous situation, a dangerous situation? >> i immediately felt like it was ridiculous. and i immediately posed the same question that you're posing to me, you know, asking me right now. i said -- why? why? what explanation can you give me or anyone about why we would be in the second week of an ebola crisis in our hospital, and we don't even have the same equipment or protection that's given to sanitation workers that have no contact with patients at all? and they said, we know, we've ordered it. >> i can't believe their response was, we've ordered it. that's inexcusable. >> two weeks? i could have, not to be taken lightly, but i'm sure i could have ordered that on amazon prime and had it in two days. it's outrageous. and the most outrageous part about it is, is that every time
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i think about the facts that i'm saying right now, i just know that the nurses that have been infected -- they were dealing with the same equipment while they were dealing with so much more than i dealt with personally. and they put their lives on the line and without the proper equipment. and there's nothing -- >> you believe nurse pham was wearing that kind of equipment when she was exposed? >> i know she was. because the, the equipment we needed was still on order. >> still on order. >> she's asking all the right questions, raising all the right red flags, but it has not been resolved, obviously. >> she's very emotional, you can understand why. >> you know how it is, if you have ever been around hospital workers, they're very tight. they're doing some of the most difficult work imaginable and lean heavily on each other. two problems, one is the exposure. the second is did you hear all the layers.
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it's great until you have to take them off. that's why it's so complicated. you're exhausted and dealing with very specific margins of error and they're very small. >> coming up, we'll talk to somebody who has been very critical of the cdc guidelines. health care workers and airline employees have been finding themselves on the front lines in the battle to stop ebola. are companies headed for a slew of lawsuits?
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welcome back, we've learned a health care worker who may have handled lab specimens from thomas eric duncan in texas has been self-monitoring on board a cruise ship in the caribbean. the state department said the person has so far known shown no signs of ebola and dealt with the sample almost three weeks ago. three weeks ago sunday. the government contacted authorities in belize to make them aware. tough legal questions need to be answered as hospitals, airlines and cruise ships and other big industries face fallout associated with ebola. mel robbins, cnn commentator and legal analyst and mary sciavo, cnn aviation analyst and former inspector-general for the u.s. department of transportation, the perfect people to discuss it all. i think i want to play a little bit of sound. we heard that really emotional sound from anderson cooper talking to brianna aguirre, the
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nurse. her attorney addresses this question, mel, of legal protection for whistle-blowers in texas. take a listen. >> the whistle-blower protection laws in texas are not that strong. that's why what i would really like to be able to avoid any kind of litigation or any lawsuit. if i could, i'm making a public request to jim burke, the president of the hospital to contact you, anderson, go on record and say, look, we recognize that this nurse is a hero. and her job is in no way in jeopardy as a result of what happened. >> so, mel, could her job be in jeopardy? she faced getting fired and would the hospital have to face the blow-back for doing that? >> yeah, you know, good morning, michaela. good morning, mary. bob kelly, the guy you just heard from is one of the top malpractice, medical malpractice and whistle-blower attorneys in the country. he's based in florida and he's absolutely right. first of all, the whistle-blower
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statute in texas only applies if you're a government employee. and she's working for a private entity hospital. that has union laws involved. but michaela, here's something that's interesting -- there is protection for health care workers. but only if they're reporting a violation of the law. so it's not clear here, and this attorney is very, very smart to go the pr angle. >> we heard that the nurse said, she doesn't feel they had the proper equipment. that it was on order. do they have any legal -- repercussions that can be taken on their behalf? >> you know, this is, i think we're in new territory here. the fact that it's on order, the fact that the crisis was kind of unfolding, the fact that this is not willful behavior. that it sounds like it's negligent behavior, i think makes it more difficult to prove, too michaela. >> let's talk to transportation. mary, i'll talk airlines in a
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second. but the new news of a patient aboard carnival cruise ship, who was a lab supervisor at texas presbyterian, is on board that cruise ship and is self-quarantined. it brings up the question, should we be asking these people not to be traveling at all? and wasn't that sort of put in place? wasn't that suggestion already made? >> well, absolutely. we should stop travel. because there are two components to it. it's not just everyone on the cruise ship is now going to get ebola. we know that's not going to happen. or everybody on the planes to and from cleveland. i mean that's not going to happen. some people are at risk, perhaps, but what is going to happen and what we know for sure now for every one person, we have the numbers now, for the young woman who flew to cleveland, the cdc is now searching for 300 people. and that can expand exponentially. if the gentleman were to get sick on the cruise ship, we would searching not for 300
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people, but more likely 3,000-plus people. so the travel ban serves to keep people from getting sick, and also stop a cries nis the transportation industry, from monitoring everybody, because it expands exponentially. >> and to tap the brakes on the fear factor. let's look at the science, unless the people are in the height of showing symptoms, they're not going to sicken people. >> well, that's what the science tells us. you know, like i said, i can't help but notice that a lot of the people who had the protective suits are the ones getting sick. so the public doesn't trust a lot of the information. so stopping the fear is also part of that. you do that by eliminating the risk. you say look we've put a travel ban in place. 21 days, if we were to stop this, we have stop it now. somebody has to get control of this. people would know, people are not traveling who have been exposed to the virus. right now we have no way of knowing that. and if the world health organization is right, and the
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cases at least in africa are going to increase to 5,000 to 10,000 a week. we could without a travel ban, we could be looking at a lot of people here and every country in africa has instituted a travel ban. >> the president saying yesterday that he doesn't have a philosophical objection necessarily to a travel ban, if it's the thing that's going to keep americans safe. i want to talk about one of the aspects here, mel, we've got a lot of people, if you're looking at potential contacts. i think about those people as potentially being people that could have legal recourse, you've got people that clean the ambulance. you've got the hospital workers that are removing the waste. not just the health care workers. but there's a whole list of people. are there structures in place that, that give, allow these people some sort of legal avenue? >> well, let's talk about texas first, okay? and when we're talking about travel bans as with a way to allay fears, i hope we're not talking about travel bans for health care workers in dallas
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that have come in contact with anybody that has ebola. that's number one. number two, medical malpractice laws in texas are extremely tough, michaela. you have to prove that there was willful and wanton conduct on behalf of the medical workers. so unless you can prove that doctors or that hospitals or that anybody was acting willfully in the way in which they handled these, mr. duncan or the two new nurses that have been diagnosed, there is no medical malpractice claim that's going to be successful in court in the state of texas, michaela. >> interesting conversation to have with us, thanks so much, mell and mary. our appreciation. we're following a lot of different angles on what's going on with ebola. a lot of other news as well, what do you think? >> let's get to it. >> all right. nina pham has arrived here at the national institutes of health. >> amber vinson may have already been showing symptoms when she
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boarded that flight from dallas to ohio. >> after multiple calls to the cdc said that it was okay for her to fly. >> i understand the people are scared. >> president barack obama signals openness to appointing an ebola czar. >> we are taking this very seriously at the highest levels. >> do we know whether or not the protocol works? >> i'm so tired of hearing their explanations that don't mean anything to anyone. >> was there actual training? >> no. good morning, everyone, welcome back to "new day," i'm alisyn camerota joined by chris cuomo. critical new developments in the battle to contain ebola. infected dallas nurse, nina pham has been transferred overnight to the national institutes of health in maryland. before she left, she recorded a tearful video from inside her texas isolation unit. >> look at what life was like for her there. some good news for her -- as well, i mean when she walked on to the plane herself, that's good. it looks like she is doing well in her fight. but there is troubling news on
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the other infected nurse. the cdc now confirms pham's colleague, amber vinson may have been showing ebola symptoms as early as last friday when she flew from texas to ohio. remember, we had only been looking at the flight coming back. that means every passenger on that plane as well as the passengers on that return flight monday now have to be contacted. this is leading to more scrutiny, the cdc director, the man on your screen, dr. tom friedan, he took a pounding on capitol hill about the cdc's response. the question is, is this just about heat? or will there be some light and change? let's start our coverage of the ebola situation this morning in akron, ohio, with national correspondent susan candiotti. susan, what do we know? >> good morning, chris, well here in northeast ohio, at this hour, a dozen people are quarantined because of contact with nurse amber vinson and there is this -- health officials are also looking for anyone else who might have had contact with vinson during a three-hour visit to a bridal
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shop on saturday. health officials would like to talk with them. and there is new information about fellow ebola nurse, nina pham. we are hearing from letter for the very first time. overnight, the first critical care nurse to contract ebola arriving at the national institutes of health clinical center in maryland. 26-year-old nina pham, transferred from texas health presbyterian in part because of concerns about the limited number of qualified people to care for her. >> and for the first time, we're hearing from pham while in isolation. the texas hospital releasing this video of a doctor thanking her for taking care of the now-deceased liberian, thomas duncan. >> this on the heels of a shocking revelation -- that the second nurse to contract the
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virus may have been feeling ill since she left dallas. flying to cleveland last friday. >> we can't rule out the fact that she might have had the start of her illness on friday. >> a federal official tells cnn 29-year-old amber vinson said she felt fatigue, muscle aches and malaise while she was in ohio and on the flight home. but amber's uncle says, it's not true. >> she felt fine, she felt well until tuesday morning. >> the cdc now expanding their outreach, to all passengers on board both frontier airlines flights, to and from cleveland. and anyone with potential risk will be actively monitored. vinson's family said she felt she put no one in danger and called a texas health official who told her the cdc said it's okay to fly. >> if in hindsight someone decides there should have been flight restrictions, that's fine. but to miss resperepresent and
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restrictions were in place when they actually weren't, is inappropriate. >> it was while in ohio for a bridesmaids fitting, according to vinson's uncle where she first learned fellow nurse, nina pham, tested positive for the deadly disease. the bridal shop owner says vinson did not look sick at all. >> she was probably here, probably about three hours, maybe. i had no idea that anything was wrong with her. >> and that store owner last night telling me that health department officials came to her home, chris, because they wanted to do a role-playing scenario, asking the shop owner to show them exactly how she interacted with nurse vinson. exactly what happened there. and the health department is offering to clean up the store if they decide that it's necessary. the shop is now closed, being closed by the shop's owner, only as a precaution. chris? >> as you know, susan, they're balancing trying to be safe with
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how the broader circle makes people even more fearful. so it's a very tricky situation. thank you for the reporting, we'll check back with you. now officials at texas health presbyterian hospital say they are keeping close tabs on workers who came into contact with thomas eric duncan. but even after two infected nurses were transferred for specialized treatment, one of their colleagues is blasting those same hospital administrators. so let's get to cnn's elizabeth cohen, following developments from dallas. elizabeth, competence and confidence go together and questioning what the management says is going to be part of this. and we're certainly hearing it from this nurse. >> yes, this nurse is certainly telling us there were problems inside this hospital. that they didn't have proper protocol and even when nurses spoke up and said they didn't feel protected, that they weren't listened to. and at a congress hearing yesterday, lawmakers grilled the executive hered a he admitted there was no training for, to
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treat ebola patients. now, in doing this transfer, the hospital said they did it for several reasons. they said it created an opportunity to prepare for what might come next. they were vague about that, but certainly cdc director tom friedan has said, don't be surprised if more hospital workers come down with ebola. and chris, you know, another reason why they might have wanted to transfer these patients out, a cdc doctor who worked inside this hospital tells me -- that hospital is two-thirds empty. financially that's a huge hit. i'm sure that the hospital wants things to go back to normal. they want people to stop being scared to come here to be treated for other diseases. chris? >> they have to be honest about what they did there, so they can get better and hopefully hospitals around the country are learning from the mistakes that were made. thank you for the reporting. in washington, d.c., president obama reconsidering his stance on an ebola czar. saying it could make sense. he's also authorizing deployment for the national guard to west africa. but he is not agreeing to a
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travel ban. despite growing calls from lawmakers, including a thursday's tense hearing on capitol hill. cnn's senior washington correspondent, joe johns is live for us with the latest developments. good morning, joe. >> you know the president has been not been able to get his choice for surgeon general through the confirmation process, so on capitol hill. that's been cited by some as a reason why he might want to appoint a czar. even though the surgeon-general typically has been seen as more of a figurehead position. nonetheless, the president now saying he thinks it might be a good idea in there to check all the boxes. listen. >> i may make sense for us to have one person in part, just so that after this initial surge of activity, we can have a more regular process just to make sure that we're crossing all the t's and dotting all the i's. >> on the issue of a travel ban on people coming here from the
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hot zone, the president says he's not philosophically opposed to that idea. however, he thinks the procedures already in place for screening of people coming to this country from there, might be better there have been some who have expressed the position that those coming from the hot zone might actually try to go underground. to avoid detection in the event they're actually was a travel ban. one more note, the president has now signed an executive order allowing as many as 4,000 reservists to travel to west africa, to try to deal with the crisis. there's no timetable on that nonetheless, it gives the pentagon the option and makes it a possibility for them to start planning for the future, when they do send some or all of those people to africa. back to you. >> good to know. >> that's for you, chris. >> i was so moved by what he was saying. good to know that they're doing more on the african side of this, the question is what are we going to be doing on the u.s. side. they don't seem as sure of a plan there. let's bring in congressman tim
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murphy, a republican from pennsylvania and the chairman of the house subcommittee that held thursday's hearing on ebola. and let's also bring in chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta. from the cnn center in atlanta. simply because sanjay always is helpful. so it's good to have both of you. congressman, let me start with you. a couple of questions quickly. you beat up on the management of the hospital yesterday. they probably deserved it. it made for good theater. but it's also as we see in the hearings, often more heat than light. what did you learn yesterday and what are you going to do with that knowledge? >> well actually for the hospital administrator, i think it was helpful that he said look, there was some mistakes being made and i didn't hear that same thing from the cdc and other federal agencies, think there are mistakes being made. i don't agree with the issue of travel restrictions would cause people to necessarily go underground. because that's saying people would be deceptive. and the issue is right now, i think we're prone to people being deceptive, perhaps being deceptive to get into this country. secondly, i don't think the screening taking place right now is going to work.
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on all levels, someone could take an analgesic and change their temperature for a while. it could change their body temperature and mr. duncan's temperature was below that line, as was the nurse. so i still think with regard to quarantines, restricting travel, for people who have been exposed to someone with ebola, i didn't hear the cdc being willing to move on that. governors are in states where now people are traveling to. but i love it if the cdc would do more of those important steps. >> so the question then becomes, what do you want done? the governors are in charge. this is complicated. we ignore it a lot. but for the purpose of this conversation, you know the cdc doesn't have big teeth when it comes to telling states what to do. that's changed over time. states are much more in control. but they're also desperate for guidance on this, because they're afraid of being the next texas. so what specifically would you recommend be done by the cdc, by the white house? what are your ideas, congressman? >> well, the travel ban
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quarantines. we asked the cdc repeatedly. i talked with dr. friedan about this, tell us what other authority you need that congress needs to grant you. tell us if there's any other advance of funds we can move forward? what authority does the health and human secretary now have to move funds where they need to move? let's speed up the advancement of vaccines and other treatments for ebola so it doesn't get caught up in the multi-year process as we go through. we laid out eight different proposals there for cdc to act on. and i think that those are things that the president can do by executive order. secretaries can do by executive order and if they need to call congress back to do it let's do it. >> if the president does it, don't sue him over it, congressman. we know what happened last time he started using his executive authority too often for you guys. let's take those suggestions, sanjay and put them to you, do you like what you're hearing from the congressman, do you think they will help? >> i think the idea of getting a vaccine sort of fast-tracked in some way. there's a scientific option maybe that would be on the
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table. that would be helpful in west africa and maybe eventually helpful to health care workers here as well. the travel ban issue is something that's come up a lot. obviously and i know it's gaining some momentum. i heard a lot of those questions. there are a couple of concerns, there's real concerns and the congressman talking about some of these things. we've got a map. let me put up the map for a second. we talk about west africa, we talk about the areas. if somebody was in one of those countries and was worried that they had suffered an exposure to ebola, even if you had a travel ban, you worry that they could go to another country by land. several of those countries there. and then perhaps travel somewhere else around the world. including the united states. i don't know that that travel ban would prevent that from happening. and the concern is those people then wouldn't be tracked. they're no longer somebody coming from an infected country. they may not get the appropriate screening and tracking once they get to the united states. more to the point, the congressman touched on this. it would impact the amount of help getting into that area.
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you know, i've seen this firsthand. i've worked with these aid organizations, we know the military can get in. but the doctors actually taking care of patients, it's going to be more challenging. you tell them they can go in, but they can't get out? these people work in shifts of a few weeks at a time. it would be really, really challenging to get them the mobility. and as a result, the problem would start to get worse, i think in west africa. medically, here would be an analogy. it would be like somebody who is having a heart attack, we're going to give them a lot of pain medication so their left arm pain may go away, but we're not taking care of the heart problem itself. eventually that's going to cause a body-wide problem. the body in this case is the world. >> the congressman is shaking his head. we've discussed this before. i want to hear your response, but also remember, you've said in the past congressman, we would let in the aid workers. sanjay's point is if you make it tough to get in, it becomes tough for everyone, no matter what your intentions are. so what's your response?
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>> we could have other flights authorized to help people move in and out. the president is sending thousands of soldiers in, we can also authorize health workers. whether they're coming from nongovernment agencies, such as samaritan's purse or doctors without borders. we could do those things. i think to put up these false barriers, only adds to the fear here. we can do these things, we're the united states of america. we can make those things happen. another thing we need, however, is there's only two airplanes capable of handling one person at a time to bring people over here. that's another one of my recommendations, we need to authorize, equip and pay for more planes to do those things as well. look, america is worried about this. most countries now in africa have travel bans, caribbean countries having travel bans, countries around the world are developing this. we can say if you're an american citizen. someone coming over here, you're going to be quarantined for a while if you've been exposed to west african countries or near ebola. we can do other screening than just the quick fever check,
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which i think sun reliable. we ought to be doing more here than just saying we can't track people around the world. so let's give up on that. i don't buy that. >> there's some issues, changes that have to be made, there's some difference of opinion there. that's for sure. we got to leave the conversation there for right now. when we pick it up again, there are blood tests that can be done, that cut down on this 21-day period. we don't hear about them being done enough. there's a lot of technology out there to do screening, we're not hearing about it being used, even though the n.i.h. paid for the research for a lot of it. thank you congressman murphy and dr. sanjay gupta, always a pleasure to benefit from your insight. mick? thanks so much. 13 minutes past the hour. a look at your headlines, just in to cnn, the syrian observatory for human rights says isis has gained control of three war planes and that former iraqi military officials are training isis members to fly them. those planes were reportedly seized from syrian military airports. we know the president will be
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holding a closed-door meeting this afternoon to discuss isis. with the vice president. and his national security council. the youngest son of vice president joe biden says he's embarrassed by his actions after being discharged from the navy in february for testing positive for cocaine. 44-year-old hunter biden says he respects the navy's decision, but is not addressing the drug allegations. biden is working as a managing partner at an investment firm. turkey's lack of action against isis might have cost them an important place at the united nations, a seat on the powerful security council. turkey campaigned hard with the general assembly member states, but came up short in the vote to fill one of the five open spots. new zealand, spain, angola, venezuela and malaysia were selected. they will serve through 2016. imagine holding your next fundraiser here. the sistine chapel. the vatican holding its first outside fundraising event there saturday, chris, sponsored by porsche. it includes an after-hours
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concert inside the chapel and dinner in the vatican museums. mere $6400 to attend, with the money going to support pope francis' charities. can you imagine how beautiful that would be? an evening event there? lovely. >> it sounds wonderful. >> doesn't it? >> i want to go right now. >> i know. it sounds great. >> you go get on a plane right now. the cdc is under fire. next, we'll talk to someone on the front lines of the ebola outbreak, who calls the cdc guidelines quote irresponsible and dead wrong. >> that's not good. president obama says a travel ban is not the way to go. but he is considering appointing an ebola czar. is that the fix? we have a political perspective ahead. you're driving along,
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he's sean coffman, he is training the health care workers on the front lines in liberia. sean, how are you? >> i'm doing great, how are you doing this morning? >> we're doing well. tell us what the situation is in liberia this morning? >> you know, i think today you know we're continuing to face the serious challenges of any infectious disease. where there's an outbreak. you know, signs of denial that it even exists and fear, you know, hiding it and being afraid that you actually are sick with it, coming to terms with it and being careful not to label people who are sick and stigmatizing them. these are things that you do, it's just going to suppress and push the disease down further. so it's going to hide it. which will put people at greater risk. >> you are training health care workers there in liberia. do you follow cdc guideline there is? or do you go further? >> absolutely not. in fact i continue to be very disappointed in how cdc is not
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only talked about personal protective equipment, but the processes that they're using and in removing the personal protective equipment. especially in recommending personal protective equipment in clinical situations with patients who are sick with ebola. >> you have been very outspoken. you've told the new york times quote, the earlier cdc guidelines were absolutely irresponsible and dead wrong. what was the problem with them? >> well i think there's search problems. number one, the quantity of ppe was way off. meaning when you have somebody who is sick and can produce large quantity of diarrhea and vomiting in an instant and bleeding out as some patients with ebola do in the later stages of the disease, it's not enough ppe. and when you look even closer, they have you in essence removing your gloves first. and if everyone were to look at their fingers around their fingernails, there are tears and
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cuts around cuticles, when you have unprotected hands taking off dirty gowns and dirty eye protection, it makes absolutely no sense and it's completely opposite to what we would be recommending in a high-contamination lab facility. >> how could the cdc not know that? >> i think the cdc does, it's an indicator of a cultural issue within the cdc. instead of looking at it as a collective group, i know for a fact, people, i have trained myself at the centers for disease control and prevention, i know for a fact there are people who work in high-containment labs who would look at this parrot kol and be shocked. i think it's an indicator that there are clinicians writing protocols for very, very serious come tam nant issues and cdc needs to come together at the table and talk about this and process a better process for doffing personal protective equipment. >> we should tell the viewers the reason you know so much about this is you were on the
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cdc's response team during the anthrax attacks and the sars outbreak. you also oversaw the treatment of the two americans who recovered from ebola. dr. kent brantly and nancy whitebol so you know all about how this should work. are you saying in terms of the culture at the cdc, the clinicians, academic and removed from the front lines, are writing the protocol, rather than the people like you, who see how it works? >> well, i think that you know to clarify, i can't take the credit for treating nancy and kent. i was really there to protect the nurses and the doctors in making sure they were doing what they need to do. but you know, the one thing that really frustrates me is that i think leaders need to stop talking and start listening at this point. and what i mean by that is i don't care if you are a general, or if you are an ambassador or if you are the president with all due respect. or if you're the director of the
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cdc. until a nurse who is the front-line of health care, says that they are comfortable with the ppe guidelines that the cdc is recommending, i will again continue to say -- that cdc is not doing enough. these nurses work with patients, they're on the front line of this outbreak. and they have their lives to feel protected and safe when doing so they know that a patient at a moment's notice could produce high quantity of fluids that would put them and others at risk. again, i do not see a nurse coming to me today saying i feel comfortable with what the cdc is recommending. >> so very quickly, sean, you're saying until the nurses feel protected at places like dallas presbyterian, they should refuse to treat any incoming, possible ebola patient? >> no, i feel it is irresponsible to not train the workforce, a nurse has the right and as do doctors, have the right to say -- this is
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something we are unprepared for. until we're prepared for it, we're at risk and that is clearly evident in the texas case. >> you're right and those nurses are coming forward and saying now this morning. sean kaufman thank you for taking time with us, it's great to talk to you this morning. >> thank you. chris, what's coming up? >> i'll tell you what's amazing is these health care workers are so dedicated to doing such a dangerous job, even though they feel they're not getting the training and protection they need. special people. and how about the ebola czar? some people are talking about it. republicans and democrats. the obama administration at first said no, we don't know. but now, they're saying we need one. better idea? how big a deal is this going to be in the elections. we have a political panel debating it. >> i look forward to that. about 55. where you headed at such an appropriate speed?
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almost half-past the hour, a look at the headlines, breaking overnight, hong kong police armed with wire cutters and riot shields tore down a site occupied by pro democracy demonstrators. at this point it's unclear if this all will affect talks on long-term reforms, which are set to take place next week. a recall from chrysler to tell you about, 900,000 vehicles, most in the u.s., are affected. certain dodge, jeep and chrysler sedans dating back to 2011 could have issues with the alternators, that could cause those vehicles to crash. and some jeep wranglers from
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2011-2013 have a problem with heated power mirrors that could cause a fire. so far, one accident has been reported. we'll keep an eye on that for you. federal investigators will be on the scene this morning of a train wreck in the ozark mountains in arkansas. a sight-seeing train full of passengers collided head-on with freight train thursday, 20 miles from fayetteville. 44 total injuries were reported. five serious, we'll continue to monitor that situation. something a little lighter now, a bear cub and momma bear together this morning after the little one got trapped inside a dumpster in pasadena, california. california wildlife officials say the cub was trying to jump out, was heard crying. took a while, but officials finally were able to free the cub. after the ordeal, they were spotted chilling near a pool in the neighborhood before heading back to the foothills, what's weird to me is this about six blocks from where i used to live in pasadena. is not completely unfamiliar, i've got the angeles national
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forest, so the bears do come down looking for food, they've been spotted chilling in people's pools. there you go. imagine, going for a dip and hey now, somebody beat me to it. >> bears are not your friends. >> no, they're not. >> even cute, little, cuddly ones. >> big claws, open you like a can of tuna. moving on, the ebola situation started in texas with the fear and demands for action are certainly nationwide. so president obama once again in the crosshairs, looking for new ways to contain the spread of the virus in the u.s. now initially, he said we don't need a czar. >> i remember. >> now he seems to be saying well maybe we do. initially it was, forget about the flight thing. it's not going to happen. now he says he's not philosophically opposed to it. what's going to happen here? how does he make people feel confident in his leadership? let's get experts to discuss, cnn political commentator, editor in chief of the "daily beast," john avalon and cnn
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political commentator and political anchor at new york one news, mr. errol lewis, headline, october surprise? is this going to be the pivot issue for the mid-term elections? mr. avalon, i see you wincing. >> what a terrible surprise ebola on a plane from cleveland is. look this is definitely becoming an issue that's preoccupying people. we're fighting not only ebola, but really fear and that can drive people's emotions and affect elections. the problem the president has right now is it appears to be an unsteadiness, an attempt to adjustment strategy to facts on the ground can come across as sort of a red-line problem. you said one thing, now you're changing. and it will be an issue, already candidates were mentioning on the campaign trail. when you start throwing out things like quarantine and banned flights, that's playing to people's fears, this will be a factor. >> errol, let's listen to what the president said about the possibility of appointing a czar yesterday. >> did may make sense for us to
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have one person in part just so that after this initial surge of activity, we can have a more regular process just to make sure that we're crossing all the t's and dotting all the i's going forward. if i appoint somebody, i'll let you know. >> errol? why all the deliberating? isn't it easy to appoint one point person? >> i don't know that it makes any sense. this is the problem here. the optics. what will satisfy people. now we've got an ebola czar. well the secretary of health and human services is signature right there. the head of the cdc, a man of enormous experience sitting right next to him. he's got his national security adviser. who is also part of the meeting. these are people who command vast resources and have great deal of experience. >> but they've messed up. >> but the so-called czar, is this person -- well look, i think we have an ebola czar, his name is barack obama, he's the president of the united states, the commander-in-chief of the
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armed forces, can he mobilize the resources that are needed. the notion of doing something just so people can feel good, can he get a hollywood act tore stand in and say i'm the czar. >> okay. let's get the actor. >> politics is perception. and i think part of the problem is, is you've got a bunch of different agencies that running in, alphabet soup, creating confusion. no one is sure who is the point person. on the ground in terms of the public. that's why apointing a czar after hurricane katrina. there's when everyone was politicizing czars in the past. the unelected individuals with vaguely russian associations, they now desperately need him. >> you cut through political hype as well as anybody. and there's a lot of it going on here. why are people afraid? because they think they're going 0 get ebola? not really. they think they can't trust the people who are supposed to keep them safe from ebola. they think texas will be
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replicated, because there's too much excusing the actions, instead of changing the actions. why wouldn't you put somebody in charge and say we're doing something. >> you've got health systems, transportation systems, education systems to the extent that some of these involve kids going into schools. the notion that you could just find somebody, i don't know the name of that person. who can somehow cut through all of these things, there's an international dimension that also includes diplomacy. fighting the battle is not going to take place here. three cases in a nation of 300 million people is not a severe emergency. that you can't, that you can deal with here. you have to get the people over to liberia, to sierra leone. you have to fight the thing where it is. and even that is not going to look like the hollywood version we would all like to see. it's not going to be people jumping out of you know, parachuting out of planes. it's going to be knocking on doors. making sure they have the treatment. >> and yet there is confusion about the virus.
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and about what the administration is saying, about how dangerous the virus is. listen to senator rand paul. he put a finer point on this. >> they say, don't worry, it's only mixture of bodily fluids to direct contact. so what are you thinking? i'm thinking like aids, you don't get aids at a cocktail party. so my level of alarm goes down. if i'm treating somebody or looking at them or i'm thinking, it's like aids, i'm not going to get it. but it really isn't like aids, then they'll say in a little lower voice, oh, but direct contact can be three feet from somebody. >> it has been confusing, the message, john? >> initially we were told this wouldn't be an issue in the united states, it wouldn't be an issue on planes, you see nurses at a hospital getting it and now there's a panic about planes, the fact about the nurse who went to cleveland was apparently told by the cdc, hey, you're fine to fly. that's a big problem when it comes to instilling confidence. but this is a moment, the aids parallel is interesting, right?
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we have had pandemic panics in the past where we've done irrational things that ultimately were proven not to be right where we talked about quarantining people, talked about all kinds of measures that were not wise or science-based. you need to confront fear with facts if we're going to contain this. >> john avlon. errol lewis, thank you so much. now that politics is involved in this, it gets even scarier. i'll tell you that. who are we going to talk to? we're going to talk to the uncle of the second texas nurse infected with ebola, amber vinson. was she tick when she boarded flights to and from ohio? that's the key question now. the cdc told her about that. and we're also going to find out how she's doing. stay with us.
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nina pham, the first nurse to contract ebola in texas has been flown to the nih in
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maryland to continue her treatment. now the uncle of the second nurse to get sick, amber vinson, is trying to set the record straight about her. now his name is lawrence vinson. he spoke exclusively with don lemon. he says his niece never called the cdc before boarding a plane as was widely reported. why does he want you to know this? take a listen. >> you have to ask you this, which is information that we got earlier regarding her. is that the texas health presbyterian hospital nurse amber vinson said she felt fatigue, muscle ache and malaise while she was in cleveland and on a flight home. a federal official with direct knowledge of the case tells cnn. did she exhibit any symptoms, did she feel fatigued when she was on her way home? >> she never conveyed that to me. >> it has been said that she contacted the cdc and asked about whether she should get on a plane because she had a temperature of 99.5. is that correct?
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>> so -- no. that's not accurate at all. amber -- when the first nurse became symptomatic, amber was already in ohio. and i guess health officials in texas started to reach out to other nurses that were a part of the treatment. and so the, the actual situation was that the nurses, that that team had been told to monitor their own temperature. there wasn't a reporting requirement. >> so they got in touch with amber, right, while she was in ohio? >> that's correct. and asked her, had she been monitoring her temperature. and how did she feel. and she told them that she was feeling fine. when someone followed up with her monday, just when she was getting ready to fly, she
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reported what her temperature was. and that she was on a return flight that afternoon. and so someone in texas said, wait, let me check and made several calls to the cdc. >> so mr. vinson, at no point to your knowledge, did she ever contact the cdc. someone, a health worker in dallas contacted the cdc for her? >> absolutely. to my knowledge, there's, yeah, no point did she directly contact the cdc. >> so the person from texas got back to her and said what to her? >> after multiple calls, the cdc said that it was okay for her to fly. >> and so, she flew and came home. not until tuesday did she start to feel exhibit any symptoms. >> that's correct. >> that's correct. >> so, yeah, if, if in hindsight someone decides that there should have been flight restrictions, that's fine, but
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to miss respect and say restrictions are in place when they actually weren't, is inappropriate. >> some of the nurses have shared and said they never felt as if they were in any imminent danger, because the hospital conveyed to them because of the precautions, the protocol, the suits and what have you, the gloves, everything in place, that they were fine. they weren't under a quarantine, they were just asked to monitor their temperature twice a day. so she -- >> absolutely. >> you're saying amber didn't feel she was putting anyone in danger, is that correct? >> that's correct. you know, they were given gear that was supposed to provide isolation. and they were given protocols to follow. that they were led, that they believed would protect them. and i believe that you know, that was the feeling and the
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intent. >> it is being called a dream for tv lovers, hbo is set to launch a stand-alone streaming service and cbs is expected to do the same. what does this mean? and how much will it cost? >> why do you need that? when you have cnn go? why do you need anything else?
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hour after hour of diving deep, touching base, and putting ducks in rows. the only problem with conference calls: eventually they have to end. unless you have the comcast business voiceedge mobile app. it lets you switch seamlessly from your desk phone to your mobile with no interruptions. i've never felt so alive. get the future of phone and the phones are free. comcast business. built for business. could potentially be a binge watcher's dream. cbs and hbo are getting ready to launch standalone streaming services. what is the cost to consumers? how will it change the way we watch television? brian stelter is host of "reliable sources." this is interesting. so let's talk about pros, cons, advantages, hbo doing it, cbs
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who i didn't think would be doing this. they've not been a bring proponent of the web tv marriage. >> cbs is the most traditional of the broadcast networks. he said i was a skeptic internally but my team answered the questions i had, all of the holes i tried to poke in ideas they came back with responses. he came away convinced it would work. it's a $6 a month product, additive for people that don't have cbs at home, gives them a way to watch it. of course you can watch it for free with rabbit ears. what people want is to watch it on their phone and tablets and that's what they're enabling for the first time. >> it's interesting the difference between young and old, too. i think the young people love to stream and the older folks are like i just want it the way i know it, right? >> the vast majority of people watch the way the way now, through cable or satellite. lot of young people watch via cable and satellite. 100 million americans have
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cable. broadband are the streamer, the people only relying on net flick, hulu or piracy. some cases it's watching illegally and these companies want you to watch legally why hbo will sell a version of hbo. "the game of thrones" one of the most pirated shows. if they can get to you pay for the privilege that would be a much better situation so what we're seeing is media companies which mostly rely on cable right now coming up with some alternate ways so they're placing multiple bets on the boards, kind of like in a roulette table, $100 on black is cable but putting $10 on red to be safe or ten on double zero to be safe. no matter how the world changes they're safe. >> i like the metaphor. this is live. you can watch this live. this isn't downloading something from netflix. >> right. >> this is a whole new world where you watch it as it happens. >> right, cbs live stream the network or watch up on "the good wife" a day later on demand. most people want to watch most
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of the shows on demand. "how to get away with murder" is the biggest new show of the season. it's my personal favorite. it gained like 7 million viewers from on demand viewing. that's a trend these companies can't stop. it's why cnn has cnn go, the app where you can watch the last 24 hours of our channel. >> i like that, cnn go, the best product out there. >> it actually is, you need that people want live and on demand. >> said something controversial his favorite new show of the season. i love viola davis. she's amazing. what is your favorite show of the season right now? >> i don't watch television. i really don't. >> oh, the big brain. the big brain. >> i love television. it's not -- we go to bed at 6:00 p.m. >> that's why you stream and have on demand. don't you listen to the man with the nice socks? >> transparent, i just found it on amazon. >> you need to start bingeing now. >> i did, it's done and now i
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have nothing to watch. here's the bit, the alacart. >> it's a dirty word saying alacart and if you start to break up the bundle that cnn. and others benefit from right now. >> pick and choose. >> it gets expensive. hbs and h cbs, hbo, netflix, i don't believe the bundle will break up too much. i believe we'll have smaller packages. some might choose to have 50 channels instead of 250 channels. the channels that get squeezed are way down your cable dial that you never watch. not a good time to be those channels but as long as you have a big brand like a cbs or hbo i believe they are going to be pretty safe in this new world. people really want those programs. that's why my biggest show before "how to get away with murder" was "the leftovers." next i'll watch "transparent" on amazon. doesn't matter where they come from as long as i can watch when i want. >> brian, thank you. i watch this next show on this week's emmy award winning
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"parts unknown." anthony bourdain takes us to one of his favorite destinations, vietnam. what culinary treasures did he uncover? >> delicious. >> here's a preview. >> goy wei is a traditional dish seldom made because of its complexity and the time needed to do it right. fish stock is made from kabong, a fish from the perfume river. pineapples, onion, chilies, sha shallots and corian. rice noodle, ginger, red chili, garlic. layer of rice noodle, banana flour, then the prongs, garnishes. the strained fish stock is brought to the table with the salad in separate bowls and combined just before eating. >> spicy for you? >> no, it's good.
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love it. >> it's very spicy. >> oh, no, i like it. what i found when i first came to this part of the world, vietnam in particular, my palette changed. i needed an elevated level of chilies and heat. >> only he can say that, that deadpan. "i needed an elevated level of chilis." >> i'm hungry. >> be sure to watch him "unknown: vietnam" sunday night 9:00 eastern. >> sounds good. >> it will be delicious. so we are all over the ebola situation answering the questions that you have. overnight look at this, new video released, that's nina pham, leaving a very emotional message from her hospital bed. look at what her existence is right now. now she's now in maryland receiving specialized treatment. we'll tell you about it. also an airline is scrambling to alert more passengers who may have come in contact with the infected nurse on a flight, this as obama doubles down and considers appointing and ebola czar after all.
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nurses for being second. >> moved to maryland, the first american contracting ebola in the united states moved to maryland for treatment. another nurse in the hospital is speaking out, wait until you hear the chaos inside the hospital. northern exposure, officials in ohio are looking for hundreds of people who could have been exposed to amber vinson after learning her symptoms may have started a week ago. at least eight people in cleveland are under quarantine. can ebola be contained in the u.s.? ponder this. is our john berman royalty? he traveled to amsterdam for answers to that question and so much more. don't miss what he discovers about his past as berman explores his roots. your "new day" continues right now. >> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan, and michaela pereira. >> good morning, welcome to "new day." it's friday, october 17th. now 8:00 in the east, and i'm joined by alison cam ryn camero.
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>> happy friday. >> 1 peop2 people in ohio quarantined. the cdc confirms vinson may have been symptomatic since last friday when she flew from texas to ohio. passengers on that flight and hundreds more who flew the same plane will also have to be tracked down. >> the first nurse to contract ebola inside the united states has been transferred to the national institutes of health in maryland for treatment. nina pham thanking her doctors in a touching video just released on youtube. and on capitol hill despite growing cries for a travel ban on west africa, cdc director tom frieden could not tell furious lawmakers at the hearing whether that idea was even being considered. our coverage of the ebola crisis begins with susan candiotti, live for us from akron, ohio. good morning again, susan.
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>> reporter: good morning, alisyn. here in northeastern ohio, health officials say they are prepared, yet they are also learning as they go, as you said, about a dozen people here quarantined so far, because of contact with nurse amber vinson. she only made two stops when she was here, her home and a bridal shop. meantime we are also hearing from nurse nina pham for the very first time. overnight, the first critical care nurse to contract ebola arriving at the national institutes of health clinical center in maryland. 26-year-old nina pham transferred from texas health presbyterian in part because of concerns about the limited number of qualified people to care for her. >> we're really proud of you. >> reporter: for the first i am we hear from pham while in isolation. the texas hospital releasing this video of a doctor thanking
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her for taking care of the now deceased liberian thomas duncan. this on the heels of a shocking revelation that the second nurse to contract the virus may have been feeling ill since she left dallas, flying to cleveland last friday. >> we can't rule out the fact that she might have had the start of her illness on friday. >> reporter: a federal official tells cnn 29-year-old amber vinson said she felt the muscle aches and malaise while in ohio and on the flight home but amber's uncle says it's not true. >> she felt fine, that she felt well until tuesday morning. >> reporter: the cdc now expanding their outreach to all passengers on board both frontier airlines flights to and from cleveland, and anyone with potential risk will be actively monday stored. vinson's family said she felt
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she put no one in danger and called a texas health official who told her the cdc said it was okay to fly. >> if in hindsight someone decides that there should have been flight restrictions, that's fine, but to misrepresent and to say restrictions were in place when they actually weren't is inappropriate. >> reporter: it was while in ohio for a bridesmaids fitting according to vinson's uncle where she first learned fellow nurse nina pham tested positive for the deadly disease. the bridal shop owner says vinson did not look sick at all. >> she was probably here probably about three hours maybe. i had no idea that anything was wrong with her. >> reporter: and for now, that shop owner is also part of the quarantine. she has to take her temperature twice a day. last night a bit of a nerve-racking visit from health officials who wanted to have her explain exactly how she interacted yet again with nurse amber vinson. for now, that bridal shop is
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closed just as a precaution. back to you, chris. >> susan candiotti in ohio, thank you very much. texas presbyterian says transferring the two nurses for specialized ebola treatment is the right move. this as another nurse who works there says the hospital made a lot of wrong moves, that they should be ashamed that nurses were forced to treat thomas eric duncan without the proper equipment or training. cnn's elizabeth cohen is live in dallas with that. elizabeth? >> reporter: chris, yes, it's certainly a picture of chaos that this nurse painted, seemed to be saying there was no policies about what to do with an ebola patient so when it happened, no one knew exactly what protective equipment to wear, no one knew exactly at what point this patient should be put in isolation. at a congressional hearing yesterday a lawmaker asked a hospital executive point blank, did you do training for your staff on ebola and he said no. now, it's interesting, as we know, this is for the first time
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in nearly three weeks there are no ebola patients at this hospital. the hospital said they needed the opportunity to prepare for whatever might come next. they didn't say what that might be but certainly cdc director tom frieden has said he would not be surprised if it there were more health care workers from this hospital who become sick with ebola. it's also interesting to point out this hospital is now two-thirds empty. people are scared to come here because of ebola. alisyn? >> elizabeth, i'll take it, thank you very much. we've been hearing from the management of the hospital. what about from the nurse's side? you'll get to hear somebody who was involved in the treatment of nina pham, her name is brianna aguirre. the entire crew of the frontier airlines night amber vinson was on at home and self-monitoring for ebola. the airline scrambling to track
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those passengers and hundreds more on the aircraft. rene marsh has more on what the airline is doing to keep future passengers safe. >> reporter: amber vinson flew on this frontier airlines plane from cleveland to dallas one day before she was diagnosed with ebola. the entire crew now at home and self-monitoring for symptoms for 21 days. after vinson's flight, frontier says the plane was cleaned in dallas before making five stops the next day. frontier says the plane received four cleanings. now it's replacing seat covers, carpets, and environmental filters on the plane. the airline is also contacting hundreds of passengers who were on vinson's plane to dallas and her flight to cleveland three days before. >> our fundamental mission is to protect americans. >> reporter: on capitol hill thursday, cdc director tom frieden was on the hot seat. >> was it a breakdown in the
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protocol? was it a breakdown in the training of the protocol? do we know whether or not the protocol works? >> the investigation is ongoing. we've identified some possible causes. >> reporter: cnn has learned the cdc is now considering expanding what's called a do not board list that prevents people with a known infectious disease from flying. the list could soon also include people being monitored for exposure to ebola, and the calls for banning travel all together to and from west africa are getting louder. >> why are we still allowing folks to come over here? >> we should not be allowing these folks to come in, period. >> reporter: federal officials say a travel ban to west africa would prevent doctors from getting to the region and could force travelers to other airports, risking more exposures, but president obama thursday not ruling the option out. >> i don't have a philosophical
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objection necessarily to a travel ban if that is the thing that is going to keep the american people safe. >> reporter: rene marsh, cnn, washington. >> let's bring in congressman peter welch of vermont, chief deputy whip of the house democrats, also on the house energy and commerce subcommittee on oversight and investigations, and was at the hearing yesterday and let's also have dr. sanjay gupta, our chief medical correspondent of course. gentlemen, thank you for being with us. congressman a quick q were aamp a here. on a scale of one to five, what is your confidence you were being told the truth yesterday by the people in control of the situation, five being a lot of confidence. >> five. i think they were being pretty straightforward, acknowledging some mistakes, not necessarily having all the answers going forward. >> one to five, let's, speaking to that point, where are you in terms of confidence that they know what to do now. >> i think they do know what they have to do now. i think the question which is much more difficult is the ability to execute. cdc knows, a, they have to give
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out clear information. they made some mistakes after dallas, but number two, we've got hospitals all over this country, and the real apprehension here is that somehow, some way, a person could show up at a hospital that's never had experience with ebola, as happened in dallas, and then even though directives have gone out, will that staff at that institution know what to do and do it at the right time. so for me, i think there's a real execution challenge rather than knowing what to do challenge. >> all right, sanjay, i'm going to give the congressman a five on both of these because he seems confident about it, but are you equally as confident that the they have their hands around what they did wrong and know how to fix it going forward? >> well, yes, i think so. i talked to some officials within the dallas hospital yesterday and obviously what's happening now does not look good. the two nurses obviously being sent to these other centers around the country. i asked the follow-up question as well, let's fast forward a
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month, so you've sort of been able to get your employees back working, you've stopped diversion from the emergency room, another ebola patient shows up. i asked the same question, chris, how confident are you to take care of it? they said they were fully confident. there were mistakes made, some simple mistakes but they think they can going forward be able to take care of patients that come in, in the future. >> here is the concern, okay? texas is a big well-funded health care system. texas presbyterian is a respected place, and yet it fell flat on its face. and everyone around the country right now is going to school on dallas because they don't want to be the next texas presbyterian. where is your confidence, congressman that, we have the infrastructure around to support these things. as we all know now, the fed's not in charge. so where does the confidence come from? >> i didn't give a five on confidence in execution. >> i'll give you a second chance at answering, congressman. >> see, that remains to be seen.
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the good news out of dallas is that it was so humiliating to a very good hospital that a lot of, all of our hospitals around the country as a result of this enormous publicity are paying attention, and there's a simple procedure that dr. frieden outlined that makes sense. will it be executed? let's see. somebody has ebola-like symptoms put them aside immediately, two, call us and we'll walk through what follow-up steps you should take. three, if it looks like there is a potential ebola person we'll come from the cdc and really take over and monitor. so that is i think very reassuring protocol. whether somebody who shows up in dubuq dubuque, iowa, or burlington, vermont, the emergency room in the midst of chaos often going on, will that personnel at that hospital execute? none of us really know. but i think -- >> protocol, process, execution, coordination, that is all part
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of the equation of leadership. do you need somebody who is in charge of this thing that does not exist right now? >> i do. i think the president is talking about an ebola czar and i think that makes a lot of sense. for instance we're having this huge debate about a travel pan. as the president said it's not a philosophical issue. whatever we have to do to keep america safe we'll do it. there's debate by people with a lot of experience like doctors without borders who suggest that's going to make a bad situation worse. this should be a medically based decision, not 435 members of congress pretending they're doctors making the decision. >> sanjay, you've been clear that you think a ban to and/or from this infected area in west africa will hurt efforts there. if you don't get it right in africa, you will certainly suffer the pain back here at home. where do you stop with the travel restrictions? now they're thinking of a no fly list. what about subways? what about boats? what about other mass transit? where does it stop in is there a practical way to even do this,
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doc? >> no, and i think that's part of the issue is that as you start to sort of just sit down and figure out the various permutations, you realize that you're really not solving the problem as the congressman has said with the travel ban. first of all people within west africa could leave those countries and go to other countries within africa and fly from there, so are you going to ban all travel from africa, period? i mean, that's a little bit hard to conceive. but also this idea that now the world health organization is anticipating 10,000 new cases, new infected patients a week. that's what the existing aids system, if you make it more challenging even to get some of that aid in, some aid will still be able to get in, but it's going to take a hit. there will be doctors, nurses who may not want to go in because they say how am i going to get out? it's a fair point they're making. it's going to take a hit. 10,000 cases a week already, that number will grow and that's going to impact the entire world. i gave the analogy earlier, chris, from a medical perspective it's kind of like if
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someone is having a heart attack and left arm pain, travel ban would be like giving a lot of pain medications for the left arm pain but ignoring the heart attack, that obviously will have an impact on the whole world. >> congressman, if you get the chance, before i let you go, we're dealing a lot with the 21-day incubation period, causes fear of the unknown. sanjay says there are blood tests people could be given to cut the time in half and we're getting pushback from the government said saying they're expensive and hard to administer. it seems like that's money well spent in that situation. is it something you guys are considering pushing for? >> it is. i think that would be money well spent. in one of the parts of our hearing yesterday was from cdc about trying to accelerate aid testing and there's some companies that have some promising ideas and two, vaccines that may be helpful. we should be very aggressive on that. >> sanjay i'm happy to pass along your idea although i am
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concerned they're going to wind up plucking you from us and make you the czar of this entire situation which you know, may wind up getting you punished for having so many good ideas. fellows thank you so much. >> i'd miss my time with you, chris. >> we'd figure something out. congressman, thank you so much, sanjay always a pleasure. >> goodness knows we can't separate you two. looking at your headlines we start with syria. the syrian authority for human rights says isis gained control of three war planes and former iraqi military officers are training isis members to fly them. these planes were reportedly seized from syrian military airports. the president will be holding closed door meeting this afternoon to discuss isis with the vice president and the national security council. some breaking developments now out of hong kong. tensions escalating as police break out pepper spray and batons trying to corral the crowd of protesters, coming hours after police used wire cutters and riot shields to
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disperse the crowd of demonstrators. it's unclear if the move will affect talks for long-term reforms which could happen next week. author john grisham apologizing for comments he made to a british newspaper concerning child pornography and sex offenders. he sparked outrage with his remarks about overly harsh prison sentences in case involving child pornography. in a statement he never intended to show sympathy for those convicted of sex crimes especially the molestation of children. have to show you this one-of-a-kind desert selfie. look at the camera smiling. apparently they'd been feeding this camel for about a half an hour before they snapped the picture. what's really interesting to me is the guy who took the picture didn't know the camel was "smiling" in parenthesis until he checked his camera later that day. there's a debate going on online about how you refer to a group selfie, some are say it's the
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word ussie but i don't know when a camel joins it, how that changes. >> the rules haven't been written for that one. >> this is uncharted territory, alisyn. >> i agree. that is the cutest camel i've ever seen. >> can we show it one more time? that is a happy camel. you can't give me side eye about the camel. >> have you ever been around a camel? they spit at you. camels. >> that camel was happy whens anot spitting at nobody. >> i've spent some quality time in bad places with camels were the only transportation. i've had better relationships. that's all i'm saying. >> debbie downer, come on, man. >> it's a nice smiling camel. i just think it wasn't unloading on those guys. shocking revelations from a texas presbyterian nurse. find out what she says happened inside the hospital that is making her blood boil. plus have you noticed how prices are sliding at the pump? you wonder why? we don't really care, right, as long as they last. will they? we've got some good news for
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was exposed. she got the brushoff. >> what was the protective gear that you, yourself, wore? >> on the day that i took care of her it was my first time being involved in the care of
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any potential or confirmed ebola case in the hospital, and they asked me if i had been trained. i said i have not. >> what was the gear that they gave you? >> so i went over there and i had infectious disease department and i had the, some representative from the cdc there, telling us what to put on. and they were going over the mistakes they made, before they were putting on three pairs of us. now they were putting on two, and they were saying this is the system we've moved to now, and it was a tyvek suit, a white tyvek suit. what i assume was a hazmat suit, only available in one size so it didn't fit us all and other people were given yellow dupont
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suits and i'm not sure which one is superior to another. they're not exactly designed the same but depending on your size, you know, you had to fit which one, get which one that fit you. and so we had that suit on, a pair of surgical boot covers that, you know, just cover your shoes, and then a taller pair of surgical boot covers that go up to either mid calf or almost to my knee, and then we had on a pair of long nitrogloves about to here, taped to that tyvek suit, and then another pair of long nitrogloves on over the top of that, so a total of two. we had a hood on over our head, both types of suits had a hood and it just went around here, and it came to a zip at the base of our necks, and we had on a papper machine which is a form
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of airborn isolation that is a machine you hook around your waist. it leads by a tube up to a hood that sits on the base, you know, the crown of your head and goes, covers your face with a shield and goes under your chin. and because the zipper of the suit was a source of, you know, contamination, we had an apron on covering that zipper seam so no bodily fluids or anything could penetrate that and go to our underlayer of clothing. >> but your neck -- was your neck exposed? >> absolutely. yes. there's a -- >> what part of your neck? >> well the zipper ended about here on me and the hood ended about here on me, and you know, this part right here made a triangle that was open. it was completely open, and the
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very first time that they were instructing me how to put this on is exactly the point when i said, "why would my neck be exposed?" i told them "why would an area so close to my mouth and my nose, why would that be exposed?" >> what did they say? >> they didn't have an answer. >> was there any follow-up when you raised objections to what is clearly a ridiculous situation, a dangerous situation? >> i immediately felt like it was ridiculous and i immediately posed the same question that you're posing to me, you know, asking me right now. i said why? what explanation can you give me or anyone about why we would be in the second week of an ebola crisis in our hospital and we don't even have the same equipment or protection that's given to sanitation workers that have no contact with patients at all. and they said we know, we've ordered it. >> i can't believe their response was "well we've ordered
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it." i mean, that's inexcusable. >> two weeks? not to be taken lightly but i'm sure i could have ordered that on amazon prime and had it within two days. the most outrageous part of it is every time i think about the facts that i'm saying right now, i just know that the nurses that have been infected, they were dealing with the same equipment while they were dealing with so much more than i dealt with, personally, and they put their lives on the line and without the proper equipment. there's nothing -- >> you believe nurse pham was wearing that kind of equipment when she was exposed? >> i know she was, because the equipment we needed was still on order. >> they have through a stressful experience as you can see and it comes out. >> the reason we have to stay on the situation is because we have to make sure that other hospitals do it better, because these people are putting themselves at risk and they deserve better. we'll stay on it.
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here's the good news. friday is here. time to gas up for the weekend and watch the numbers. spin like a slot machine, right? wrong. gas prices are dropping fast. why are they and will they stay this way for a while? answers ahead. and as you may know it is not new that john berman considers himself better than other people, but it turns out he may be right! is john berman descended from nobility? he throws on some clogs and dances through the tulips to his own dutch roots. >> does he? >> yes, he does. want a clue? google "spinoza." >> and do you have to say it like john? ♪ there it is... this is where i met your grandpa. right under this tree. ♪ (man) some things are worth holding onto. they're hugging the tree. (man) that's why we got a subaru.
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or was it that tree? (man) introducing the all-new subaru outback. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. ♪ who's going to do it? who's going to make it happen? discover a new energy source. turn ocean waves into power. design cars that capture their emissions. build bridges that fix themselves. get more clean water to everyone. who's going to take the leap? who's going to write the code? who's going to do it? engineers. that's who. that's what i want to do. be an engineer. ♪ [ male announcer ] join the scientists and engineers of exxonmobil in inspiring america's future engineers. energy lives here.
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(receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies.
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like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. alisyn that means it's cnn money time. >> oh, good. >> your money. >> mine, personal? >> chief business correspondent christine romans has some good news about gas prices. >> did you hear those coins? you heard the coins. >> yes. >> those coins are in your pocket because gas prices have been falling and going to continue to fall. $3.14 the average price per
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gallon of gas down more than 20 cents in the past month. can i show you how it's been going since the peak this summer, 50 cents a gallon right back in your pocket. you've got these states already below $3 a gallon. missouri is the lowest. look over here jersey below $3 a gallon. can i tell you over here in the rocky mountains and western states another 15 cents to 30 cents that are going to drop by the end of the year according to gas buddy. over here you'll see some relief. if you are going to heat your home with any of these things this winter and you probably are, this is how much prices have forecast to come down for you. it's going to be a warmer winter plus these prices are coming down, going to be a relief for consumers heating their homes and also putting gas in their cars. this is what oil prices have done because of plunging oil prices, $107 a barrel this summer, now down to $83. the u.s. is producing a lot of it. the rest of the world is slowing. that combination means you've had a real decline but up a bit this morning, look, $83 a barrel
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is something. >> wow, you can come on any time. >> only come on when there's good news in gas prices. everyone hates it when i come on with bad news about gas prices. enjoy it. >> thank you. >> only $83? i have to run out and buy a barrel of oil. let's get over to michaela. >> my takeaway is a warmer winter, yahoo to that. time for the five things to know for your new day. texas nurse may have had ebola last friday when she flew from texas to ohio. 12 people who came in close contact with amber vinson are in quarn tee. hunten biden got the boot from the navy back in february. sources say he tested positive for cocaine. he's now a managing partner at an investment firm. isis reportedly has control of three war planes from syrian airbases and is training to use them with help from former iraqi military officers. the president will hold a closed door meeting this afternoon on the issue of isis. overnight hundreds of police in hong kong clearing the site
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where pro-democracy protesters camped out now for weeks. it's unclear how this affects plans for talks with officials next week on long-term reforms. ,000 will be los gigantes and the royals. san francisco wins with a dramatic three-run homer bottom of the ninth eliminating the cards in five games. world series starts tuesday in kansas city, game one. we always update the five things to know. visit newdaycnn.com fort latest. john berman makes his living asking questions and chasing answers. and when he went looking into his own family history, he got some answers he was not expecting. that's next.
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♪ who's going to do it? who's going to make it happen? discover a new energy source. turn ocean waves into power. design cars that capture their emissions. build bridges that fix themselves. get more clean water to everyone. who's going to take the leap? who's going to write the code? who's going to do it? engineers. that's who. that's what i want to do. be an engineer. ♪ [ male announcer ] join the scientists and engineers of exxonmobil in inspiring america's future engineers. energy lives here. are the largest targets in the world, for every hacker, crook and nuisance in the world. but systems policed by hp's cyber security team are constantly monitored for threats. outside and in. that's why hp reports and helps neutralize more intrusions than anyone... in the world. if hp security solutions can help keep
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♪searching with devotion
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♪for a snack that isn't lame ♪but this... ♪takes my breath away
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♪ wake me up when it's all over ♪ i'm going to cry, laugh. >> do we have tissues? >> some say the reason cnn undertook the week-lock series "roots: our journeys home" was really about john berman. >> it's true. >> sure 13 of our hosts and anchors or tracking their lineage for your viewing pleasure but only one may be descended from royalty. >> look at that face. >> near from "new day" we looked up to berman because often wears lifts but royalty is really a note of distinction, sir. >> i went searching deep moo my roots chris cuomo and found out i am related to tom brady, so it's very exciting. no, look, it's not about royalty. it's not like i'm a duke of boston or anything. the question is, am i related to one of the greatest thinkers of
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all-time like in the history of the world and there was every reason to believe that the answer to that was yes. look and see how i searched for the answer. ♪ why am i sitting here in front of this statue in this city, no less? amsterdam, city of canals and bridges and a country of windmills and tulips. well, i'm here because the two of us we share a name. this is baruque spinoza. i am john spinoza berman. baruque spinozoire was a french philosopher, statue, portraits and streets bear his name. >> he's been an icon of the soul thinker who is in the community
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and more generally religious tolerance. >> reporter: his petty ideas of god being inseparable from nature and at the time haughty notions about freedom of thought were so radical they got imex-communicated from the jewish community in 1656. scandalous then now revered. >> he's a popular symbol for all kinds of things that we'd like to associate with. >> reporter: i'd like to associate with that. it's a good name to have, right? >> absolutely. >> reporter: good name, great lineage, if it's mine, which is what i grew up being told. >> you've driven by with friends, do you point up? >> reporter: my father gerald spinodda points to the name carved in the public library. when you see it, what do you think? >> i would think that's my family, my heritage, my grandfather's name was spinoza my mother's maiden name was spinoza and we thought they were
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deend descendants from baroque spinoza. >> reporter: makes me the son of a prince? >> or something. >> there's one problem. >> according to dutch philosophy professor michael leezenburg. what do you know about spinoza the man in terms of family life? >> well it's fairly simply so say he did not have any family life at all. he was never married. >> reporter: no marriage, no known children. so how did my family and would-be philosopher prince father account for this? >> we were brought up thinking we came from a long line of bastards. >> reporter: a long line of yes, baz tarreds. rememb bastards. what is the truth? am i loaded with radical philosopher dna in after a lifetime of expectations at last my sell ergelblat from ancestry.com searched for an answer that intriguingly begins
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in amsterdam, the birthplace of the philosopher. >> the first generation of spinozas in the united states was benjamin spinoza, and benjamin is your second great grandfather, and he was born in amsterdam. >> i don't really speak good dutch. but you don't have to speak dutch to go to amsterdam. nearly everyone there speaks perfect english, including heddy burg, the curator and manager of museum affairs for the city's jewish historical museum. she walked me through the historic jewish corridor. >> the girl's orphanage was here, there were all kinds of jewish institutions also on this same street. >> reporter: so benjamin spinoza was born here in 1850, 121 rashrhberger.
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rappen berger strass. your language is a pain. >> i know. >> reporter: the neighborhood revolved around this gorgeous building. ♪ the 339-year-old portuguese synagogue filled with grandeur, not to mention treasure. >> it's all lined with gold letter of the 17th century. >> reporter: it was built by the tight-knit community of jews who like baroque spinoza's family emigrated from the iberian weliness la. >> there were about 4,500 portuguese jews part of this community. >> reporter: this synagogue, this community was everything. >> yes. >> reporter: and to live outside this community would have been next to impossible. >> yes, it was not really an option. i mean, baroque spinoza was really the first jew at that time to live outside of community. >> reporter: he got tossed. >> he got tossed so it was not
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out of free choice. >> reporter: remember, he was ex-communicated in 1656, a problem for him and it turns out a problem for me in my long-held belief that i might be his great, great, great, et cetera, grandson. ancestry.com uncovered a document from 1737. >> this is isaac's p espinoza, seventh great grandfather. >> reporter: early 1700 snz. >> yes in amsterdam. this is your seventh great grandfather talking about isaac espinoza of zali and then it goes on to talk about his father. >> reporter: daniel. >> daniel espinoza of barbury. zbrr wait, barbury. >> are you familiar with the barbury coast? >> reporter: that's like north africa?
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>> yes. >> reporter: interesting. >> zali we think is saleh, which is part of morocco. >> reporter: morocco, me, the morocco in north africa. my ancestors emigrated from amsterdam to a jewish community in what is now morocco in 1722. well, after baruque spinoza was living in and scanned liesing amsterdam my people were on a different continent. i am not, it seems, a direct descendant. so if his story is not my story, what is my story? it turns out the answer buried in the amsterdam city archives with 700 years of records is scandalous in its own right, even for a spinoza. researcher eric heiselar found the records of my family's early years in amsterdam in the 1700s. >> here we start. >> reporter: marked by one four-letter word "debt."
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>> another page. here's another page. >> reporter: pages of it. >> it's list after list of gentiles $33,295 and a little bit. >> this is in 1744, that's got to be a lot of money now. >> half a million. >> reporter: a half million dollars in debt. i'm not responsible for any of this, am? i. >> well -- >> reporter: is this where someone walks into the room here? that's not even the big family scandal. for that, eric looked nearly 100 years later, 1822. birth record for another eye stack spinoza, the great, great grandson of isaac the debtor. >> there's something weird about it. the father, there's no mention of a marriage. >> reporter: interesting. >> very. >> reporter: so there's a father let's say but there's no marriage, that's unusual? >> very unusual. it's a small community. everybody would know what's going on.
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the young woman without being married would be frowned upon. >> reporter: wait, there's more, a record of isaac's mother. >> married in 1811 with a different husband. >> reporter: she had a kid. she had isaac. still married to somebody else. >> for years. >> reporter: and the son isaac? >> he's a jewish name for illegitimate child without any rights. >> reporter: his offspring, too, that could be why isaac's son, benjamin, left amsterdam and came to the united states in 1867. benjamin spinoza, born in amsterdam in 1850, died in boston in 1907, spinoza bermans have been there ever since. the search for spinoza, the connection to baruqu spinoza
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came up empty. at least one part was true. benjamin spinoza's father is what's called a momzer. his parents were not married when he was born. >> so that part is true. lot of bastards after all. >> reporter: yes the name on the wall might not be our history but our name filled with its own history. >> wow. lot of information there. >> pretty crazy. amsterdam the records there are insane. 700 years' worth of records. you pick up the books page are page of information that seventh grade grandfather was a half million dollars in debt. it listed what he owed and to whom. >> what did your father think? >> look, it's his middle name, my middle name my grandmother's maiden name. he sort of thought we were
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descended from the philosopher even though the fact that the guy never had any kids should have been a sign to some of us that maybe it wasn't the case. so you know, i think it was interesting to him that the facts are what they are. >> i feel like you're glossing over your north african roots. we might be more the same than we thought. >> my boys want to know what countries they should root from. they're rooting for cameroon in nigeria, turns out we're african. the truth of the matter is the north african jews, those jus in morocco was part of the original portuguese community very likely the same baruque spinoza's family was. we are probably related as cousins from one town in portugal or spain. >> you're clinging to this i see. >> that shows how beautiful all this is. in a world where we seek to divide that's what this roots thing has been illuminating for me, we're all really connected. >> i don't feel so connected to
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you and i'll tell you why. >> come on. >> for years berman has been holding this spinoza thing over the heads of colleagues just so you know, many a debate berman has accented with the "i'm descended from spinoza." >> just because i'm right doesn't mean i'm related to a philosopher. >> i agree. >> it is my name. it's fascinating they got to boston, my spinozas got to boston in the 18 0s there,' no other spinoza there. is it espinoza or spinoza? >> the 1700s it was spinoza. depending which language you speak in it's espinoza or spinoza. it is a rare name in the united states for jews. certainly for espinozas. >> did you pass it along? >> one of my boys has spinoza. >> this is good for the family. >> they root for the netherlands
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now and if morocco had a good team they'd be rooting for them. >> you tried to convince you were like 8% egyptian and that you came from the pharaohs. >> i am, you're jealous. 11% egyptian. >> the it, na we took a dna test. ancestry took a dna and mine came back turns out i'm jewish, i'm like oh my god! is that thank explains the barmitzvah, thank you! >> i liked learning more about you. >> thank you, what a great storyteller you. >> thank you. >> you're a very interesting guy, even more interesting now. >> this could go bad quickly. >> you want to learn more about john berman, who doesn't? go to cnn.com/roots and there's a lot there. >> a lot. >> our series will pick up tonight at 8:00 with fareed zakaria his quest to trace his lineage and monday morning we'll have kate bolduan's story which as we now know has a new branch, cecelia is in there, too. tuesday night at 9:00 here on cnn. you can make sure to watch our
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two-hour roots special hosted by anderson cooper, and john berman's cousin, michaela pereira. >> ethel bass and matt ardle put that together. >> great job. >> well done. here's a tease for you. can soccer fans change the world? one of the top ten cnn heroes of 2014 thinks so. find out how, when we come back. [ female announcer ] hands were made for talking. feet...tiptoeing. better things than the pain, stiffness, and joint damage of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. before you and your rheumatologist decide on a biologic, ask if xeljanz is right for you. xeljanz (tofacitinib) is a small pill, not an injection or infusion, for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can relieve ra symptoms, and help stop further joint damage. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections,
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vote is in your hands at cnnheroes.com to decide who takes home the top prize. this week's honorie turned the fervor into soccer fans into philanthropy for orphans. >> it's electric. >> here is john burns. ♪ ole, ole, ole, ole >> all different nations come together in a kaleidoscope. football is the only worldwide
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sport really. 2004, i would see a full stadium and saw all the fans around me like an army. i started asking myself what could i do if we could mobilize some of these people to do some good? so we bring people toed world cup, they watch games but for a huge chunk of that we find local charities working with children and ask how can we help you? >> to come and do this for the children, this is a world cup spirit. >> in brazil we've got about 300 volunteers here from about 12 countries. we did a couple of days part of the team full of fun and working really hard. >> oh, hey. >> when we invest in a place it's for the long-term. lots of guys come and get it in their blood. that's what we're about. look at how far we've come in a week. fantastic. football has had the ability to
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break down barriers. we're trying to harness the passion of football fans to make a different. >> brilliant idea. >> right, creative, dedication. john just one of our top ten honorees, one of them will become cnn hero of the year and receive 100 grand towards furthering their own work, so what do you do? go to cnnheroes.com and vote once a day, here's the key word every day. all ten will be honored at an all-star tribute hosted by anderson cooper sunday december 7th. got all that? good. lot of news and information to update. let's get you to "newsroom" with ana xwre cabrera in for carol ana xwre cabrera in for carol costello. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com mpgts. happening now in "the newsroom" nina pham in good spirits getting treatment for ebola at the national institutes of health.

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