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tv   New Day  CNN  October 21, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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he shot an intruder. >> i've been in court every day for the past few months. and it's been such a dramatic, convoluted, drawn-out delayed process. today when oscar pistorius was made to stand up and the judge delivered that judgment, absolutely no emotion, no gasps of relief or shock. no emotion from him. take a listen, take a look. >> mr. pistorius please rise. the following is what i consider to be a sentence that is fair and just both to society and to the accused. count one, culpable homicide, the sentence imposed is the xim imprisonment of five
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years. >> okay. so what does all that mean? well, it meant that very soon after the judge left, moments after she made those comments, oscar pistorius was led down the stairs behind the dark stairs that lead to the cells here at the courtroom. he didn't have a long lingering good-bye to his family. he looked one or two in the eye, and quietly, just disappeared down those stairs. no obvious reaction from reeva steenkamp's family. i must say, in fact all of us in court were quite quiet there was a sense of an anti-climax in many ways. legally, what does all this mean? we hear from kelly phelps, our legal analyst. that he could just serve a section of that five-year sentence, which could mean he's out after ten months, but that's very much at the discretion of authorities here. >> this sounds like a fairly light sentence by manslaughter
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standards in the u.s. what's the perception there? >> you know what? the judge was at pains, it was more than an hour-long judgment, and she was absolutely at pains to try to paint a balance between punishment, the need for retribution, the need for the victim's family to feel like they could have closure. but then she said there's also the need for the court to be merciful. she weighed up all of these options, she said she didn't think he deserved a long jail sentence. but she certainly didn't find that house arrest would be appropriate. this, under manslaughter and culpable homicide here in south africa, it's not a particularly short sentence. not a particularly long one. it kind of falls in the middle. in terms of public opinion, it's always been so divided over this case. but she's certainly not having people take to the streets, as you can see. traffic still piling up. there are few onlookers behind me on the court.
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but there hasn't been some sort of physical reaction to this at all. >> robyn curnow, thank you very much. >> that probably means it was the right sentence from the judge if there was no reaction and people aren't in the streets and you don't hear an outcry. it probably means she struck the right balance. >> or there's shock. our appreciation to robin for that. we hear there's new ebola protocols this morning for health care workers, finally, being released by the centers for disease control. the new guidelines call for rigorous training and practice with protective gear that needs to cover workers from head to toe. seems pretty obvious at this point. but unfortunately, the guidelines come too late for two dallas nurses on your screen. now infected with the virus. so how are they doing? and is the risk of more cases finally under control? cnn's coverage of the ebola situation begins in dallas where we find nick valencia. >> cdc director tom friedan says
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he'll provide increased margin of safety. the new guidelines were based on a consensus of health care workers who have treated ebola patients, three new recommendations. is first repeatedly training workers in the donning and dofing of protective equipment and third using the buddy system and trained monitors are on hand for the donning and dofing of ppes. we saw nurses, stand front and center and defend the hospital. today is also a big day for five additional patients who were being monitored for ebola-like symptoms. yesterday dallas county judge clay jenkins that news about their condition will be announced later today at 10:00 eastern. let's talk more about this, joining us is the director of communications for the world health organization, christie fog, the public health agency
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tasked with battling ebola and dr. amish adalja. thanks to both of you. doctor, let me put up on the screen for the viewers at home, what the new personal protective equipment includes. doctors and nurses must waeb double gloves, mid-calf boot covers, or leg covers, fluid-resistant gown or cover jamal without hood. they must have respirators, they must have disposable full-face shield, surgical hoods covering their head and neck. waterproof apron that covers their torso to mid calf. dr. adalja, what has changed here? >> what's really changed is now we're recognizing that what was going on at texas presbyterian wasn't enough. and there's no room for inconsistency with this unforgiving virus there was probably a gross underestimation of what ebola would do in the
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modern intensive care unit. now everything is getting into line with what doctors without borders do and nebraska and emory do. so there's no margin of error with this important personal protective equipment. >> a couple of things jump out at me, that now your neck has to be covered. that wasn't happening at the dallas hospital. we don't know if that's how the nurses got exposed. why didn't they do this sooner? >> i really think it's because people didn't understand what with a happen in the modern intensive care unit. they were extrapolating how we were treating ebola in resource-poor settings and how it was with patients in a normal hospital setting. >> mr. duncan was put on a dialysis machine and respirator. bacteria and other viruses can cause rampant and cause a lot of hospital-acquired infections between patients and health care workers and that's what happened here. that's why you're seeing this
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big push and standardize and go to the full extent. we don't know what happened in texas and it's important to get to the root cause of how those workers got exposed. >> christie, the new guidelines come as a result of the dcc receiving a lot of heat because of how poorly people believe they handled the ebola cases in the united states and your organization, world health organization, has come under criticism for basically ignoring the writing on the wall and having what happened in west africa already spike to more than 8,000 cases before people are able to get their arms around it. what's your response to the criticism of world health organization. >> there's a lot of reasons why it took everyone three months to figure out that this was actually ebola. primarily because this part of the world had never seen ebola before. they have cholera, they have malaria, and dengue and yellow
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fever. so when seven of the nine cases came back positive for cholera, the doctors there stopped looking for ebola. so it took a while before the news spread out far enough that people could say that we've seen ebola before, perhaps just perhaps this could be ebola. when you're working with a place that has not seen it before, it's never the first thing you go to, you tend to go with what you see on a regular basis. >> we know thundershower organization strives to maintain high standards and is doing some soul-searching now. what do you think could have been done differently in thorly days of this outbreak in west africa. >> in the early days, as soon as we were notified of it. and in late march, we immediately launched a team of some of our best experts to go to the affected country. at that point it was guinea. within days we had three and a half tons of protective gear in the air. by april we were calling for foreign medical teams to come
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help and foreign medical teams we use in emergencies. we thought this is what we're going to need here. because this health system is so shattered from years of conflict, we're going to need some surge. but people aren't used to dealing with ebola and people were not as ready to come in to help fight ebola as they are say with the philippines, when a typhoon comes through. that's much more of a comfort zone for them, so it takes a while to convince people to help. >> you do agree thaw missed some critical opportunities at the beginning? >> i think everybody that looks back in hindsight says we could have done more sooner. we mounted a larger-scale response mid summer when the cases really started looking different from normal outbreak. we dealt with about 15 ebola outbreaks in the past decade we have a lot of experience with ebola and on the front end, we thought, this is very unusual, you have communities that aren't used to dealing with this.
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we didn't recognize straightaway that this was going to be such an anomaly of an outbreak if we would go back now, we would look to see what were the signs earlier on that this would be such a deviation from the norm. it was early summer when our experts started to see the first signs that the epi curve would just take off. >> dr. adalja, do you think now that the cdc new guidelines are in plont, do you think it would have prevented the two nurses at texas presbyterian from becoming infected? >> it's hard to say. we don't actually know how they got exposed. we have to figure out how that happened. that's the key to the whole ripple effect from mr. duncan. with the new guidelines, it's clear you're going to get much less exposure to blood and body fluids. it probably could have prevented their infection, based on what we're hearing already. the important thing, it's not just the guidelines, hospitals have to train, they have to continually train and make sure
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that people can do this. this is a lot more complex than the earlier guidelines, although there's more protection, there has to be more care with putting this equipment on and off and making sure that everybody can do it appropriately with the buddy system. it's not just having the guidelines, it's making them work. >> more rigorous and repeated trainings. thank you so much for your candor and information this morning. overnight we learned legendary fashion designer, oscar de la renta has died. the 82-year-old was best known for dressing some of the most prominent people around the globe. he was diagnosed with cancer in 2006. he did appear frail in recent appearances. jason carroll is here with a look back at the life of a man recognized as a trail blazer in the fashion world. in a world where so many pretend, this is an authentically good man. >> he was the real deal. those who were close to him, close to the designer knew he was gravely ill.
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but news of his death still came as a shock. os kwcar de la renta was born i the dominican republic. but he will always be remembered as one of america's best designers. dressing women from the red carpet to the white house for nearly 50 years. legendary fashion designer oscar de la renta has died. cause currently unclear. >> are you stunning and in your oscar de la renta dress. >> his style spanning generations. hollywood's elite from taylor swift to oprah winfrey, draping themselves in his haute couture. hbo's hit series, "sex and the city" centered an entire episode around one of his stunning cree ass. >> oscar de la renta, sleeveless silk voile. and amal clooney's gown for what
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was dubbed the celebrity wedding of the year. >> oscar de la renta was among the designers in post-war america who came out from the back rooms and put his own name on the label. >> he moved to new york in 1965. launching his own label and stitching his way into america's history forever. >> i am unbelievable lucky man. i live in the best country that a human being can live. >> he a reputation of dressing new york socialites, de la renta also dressed every first lady since jacqueline kennedy. hillary clinton wore one of his gowns to bill clinton's second inauguration. as did laura bush for george w. in 2005. even the current first lady, michelle obama, could not escape the sultan of suave, donning her first de la renta just this month. >> it's a compliment to women,
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in the united states we want to be proud of our first lady, how she works. >> oscar de la renta was 82 years old, he leaves behind a wife, a son and three step-children. we were talking about oscar, i interviewed him a few years ago. one of the things i remember about him is i said oscar, how much are one of these dresses going to cost, and he said, well you know, jason, if you have to sk ask -- he had this great sense of humor. >> he was dressing people up to george clooney's bride a few weeks ago. >> he was a workaholic, always wanting to be in there. always wanting to work. always influencing those, the younger people who he was trying to bring up. the younger designers. he's going to be greatly missed. >> straying true to his brand, but completely relevant. he worked very hard to always know who he was, but always still there and part of the culture, you know, it's an amazing feat to be able to do
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that. >> and a loyal following to the end. the ladies who lunch, the fifth avenue socialites loved him until the very end. >> he became the stamp of you are now legit. if you're wearing oscar de la renta, it's about your position, you matter. even the first lady who tries to be very accessible in terms of what she's wearing so it's not just about the price tag. at some point you got to wear oscar. he's going to be very missed. >> i want to wear oscar. >> you still can. >> you're a perfect example of who he wanted to dress. >> really a special man. >> thanks so much. let's take a look at your headlines right now. 15 minutes past the hour. turkey says it will allow iraqi kurdish fighters to use its territory to cross into syria and help defend kobani against isis, the turkish government had previously refussed to let fighters or weapons across the border. in the meantime. isis militants launched 15
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nearly simultaneous attacks on kurdish forces in northern iraq. isis control as dozen cities in iraq. we are learning chilling new details about the convicted sex offender suspected of killing at least seven women in indiana. police are now saying 43-year-old darren vann may be a serial killer whose crimes span 20 years. and that more victims could surface. they say vann admitted to killing a 19-year-old woman this month. then led them to the bodies of six other women all in abandoned houses in gary, indiana. representatives of hong kong government are finally meeting because of pro democracy leaders. the students want to have direct input on the candidates. officials say their demands are impossible. saying caving might give the city's poor and working class a dominant political voice. the president involved in a
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touchy situation in chicago. voting in a the state's mid-term elections. he comes across a guy who gives him a run for his money. the commander-in-chief kind of plays along, i want to you take a look. skr. >> there's an example of a brother em basing me for no reason whatsoever. >> now you'll be going back home talking to your friends about this. that i can't believe, mike, he's such a fool. >> i was just mortified. >> fortunately the president was nice about it. >> and you know, so it's all right. you're gonna kiss me, give him
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something to talk about. >> now he's really jealous. >> now mike the man you don't really see him, he sort of said it was kind of weird and tense and they didn't expect this to happen. so he wanted to say something funny to cut the tension and the president ran with it. >> don't touch my girlfriend, i don't know that that's the first thing to come to mind as a funny thing. the suspect in the disappearance of university virginia student is now linked to three crimes. could jesse matthew be involved in even more unsolved crimes? [ female announcer ] you change your style. why not your eye color? new air optix® colors prescription contact lenses
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♪ introducing the world's first curved ultra high definition television from samsung. new information for you there. new charges against jesse matthew. the man in custody for the disappearance of university of virginia student hannah graham. matthew has been charged with the 2005 atemded murder, abduction and rape of a 26-year-old woman. that kiss has a dna link to the disappearance of another college student, named morgan harrington. officials say forensic evidence connects matthew to harrington's case. but no charges yet for him in
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that matter. let's bring in mel robbins, cnn local commentator and legal analyst, lawrence koefl inchesky. let's talk about what we have and don't have. mel, i'll start with you, the case of the woman who survived, thank god, the victim of the rape and assault, attempted murder there. how did they get do that point? what must they have learned from the woman about that? where does that make the situation lie for you? >> hey, good morning, chris, good morning, larry. this is a terrific development. and the reason why it's terrific is we now have case, chris, with a victim who is alive, police have spoken to and who is willing to testify. so what you're going to see, they're going to bring charges in fairfax county. and they absolutely with dna evidence and a victim, will be able to convict him. that way, he will be a convicted rapist and a convicted guy with
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an attempted murder charge when they bring him on charges against harrington and hannah graham. >> what did she have to tell them, mel, that gets them to an attempted murder charge and not just rape? >> well, perhaps that he threatened her, that he said he was going to kill her. perhaps the way in which he was physically assaulting her. i don't want to get too graphic because it's 6:00 in the morning. it's only a two-page complaint, chris, and police are being very tight on the details. but he might have had some kind of weapon, not a gun, but some sort of instrument with him. reading between the lines here. so we're going to find out more in the days to come. >> and larry, look, rape is bad enough. it's about a bad a crime as we have. but i'm trying to figure out how they're going to make this man a killer because of these two open cases. you have morgan harrington, they say there's a dna link from the woman who survived that situation and her case.
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what does that mean? >> well you know because we have a national database, we can link up different cases through dna. so if there's semen or hair, you can type those things and establish a linkage, we don't know what the forensic linkage. >> if they have a forensic link of dna, why haven't they charged? what more do they need? >> i think they have plenty of time. there's no rush to charge with a murder case, they want to get their case together. and i think we will see indictments for the other, the other crimes. >> mel, quick word, why do you wait in a situation like this? what's the risk for authorities if they go too quickly? >> well run reason why you wait, chris, is leverage. what you want out of a case like this is you want information, everybody watching at home knows there's more bodies out there somewhere. i mean you don't just do this once or twice or three times. this guy is likely been on a
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string. and so what they probably want is they want the leverage now that cases are mounting. that somebody's going to tep and they're going to hold the death penalty over this guy's head to try to get information, chris. >> that leads us to hannah graham. they found remains, 30-plus days, right. >> 35 days. >> you tell us, what do you think about the remains in terms of how they were found and whether that's suggestive that this could be hannah graham. given the time period and how challenging it will be to make an identification. >> i was not surprised that after 35 days they would find skeletonization of this victim. i think the anthropologists would look at this at the skeletal remains and determine the gender, the approximate age of the victim. the height, there's a lot that can be determined. but then come the pathologists trying to do an autopsy and dna analysis establishes firmly that
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it is hannah graham. >> it gets tricky with dna, that's why it's so important for them to find clothing. >> if in fact semen is present, if it's on clothing they should be able to type it. if semen were in a body cavity. it would have completely degenerated. but on clothing, it would remain intact. >> and important to note. that matthew lives four miles from where those remains were found. about five miles from where morgan harrington's body was discovered. it's not dispositive of anything, it's not positive proof. but it is highly suggestive to authorities. mel rob ngs, thank you very muc. monica lewinsky is breaking her silence and speaking out about falling in love with president clinton and the public humiliation that followed. her new mission in life -- ahead. when salesman alan ames books his room at laquinta.com, he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can check in and power up before his big meeting.
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31 minutes past the hour. let's take a look at your headlines, and begin with breaking news, oscar pistorius will spend five years in prison or at least that's the sentence he was given for murdering his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp, the defense says they expect him to serve ten months. prosecutors wanted him locked up for ten years. he shot his girlfriend in 2013, after saying he mistook her for
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an intruder. health care workers carrying for ebola patients must train and wear new protective gear with no skin exposed. four major hospitals have been testing you nated for ebola treatment centers by the pentagon for any soldiers who contract ebola in west africa. they'll first be sent to walter reed army medical facility in washington. if your car is recalled for air bag problems, get it fixed now. that's the warning from the national highway safety administration, they say inflators can rupture in the air bags, causing metal fragments to fly out when the car crashes. it covers air bags made in five million vehicles, dating back to 2002. that's not a criminal, new york city police are chasing. it is a runaway carriage horse. the horse apparently broke free from its handler and bolted
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across midtown manhattan. police were able to corral the animal and return it to the stable. of course as you can remember, there's been quite a lot of controversy there. critics who are wanting horse-drawn carriage rides to be banned in the big apple. adding further fuel to that ongoing debate. >> because this means the horses don't like carrying the carriages? >> that they ran, they want to be at work. >> that makes a horse different from everyone else, how? >> you can get away from it by running away from your job. >> got to have better fuel for the debate than that. did you see the horse running away the other day? that's a sign of exploitation. if that horse could speak -- so here's good news, baseball's world series getting started tonight, the royals hosting the giants. did you know it's been a 29-year drought for the kansas city royals? >> i did know that. he loves them.
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>> andy scholes in kansas city. andy, royals fans, they can't wait to get the game going tonight. give us a preview. >> yeah, chris, it's an electric atmosphere here in kansas city. everywhere we go, we went to some barbeque place, had some ribs, they were excellent. everyone is wearing the royals blue, the team haven't been in the world series since 1985. that drought will of course end here tonight. royals fans have had plenty to cheer about during the playoff run. the team has won eight straight games to start the postseason. no team has ever done that before, the giants run like the royals, they're used to trips to the fall classic. looking to win their third world series in the past five years. will they be able to stop the royals' magical run? the fans in kansas city hope not. they've waited a long time for this moment. >> you hope for this day to come. you wait and you wait and you wait and 29 years and now it's
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here, you're like -- you know, it paid off. >> i've been here all of my life. season tickets with my dad, unbelievable. 1985 was awesome. 2014 -- again. >> first pitch for game one in kansas city set for a little after 8:00 eastern. and the ticket prices for tonight's game one are going crazy. just to stand in the stadium right now, going for more than $650. so clearly, the fans here in kansas city, they've been saving their money for 29 years waiting for this moment to get back into the world series. >> very cool for you to be able to be there, andy. that's a lot of beef. >> why was the word giants not mentioned once during that whole conversation. >> the first game is in kansas city. >> come on, can we talk about the giants. >> do you feel you're being unfair to the giants? >> i mentioned the giants. >> barely. >> michaela, they win the world
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series in even years, they won this 2010, they won in 2012 and a lot of people think they'll win it this year. >> write it off, andy, squeaky wheel. >> always gets the grease. >> kansas city royals, facts about the game as they're going along. royals, named after a beef, a livestock show. >> i knew that. >> not like anything else royal. that's how big beef is in kansas city. the team is named after a livestock show. >> and the men on the giants team are actual giants. >> i don't know what it's named after, do you? >> we will research that in the break and bring that to you. meanwhile, after years in seclusion, monica lewinsky is speaking out now about her affair with president clinton and how she really felt about all this. we have her fascinating speech, straight ahead.
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{door unlocking} hey, what's up? (door closing) how's it going? what are you doing? i can't believe you're watching this without me.
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we agreed we'd catch up on everything tonight. if i did this to you, you'd murder me in my sleep. you know what? just watch it by yourself. (sighs) i can't not know when i know that you know. the latest episodes of the top 100 shows are preloaded and ready to watch with xfinity on demand. 16 years ago, fresh out of college, a 22-year-old intern in the white house, and more than averagely, romantic. i fell in love with my boss.
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in a 22-year-old sort of way. it happened. but my boss? was the president of the united states. that probably happens less often. >> that was monica lewinsky. opening up to an audience in philadelphia about her relationship with president bill clinton. and the humiliation that she experienced when it went public. calling herself, patient zero of online harassment. lewinsky said her new mission in life is to end cyberbullying. lewinsky's speech coming on the same day she joined twitter. here to talk about it are cnn little analyst and editor in chief of the "daily beast," john avalon and fascinating to see monica lewinsky back and reflective, the tone that she's using. margaret, what do you think? >> i think that monica lewinsky, like all americans or all people
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deserves a second act in american life. this is a woman who as we all know was really banished and shamed and she spoke so eloquently incredibly in a raw way, in a vulnerable way. and i have, i frankly garnered such a huge amount of respect for her courage. for her journey. and think that we in the media should, we're ready to move on. we don't want to relive the clinton legacy. let's let her be a spokesperson for cyberbullying. she's an authority on this and she could be an incredible voice in this debate. out of respect for her and her process this is a real person who really suffered. she even spoke so candidly, she almost died. >> she considered suicide. she talked about how she was feeling suicidal. let's listen to her talk about her public humiliation. in the past years. >> i was patient zero. the first person to have their
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reputation completely destroyed worldwide via the internet. when i ask myself, how best to describe how the last 16 years has felt, i always come back to that word -- shame. my own personal shame. shame that befell my family. and shame that befell my country. our country. >> john avalon. fact -- monica lewinsky paid a much bigger price for the affair than president clinton. fact or fiction? >> absolutely fact. >> sexism? >> when you have the bully pulpit. people have to seen new context. if he would have been a manager at a sporting goods store, he would have been fired on day one. >> they tried to, they impeached him. >> but they can't unilaterally. but i do think the speech was so thoughtful and funny at times. and she took the risk of
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intimacy, which great speeches have to do. and it reminds us 16 years after that constitutional crisis, that celebrity-driven scandal, the human collateral damage in that political witch hunt. >> witch hunt? how is it a witch hunt? >> it was a politically motivated investigation of to e delegitimize an elected president. hover was caught in the crossfire. there was an element of shaming and cyberbullying. she was patient zero to some extent. she survived, the president survived. left office with 60% approval ratings and 15, 20 years later you're able to see her in a deeper context that compel s compassion. >> i don't know that she survived, she survived literally. but her life has been a shadow of what it could have been. she's talked about that. she didn't get jobs, she didn't have relationships.
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all because she was so shamed. but you know, i don't want to blame the victim here and i believe that she now after all that, because of the fallout, she was the victim. >> the president as well as the media. >> of the cyberbullying, not of her action, but basically shouldn't she have spoken out sooner? it is so poignant, it is so relatable. maybe she shouldn't have waited 16 years to talk about it. >> i'm criticizing anybody that's been a victim. she is the only one we've seen to be a cyberbullying victim to this extent. let's let her be a spokesperson for this. let's let her speak out and let's let her create a new identity for herself in the public eye that we can all respect and talk to and listen. >> the "vanity fair" article, there is stink on her about this. >> only because we perpetuate it by saying things like that. >> i'm saying the media won't leave her alone. she came out in "vanity fair," she wrote a very intelligent
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piece. hocked right away, she should shut up. she should go away. if the sitting president, do you think that there would have been this kind of reflective ignoring of any kind of feminism, any kind of gender balance and putting it all on her like what happened then. >> that was unprecedented in american history. we were coming to grips with something in real-time that we never had to confront before. >> we had had presidents who stepped out before. >> but we never confronted it in real-time with evidence. here's a country that has a tradition going back to the scarlet a and our puritan roots. this was a tough, real-time confrontation with ourselves and our own hypocrisy. she got caught in the middle of it. when we see the scandals unfold in real-time, try to remember the real human beings underneath them. >> people respond differently. there is sympathy, once you hear
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somebody in their own words, there is sympathy. she joined twitter last night at 9:00 p.m. she tweeted this -- and this is good news, i think. she tweeted #gratitude, #overwhelmed, #thank you. >> if she wants to get the message out about cyberbullying, she's in the right place on twitter. but i hope she's ready. >> she's bn amazingly thoughtful. i want to hear more from her, i applaud her, think she's a woman of real courage. to put herself out there all over again, this is somebody i want to hear more from and to allow her to create a new identity for herself. so people can learn from her experience. >> we want to know what you think about it. you can find us on twitter. quick programming note, tonight jake tapper mod rates the florida governor's debate. the current governor and former governor go head to head on 7:00 p.m. eastern on cnn. let's hope they both have fans.
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oscar de la renta, he dressed first ladies, leading ladies, ladies who lunch. anybody who wanted to be somebody needed to be seen in oscar de la renta. this morning we'll remember him. he died at the age of 82. we'll have a look back at his life and pioneering style. a man of true class that went well beyond fashion. i've always loved exploring and looking for something better. that's the way i look at life. especially now
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we hope do you indeed join us for that it will be a fantastic two hours, anderson and i will lead you through the great stories of us finding our roots. right now we turn to news breaking overnight. iconic fashion designer oscar de la renta passed away at 82 years old. he made a name for himself in the '60s when he dressed first lady jacqueline kennedy. from there his creations soared. we want to turn to eric wilson, the fashion news director for "instyle" magazine, to discuss the power this pioneer of fashion had on the industry. i'm sure this news rocked your world quite a lot. i think so many of us looking
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back at how this man was able to stay so true to himself, eric and yet stay relevant, right until recently with george clooney's wedding. >> absolutely. he was one of the founding pillars of american fashion. he helped create a very sophisticated look for american fashion and it was beyond blue jeans and work wear, we moved into twin sets and ball gown skirts because of oscar de la renta. >> what made his fashions so unique? what defined it. >> i think you could summarize it by uptown sophistication, glamour, elegance. he made clothes that women could just totally shine in and that's true for more than five decades. he adapted other the years to create new looks that spoke to different generations. >> many become trendy. popular, successful in fashion. there was only one oscar. what allowed him to transcend even his business and to be seen as somebody who had value in this society. beyond what he was putting out in his product?
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>> there's many answers to that question, but first and foremost, it was his personality. he could charm anyone into an outfit. he could seduce the customer into his clothes and his philanthropy. helping children in new york is quite legendary. >> aside from very famous ball players, probably the most notable dominican and very proudly, a bit of a diplomat and also like an unofficial ambassador there. i think it's also interesting, too, that even after he was diagnosed with cancer, a tough time in his life to be sure, he was very ill, yet his business soared. >> there was a real turning point around "sex and the city" when sarah jessica parker mentioned his name on the show. cancer didn't stop him for an instant, he was working, would you see him at the shows, even when he was in the worst of health over the last eight years
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or so, and he would continue working endlessly just to make that business happen. partly for his own interests and partly for the people that worked for him. >> did you have a favorite dress, a favorite gown? >> i couldn't even begin. but i was just thinking of michelle dockery. >> lady mary from "downton abbey." >> from the golden globes. >> wonderful to have you here and remember his son, moises is a designer in the company and will likely carry on his legacy from his father. thank you very much. we'll be keeping an eye on the legacy of oscar de la renta as more information comes out about him. that's jun just one of the stories. a lot of news, let's get to it. >> oscar pistorius just sentenced to five years in prison. >> things are going to change dramatically for him. new guidelines for health care workers treating patients
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with ebola. >> obviously there have been some missteps. >> the guidelines up until this point were inadequate. blood was found on wilson's good, inside wilson's patrol car and on his uniform. >> that tends to support officer wilson's testimony. >> when your hands go up, the threat is over with and darren wilson should have responded accordingly. >> welcome back to "new day," i'm alisyn camerota along with chris cuomo. we begin with breaking news, oscar pistorius finally knows his fate, the blade runner sentenced to five years in prison for murdering his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. >> that sentence could be a little shocking. get this, he could only serve ten months of that sentence. pistorius remaining stone-faced as the judge handed down her ruling. he quickly left court in a police van. let's get to robyn curnow in pretoria with the latest. any more reaction from down
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there? how is the sns being perceived? >> we've had comments from oscar pistorius's uncle. he spoke outside the court. he said they're emotionally drained, exhausted. i think very importantly they felt quite angry. it was quite a strong taste from the pistorius family, they felt that the state had made the truth become totally irrelevant during this trial. we've also recently heard from the steenkamp family saying that they accepted this decision. inside court as you said, oscar pistorius's stoney-faced, very unemotional as he received the sentence. everybody in court, too, chris, pretty quiet. pretty unemotional afterwards. take a look at the way the judge spoke directly to oscar pistorius as she handed down the five-year sentence. >> count one, culpable homicide.
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the sentence imposed is the maximum imprisonment of five years. [ inaudible ] [ inaudible ] >> robin, we know that you recently spoke with oscar pistorius. what did he say? >> well in the last few weeks, oscar pistorius seemed to become more accepting of his fate. i think he had been prepared by those around him that the possibility of a jail term was very real. and i got the sense, well he, he insin waited that he wasn't scared, he wasn't afraid, that there was an acceptance about going to jail. he seemed to want to contribute while in jail, suggested perhaps that he could perhaps start a gym club or help some of the inmates with literacy. with reading classes. so there has been over the past few weeks, a preparation mentally and emotionally from him. in terms of what happened today.
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he left court, went down into the cell, got into a police van and is being take ton a local prison. >> robyn curnow, thank you so much. we said he was just sentenced for murdering his girlfriend. it's actually culpable homicide. there's a distinction. >> everywhere, there's a homicide charge but there was no finding that he intended to kill reeva steenkamp, by american standards, manslaughter relatively light sentence. we'll follow up as there's more reaction. new information back at home. two dallas nurses, already infected with ebola. the cdc has released new protocols for health care workers to deal with working around the virus. the updated guidelines call for vigorous training and practice for putting on and taking off personal protective equipment. ppe. over 120 people in this country are being monitored for possible exposure to ebola.
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we're lucky to have chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta with us this morning to tell us about these guidelines. am i right to keep phrasing it in terms of finally? because for me, it feels like when you were down in monrovia, you knew it the right way to do it. in tents in wet africa, why didn't we know the right way to do it? >> i think we did and i think that's making your point. for 40 years they've been doing this in very tough spots around the world. and i think you know, we didn't do that here. there's a lot of different reasons. you hear different things from different people. as you mentioned, intensive training, no brainer, right? not only training, but you go the to prove competency, before you can take care of an ebola patient. this is the equipment. the bottom line, there's no part of your skin that is going to be showing any more. we've talked about this over and over again. this idea that even a little bit of infected bodily fluid getting on your skin can cause an infection. cover your skin. that's a basic thing. and so and then you want to have people who observe you putting
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this on and off. mistakes can get made, when i was showing the demonstration, you need somebody to show you and look at you and say, one moment before you do this particular step. that could be a source of infection. it's those observers, the three main things. that's just, it's if you go to monrovia, if you go to guinea, that's what they've been doing for a long time. >> now their neck is covered, is in a a big difference? >> that's a big difference. and there's a hood that comes over it covers up. you got the face mask instead of the goggles, to get your whole face covered and the neck, the big thing whendy that demonstration, neck was still showing and you could possibly get infected fluid. >> remember when you walked us through in lie beer yarks the decontamination process, not just the donning and doffing of the equipment, but the bleach used to clean off any resistant bits that could be -- you know what i mean? is that part of it you put your hands in bleach. >> we dunked our hands in buckets of bleach he they say that will be done on a more
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as-needed basis. they won't make it mandatory for every single step. they don't think it needs to be part of it as much as covering all the skin. when i listened to them carefully, they said we had these previous protocols, they're inadequate. they made a big point of saying that. the dallas hospital followed our protocols, those were inadequate protocols. also, there was a notion that american hospitals, we do procedures that are more invasive. we put breathing tubes into people. we put people on dialysis. that increased the risk. we should have thought about that. we should have put on the more protective gear. >> that's the important point. look, you've been great on this, sanjay, that don't be afraid of ebola. it's not going to break out here the way it is in west africa. but what was fueling a lot of the panic is, i don't trust what they're telling us. is what we kept hearing from the audience. i want to play a little sound, amber vinson, the second nurse to get it. even on here there was a little
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suggestion, maybe she didn't do what she was supposed to do. you didn't hear authorities coming out and defending her. listen to what her mother told don lemon last night. >> did she call the cdc or did a representative from the health agency in dallas call the cdc? >> the protocols that were in place was she was to call a team member of the dallas county health department. and they did the reporting to the cdc. >> you know the protocols. did this nurse do everything right as she was told to do? >> it certainly sounds like it. i mean she was probably told the monitor her temperature. she was told to call in if there was a problem. she wasn't told, this is a critical point, not to get on a commercial aircraft. had she been told that, she probably wouldn't have done it. i think that's the interesting thing. you come back and hear from the cdc saying of course someone being monitored, they're in this controlled movement stage. can get in a car, they go k get
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on a chartered airplane. they can't get in a commercial aircraft. they can't get on a cruise ship. it makes sense, but at the time amber vinson it doesn't sound like hee was told that. and the person who got on the cruise ship, wasn't told that. >> i was interested, one of the new guidelines, they have to wear a respirator so they can breathe in here. is that one of the problems before, they were breathing without a respirator. >> this is filtering out airborne particles. this circulates air through the whole system. so you, it's more comfortable. i can tell you in guinea, if you were wearing that thing for 20 to 30 minutes, you were done. you couldn't do it any more, you got so exhaust sod quickly. this helps with that. >> sanjay, thanks. >> thank you. now to the fight against isis. the government of turkey moving to help kurdish troops defend
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their besieged border town of kobani, officials have cleared the way for peshmerga fighters from iraq to use, turkish territory to launch attacks against ice nis syria. cnn's ivan watson is live at the turkish border. >> it appears to be a u-turn alisyn, saying that's right, reinforcements can come in to help this besieged city behind me, which has been hit we believe by what appear to be two air strikes within the last half hour. there's still smoke going up from that. if and when the peshmerga fighters from northern iraq come, they'll be welcome reinforcements, bringing presumably more weapons and the kurdish defenders of that town are getting other help. of course the u.s. making its first air drops of ammunition, and much-needed medicine to this town. early monday morning, we have exclusive video of some of the medicine getting to some of the people who need it most.
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a doctor we've been talking to for weeks, showing us basically with video that we obtained from inside kobani, so of the medicine he got that he's using to treat wounded civilians. and wounded fighters in that town of kobani. this doctor has had to move his clinic four times because of artillery fire coming from isis, he's had desperate people coming to his clinic, asking for bread, just to give you a sense of how limited the supplies are in there. so if the iraqi peshmerga fighters come and join as well, that will be another bonus perhaps that could perhaps break the back of the isis siege around this beleaguered city. >> let's hope that works, ivan watson, thanks so much for the update. a lot of news, let's get back to mick. >> with your headlines, everyone, good morning. the private suspect in the disappearance of virginia
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student hannah graham has been indicted for the rape and abduction of a woman in fairfax, virginia. police say jesse matthew is cooperating with their investigation. this morning investigators are still trying to determine whether a skull and bones discovered behind an abandoned home on saturday are indeed the remains of hannah graham. ukrainian army appears to have fired banned cluster bombs into rebel-held donetsk during two attacks this month according to the "new york times," based on physical evidence and interviews with witnesses and victims. the attacks wounded six people and killed an international red cross worker. these new developments could complicate efforts to reunite the country. human rights watch says pro russian rebels likely also used cluster weapons in the conflict. you'll recall the white house fence-jump another made it to the east room before being arrested last month? he face as competency hearing, 0 omar gore zanzales has pleaded
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guilty to several charges. last week a federal grand jury also charged gonzales with assaulting, resisting or impeding officers. i got to show you some celebration here on "the price is right" that's a contestant hitting the dollar sign on the big wheel. and then breaks into what can only be described as like a -- i don't know, watch it for yourself. is this a belly-flopping fish dance? i'm not sure. wait, stirring the pot. stirring the pot. but then he spins the wheel again. this is the second time. what more does he have in him. he lands where? big money, big money. he didn't get the one double zero again, did he? uh-oh! this time for $25,000 he wins an 11-night cruise to tahiti, a car, $6,000 in cash. it's like a $60,000.
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here's what i'm going to say, sometimes i do things and i feel like you could be a little more supportive. i want to see more exuberance from you. a little of that spirit, not a lot. >> i've got a lot in me, i'm not going to lie. i got a lot of moves. they're not good moves, you may not want to see them. but they're moves nonetheless. >> the only thing that will get my kids to go to sleep, when daddy starts dancing. you know the sprinkler. wait for it -- that's the sprinkler, it's strong. you know you're going to try it later. >> thank you for busting that one out for us. >> i have moves. >> we may have created a monster. back to the news, the situation in ferguson is threatening to erupt again. why? because of these new details. coming out about the michael brown shooting. evidence that may support the
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offic officer's account of the fatal shooting. who leaked the information and what could it mean? >> and when president obama went to vote early for the mid terms, he got more than he bargained for. what he did when another voter told him -- not to touch his girlfriend. that's coming up, "inside politics." right when you feel a cold sore, abreva can heal it in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast,
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good morning, tensions rising once again in ferguson, missouri, as new details emerge about the michael brown police shooting, overnight, two people were detained, including a missouri state senator, while protesting outside the ferguson police department. why? new forensic evidence could should light on exactly what happened the night officer darren wilson fatally shot the unarmed black teen. cnn's pamela brown is in the washington burg with details. pamela? >> a source with first-hand knowledge of the investigation saying one of the bullets that struck michael brown is at close range and is consistent with a struggle at officer wilson's car and new forensic evidence showing where brown's blood found at the crime scene is backing up that narrative. >> police shot this boy outside my apartment. >> cnn has learned new forensic evidence shows michael brown's blood was found on officer darren wilson's gun, uniform and inside the interior door panel of the officer's car.
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>> if in fact there's significant blood evidence inside the car, or gunshot residue inside the car, that tends to undergird the officer's assertion that brown came in the car and they were fighting in the car and there was a struggle for his gun inside the car. >> officer wilson told investigators he feared for his life after struggling with brown in his police car. wilson says brown tried to grab his gun. but dorian johnson, who was with brown at the time blames the officer with a the aggressor. >> the officer is pulling him inside the car, he's trying to pull away. >> the attorney for michael brown's family said what matters most is what happened in the street when officer wilson fired the fatal shot at the unarmed brown. not what happened inside the car. >> that's not when michael died, michael died later as the officer got out of his car as michael was running away from him and the officer decided to shoot him as he ran away.
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>> as anticipation mounts for the grand jury decision on whether wilson should be tried for murder, questions remain about why the information about the new forensic evidence, first reported about the new york times, was leased in the first place. >> it could be in part for a beneficial purpose to start leading those community leaders and those leading the protests to believe that there won't be an indictment. and maybe over time, that will have a beneficial effect of no riots, no battles in the streets again. >> two months since wilson killed brown, an anger in missouri still simmers in an exclusive interview with cnn, attorney general eric holder tried try ed to temper expectations on whether there will be an indictment. >> high hope would be as we go to the federal government, we look at the facts, looked at the law, had to deal with that high standard and came to an appropriate conclusion.
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when we do that. >> it's unclear at this point when the grand jury will release its decision. but officials say there's a good chance it will be mid november. alisyn? >> pamela, thanks so much for. let's talk more about it, jebry toobin is cnn legal analyst and joins us now. jeffrey, great to see you. what do you think of the new testimony and evidence that's come to light that blood was found inside the car, found on officer wilson's uniform and on the gun? >> i think the problem is when you look at one piece of evidence in a complicated case, and this is fairly complicated, and think you somehow have the answer. but yes, this is a fact. this latest forensic evidence. that seems helpful to officer wilson. because it suggests that he was not the aggressor. in the struggle. however, it is important to remember, that michael brown was shot outside the car. and the most important forensic
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evidence we don't know yet. how far apart were they? was he shot in the back? was he shot in the front? those are going to be the key issues. not what went on inside the car. >> but by the way, just because michael brown's blood was found on the gun and inside the patrol car and on the officer's uniform. how does that mean that he was the aggressor? we don't actually know what happened. >> we don't know that. and it's been clear for a long time, eye witnesses said there was some sort of confrontation between brown and the officer by the car. but as you point out, the key issue here is when michael brown was killed. and he was killed outside the car. and you know, even if officer wilson was threatened inside the car, even if the gun went off inside the car, which it apparently did, that wouldn't give officer wilson the, the right to shoot michael brown in cold blood if there was no threat outside the car. >> is that right, jeffrey? we've heard diverging things
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about a this. that if he were threatened, if the officer were threatened, if michael brown had gone for his gun inside the car, that that does justify what happened outside the car. because then the officer was in pursuit of an aggressive assailant who had been trying to kill him by grabbing for his gun. >> no, that's not necessarily true at all. just think about it, you know, hypothetically, again, we don't know exactly what happened outside the car. but suppose michael brown ran away after this confrontation and 25 feet away, officer wilson shot him in the back. that wouldn't be justified under any circumstances. again, i'm not saying that's what happened, but that is a possible scenario that certainly would be an unjustified shooting. if, however, michael brown continued to come at officer wilson, and they're two feet apart and wilson shot him in self-defense, that would be
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justified. but again, we don't know what happened outside the car, at least based on forensic evidence and that's the most important part of the case that we don't know about. >> jeffrey, isn't all this information supposed to be secret and sealed from the grand jury? >> yes. but in high-profile investigations, some stuff tends to come out. you know i don't really buy the conspiracy theory that you know, someone's leaking to anticipate what the ultimate result will be. you know we're journalists. we try to find out stuff. we're going to try to find out stuff in all circumstances. i don't necessarily believe that someone is sitting there thinking -- we're leaking, to anticipate what's going to happen six weeks from now. you know, journalists are pressing for information. we're good at our work, we find stuff out. i don't think that means that one result is more likely than another. >> so the fact that there is such a discrepancy, between what witnesses, such as dorian johnson, who was with mike brown says and what officer wilson
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says, does this mean the grand jury should send it to a trial for a jury to hear all this? >> i don't think you can say that in the abstract. i think you have to be much more meticulous about what each witness said. i think it's important to point out that many witnesses have said now, that wilson shot brown at some distance. most of the witnesses support the thesis that this was a crime. this was an unjustified shooting. now we don't know. that all the witnesses ultimately will line up. all we know is what people have said on television what people have said to reporters. ultimately the grand jury is going to hear everybody under oath. and we hope come to a just resolution of how this case should proceed or not proceed. but you know, this is not, you know, just some sort of even story so far. most people suggest the eye witnesses suggest this was an unjustified shooting. it will be much more important
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to know what they say under oath with the grand jury. >> jeffrey toobin, thanks so much for the analysis. let's go over to chris. >> as you know, the mid term elections are two weeks away, as they go, so could control of congress. as that gsz, as you know, comes the chaos we all have to endure from washington, d.c. john king and his "inside politics" team will dive deep into the most crucial races of the year to explain what factors could determine the all-important outcome who have controls the senate. that's ahead. also new leads for you in the manhunt for a cop killer in pennsylvania. are police finally closing in on one of the fbi's ten most wanted fugitives? details ahead. hello... i'm an idaho potato farmer and our big idaho potato truck is still missing. so my buddy here is going to help me find it. here we go. woo who, woah, woah, woah. it's out there somewhere spreading the word about americas favorite potatoes:
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good to have you back with us here on "new day." breaking news -- five years in prison, that's the sentence for oscar pistorius in the shooting death of his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. he could only serve ten months. because the law he was punished under call force him to serve only one-sixth of the prison term before he could be placed on house arrest. steenkamp's family said they're satisfied with the ruling. prosecutors have not decided whether or not to appeal. new ebola guidelines from the cdc. health care workers treating ebola patients must rigorousry train and practice doning and doffing protective gear. amber vincen has announced she's hired a high-powered lawyer and insists the cdc clearing her to
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fly, disputing claims by the agency that he had been told to avoid travel. the ceo of the french oil company total has been killed in a freak accident at a moscow airport. say his private plane collided with a snowplow monday. and that the snowplow driver was drunk. still russian officials say they aren't discounting other factors like pilot and air traffic controller error. three members of the plane's crew were also killed. in the spirit of the season, weird or spooky you decide. take a look. ♪ ♪ >> that house in illinois rocking out to queen's "bohemian rhapsody" devilish faces singing along. we're told that the light show is timed to some 30 different songs, including of course, hello, michael jackson's
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"thriller." the display is attracting a lot of traffic in the neighborhood. what do you think, creepy, spooky? >> weird, spooky or awesome. >> i should have given awe third choice, my bad. >> strong. easy come, easy go, will you let me go. >> let him go. >> oh, no. >> go on. >> i think it's a metaphor for the segue to john king because they're fighting for control of congress. >> you can find a segue anywhere. chris cuomo. >> "inside politics" with john king. we could use some better music. there's no doubt about that. just for you, two weeks out, we broke out the fancy toys to explanation this election. with me to share reporting as we go through especially the race for control of the senate. ron fournier of "national journal" and jonathan martin of the "new york times." three dozen senate races across
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the country, only about a dozen are competitive. democrats have 55, including two independents. republicans at 45. i'll give awe scenario, it will make some democrats mad. here's how republicans think they get to a majority. i changed six states, montana, south dakota, alaska, arkansas, louisiana and west virginia. those are the six states republicans think they are most likely to win. and they think that helps them get near a majority. even if it happened and democrats say we're not out of play in arkansas, we can still win in alaska. but hypothetically that happens, 48-45. how do republicans get do a majority? >> they have to hold their own. they think they'll hold kentucky. it's a close race, this is close to the end. republicans think they'll work this one out. if that happens, they're up to 49. now two republican states, kansas and georgia, the rest are democratic held states, colorado, iowa, new hampshire. let's go to colorado, i was just out there. this one is still close, this is
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a state where the republican is slightly ahead. the democrats think with early voting and the like they can outhustle them. who's going to win here? >> you're the one who taught me at the "a.p." there's a reason why we have a vote. turn-out is going to matter, the hispanic vote favors udall. i have no idea. >> you can't find a public poll, john, that has senator udall winning that race. but democrats and even some private data that i've heard about from the gop has the race still a one to two-point race in the margin of error up in the air. >> i'm going to come over here to new hampshire. the democrats say they're still slightly ahead in this one. the republicans will troo i to make the two-week push to get it. i'll give this to the democrats as we play off the map. now we're at 49-46. north carolina is a race where the libertarian candidate could shape this race. republicans say their candidate, tom tillis has surged in the last two weeks, focusing on isis
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and ebola. i'm going to give this one to the democrats and say kay hagan holds on. now 49-47. with colorado, which we're not ready to call here, iowa still in play. i was out in iowa again. this one is very close. for the sake of arguments, democrats say they're going to use the obama machine. i'll assign this one to the republicans for the sake of argument. that would get them to 50, we would still have three states in play. watch this. what happens if michelle nunn wins in the state of georgia? republicans are furious at their republican candidate. let's assume the democrats hold on in colorado and mark udall wins the state. 50-49, control of the senate could come down to an independent in kansas. if greg orman wins this race, it would be 50-50. if he went with the republicans, it would be a republican senate. so the kansas race could decide the whole state of play. i'll walk back over here. the question then, is what's it
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about? i could give you a scenario where the democrats hold on and have 51, 52, c. does matter? will anything change in washington, if we, forgive me mitch mcconnell and har were reid have, a different 70-something-year-old white man controlling the united states senate? >> no. no matter how this goes, we're going to have more gridlock and more politics above policy and i think we'll have as we turn to 2016 it will be angrier, more frustrated and looking for alternatives outside these two parties. >> i think you'll see some changes, if mcconnell is the leader. especially in terms of the appropriations bills, i think you'll see senator mcconnell on the gop try to use the bills to fund the government to set policy. recognizing they can't get stuff done. can they do things through the spending bills, forcing the president's snand and therefore keeping the government open? >> can they repeal obama care
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with a democratic president? >> no, they can't. what john is saying it's so incremental that it won't matter to one person living outside washington. >> why are we spending $2 billion, then? >> there's a lot of powerful people making money off the election. >> it does matter who is the chairman of the senate judiciary committee. the president saying he'll take executive action on immigration and environmental issues, it does matter in terms of the fight for that. let's focus on the wind at the republicans' back. if you had to bet, they may get 51, or as high as 53, 54. the democrats say after the 2008 obama victory they were going to use the machine in 2010 and defy history and they didn't. republicans had a big year. but republicans don't have the pitchfork holding tea party movement this year. i was traveling and there's enthusiasm but it's not like 2010. can the early voting machine of the democrats surprise us? >> it could, i mean a lot of things can surprise us. the fact of the matter is even
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the best turn-out operation is only effective if you have momentum and let's listen to the president, he did an interview with al sharpton. the president is talking about how he doesn't mind that candidates won't invite him to iowa and colorado. he says i don't mind them doing this, because these are my guys. >> the bottom line is, these are all folks who vote with me. so yeah, this isn't about my feelings being hurt. these are folks who are strong allies and supporters of me. and you know, i tell them, i said you know what, you do what you need to win. i will be responsible for making sure that our voters turn out. >> now that's a, a fact. b, does he want to say that publicly? is that going to end up in ads where republicans are saying against kay hagan or against mark udall.
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that they're with obama. they're 99% with obama. >> he's trying to fire up african-american voters who are seeing democrats, trashing or ignoring the president. he's trying to say, you can still be for them. the problem is that the year 2014, the message doesn't only go to african-american voters, it's instantly beamed across the world and it's two weeks out. that's the kind of message you usually hear two days out on african-american radio. the fact that there's two weeks left gives the gop an opportunity to push it out. >> i agree with everything he's saying and the clearest indication we have that the democrats are going to lose is my phone was lighting up yesterday with white house officials blaming senate candidates and senate campaign committee and senate campaign is kplam kplaining about the white house, there's already finger--pointing inside the party. >> two weeks to go. jonathan and ron, thanks for coming in. the president did his part. he cast his early vote in chicago and it became rather entertaining. watch.
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>> i really wasn't planning on it. >> i am sorry, please excuse him. settle there's an example of a brother, just embarrassing me for no reason whatsoever. and now -- you'll be going back home and talking to your friends about what's his name? >> mike. >> i can't believe mike, he was such a fool. >> he really is. >> i was just mortified. >> fortunately the president was nice about it. >> i am freaking out right now. >> and you know, so you're gonna kiss me, give him something to talk about. now he's really jealous. >> mr. cuomo i'm sure that happens to you when you vote as well. a funny scene, the president has a sense of humor whether you're a democrat or republican. you should give him that point
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and that's a vote she will never, ever forget and good for her, look what happens. >> you never know when the president is going to seidel up to you. >> mike is a fool, can you believe he said that to the united states? i don't know what's going on today, john king. >> mike's getting a lot of play today. >> see you tomorrow, my friend. a quick programming note on the political side. tonight jake tapper moderates the florida governor's debate. the state's current governor rick scott and former governor, charlie crist going head to head. no fans allowed. so the new ebola protocols -- good news, right? do they go far enough? we're going to get reaction from those on the front lines of the fight to see whether or not we really have the risk under control. and alleged cop killer and survivalist eric frein has eluded capture for six weeks, now credible new sightings
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leading investigators in a new direction. we'll take you to the search zones, so stay with us. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities.
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the centers for disease control and prevention have issued new guidelines to better protect health care workers handling ebola patients, they're on the front line. new measures call for rib rouse training and practice for putting on and taking off, the donning and doffing of personal protective equipment. equipment that needs to cover from head to toe, leaving no skin exposed. and most importantly perhaps, a trained monitor must be on hand to observe any health care worker getting in or out of that protective gear. the question is do these guidelines go far enough? joining us now, dr. irwin redliner, a familiar face on our show as we discuss the issues surrounding ebola. given your expertise, do these guidelines go far enough? go we hope that they do i think they actually will and it's been
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very difficult making the transition from what we were doing to what we need to do now. >> just you say the issue of training. of course, critically important. how often do you need to train? weekly, monthly, twice a year? i think there's a lot of these things that need to get worked out. >> do you think they need to do a further drill down of these guidelines, sort of guidelines 2.0 that gets to some of the more specific things then? >> yes, one of the specific things about the cdc's relationship to what happens on the ground. the cdc is issuing guidelines, but not necessarily developing the protocols to be used in the hospital. >> and they're not an enforcement body. >> no. so we have the misconception that the cdc can swoop in and take over the medical care of patients in hospitals as well as the public health activities on the ground. >> enforcement is left to what body. on the state level, health departments on the state level? >> in some countries with different kinds of health care
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systems, can you nationalize the entire health care system. you can't do it in united states. the actual enfoshsmercement has happen with the hospitals themselves. the state regulatory agencies, could be significant in terms of incentivizing or disincentivizing behaviors in the hospital. >> you've been vocal about the response to the cdc's handling of ebola. saying it's unfair to criticize the cdc. you're saying the problem lies at the local level. >> the cdc issues guidelines. and the expectations is that these are the scientific guidelines that should create the protocols at the hospitals and on the local levels. if that's not happening, the cdc does not have authority to order a hospital to do something or not do something. that leaves it up to local officials and state officials regulating the hospitals who need to stay on top of things and make sure things are happening as they should happen. anded other thing that's been interesting is hospital
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officials say they didn't know what to do, waiting for the cdc to give the guidelines this he could google ebola and figure out how ebola has been handled in other countries what the dangers are, how it's transmitted. >> you have said the w.h.o. and the doctors without borders have been effectively dealing with this crisis as best they can. in west africa for years. so that end, those very issues that you say, that sort of plague, you talk about some of the budgetariy constraints on the local level, going back to our original question, then, how effective will those guidelines be. given the fact that on the local level, it's going to need enforcement, you're going to require competency. you're going to require follow up. >> do you feel confident? >> no one is confident. but i think the attention given to ebola has been force iing hospitals and local communities to step up their game in terms
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of being ready. no hospital wants to be caught like the hospital in dallas was, i don't think that will happen again. on the other hand, new york has got dozens of hospitals, will every one of those be prepared? i think we're making good progress here in new york. i think we are in a situation that we've done a tremendous amount of preparedness. other places, other situations? you know, we don't know yet. we'll have to see and hopefully we'll get to a place where every hospital knows enough of the basics so they can move people to the facilities that can actually do the care. >> dr. redletter, we'll have to leave it there. thanks so much for this great conversation. over to you. new information about the manhunt for alleged cop killer eric frein intensifying in the area. schools in pennsylvania are closed because of a possible sightings of the fugitive.
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welcome back, the hunt for suspected cop killer eric frein is heating up again in northeastern pennsylvania. mostly because law enforcement officials have reported spotting hill monday near a post office. several nearby schools are now closed as a result. frein is believed to have made the farrest his home after allegedly opening fire. we have alexandria field following the developments in swiftwater, pennsylvania. >> reporter: hey chris, over the course of the search, we have seen schools closed before. they are making that decision in the interest of safety. officials have decided to move their search area further away from eric frein's home, but
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still into an area that he said to know very well. so these are the woods they've been searching. >> yeah, 16 acres back here. >> reporter: the hunt for a suspected cop killer eric matthew frein leads police into one family's backyard. >> we pulled up and all these u.s. marshals and everything came out of the woods, and they said that the dog actually tracked his scent to our back door. so they had to go in and clear it, and i guess he wasn't in there luckily, but i do hope they find him. >> reporter: the search for one of the fbi's ten most wanted as gripped the eastern part of pennsylvania. he's a self-styled survivalist, believed to be holding a grudge against law enforcement officers, suspected of planning for years for a confrontation and for six weeks, he's avoided capture. did you imagine it could take this long to find him? >> i thought they would have found him the first few days. >> reporter: it was tightly focussed on the wooded area near the frein's family home. but a recent sighting moved
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efforts some ten miles south. closer to frein's former high school. >> it was reported in the area of the polk know mountain east high school, the individual's description was consistent with frein, and he was observed carrying a rifle. >> reporter: the possible sighting came friday night, a woman walking near this empty house tells police she saw frein, his face covered in mud. >> it was very alarming and, you know, creepy. how he showed no like reaction and like it was like avoiding contact. >> reporter: then on monday, another possible sighting. this time, bay police officer -- by a police officer. authorities swarming the neighborhood near the high school, but with frein still out of sight, he's on every mind. >> only at night. when it's dark and that's when i believe he's moving. so it's the only time i'm afraid really. >> reporter: all right. people in this community really putting up with a lot as this search drags on. they've had the annual halloween, hunting restrictions,
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a lot of people are hope hoping that as frein moves, authorities will finally be able to close in on him, chris. >> sighting is good news obviously, hopefully he needs to be smoked out, get out there and regular population to so he can be spotted. >> how imagine now nerve-rack g nerve-racking. the kids are living with fear. new breaking this morning, oscar pistorius is sentenced to five years in prison for killing his girlfriend reeva steenkamp. we will take you live to south africa for the reaction. ♪
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breaking this morning, oscar pistorius sentenced, five years in prison. could end up being only ten months. we have his reaction in court and from the family of the girlfriend he killed. new rules. the cdc releasing brand new guidances for how to treat patients with ebola. this has nurses inside the dallas hospital speak out with a different story. we have the latest. and icon of style has passed. oscar delaware louisiana ren
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that. from the red carpet to the white house. your new day continues right now. it is tuesday, october 21st, 8:00 now, we are here with breaking news. oscar pistorius gets five years in prison for killing his girlfriend, reeva steenkamp. >> but he could end up only serving ten months of that sentence because he was convicted of culpable homicide, not murder. let's get the latest, she is live in south africa for us, tell us the reaction there, robin. >> reporter: well initially in court there was very little reaction, not a lot of emotion. pistorius himself quite stoic as certainly not crying or overreacting in the way we've seen him through some of this trial. he slipped away, very dignified,
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i mus say down the stairs. we now know that he was taken to holding cells underneath are the courtroom. he was put in a van, he was taken away to the prison where he's no doubt being processed. he told me a few weeks ago that he wasn't scared. he wasn't afraid. that he had somehow come to some sort of acceptance of his fate. the possibility of jail time. now that it's happened, i know and his uncle arnold also said he wants to contribute while in jail. he said to me he wanted to start a sports club or help people to learn to read. so there's that aspect of things in terms of reactions. his sister, also importantly said and paid acknowledgment to the steenkamp because she has lost her life, you can't forget. and the pistorius family coming out and saying they know this journey will never be over for reeva steenkamp's family. >> robin, it's interesting, we
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understand that the steenkamp family said that justice has been done. it'll be a little bit of shock to the u.s. audience because five years relatively light sentence for what equates to manslaughter, but there, this sentence is being met with, if nothing else, just a sense of finality, i guess. >> reporter: absolutely, i think just remember that. in the states, you have the death penalty, they don't have the death pent here. there's a higher level perhaps of punishment for crimes in the u.s. even a life sentence, if he had been given that is not life, it's 25 years here in south africa. so i think just try to remember that this is a different justice system and the concept of punishment and the harshness of punishment is certainly not the same. in the context of previous and criminal cases, kelly fox says this kind of sits in the middle of harsh and lenient and she feels like the pins a lot of
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time trying to explain also to the public here that they mustn't rely on indignant or righteous rage to cloud the judgment. they must understand that she is worked within the perimeters of south african criminal law, and this, and the judge's understanding of things, and i think to many legal experts who i've spoken to, this is a fair judgment. >> and to be certain, the judge has been complimented throughout the process for her knowledge of the case and how seriously she was taking it. so the system has spoken, and now we'll see how oscar's life goes on from here. thank you very much for taking us through it from the beginning. now to one of the other top stories, american health care work verse a new set of ebola guidances from the cdc. the new measures call for repeated training and practice with personal protective equipment that needs to cover workers from head to toe with no skin exposed. two dallas nurses now battling
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ebola and 120 other people being monitored for possible infection, critics say the cdc should have updated this ebola protocol much sooner. let's bring in our chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta, thanks so much for being here, thank you. you've brought your gear. explain to us what is different today about the protocols than yesterday? >> there's three main things, one is that everyone who's going to take care of a patient with ebola has to be pull fully trained and prove it. they have to go through competency testing. someone's going to be there to watch somebody put the garb on, the protective gear on and also to take it off. i think the most important point, the one you mentioned as well, allison. no skin will be showing when you put this protective gear on. in the path, there was a concern that the skin around the neck was showing, it wasn't. it was inadequate, the cdc acknowledged that. they said even if dallas followed our guidelines, it would have been inadequate to
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protect their health care workers. >> now they have a hood they'll be wearing and you have this face mask. >> you have the face mask as well. you have the hood that comes down over, and then covers the neck as well. you do have impermeable apron, there's other things standard, standard gear. but i think the main thing again, no skin is showing because that is how you contract this. infected bodily fluid gets on your skin. >> why didn't they do this a month ago? this is what doctors without borders have been doing on the scene, why didn't the cdc collaborate with them? >> i can't tell you why, but it should have been done earlier. a lot of this stuff evolves. sanjay covered us many years ago after 9/11 when he were ramping up for all hazards preparedness, and this is when some of the guideline first came out. we have a lull in activity, people feel complacent, they're not being challenged, not being educated and having a buddy system where somebody's watching you put the equipment on, taking it off, and so on.
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there was a lot of gaps tharn apparent. i think it's because we went through this period where this wasn't much going on as far as attention emergency preparedness. >> is it fair to say to say that if these guideline fwhrs place one month ago that the two nurses from dallas presbyterian wouldn't have gotten it? >> i think there's a strong likelihood. you know, look at some of the data. if you look in central africa, they've been take care of thousands of patients over decades and two health care workers over that time total have ever become infected. in the united states, one patient infected, two health care workers that get sick as a result. so yeah, they've done it really well there for a long time. i think we could have applied some of those practices here and probably been much more protected. >> doctor earlier we spoke to christie fye, she is at the world health organization. there are now almost 10,000, i believe, cases of ebola in west africa. and her organization, the world health organization has come
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under criticism for not getting their arms around it sooner. here is how she explained why they were sort of asleep at the switch. >> there's a lot of reason why is it took everyone three months to figure out that this was actually ebola, primarily because this part of the world had never seen ebola before. i think everybody that looks back in hindsight says we could have done more sooner. >> that was a surprise. that part of the world hadn't seen ebola. west africa hadn't seen ebola before? >> ebola was first picked up in the mid'60s, late '70s excuse me, mid to late '70s. we've known about ebola. when we were planning for terrorism, it was one of the select agents we identified as an agent that could be weapon niezed. >> do you disagree? >> i agree we should have done something sooner. why there wasn't a more concerted response, really problematic. >> what she said again was they thought people were coming in with malaria, they weren't
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thinking of ebola. >> they can be differentiated quickly from ebola. i mean, significant questions, if you're in an area that's endemic, blood tests are easily looked at. you see pair sites in the blood as well. i'm not certain what she's dr s dressing -- addressing. clearly what we learned from all of this is we can't be kplas sant. we have to stay on top of this, we see what happens now that we have almost 10,000 cases and we're struggling to curtail the increase in cases. >> there was so much complacency, christie fey. we have a lot of contact with them, even when i was there in april, i can tell you talking to people at world health organization, they thought this thing was coming to an end back in april. >> why did they think that? >> they looked at trat jekt ri, previous outbreaks -- trajectory, previous outbreaks. as it got worse and worse, people all the sudden woke up
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and the world health organization put themselves in that category as well as people do who did not recognize of the early signs of how bad they could get. none of the people were being traced. the contacts were not being traced. they were moving around and you had more and more of the mini outbreaks. you could have predicted this if you looked at what was happening there. nobody really did that. doctors without borders were saying it's getting out of control and everybody thought it was laugh public. retrospect now we know that the signs were floebl. and when christie says that, she's putting the world health organization in that category as well. they missed that as well. >> if you look from about mid20u7 present, there's ban number of outbreaks, they're all contained in the area. we can do this, it's not a problem, it won't leave here. but in fact they were wrong. >> yeah. >> now that we have these new guidelines and the new gear, is there anything that's onerous about putting on all of these
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protective pieces that do you think doctors will cut corners? >> i don't think they're going to cut corners, especially in light of what has happened over the last couple of weeks. they've seen this realtime. this is real. for a long time ebola was a central african disease it's not going to effect us here. it is real here. people are reluctant to cut corners, and you have the monitors, people enforcing this as well. so is it couple bumbersomcumber? you want to be able to do your job, but people have been using gear like this and taking care of patients for decades. by the way in tough spots with no air-conditioning, it's 130 degrees outside, we're dauk hospitals where you have tons of resources, even a little air circulation in your suit to keep you cool, yeah, i think that they can probably do this and still do their jobs. >> that's good. these health care workers are on the front line and doing a great effort. it's wonderfulle to see. and sanjay, thank you, doctor, great to have you. thank you so much. there's more news, let's
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check in with michaela. >> good morning everyone, once again, here's a look at your headlines. turkey says it'll allow iraqi fighters help defend kobani. the turkish government previously refused to let them across the border. meantime, isis militants launched 15 nearly simultaneous in iraq. get your car fixed now. if it has been recalled for an air bag problem. that is the warning from the national highway safety administration. it says inflaters can rupture in air bags prompting metal fragments to fly out when the bags inflate in the crash. the recall covers close to five million vehicles dating back to 2002. oh those pittsburgh steelers. proving to be unbeatable on monday nights, they defeated the texans last night.
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two first half touchdown passes. it was the 16th consecutive monday night win for the steelers fan, oh to be a pittsburgh fan, how about that. so lay's asked fans to do us a flavor, now they're being rewarded with a new chip. they voted for their favorite among four new creations. after about a million votes, with is a by ginger chips won out. that new jersey mom of three children will get a million dollars, or a portion of the year end sales, whichever is greater, and we here at new day thank you america for preserving the sanctity of the potato chip. >> how do they make it to a vote? >> chris wants to be able to accidentally dunk them in his coffee and not be a legal like snksed potato chip. don't judge him. >> what do people have against
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bacon and chepder. >> that sounds strong. >> certainly deserved a vote. >> yeah. >> i would have liked to seen a little buffalo chicken chip. >> should those exist? >> that seems natural, right? >> million dollar idea. >> we're going to be thousand airs. >> it's a long story. >> blue cheese dip. >> oh, that's what i'm talking about. >> work together. >> carry on. >> feel free to weigh in with your vote. meanwhile, new details we need to tell you about this morning about the michael brown shooting. evidence that may support the police officer's account of the fatal shooting. what happens in ferguson if officer darren wilson is not indicted? plus some sad news we've learned overnight, oscar de la renta dayed. how he revolutionized fashion. he was much more than that he made, stay with us.
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tensions rising once again in ferguson, missouri, as new details emerge about the michael brown police shooting. overnight two people were detained including a missouri state senator. while protesting outside the ferguson police department. meantime, new forensic evidence should shed light on what happened, officer the day, darren wilson fatally shot the unarmed black teenager. pamela brown has the details. >> police shot this boy outside
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my apartment. >> reporter: cnn has learned new forensic evidence shows michael brown's blood was found on officer darren wilson's gun, uniform, and inside the interior door panel of the officer's car. >> if in fact there was significant blood evidence inside the car or gunshot residue inside the car, that tends to undergird the officer's assertion that brown came in the car and they were fighting in the car and there was a struggle for his gun inside the car. >> reporter: officer wilson told investigators he feared for his life after struggling with brown in his police car. brown tried to grab his gun, but dorian johnson who was with brown at the time claims the officer was the aggressor. >> pulling him inside the car, and he's trying to pull away. >> reporter: the attorney for michael brown's family says what matters most is what happened in the street when officer wilson fired the fatal shot at the unarmed brown. not what happened inside the car. >> that's not when michael died.
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michael died later as the officer got out of his car as michael was running away from him and the officer decided to shoot at him as he ran away. >> reporter: as anticipation amounts for the grand jury's decision on whether wilson should be tried for murder, questions remain about why the information about the new forensic evidence was leaked in the first place. >> they could be really for in part a beneficial purpose to start leading those community leaders and those leading the protests to believe that there won't be an indictment, and maybe over time, that will have a beneficial effect of no riots, no battles in the streets again. >> reporter: two months since wilson killed brown, an anger in missouri still simmers. in an exclusive interview with cnn, eric holder tried to temper expectations on whether there's going to be an indictment. >> my hope would be that people
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will understand that certainly the federal government that we look at the facts, looked at the law, had to deal with that high standard it came to and appropriate conclusion. when we do that. >> thanks to pamela brown. so what will this information mean to the case? what would it mean to keeping the piece in ferguson? let's bring in now chris king, he's the editorial director, he knows the community very well, and liz brown, a columnist for the st. louis american and an attorney. it is good to see you both again, i am sorry it is to once again take the temperature of a community on edge. so liz, let me start with you, how is this information about potential testimony or evidence in this potential case going forward, what's the reaction? >> well the reaction is that people want to talk about how this statement needs to be framed. if we're looking at the statement that's coming out of the new york times now we have to understand that the statement
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made by darren wilson was made foush plus weeks after the fact was not that statement that was taken at the time of the incident. unlike the witnesses statement. so what does that mean? that means that there's a possibility that darren wilson waited until there was all of the information, all of the statements, all of the, the comments made by those that would be potential witnesses, and framed his information accordingly. and secondly, the fact that there's blood in the car, the fact that someone is saying that there's blood in the car and blood on the gun and all of that, that's consistent with the statements made by the witness, the first witness, said that he was shot in the car by darren wilson. so again, the most important issue here, the most important question here is your would a police officer shoot an unarmed person walking away, running away with their hands up. that's the question. >> you know what the suggestion is about this testimony though, it would go to the fact that the officer believe d strongly that
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michael brown was going for his gun. that's what the potential is here, but again, we can't know that right now. we don't know enough to know, and frankly the key question -- >> even -- >> here's the thing. i know -- go ahead, make your point and we'll go from there. >> my point is, is that even if we considered the information in the best light of favorable to darren wilson, the issue is, why, if you struggle for a gun, that means he didn't think that mike brown had a gun, and why did you shoot him running away with his hands up? >> i understand, i understand. >> you're not afraid if you have a car, if you have the ability to call for back up, if you have the ability, you haven't been shot, the person is going away. the person is running away. and you shot him. not once, not twice, but six times. >> that's what i thought you were going to say. i get it, and that is a real question that remains. and we still have to know, i think the key of the story will be how did the gun come out of
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the holster? did michael brown take it out or did the officer take it out? this just goes to what could happen in a trial. the question is do we get to trial? chris, you said you think the police are preparing for there to be no indictment here. we have to remember, this banding about of potential information, it's not what a grand jury does. a grand jury doesn't try facts, they say if there's probable cause. you think they're getting ready for no indictment. >> well, most people do think that. there's a lot of preparation on the ground here for that. the king center came here from atlanta, of course the civil right's division of the department of justice is here. there's ban lot of passification techniques. senior law enforcement officials in missouri right now are trying to persuade the ferguson police department to disband, trying to get the municipal government to proactively disban their police department there in the middle of a pattern or practice probe
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from the civil right's division or the department of justice. that's certainly going to end in a consent degree will be too expensive for the city to continue with that police department. sop if the if a year from now they're going to knock that police department flat, why not do it now? and if that were to happen before mckolic comes back with the grand jury, that would be a major victory for the protesters and that could easily, easily prevent some what we're calling unrest politely. >> has any good come out of this in terms of community outreach and that the police were supposed to do better and understand their policing, the community they're place policing more, chris, any sign of that? >> no. but understand, we're in an entrenched protest environment where the police, the police's behavior is being, you know, the police are being confronted with their own worst behavior on a daily basis. it's not a good scenario for the police to behave differently, but they're not. >> and it's too early to really ask the question has any good
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come out of this because we haven't finished this. we haven't addressed this. these are problems that are systemat systematic. these are problem at are generation-old, hundreds of years old. we haven't begun to address them, and it's way too early to ask the question about any good coming out of this at this point in time. >> why is it too early. why do you need to wait for an adjudication for the police to do something actively to change the relationship with the community? >> because the relationship with the community is build on trust. and there is an absence of trust. and you can't build trust, fix trust overnight. you can't fix trust -- >> you can start. you can start. >> you can start, absolutely, but the start has to be determined, whether or not you started something, you have to wait and see six months from now if that was sincere or a clear start. it's too early. >> right, but i'm saying it's not too early for efforts to have been made and it's
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disappointing to hear that they have not been made. now this being leaked out. this is not unusual. okay. you both know this is journalists, we don't believe it came from a grand juror, that would be more troubling, but information comes out, its come on out both sides from the beginning. does this do anything meaningful in terms of shaking, chris, the integrity of this process for people in the community? >> well, let's start with the quality of evidence the new york times gave us. it's as follows, somebody told somebody who told me. >> right. >> the reporter said they spoke to a source who spoke to a government official who was briefed on the testimony. i think that's basically worthless evidence. and to tell you the protesters, they feel like they're being set up. and they feel like it was a deliberately leak. whether or not it was, it could be a reporter with sources or i think it's a shame that it happened the way the it
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happened. >> we're having police officers or police officials on local news suggesting that the reason that it was leaked was intentional, and intentional for the purpose of attempting to dampen down any reaction to the expected non-indictment. >> well -- >> also chris. managing editor for the st. louis american -- sorry. >> go ahead. >> i've been given evidence repeatedly by government officials, by police, people try to leak this story on me before. and i just declined. let's let it come out in a systematic way. >> i respect that. thank you for doing it the way you do it. liz brown, always a pleasure to get your perspective, thank you very much. the man suspected in the disappearance of hannah graham indicted on an attack on another woman. could jesse matthew be behind a series of crimes? we'll look at that. plus he dressed prominent,
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people around the world. mourning the loss of oscar de la renta, and some of his best dresses. (receptionist) gunderman group. gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups. they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. that's the way i look at life. looking for something better. especially now that i live with a higher risk of stroke due to afib, a type of irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. i was taking warfarin, but wondered if i kept digging, could i come up with something better. my doctor told me about eliquis...
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fashion world has lost an icon, oscar de la renta died at his house in connecticut. known for dressing celebrities and prominent women to the nines, his wife telling the new york times he was battling cancer. jason carroll is here to look back on the life of a man who revolutionized fashion. >> yeah, a lot of people in the fashion community hurting today. oscar de la renta started out sketching dresses for others. over the course of decades, he became an american fashion icon. dressing women from the red carpet to the white house for nearly 50 years. legendary fashion designer oscar de la renta has died. cause currently unclear. >> you are stunning, in your oscar de la renta dress. >> spanning generations. hollywood's elite from taylor swift to oprah winfrey, draping
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themselves in his couture. hbo's hit series sex in the city even centered an entire episode around one of his stunning creations. >> oscar de la renta, sleeveless silk file, now that is pure poetry. >> the fashion icon's final masterpiece, amal clooney's gown for what was dubbed the celebrity wedding of the year. >> oscar de la renta was the diplomat for american fashion. he was among the generation of designers in post-war america who came out and put their own names on the label. >> originally from the dominican republic, he moved to new york in 1965. launching his own label and stitching his way into america's history forever. >> i am an unbelievable, lucky man. i live in the best country that any human being can live. >> reporter: we had a reputation of dressing new york socialites,
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de la renta dressed every first lady since kennedy. as to did laura bush for george w. in 2005. even the current first lady, michelle obama, could not escape the sultan of suave, donning her first de la renta just this month. >> i see it as a compliment to woman in the united states we want to be proud of our first lady and how she looks. >> again, oscar de la renta was 82, he is survived by his wife, son, and three stepchildren. those who knew him say he was always kind, always graceful, a true legend. >> that's great. i love looking at those dresses. i could look at them all morning, they're beautiful. >> i think ab lot of women feel the same way. >> thanks so much. good to see you. let's go over to michaela. >> five things you need to know for your new day. i almost forgot what day it was. number one, oscar pistorius sentenced to five years in
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prison. for killing his girlfriend reeva steenkamp. there is a chance he could only serve ten months because the law he was punished under. the cdc has new ebola protocols, trained monitors must observe health care workers putting on and taking off protective gear that must cover from head to toe with no skin exposed. jesse matthew the chief suspect in the disappearance of university of virginia college student hannah graham is facing three felony charges for the 2005 rape, abduction, and attempted murder of another woman in fairfax, virginia. after two previous tries, representatives of hong kong's government are finally meeting with pro-democracy student leaders. there is little hope of a break through since both sides have dug in their heels over howed on thatle the 2017 vote. baseball's fall classic begins tonight in kansas city. should be a nice evening there with the national league champion san francisco giants meeting the al, american league
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champs, kansas city royals. that'll be game one in the world series, tune in, don't miss it. we always update the five things to know. newdaycnn.com for the latest. time for andrea peterson for the chance of a nor'easter potential. >> over the next several days, you're talking about one thing, and that is rain and a lot of it. we have the set up, we have the cold that's made its way in, also a low that'll be developing overnight tonight right along the eastern sea board. you can see the cold pool of air, look at chicago, another ten degrees cooler today, highs there just into the 50s. so that's just one side of the equation. the other side of it, again, is this low that's going to start developing, notice all the systems, even the rain and the wind that's already bringing a lot of showers to the area. once that you have low develop, you're look at potential for even some stronger wind out there. of course that's going to enhance the rainfall that we're looking at, especially right along that coastline. here we go. three to five inches of rain.
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that's what we're talking about. further down to the south, maybe around the mid-atlantic, you're only talking about one to two inches of rain. doesn't sound like much when we talk about day after day of rain, may not be wanting it. here we go, each day separately, light showers, it's overnight tonight that you see that low develop. that's where we see the enhanced a. rain. you're going to be talking about it, winds by the way, they could be gusting up to even about 50 miles per hour. what you see today, the light rain, not the story quite yet. tomorrow, you'll feel the difference. >> that's unpleasant. thank you. >> you're welcome. >> good, bad today, worse tomorrow, thanks. >> great to see you. suspect in the disappearance in the university of virginia student just indicted for allegedly attempting to murder a woman nearly a decade ago. we'll tell you those details and if police think jesse matthew is involved in even more crimes. shopping online is as easy as it gets. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list, now it is. start shopping online from a list of top-rated providers.
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it's a fresh approach on education-- superintendent of public instruction tom torlakson's blueprint for great schools. torlakson's blueprint outlines how investing in our schools will reduce class sizes, bring back music and art, and provide a well-rounded education. and torlakson's plan calls for more parental involvement. spending decisions about our education dollars should be made by parents and teachers, not by politicians. tell tom torlakson to keep fighting for a plan that invests in our public schools.
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so we have new charges against jesse matthew, he is the man suspected in the disappearance of university of virginia student hannah graham. matthew has now been charged with the 2005 attempted murder, aub duction, and rape of a 26-year-old woman. we also know that that case has a dna link to a third case. the disappearance of another college student, morgan hairington. he is correct connected to her case, but no charges related to her killing yet. we're going discuss that now and other perspective on this with cory bearfoot, he is the host and executive producer of inside charlottesville, as well as a journalist following these cases. he's joining us this morning from virginia.
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cory, thank you for joining us. understanding the community, wait you do, proximity plays a role here. give us a map diagram of where each of these cases and disappearances and discoveries have been made, and what it means to you. >> sure. well let's begin with the night that hannah graham went missing, that was in the early morning hours of saturday, september 13th. i spoke with an eyewitness who was the last person to remember seeing hannah, and that was on charlottesville downtown mall in the heart of the city. police believe they discovered hannah's remains exactly five weeks to the day she went missing, 11 and a half miles south of town in a very rural, heavily wooded area in the county. hannah remains are believed to have been found five miles from where morgan hairington's remains were found. morgan went five years ago they are past weekend. she was last seen here in
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charlottesville, october 17th, 2009. a 20-year-old virginia tech student, who had come to charlottesville to see a metallica concert. she was found in late january of 2010. police have confirmed that jesse matthew is linked to both of these cases. and morgan's case is also linked by dna to the case in fairfax. that is septd 24th, 2005. a woman was brutally raped and nearly beaten to death and police announced yesterday in fairfax that mr. matthew has been charged with the abduction, the rape, and attempted capital murder in that case. capital murder is heightened murder. that is murder that is committed and the act of actually committing another felony, in this case, rape. police believe than mr. matthew is linked to all three of these cases. >> now we have not heard about charges, even though there's a dna link, that'll be confusing to people because usually we see dna as the home run of
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forensics, but, there is a little bit of a game afoot here with police with matthew, right? they're trying to get information, so what do you think that suggests, that norge no charges yet? >> well, take a moment and think like a lawyer. i'm not one, but let's do that just for a moment. the attorneys in this case, the common wealth of virginia believes that the fairfax case is a much stronger case. the dna of the perpetrator that was retrieved at the scene was found on the victim. the dna that was retrieved in morgan's case four years later was found on her shirt. the shirt that she was wearing that night which was found not far from where she disappeared, but the shirt was found about eight miles from where her remains were recovered. so they do not have any dna on morgan's remains, they found it on her shirt. that does not mean that that is not the dna of the perpetrator, it just means that the dna that was discovered in the fairfax
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case in 2005 makes that a much stronger case, and so that's what the charges were announced yesterday. >> and also, obviously if you have a murder charge, that may give you more leverage with matthew in terms of what you can get him to cop to because as i understand it, please fill in the blanks for us, there's a concern about how many cases would be involved here, there are plenty of open cases of missing and potential homicides. >> there absolutely is. and in my law enforcement sources are telling me that this case and the story of jesse matthew could get a lot bigger. for those who are outside of the area understand that virginia has independent cities, separate from counties. which makes for all different judicial systems here. so we have city court city and a county court system which means he could be seen in ultimately up to three different court municipalities here in virginia. and in many ways this is just property log to a long story.
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>> any early word on e confidence that the may be hannah graham? >> they were announced on saturday. just a few days ago. the sources that i'm talking to, the guys who were out there at the scene, there is no no one who was there that doesn't believe that they have found the remains of hannah graham. and certainly police chief tim longo with the city of charlottesville made that very clear on saturday that they believe they do have found, finally where hannah graham, where her remains were left. the remains have been taken to the medical examiner's office in richmond where a full autopsy will be done, and the confirmed identification we're expecting any time now. >> they have dna analysis and what's called a forensic anthropologist working on it to get the best id and any suggestion of evidence that they can. we also understand that the preliminary hearing, or one of
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them, for mr. matthew has been pushed back, we'll have to figure out what that's about. please stay with us, cory bearfoot, going forward on this. let us know your information is as good as anybodies, we look forward to talking to you again. >> thank you so much. >> alisyn. is mitt romney running for president again? newt gingrich gives us he thought on a romney re-do and their new project.
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welcome back to new day, a tiny elephant named ellis has been exploring important events in american history, and in his latest adventure, he gets to go with lewis and clark on a journey of discovery. the book is called from sea to shining sea, it's written by celeste gingrich. good to see you guys. this is the fourth book, what is ellis up to in this one? >> well, in my fourth book from sea to shining sea, she discovers the expedition of lewis and clark. i write them because i love america and i believe america is truly an exceptional nation and it's more important now than ever that our children understand what makes this country so special. >> and so do you think that there is something inadequate lapping with american hisy in schools and you need to supplement? >> i do, unfortunately many students read it failing to learn american history, including our founding principles and values. and instead learning
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revisionists or politically correct history. so we really need to give our kids the tools they need at an early age to appreciate the greatness of this nation. >> newt, what why do you think that is? why do you think kids are not learning american history as much as they used to? >> i think a lot of academics didn't appreciate america and teach things. the numbers are stunning, you go out and ask the fourth graders, eighth graders, basic things about america, they don't know. they don't know with why george washington matters, why the constitution matters, and it's worrisome because it becomes like amnesia for a whole country. >> and american history is particularly important, it's particularly important now, with the fight against isis. and what's going on in the middle east. i find myself having to explain to my second grader and fourth graders, what isis stands for and how that's different than what america stands for, and what america was founded on. if it keeps coming up because the news sort of forces it to come up, but this is a much more
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accessible way to have to talk about it with kids. >> right. well you know, a lot of people ask me why an elephant. when you have children, they need a unique character to capture their attention. that's why we've chosen ellis the elephant. >> have you considered sending a donkey on a trip? >> anything's possible. but these books are really aet patriotism, they are not been meant to be republican or conservative books, but pro-american books. i hope many will see them as a celebration of our patriotism and nation. >> absolutely, they're charming. i did get a chance to read it to my kids, it's accessible. there's no agenda, it's just sort of the facts about the founding of america and the lewis and clark expedition. but let's talk about politics for one second. so we've been talking about rmit romney, he seems to be involved here, some people are clambering for him to get more involved in
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2016. do you think he's going to run again? >> i think that's up to him. he has a national base, it's very good for the republicans if mitt is the involved. he's helped raise money, he didn't have to. and i think in that sense in terms of what happens election day, mitt romney's making a positive contribution. >> but his wife was not interested. >> that's what we hear. >> she seems to be pretty declarative and definitive about that, she has said we're done, done, done. and it has to be a family decision. >> that's right. campaigns are long and hard, they've done it twice, they've made their contributions, and i'm sure they feel they want to move forward. >> jeb bush? >> jeb is a possibility. i try to tell people, there are many runners and no front runners. you're going to get potentially governor christie, governor casey of ohio, governor walker of ohio, governor perry of texas, govern bush of florida, governor jindal of louisiana. senators who could run in people
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like marco rubio, ted cruz, rand paul, we're going to have a huge field at the beginning, maybe the most open republican nomination since 1940. jeb certainly would be formidable as would mitt, but there will be a lot ofplayers, paul ryan could decide to run. there'll be a lot of players this year. more than we have normally. >> and what do you think's going to ham in the midterms? >> do you want to go for it? >> i think in the house, we'll keep it, we'll likely gain six to 12 seats. i think in the senate, it looks like we may gain the majority with an increase of six to eight, but it's not over until it's over. and an election cycle is long and hard. two weeks out is an eternity in an election cycle. everybody has to keep working very hard and it's not over until it's over. >> you're so right. great to see you guys, the book again, from sea to shining sea. great to talk to you guys. i better get a copy of that book, it's always one of the perks of being on the show. so we do have new information for you, chilling details about
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californians are discovering the real risks behind prop 46. it was written and paid for by the trial lawyers to make them millions... while, for the rest of us, health care costs go up. no wonder every major newspaper in the state opposes prop 46. they say 46 "overreached in a decidedly cynical way." it's a ploy "for trial lawyers to enrich themselves." and prop 46 has
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"too many potential drawbacks to be worth the risk." time to vote no on prop 46. hello. >> it's hello baby. good stuf today, it is the good, good, good stuff because our new
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family gets bigger. over the weekend, three new day babies were born, senior producer paulina and her husband rich had a little girl on friday. dominika. a nice irish name. came in at seven pounds, 13 ounces. doing great, we love them. all the best of them. we also have twins, my senior producer, john griffin and his wife ally had two boys on saturday. jack and bobby. not named after the kennedy's, but after his grandfathers. maybe he did go that way. jack six pounds 12 ounces, bobby, six pounds, five ounces. came a little early because team cuomo is always early. they and mom are doing just fine. congrats to them. sbooz on the way to both households. >> we're so thrilled for all of you. >> congrats. >> no better blessing than a healthy baby. great news for the new day
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family. reminder, you get to see more mikhailly, root speciaspecial -- michaela, root specialist, her and anderson cooper. a lot of news, let's get you right to the newsroom and mis-carol. >> congrats to everyone, and i'm not drinking the water anywherer in your set. >> be careful, carroll. have a great day. >> newsroom starts now. happening now in "newsroom." possible new sighting of police ambush suspect eric frein, a woman walking in the woods sees a man carrying a rainfall with mud covering his face. also, i was patient zero, speaking out against online bullying saying she wants to put her suffering to good use, but is she too late? and air bag danger, a massive new recall affecting millions of you at urgentrt

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