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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  November 15, 2014 7:00am-11:01am PST

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we're out of time. thank you for joining me. don't forget follow me on twitter as long as you can spell smerconish. see you next week. is america's military presence in iraq about to expand? a surprise visit to baghdad this morning by the man in charge. >> several more units over here or there's going to be a problem. >> 90 seconds that changed a city. for the first time hearing the dramatic police audio of the moments michael brown was shot in ferguson, missouri and the new video of the officer at the center of it all. >> and this morning comedian bill cosby is asked about those and we have his response.
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thank you for keeping us company. always good to see you. >> it is 10:00 on the east coast. 7:00 out west. you are in cnn news room. new developments out of the iraq. america's top general is on a surprise visit meeting with the iraq's prime minister seen on left. and u.s. troops and commanders. the prime minister said the troops are part of a strategic plan for the liberation of the entire iraqi territory and we're going to achieve this goal. >> live from southern turkey right now. give us your take on what general dempsey is hoping to achieve with this very surprising visit. >> reporter: well he at the very least wants to get as best he can an on the ground, boots on
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the ground, his own that would be, assessment as to what the situation really is. the prime minister ears office just put out a statement talking about this meeting not giving a lot of details but saying they were speaking about the iraqi security forces successes and what was going to be needed moving forward. what is especially critical for general dempsey to try to ascertain is just how big a threat is isis posing and what exactly what capabilities do the iraqi security forces need and do the american troops that are going to be coming in, do they have the support to acquire whatever goal it is the u.s. and iraqis set out for them? >> this is very important for the shear basic reason that the americans already initially grossly underestimated the capabilities of isis. we saw just how capable they were and their swift takeover of vast swaths of iraq, catching everyone unawareness. the americans also
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underestimated or perhaps overestimated the capabilities of the iraqi security forces. so main aim is going to try to get to as real an understanding of the situation on the ground as he can. >> he said earlier this week he does not rule out sending u.s. ground forces to iraq. let's listen now to some of the sound. okay. we don't have that. but the bottom line question is this. are boots on the ground necessary to defeat isis from your perspective? >> reporter: that is tough to tell. we have to look at america's history and iraq. and let's assume that they did send in 10s of thousands of u.s. forces. well that's already been done and it wasn't necessarily successful. what is going to be key, if one really wants to talk about a long term strategy that is going to ultimately deny an entity
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like isis the safe haven to operate which is the situation we have in iraq bearing in mind it is vastly different from the situation in syria, it is going to be having that political landscape in iraq that is going to mean that the sunnis don't feel disenfranchised and aren't doing to be turning to an entity like isis. that is what's going to be vital. really creating that government of national unity we've been talking about more than ten years. and that is not going to be accomplished but american military might and not through american boots on the ground. even if we have the u.s. military in company in iraq. and if they were able to drive isis out, again an entity like isis or another would reemerge if that is not in place. >> thank you so much. we appreciate it. as you said, general dempsey, he
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wants to determine whether more resources are needed there in iraq based on what people are saying on the ground there. >> at this point let's bring in cnn's aaron mcpie at the white house. are you hearing anymore more detailing about this visit aaron? >> i want to point out that dempsey on thursday testify before the house armed services committee and in his testimony he said essentially that he is considering whether or not he needs to recommend to the president to send u.s. combat troops into iraq. as you know the president has repeatedly insisted that he does not intend to send u.s. combat troops on the ground in iraq or syria. so we expect that once this trip is over, dempsey will report what he has found to president obama and defense secretary chuck hagel and of course this will be something that the president has to address yet again, joe. >> i want to shift here. we were talking about general dempsey but this visit from him
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while president obama is in australia. and russian president vladomir putting quite a chilly reception there. aaron what have you learned. >> you may remember that back in july, russians shot down flight mh-17 over eastern ukraine. so australian dignitaries and the media have been very upset with putin and are calling him out. president obama did much the same in his official remarks at the university of queensland earlier today. listen here to those comments. >> we're leading and dealing with ebola in west africa and an imposing russia's aggression against ukraine, which is a threat to the world as we saw in the appalling shootdown of mh-17. a tragedy that took so many innocent lives, among them your fellow citizens. as you ally and friend america
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shares the grief of these australian families and share the determination of your nation for justice and accountability. >> there was some discussion too over whether or not putin would leave the summit early. at this point he does not appear to be leaving early. >> aaron mcpike at the white house. thank you. >> thanks aaron. i also want to share something new from overnight. now have police dispatch tapes from ferguson, missouri. >> the radio calls detailed a moment surrounding the encounter between unarmed black teenager michael brown and officer darren wilson who's white. the new audio and surveillance video of wilson in the hours after the shooting come after a grand jury could decide any day whether to diet the officer in brown's death. -- indict the officer in brown's
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death. >> they obtained the video through the sunshine law. a time line of the encounter between darren wilson and michael brown. at 10:00 a.m. reports a stealing in progress. >> subject may be leaving the business at this time. standby for further. >> the post dispatch says about 19 seconds later dispatch issues a description of a suspect. >> a black male in a white tee shirt. took a whole box of the swisher cigars. >> black male white tee shirt. >> affirmative. he just walked out of store. >> and more detail in the this police cross-talk. >> with another male. red cardinals hat. white tee shirt. >> according to the paper, at noon officer wilson reports he's back in service from another call.
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he then asks officers searching for the suspect if they need his help. >> do you guys need me? >> seconds later officers report the suspects have disappeared. >> dispatch relay. we couldn't hear. >> he say they disappeared. >> the paper says at 12:02 officer wilson responds. 21, put me on can field. >> on august 9th. michael brown's friend dorian johnson says they were walking down the street when officer wilson told them to get out road. according to -- johnson said the officer grabbed brown by the neck and drew his gun eventually shooting brown. by contrast a wilson family friend identified a jozy told local radiostation ktfk that according to wilson brown started a physical altercation with him and grabbed the gun which went off.
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both sides agree that brown ran and then turned back. the post dispatch says 41 seconds after the call another officer was about t to arrive at the location. the radio calls also show other officers arriving at the scene and a call for a supervisor. and then, according to the newspaper, this call at 12:07 p.m. was the apparent sound of a woman whaling in the background. >> get us several more units over here. there is going to be a problem. >> any available units to respond to camfield and copper creek. >> also obtained surveillance video of officer darren wilson hours after the shooting. wilson in the white tee shirt leaving the police station two hours after the shooting accompanied by other officers and his union lawyer the video
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then shows him returning to the police station. >> reporter: and here in ferguson people are focused on that grand jury decision when it comes out and what it will mean for their town. if you can see behind me there is one shop boarded up and a lot of shops have done the same thing. boarding up if there is more unrest here where there was so much in august and the months after that. but that is the totally focus here in ferguson. >> wow. that is something else. stephanie, thank you so much. still coming up this morning, the growing cloud over bill cosby as another woman comes forward alleging rain. and despite canceled tv appearances in the wake of allegations cosby accepted an interview on pcr that just aired. we'll play some for you next. [ male announcer ] it's a warning.
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you almost can't tag your eyes off it. >> so true. >> decades old rape allegations resurfacing against bill cosby. he was asked a direct question just a few minutes ago. >> and alexandria field has been watching the interview for us. did he really respond to the latest allegations. >> owe joe i think people were
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hoping to hear more. we knew the journalist asked bill directly about the rape allegations. simon tweeted the listeners who you have to decide for themselves whether he said yes or no. >> this question gives me no pleasure mr. cosby. but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days. you are shaking your head no. i'm in the news business. i have to ask the question. do you have any response to those charges? shaking your head no. there are people who love you who might like to hear from you about this. i wanted to give you the chance. all right. >> shaking his head no. no response, no word at all from bill cosby that. silence speaking volumes to
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listeners though. of course it is subject to interpretation. but here is some what we're hearing from people who heard the interview. run listener writing on twitter cosby was on npr to not talk about those. another tweeter saying cosby his refusal to answer painful still. a lot of tweets still continuing to support bill cosby. he's never been charged with a crime. through the years his lawyers repeatedly deny all accusations after rape against him. >> just one question before you go. i've heard there have been some non disclosure agreements to all of this. is it possibility he's not talking because of that. >> it's certainly been suggested he is not able to talk about
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this. i think people would have still hoped to or heard something about the lines i can't talk about this. i think it was a little stunning for some people to be listening to the radio and to be told she was simply shaking his head. and this is subject to interpretation. we don't know if he was say no to the allegation or in refusal to address the questions. a lawsuit filed back in 2005 by a woman who accused him of raping and drugging her. they didn't have the evidence to charge him. but there was a civil suit and that was confidentially settled so we'll never know the terms of that. >>. christmas cards pretty.
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okay. you want a sign of the season?
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look at what a boise, idaho ireporter sent us. the first snow of the season. it is a real beauty. boise received 7.6 inches of snow, breaking the old record by just .2 inches. but remember it is mid november. >> yeah but that would make a beautiful christmas card. jennifer gray is out there. i've heard from so many people. they have been tweeting. penny from topeka. it's 27. >> it's actually warmer here now right? >> we've actually warmed up about 10 degrees since we've been out here. it almost 40. we're at 39. we are above freezing. we have hit a milestone here at centennial park much of the country is suffering.
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many areas in single digits. some haven't gotten above freezing at least a week. and we are expecting another push of the arctic air into next week. the graphic, temperatures in the 30s across much of the south. folks in the northern plains and midwest are running 20, 30, 40 degrees below normal. so quite the change there. minneapolis at 11 right now. 4 in cheyenne. minneapolis has been below freezing since monday. will continue until at least the 2nd. so at least another weekend of this bitter cold. and things aren't changing soon. also additional snowfall with this. midwest could pick up two to four inches and the chilly air is expected to come through monday into tuesday reinforcing the cold air into the northern plains and guys the southeast and the northeast could be even
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colder next week than we have been this past week. so just trying to bundle up and stay warm this weekend. it is going to last on through next weekend as well. >> okay. good enough. thanks for that jennifer gray. oh what a saturday it is in college football. >> there are plenty of games and rivalries and match-ups going on right now. the big playoff implications are in there as well. brian mcfaden joins us from the university of georgia for this morning bleacher report. hey brian. >> i'm trying to keep warm. i just saw the weather report right now. it is about 30 blow here in athens. maybe not that cold here. i'm in athens. home of the georgia bulldog, 15th ranked. playing the 9th ranked august urn tige auburn tigers. they need to win here to stay
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alive. and georgia's chances improved drastically when they learned their star running back todd gurley will be eligible to play. they suspended him after he admitted to signing autographs for money. he hasn't played since october 4th. he'll be a big boost. kickoff at 7:15 eastern. cold too. and the match-up of the week has to be mississippi state at alabama. mississippi state is the number one ranked team going into tuscaloosa to face the fifth ranked crimson tide. mississippi state might be the top ranked team but alabama is favored to win by the odds makers. this is why the regular season and college football is so exciting. girls, guys. a really big weekend for a lot of teams around the country. i'm going to try to keep warm with these guys and keep some food my belly too. >> brian you have a really tough job. thank you so much for -- thank
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to your mobile with no interruptions. i've never felt so alive. get the future of phone and the phones are free. comcast business. built for business. 31 minutes past the hour right now. welcome i'm christy paul. and. >> and i'm joe johns. here the hours top stories. general martin dempsey on a surprise visit to iraq. the head of the chief of staff is immediating with the iraq officials and other u.s. officials and troops. >> the visit comes as u.s. plans to expand assistance to iraqi can kurdish forces battling isis. >> students mourning the loss of their friend.
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18-year-old nolan birch unconscious at a frat house wednesday. died yesterday at the local hospital and now the university has suspended all greek activity o s on campus. >> this doesn't define him at all. whatever happened it does not define him. >> officials are not giving out details also they continue to investigate. a surgeon diagnosed with the ebola is on his way to the nebraska medical center. expected to arrive this afternoon but he's a native of the sierra leone yet a permanent resident of the u.s. the third patient to be treated at the nebraska hospital. >> thunt for alleged cop killer eric frein cost the state of pennsylvania $11 million. he led authorities on a man hunt that lasted seven weeks. >> and the famous philae comet lander we're told is dead or at
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least taking a long nap. it landed on a comet 310 million miles from earth. but apparently its batteries ran out of use. they were hoping sun would power it but it landed in the shade and not getting enough sunlight. >> president obama says he'll do it on his own. immigration reform. he's reading to use his executive power to over haul the law granted legal status to as many as five million undocumented residents and it could all happen in just days. >> and i indicated to speaker boehner several months ago that if in fact congress failed to act i would use all the lawful authority that i possess to try to make the system work better. and that is going to happen. >> the president's move has republicans moving. house speaker john boehner says
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they will fight obama tooth and nail even if it takes another government shut down. >> this is the wrong way to govern. this is exactly what the american people said on election day they didn't want. and so all the options are on the table. >> joining me now to discuss this, maria cardoa and lisa booth. li lisa, why are republicans so resistant to the? because of the process? the way the president is doing it the substance or both. >> it's the process. it's important to know republicans aren't resistant to immigration reform. john boehner himself has had that the house will act that. congress will act. what republicans are so resistant so the president obama's decision and signaling that he will understood mine the
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rule of law and the clear message voters sent on election day that they want a republican majority that president obama will underline the message sent and go it alone. that is absolutely unacceptable and president obama himself in 2011 said it would be unconstitutional for him to act alone on immigration. it is time to start listening to the american people and even listen to himself. >> maria some core republicans are really trying to frame this as amnesty. so let's just look at what the president's executive action is actually planning to do. it would allow parents of the american born children the remain in the u.s. legally. protecting undocumented residents. ensure deportations for convicted criminals. conservative columnist, charles kraut hammer said this planned action was inpeachable. calls ate the flagrant assault on the constitution.
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and he's not alone on that. i guess the question for you isn't the president going too far here creatings legislation that the congress out to be a part of. >> let's be clear this is not legislation that the president is creating. he cannot create legislation. that is up to congress. and he has made it very clear that that is what he would prefer to do is for congress to do this. so the president is now looking to his executive action, which the constitution does give him the authority to do. past presidents have done it. president reagan has given relief to certain groups of immigrants on immigration. president clintonen did it. george bush one did it. george bush two did it. so when republicans fume about the president taking this authority into his own hands that he doesn't have. that is just not true. he does have the legal authority to do it. other presidents have done tons of the executive actions and much more so than president obama has undertaken. and to go back to lisa's point,
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i would believe her except for we've seen this movie before. and we know how it ends. republicans have had over a year and a half to act on immigration reform. they have refused to do it. so when they say they are not are resistant to do it, that they want to get it done, why didn't they do it when they had a chance. and i'll go further. they still have the chance. they could do it tomorrow if john boehner brought it up. so get the legislation done. >> let's live lisa chance to get in there. give me a response that. and also aren't the republicans being set you wiup here. at the end of the day this could possibly turn into a problem for republicans with hispanic voters in 2016. >> to answer maria's question. she mentioned presidents who have taken executive action and also mentioned reagan. the immigration reform that
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happened under reagan was act of congress of the that was congressional legislation and none of those presidents over reached to the extent president obama plans to do. that is the first answer. second in regard to hispanics in 2016 i think president obama is doing hispanics a great disservice. because he is not addressing the key and root issues we're facing with immigration and he is now allowing congress to act on immigration if he moves forward alone. and as i mentioned before president obama is not addressing the root issues. if anything he's incitinining problems along the border like we saw. and according to research surveys as recent as september, hispanics list border issues as top thing they care about. and that's along with republican thinking. >> why didn't they act. >> --
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>> wait one at a time. >> if you want to look at the border crisis this summer. house republicans, the house was the only body to -- >> they didn't do anything to fix the immigration system, lisa. the american people want comprehensive -- >> timeout. >> that is definitely -- >> timeout. let me ask a question. -- >> hello. >> sorry. >> quick question. what about the middle ground. there has been a suggestion that the president take executive action and delay implementation long enough for congress to push something through. is that good idea or not. >> for someone whose purportedly a constitutional law professor it would be in president obama's best interest to check up on the
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constitution. it's president obama's job to enforce the laws and congress's job to devise the laws. >> and i'll say this, joe. the president does want to focus on his legislation and -- >> no he doesn't. >> and it's always been his preferred choice. when republicans decide to turn their backs on american people there is a bill right now boehner can call up tomorrow li lisa. but they don't want to do it. so the president is taking his constitutional authority that he has, that is given to him by the constitution to get something done. and in the meantime when republicans get it together, if they can get it together. then he will put the executive action aside and take up the legislation. >> all right. and now i just want to get your reaction to something that happened earlier this week when two former presidents had a little fun with each other on social media. it started when bill clinton posted a picture of himself
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reading george w bush's new book about his father. he thangd him for the book and replies how are you still at on twitter. so bush replies, and then how are you still not on instagram. so washington d.c. could learn a little something from these guys. >> absolute i. and if you remember bill clinton worked with a republican led congress to pass welfare reform. and i agree they absolutely should. the leaders in d.c. should learn that you can work together. that you can meet in the middle. unfortunately republicans have demonstrated time and again that when it comes to president obama, they have no interest in working with him. >> president -- >> they have not come to the table. >> he is going to try to get things done. >> thanks both. really good discussion. we'll be right back.
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we are shining a spot on the top ten cnn heroes of the 2014. as you vote for the one that inspires you the most. >> this year's honoree teaches young people to cope with grief from violent crime and death in the city of baltimore. meet annette march greer. >> chicken nuggets, french fry, honey mustard and a milk shake. my daddy ordered had same as me. >> my son's father was murdered. that bond. was just a bond a lot of kids don't have. >> a child's grief can be very different from adult's.
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they can easily lose their identity and their security. and that shift can be very dangerous. >> there you go. how are you feeling today? >> our program provides that safe place for a child to recover after the death of someone close. our volunteers help the children explore their feelings. >> why did you choose red? >> i was angry when my dad passed away. >> and talk about ways of coping. we teach our children that it east okay to cry. grief is truly a public health problem. we have got to begin to address it. >> coping is how we deal with our feelings. >> we're helping to heal wounds. and bring families back together again. >> this is the last weekend to vote for the cnn hero of the
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year. so go to cnn heros.com to vote once a day every day for the hero that inspires you most. we are just getting pictures in of a surprise visit to iraq today. >> visit by general martin dempsey visiting with the haider al abad. nobody really knew what was going on on the ground there. and there are questions about whether he is going to recommend more boots on the ground for united states military forces in iraq. >> yeah. again in the battle against isis. we're going to be right back.
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well the former navy seal who said he shot and killed osama bin laden may have nerves of steel but now tells cnn he's worried the pentagon may prosecute him. >> in his most extensive live
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television interview today he sat down and not only described the harrowing mission but responded to the criticism he faced for breaking silence about killing the most wanted man in the world. >> before you walked into that room on the third floor where you thought bin laden was what went through your head. >> there was two left on the stairs we knew we had to get up there because they were doing something. we assumed rigging explosives, vests to blow themselves up. so when we went up my thought wasn't oh we're about to shoot that this guy and be heroes. my thought was we're going to do blow up. let's get it other with. and we up there to get it over with. he was not surrendering. he was moving and based on the level of him not surrounders and the likelihood of him having a vest. i engaged him. and shot him twice in the head. >> what did it feel like? >> the ens sense was first
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recognition and id of him and then he's a threat and i had to shoot him. and it wasn't the fist i'd done that on a target before. i engaged. at that minute it felt like that was the initial threat i had to take care of. and threat this were already threats. threats are just potential unknowns. it wasn't until the room was cleared that i had a moment of pause and i talked to a friend in the room and he came up to me and put his hand on my shoulder and i said hey what do we do now? and he smiled and he goes now we go find the computers and i smiled and okay. i'm back. that was quite a thing. >> and the pentagon is watching every word that you are making public. are you concerned about a prosecution, about violating the non disclosure agreement. >> it does concern me. and if it comes up aisle gresz it. i think i did this in a way that
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doesn't violate any tacticing or any rules. >> do you think you are a hero. >> i was part of a team full of heros. >> cnn.com slash the lead. >> the players are going to play and the haters are going to hate. swift pulled access to streaming of her music in the u.s. now she's yanking it from another country too. man: [ laughs ] those look like baby steps now. but they were some pretty good moves. and the best move of all? having the right partner at my side. it's so much better that way. [ male announcer ] have the right partner at your side. consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. go long. but when we start worrying about tomorrow, we miss out on the things that matter today. ♪
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you should know everybody in our studio is dancing right now. >> yeah. and so is my daughter. >> even more of taylor swift's fans are just going to have to shake it off. friday her music was taken off streaming services in china. she yanked herself from spotify because she wasn't getting paid enough. spotify said she would make around 6 million. but her people saying she actually only made about 600,000. >> ones to watch with the profile of one of the biggest names in the business. >> reporter: the popular dutch
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dj was voted the world's number one dj a record five times. prulss h s produces his own son and now owns a record label. >> it is difficult to breakthrough. your conviction way to to the top is make your own music. not to dj actually but to make electronic dance music. >> his influence is such that he can boast 8 million facebook friends. 1 million spotify subscribers and over 1 million twitter followers. dressed in a tee shirt jeans and trainer you might not notice him walking down the street. but he commutes by private jet and can command a crowd by the mere raise of his arm. >> i had to pick two ones to watch. i chose heat beats the duo from argentina who have their own distinct sound. they have a very energetic but
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still very melodic sound. the second a andrew r. from maldova. just a really talented guy who creates wonderful art. >> all right then. thank you so much for watching today. >> yeah. make some great memories but don't go away because our colleague fredericka whitfield is here. >> yeah. one must always cheer for one self. >> yeah. >> have a great day. thanks so much. it is the 11:00 eastern hour of the cnn news room which begins right now. all right. brand new video of officer darren wilson hours after the shooting death of michael brown.
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this as we also hear for the first time the conversations between police. >> 25. >> get us several more units over here. there is going to be a problem. >> then one of american's top military leaders making a the surprise visit to iraq. what general martin dempsey's trip means next. then: >> this question gives me no please mr. cosby but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days. >> bill cosby confronted about rape allegations on the air. wait until you hear his response straight ahead. now brand new surveillance video and police radio calls from the day darren wilson shot and killed a unarmed teenager in
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ferguson. the audio shows the fatal shooting lasted less than two minutes. and these new tapes released after the ferguson community awaits the grand jury decision. stephanie elam is in ferguson with more. >> reporter: the st. louis post dispatch obtained the video and audio through the sunshine law. according to the paper's timeline of the august 9th encounter between darren wilson and michael brown. at 11:53 a.m. a stealing in progress at the ferguson market. >> we're taking a stealing in progress from 9101 west florissant. >> the post dispatch assays about 19 later dispatch issues a description. >> black male in a white tee shirt. running towards quick trip. he took a whole box of the
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swisher cigars. >> and there's more detail in the police cross-talk. >> he is with another male. he's got a red cardinals had. white tee shirt. yellow sox and khaki shorts. >> according to the paper at noon officer wilson reports he's back in service from another call. he asks officers searching for the suspects if they need his help. seconds later officers report the suspects have disappeared. >> relay. i couldn't hear him. >> he thinks they disappeared. >> the paper says at 12:02 officer wilson responds. >> 21, put me on canfield with two. >> said they were walking down the street when officer wilson told them to get out of the roland. according to johnson he and brown told the officer they were
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almost at their destination and would be out of the street sortly. but he said officer grabbed him by the neck and drew his gun. in contrast, a jozy told local radio station that according to wilson brown started a physical altercation with him and grabbed the gun which went off. both sides agree that brown ran and turned back. after wilson call another officer was about to arrive at the location. the radio calls also show other officers arriving at the scene and a call for a supervisor. and then according to the newspaper, this call at 12:07 p.m. with the apparent sound of a woman whaling in the background. >> get us several more units over here. there is going to be a problem. >> are there any available ferguson units who can respond to canfield and copper creek
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advi advise. >> the also obtained video of officer wilson hours after the shooting. paper show says the video shows wilson leaving the police station to the hospital two hours after the shooting accompanied by other officers and his lawyer. the video then shows him returning to the police station. >> according to the timeline the interaction was less than two minutes. two minutes now the focus of the grand jury decision, two minutes that chamgd one man's life and left an 18-year-old dead. >> joining me now is the missouri mayor. senator, what do you make of these new recordings. >> i have to tell you that it is interesting that we now know what happened at the very beginning. i don't think it officers too much information. however the officers who did call the dispatcher did know that there was going to be a big problem pending. and so that is why the urgency
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was in his voice. and obviously we're where we are at now. >> so what did you hear in the audio that perhaps completed a very uncertain picture in your view? >> well i think from the very beginning they knew that this was going to be a big deal. and obviously it is. because the entire world is looking at ferguson right now. and we still don't have any answers. i initially said that the time frame that the grand jury is going to be looking at is approximately 45 seconds from the first encounter to the final, the fatal shot of michael brown. and we now know in fact that it is within 2:00. so that is the timeline that the grand jury is going to have to look at very closely. and we're just waiting for the results of that grand jury right now. >> and what do you interpret from the motivation behind releasing these audio tapes to
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the st. louis dispatch at this juncture when it is believed within days possibly a decision will come from the grand jury. >> well actually, i don't really think it offers much more than what it is. i mean, it is what it is. but it doesn't say that darren wilson had a certain kind of personality. he doesn't show any emotion in the video whatsoever. it doesn't show him talking or corresponding with anyone else. so i don't think for the people who live here in st. louis and in ferguson particularly, it offers any new information. what we do care about is the authenticity of any reporting between and among police officers. that transparency has not been available to the public. and that is a concern for the people who li here in ferguson. >> what concerns do you have post release of the verdict? >> well, you know, we do hope for best. there are many of my
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constituents who do want to have an indictment. i think there is so much information that is available to say that we may have an indictment. b but practicality tells you there won't be one. so what i am concerned about right now is people are able to demonstrate peacefully. we must have a balance between what the constitution ensures every single american citizen and also making sure that we are also protected at the same time. >> missouri state senator maria chap el nadal. thank you. i'll talk to three people who live in the area, who own businesses there. and they will be telling us how they are preparing. many are preparing for at least protests but no one is sure whether it will be peaceful or
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not. rig right. right now general martin dempsey making a the surprise visit to baghdad as the u.s. prepares. this new video we just received we want to share showing dempsey at the iraqi ministry of defense. on his first trip to iraq since president obama ordered non combat american forces back into that country. so this visit caught some people by surprise. what do you make of the timing? why important? or what kind of signal is it sending now. >> i think general dempsey first of all, good morning. and dempsey likes to get out and conduct battlefield circulation. that is what we call it. you get a feel for what is going on in the ground. and with all the debate of the expansion of the mission and
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putting more troops to help the iraqi army, i think he wanted to get over there and meet some of the new leaders and as well see how the troops are feeling. >> and just this week general dempsey testify before the house armed services committee and this is some of what he said. >> i'm not predicting at this point i would recommend those forces in mosul and along the border would need to be accompanied by u.s. forces but we're certainly considering it. >> how will the general try to assess the situation on the ground? can he really in terms of whether indeed it is helpful to have more u.s. troops there whether they are combat ready or not. >> he is going to talk to a bunch of different people while he's there. not only mr. al-abadi. as we just saw in some of the film. i watched the first clip and it looked like he was shaking hands with the previous defense minister. but he's also going to meet the new defense minister.
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he is going to talk to the military command erpers not onle air commander but as well there is now a division headquarters there. the first infantry there commanded by major general paul funk whom he knows well. he a going to be talking a lot of the iraqi parliament. and a lot of the new iraqi generals. as you know they just swept clean a group of old generals. and i think dempsey knows all of these people. he served over four years in iraq. so he is going to meet with some of the new people and just look at their battle plans. and see what they are trying to co-and what they are going to do next. >> and you know general dempsey. you know him personally. formally a neighbor of yours even. from what you know about him, what do you suppose his thinking might be or how he calculates when or how anymore u.s. troops
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would be involved in iraq. >> well i do know john dempsey. i have the honor of having served with him but also calling him friend. and i i'm a bit biased because i think he's probably the best leader we've had in that position. america is really. it's good to have him in this position. but i think what's doing is getting a feel for ground. what is happening, what kind of options can he recommend to the president, what kind of movement in sectarian issues in within iraq and are they countering those. what offend things have they learned from the military on the ground. what have the american advisers going to tell him about what they are seeing within the iraqi army. he likes to be on the scene. he likes to go to the places where things are happening and circulate on the battlefield. so he is going to get a feel that he just can't get from reports and from messages and dispatches. and that is what's going to happen while he he's there.
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>> lieutenant general, always good to see you. also overseas, russian president vladimir putin will not leave the g 20 early after all. there are reports he was going after after being heavily criticized by obama and leader of other nations because of the tension in ukraine. well whatever tension you might interpret in this photo between president obama and mr. putin, well that was reflected in president obama's words and other australians while echoed with other leaders. >> we're leading and dealing with ebola in west africa and in opposing russia's aggression against ukraine, which is a threat to the world also we saw in the appalling shootdown of mh-17. a tragedy that took so many innocent lives among them your fellow friend.
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america shares the grief of these australian families and share the grief of your nation for justice and accountability. >> and along with putin's arrival well, there was the surprise arrival of russian warships on the australian coast also increasing tensions at that summit. >> more than half the country is dealing with the very deep freeze right now. so just how how will temperatures go? we'll check in. and business cosby, america's dad, confronted about rape allegations. the comedian's reaction that just might leave you scratching your head. you've come to realize... [ starter ] ready! [ starting gun goes off ] [ male announcer ] it's less of a race... yeah! [ male announcer ] and more of a journey. keep going strong. and as you look for a medicare supplement insurance plan... expect the same kind of commitment you demand of yourself. aarp medicare supplement insurance plans insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company.
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but when we start worrying about tomorrow, we miss out on what matters today. ♪ at axa, we offer advice and help you break down your retirement goals into small, manageable steps. because when you plan for tomorrow, it helps you live for today. can we help you take a small step? for advice, retirement, and life insurance, connect with axa. comedian bill cosby
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confronted on the air about rape allegations for the first time since they started making head lines again. npr just arid an interview with the anchor scott simon and cosby, where cosby was asked about the accusations. alexandra field joining me from new york. i guess it's what he didn't say that's getting attention. >> reporter: it surprised a lot of people. i think people expected he would issue a denial. that's what we heard from all his attorneys over the years. they have flatly denied all the allegations. he was asked again today. said not a word. here is how the exchange went. >> this question gives me no please mr. cosby. but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days. you are shaking your head no. i'm in the news business. i have to ask the question. do you have any response to those charges?
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shaking your head no. there are people who love you who might like to hear from you about this. i wanted to give you the chance. >> there you have it. you heard nothing. bill cosby not answering these questions. we don't know if he was given a legal guidance to do that. we haven't dnd decided if he several doesn't want to answerb charged. these allegatio light back in 2005. at the time police investigated and say they could not findhi w was confidential so weon't >>t gave us the . most recent barbara t. she was on cnn's new at that ti.
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and i didn't drink and i certainly wasn't doing anything but exactly what i was supposed to do. in 1989 i did go to a lawyer. eventually he laughed me right out of office. it was terrible. it was humiliating. it was scary. >> charges cannot be filed against cosby in relation to barbara bowman's allegations because apparently the statute of limitations has passed. and coming up. boehner saying he'll fight obama tooth and nail. and our next guest is a democrat and [ male announcer ] it's a warning.
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. president obama warning rubbepublicans he'll use execut action to get immigration reform done. and john boehner says the gop will do everything in their power to stop. >> and i indicated to speaker boehner several months ago that if in fact congress failed to act i would use all the lawful authority that i possess to try to make the system work better. and that is going to happen. >> we're going to fight the president tooth and nail if he
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continues down this path. this is the wrong way to govern. >> i'm joined now by democrat ek congressmen henry cuellar. you are a proponent for immigration reform. what would you'll want to see in a package. >> i do support immigration reform. and i think any packageoncept. one sensible security. i live at the border and that is what i want to see. and two some plan to make sure we address the needs we have here in the economy. and number three is what do we do about the 11 or 12 million undocumented persons we have? the problem is that right now with all due respect to our republican friends because there are some republicans that do support immigration. but we had at least two years this session to work on immigration reform. the senate passed a package on
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the house side it never, never moved. so in instead of fighting tooth and nail to stop the president, boehner should be fighting tooth and nail to compromise to come one some consensus on immigration reform. >> so if that doesn't happen as we're hearing alluded by boehner. then the president says he's going to use executive action in order to make it happen. but you don't agree with that approach. why is this. >> well i mean i'm not going -- if the president does that, i'm not going to vote to defund it like the republicans are saying. i won't go that approach. i prefer that we have a bipartisan approach in congress. that is the way it should be. but as the president -- >> but in this climate is that realistic? in this climate is that realistic? >> in this climate, no. so therefore the president
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decides to go this way, we are going to have some sort of limited immigration reform. i'm not going to defund that. i will support the president. i might not agree with everything because he's doing this in secret and we don't know what's doing. i saw some suggestions that might come out. and i don't agree with all of them but overall i think we can work with him. and remember the president has the power to use an executive order just like other democrat and republican presidents are done in the past. >> what are some things you don't agree with? two of the items you mentioned are in, i guess, the possible elements of his plan. these possibilities have been leaked by various sources. you know, tighter border protection. some sort of allowances for a guest worker program. the president apparently or possibly in this plan would be allowing people with children to stay. migrate workers would be able to stay. under certain conditions. what of the information that you
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are hearing might be in the president's -- >> yeah those things are fine. we got to look at the details. i'm talking in particular one thing in particular the secure community. the secure community is if somebody gets picked up for a crime and they are taken to a jail, they will use biometrics to check his criminal record. and under secure communities they can use biometrics to check whether he's here legally or not. and if we catch a felon at that time, are we supposed to let him go because we get rid of the secure community and he's not a non documented person? no i don't think so. if he as a parking ticket in the past that is something different. but i think secure communities can be adjusted on priorities but it should not be eliminated like the president is saying we should eliminate it. >> if that were one consent made would you agree with the president using executive action
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with the elements that we know of in his plan. >> again i'm not going to defund the president if he does use it. i'm not against it. the president has used 193 executive actions since he was president. the average is 240. at 193 the president is lower than president reagan, president bush and president clintonen so he's not used them a lot. i'm not against executive action. i just prefer a bipartisan legislative approach. but if he does that, then we'll work with with him on that. and i might not agree with everything he's doing but i do radioagr agree we need immigration reform. >> we'll see in the week ahead. >> thank you so much. bye-bye. >> appreciate it. thank you. it is brand new. police audio of what happened moments after the michael brown shooting.
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>> get us several more units over here. this is going to be a problem. >> so with ferguson on edge as they await the grand jury decision, will the latest leak have an impact? we ask a panel of local business owners next. how much money do you have in your pocket right now? i have $40, $21. could something that small make an impact on something as big as your retirement? i don't think so. well if you start putting that towards your retirement every week and let it grow over time, for twenty to thirty years, that retirement challenge might not seem so big after all. ♪
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all right, new surveillance video and police radio calls
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have been released in the case of ferguson, missouri police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black teenager last august. the video shows officer darren wilson hours after his fatal encounter with brown. and police radio calls released by the post dispatch are shedding light on the moments lelanding up to the confrontation. listen. >> we're a stealing in progress. subject may be leaving the business at this time. standby for further. >> it is going to be a black male in a white tee shirt. >> black male, white tee shirt. >> affirmative. she said he just walked out of store. >> he's with another male. he's got a red cardinals hat. white tee shirt. yellow socks and khaki shorts. >> you guys need me?
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zmach can you replay. i couldn't hear him. >> he thinks they disappeared. >> put me on canfield with two and send me another car. >> t get us several more units over here. there is going to be a problem. >> any available ferguson units who can respond to canfield and copper creek advise. >> meanwhile a grand jury could decide at any moment whether to indict wilson for the chute shooting. so many people who live in the ferguson area are on edge. business owners are boarding up in anticipation of the decision and what could happen afterwards. churches are even planning prayer vigils. and missouri's governor is warning violence will not be totalled, quote, unquote. but a lot of people are afraid things will turn violent if they particularly decide not to
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indict officer darren wilson. let me bring in three people who own businesses in the area. charles davis owns the ferguson burger bar on moore. and and -- and suzanne jackson has already boarded up the store she owns. thanks to all of you. let me get all your reactions to the audio tape. if i could begin with you first, charles. >> well, now that they are deciding to release some of the nature i really don't have an opinion of it. because it just seems like that is something they would have done prior to now. >> so you question the motivation behind the timing of
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the release of these recordings? >> it just seems odd they decided to do it now instead of in the beginning. because it may have helped keep a lot of disruption down had they done it in the beginning. >> and suzanne? what are your thoughts on that? do you think timing would have made a big difference on how and when to release these recordings? >> honestly, i think the media has been leaking little things here and there. and, you know, i don't think that this is really going to make a difference either way. i think that, you know, tensions are high. and emotions are high. and, you know, people are going to react how they are going to react. i don't think that this little bit of information is really going to make that big of a difference. >> and steve, you are on the phone with us and you own a gun shop in the area. what are your fellow business leaders and friends and neighbors saying about the release of this kind of information in a time where it could be just days away from
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this release of a verdict? >> and as evidence to the grand jury, i think that a lot of the stuff had to be confidential and safeguarded. so that rumors and the media quite frankly didn't take it out and try to put spin on it. . i think the grand jury has rt heard a lot of evidence from a lot of people. they need to get that from those people directly. i don't think outside sources should influence what the grand jury is thinking of. and i think we need to get all of the evidence on the table before we make a decision and let this process work itself out. >> and steve while you were talking we're also showing pictures of the interior of your gun shop. and i just want for context want to explain why we're showing video of all the guns in the shop there as we are talking about, you know, an impending reaction from people. because i don't think it is fair to make that kind of correlation between what you sell at your business and what could or could
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not happen at the protest. but explain to me why sales, in your view, have been influenced by the fear or even concern that people have as it relates to this august shooting. >> well that is a very good point. in august the people of ferguson, in particular on west florissanta say they saw what was going on and they were able to react to what they thought they needed to combat that fear they had. so people of the area, the surrounding areas, came to our shop. because we are their neighborhood gun shop. and they purchased firearms for protection from what they perceived as the threat. what's different about it this time is that we've had three months of the media and law enforcement and politicians and protesters saying that there is
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no safe neighborhood in st. louis. that any neighborhood can be selected to be protested. any neighborhood could be selected for riots or demonstrations. and that, you know, when you are telling people that t people of clayton, the people of ladoo, st. charles, west st. louis county, south st. louis county, they start to have these fears in their head that this can happen at any place, at any time. so now we don't have this particular area but we have the entire metro st. louis area on alert. and it think it's a responsible thing for people to understand that law enforcement cannot protect each and every single individual. their job as deemed by the supreme court, two times now. their job is to maintain peace overall. the law enforcement over the community. not individual protection. so i think people are being responsible. and they are prepping just like they would be prepping for a
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snow storm or a hurricane. they are getting firearms, ammunition, food, water. >> i'd love to talk further about that. because sometimes fear makes people or encourages people to make not good sound kp decisions. so charles and suzanne as you are hearing this from steve and he says fear is why a lot of people are buying guns because they are afraid of what could happen. charles, in what way are you seeing people being fearful about their day to day lives and i guess it's not clear, fearful of whom? of each other, of the relationship between the community and police? what are you seeing charles in people that you know? >> i think the people are more fearful of the relationship between the people and the police. i don't think they are fearful of the relationship between people and people. as you can see, most of the businesses have boarded up, simply because they feel it might be a disturbance because
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of the presence of the police and the people that may be down here. and it's a hard thing to distinguish between the peaceful protesters and the individuals who are not trying to be peaceful. me, myself, i just put my trust in god. that's why i'm not boarding up. and if you want something to happen it happens. a lot of individuals have not really came in and gave their views about fear. they gave their views on whether it's going to happen, whether it's not going to happen. a verdict or no verdict. but no one has come in and said they are fearful. >> okay. . and suzanne. quickly. your interpretation. if you are seeing fear, in what way are you seeing it from people or experiencing it? >> we're not afraid of the general public. we're not afraid of the protesters. what we're afraid of is the opportunistic tapeworms who may or may not do something just because the opportunity is
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there. you know, it -- i can't afford to lose my business because somebody just feels like being violent. you know, the protesters aren't what scarce me. it is just the people that want to take the opportunity to destroy something. >> we'll leave it right there. suzanne jackson. steve king, charles davis, thanks to all of you and hopefully we'll be able to chat with you again as developments continue there in the ferguson area. thanks. and we'll have much more from the news room after this. she inspires you. no question about that. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved
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endured 17 surgeries to repair her leg. after all that she had it amputated. and stayed positive through it all. here is andersson cooper interview following the surgery. >> first how are you doing. you look great. >> thank you. everybody would expect me to say i'm not feeling very well after i just got my leg chaopped off. i honestlymazing right now. probably better than i have felt in the last 18 months. >> is that the technical term? do they use that in the hospital? >> no they used amputation in the hospital. >> okay. all right. i just wanted to check. i wasn't up on my medical knowledge but i was pretty sure that's not what they call it. so the decision to amputate your leg. can you take us through how you got there? i know the last few years having extraordinarily difficult for you. 17 different operations.
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>> yeah when the marathon bombing first happened and i was in the hospital and the possibility of amputation came up i kind of told the doctor, hey look my leg is just a leg. it is not my life. and to me i'm blessed to be here. so if you need to amputate it, you can. >> you wrote this break up letter to your leg, which is just gotten a lot of attention. and i think it's an amazing idea. you posted it on facebook. you said i feel like you are holding me back from really reaching my full potential. you are talking to your leg. now i get this is probably pretty tough to hear my say but i never lied to you and what i need is something you can't give me anymore and the empathy that you requireky no longer handle. explain the idea of writing that letter. >> it's >> i didn't understand that letter would be such a huge deal to everybody. i wrote it in about three minutes, and it was my way of saying, this really is a
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breakup. here's a part of my body, a piece of my life i've had for the last 27 years, but it's not doing me any good, so when i think about it, it's kind of like a bad boyfriend. there's all these reasons you've got to get rid of him. so i wrote the letter and everybody thought it was funny. so i'm glad that everybody could get a kick out of it. >> i saw a photo that you posted on facebook, in which you wrote, of course, the most cliched breakup of all, on your leg, you wrote, it's not you, it's me. >> yeah. >> which i think i've used that line multiple times. that was great. >> right? see. i mean, everybody's used it before, so it was just -- i mean, i used humor in everything and i tried to be really positive. so even with this, i wanted to make it something that wasn't a sad thing, that really, you know, was a celebration for a new beginning. so, yeah, i wrote that on my leg and it was, i guess, it was pretty funny.
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>> funny and very profound. a psychologist working with survivors of the marathon bombing says demartinez's letter to her leg was a very healthy way to work through a traumatic loss. all right. a polar plunge engulfing most of the country. you know you're feeling it right now. jennifer gray is feeling it too, because she's outside braving the frigid temperatures. [ male announcer ] we all think about life insurance. but when we start worrying about tomorrow, we miss out on the things that matter today. ♪ at axa, we offer advice and help you break down your insurance goals into small, manageable steps. because when you plan for tomorrow, it helps you live for today. can we help you take a small step? for advice, retirement, and life insurance, connect with axa. for advice, retirement, and life insurance, and i'm here to tell hi,homeowners winkler that are sixty-two and older about a great way to live a better retirement...
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. all right. are you wearing extra layers
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today? hat, gloves? the whole works? because it's very much like winter out there. even though, officially, the start of the season is still more than a month away. well, let's take a look. redmond, oregon, it looked very much like winter. if you had to catch a flight, you were not going anywhere. the airport actually closed after snow covered these runways. and it was a very similar scene near boise, idaho. the ireporter who captured these images said the early snowstorm caught so many people there by surprise. it sure is pretty, but oh, my gosh, it can be a little uncomfortable. hey, jennifer's out in the cold. cold snap, no snow on the ground, but it is kind of like, sometimes there's an icy chill in the air there. you're in atlanta. >> yeah, most definitely. you know, this morning, when we got here, it was 29 degrees here in atlanta, which is about 15 to 20 degrees below normal. of course, folks in the midwest, the northern plains wish they could feel temperatures at 29 degrees. we warmed up to almost 50 near in atlanta. now the sun has come out and it actually feels pretty nice.
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but friends to the north, it is going to be 20, 30, 40 degrees below normal and that's going to keep up throughout the next week. let's look at current temperatures right now, because we are starting out -- we were starting out in the 20s. now we're up to 43 in atlanta, 39 in memphis. currently 15 in minneapolis. 8 in billings. the snow is going to continue for the midwest, the northern plains, we could see anywhere from 2 to 4 inches and we could see that chilly air continue. another plunge is expected the beginning part of the week that's going to reinforce cool temperatures and possibly bring the southeast and the northeast even colder. and fred, highs in atlanta by the middle to the end of the week in the 30s. >> oh, my gosh, that's the high? oh, boy! well, pull out the layers, indeed, and we're not putting them away. thanks so much, jennifer. you look cute in your hat, too. >> all right, we have much more straight ahead in the newsroom right after this. ♪
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comedian bill cosby confronted on the air about rape allegations. his response just might surprise you. plus, president barack obama issuing a stern warning to vladimir putin. what it means for their already icy relationship. then --
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>> get us several more units over here. there's going to be a problem. >> brand-new audio and video of the moments before and after the michael brown shooting in ferguson, missouri. we're live with the latest. hello, again, everyone. i'm fredricka whitfield. we start this hour with those rape allegations against bill cosby that have resurfaced. alexandra field has been covering the story. alexandra, these are new allegations. one is at least decades old. cosby was asked about these allegations again on npr, but it's what he didn't say that is raising some eyebrows. >> yeah, he was directly asked again about these rape allegations that have plagued him for so many years now. and i think a lot of people thought that they were going to hear, you know, a flat-out denial. his attorneys have repeatedly said that he's never done
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anything wrong, he's never been charged with a crime, he's never been prosecuted. they continue to deny all of the allegations that have been lobbed at him over the years. instead, we hear this interview today where bill cosby has an opportunity to say something, to come to his own defense, he chose not to. listen to this exchange with scott simon. >> this question gives me no pleasure, mr. cosby, but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days. you're shaking your head no. i'm in the news business. i have to ask the question. do you have any response to those charges? shaking your head no. there are people who love you, who might like to hear from you about this. i want to give you the chance. all right. >> cosby was being interviewed with his wife by his side. a lot of people listened to that
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interview. we knew that this question was being asked of bill cosby. a lot of people tuned in to hear how he would respond, and now they're responding on twitter. some of these responses, one listener saying, i know there might be legal ramifications if he speaks out, but being silent sure makes you look guilty. another listener saying, leave bill cosby alone. and one more saying, the bill cosby interview with scott simon was painful to listen to. particularly painful for one of the women who has accused bill cosby of drugging and raping her. again, cosby has never been charged with a crime, but that woman, barbara bowman, put out her own statement following the interview. and she says, i'm not surprised that bill cosby was speechless. he has met his maker. a simple shake of his head is implication of a man whose heart is heavily burdened with shame. those words from barbara bowman. >> and alexandra, the interview started out, you know, quite docile. in fact, you know, camille and bill were quite excited to talk about their african and african-american art that is on display at the smithsonian.
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so i guess one has to wonder whether that question caught them by surprise or if because of all that has taken place in the week, as it pertains to those drudged up allegations again, whether he anticipated that question would be asked and this was the response or no response. >> right. well, we know that this was a pre-taped interview. i believe it was done a few days ago. so there has been some time, as this has sort of mounted in the media and on social media in the last few days. but this is not a new topic for bill cosby to have to take on. frankly, there was a comedian in october who really attacked bill cosby, calling him a rapist. these are allegations he's had to answer to before. and while this was an interview with his wife by his side, while the topic was art, you sit down in front of a journalist and i think that he probably expected or anticipated the possibility that he would be asked these questions. we can't say for certain, but you hear scott simon say to him, i'm a journalist, i've got to ask this. and scott simon had tweeted in
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between the time of taping that interview and airing it today on npr, saying that he did ask bill cosby directly about these allegations and he said that listeners would have to decide for themselves whether cosby said yes or no. >> all right. powerful even in its silence. all right. thank you so much, alexandra field, appreciate that. so alexandra talked about barbara bowman and her latest statement as a result of cosby's interview. well, miss bowman was on cnn's "new day," explaining right in front of the camera her version of the relationship with cosby. >> i didn't really talk about it much, because nobody was believing it. and it was just -- i was in a situation, i was in new york, my job was to work hard, go to classes, don't ask questions. just be grateful for this amazing opportunity. don't mess it up. so when things would come up and he would start making me uncomfortable and i knew something was going on, i would start asking questions. and he would say, you know what, you don't trust me? you've got to trust me.
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and by the way, you were drunk. and i didn't drink. and i certainly wasn't doing anything but exactly what i was supposed to do. in 1989, though, i did go to a lawyer, a friend talked me into doing that. eventually, he laughed me right out of the office. it was terrible, it was humiliate i humiliating, it was scary. >> and over the years, cosby through his attorneys has repeatedly denied sexually assaulting anyone. all right. now to the surveillance video and police radio calls from the day a white ferguson, missouri, police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager. the surveillance video shows darren wilson in the hours after he shot michael brown and the audio reveals the fatal shooting lasted less than two minutes. these new tapes are released as the entire ferguson community awaiting the grand jury's decision on whether to indict officer wilson. our stephanie elam has more. >> reporter: the "st. louis post-dispatch" obtained the police audio and video through the state's so-called sunshine
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law. according to the paper's timeline of the august 9th encounter between darren wilson and michael brown. at 11:53 a.m., a dispatcher reports a stealing in progress at the ferguson market. >> we're having a stealing in progress from 9101 west florissant. the suspect may be leaving the business at this time. >> the post dispatch says about 19 seconds later, the dispatch issues a description of the suspect. >> 25. it's going to be a black male in a white t-shirt. he's running towards quiktrip. he took a whole box of swisher cigars. >> black male, white t-shirt. >> that's affirmative. she said he just walked out of the store. >> and there's more detail in the police cross talk. >> he's with another male, he's got a red cardinals hat, white t-shirt, yellow socks, and khaki shorts. >> according to the paper, at noon, officer wilson reports he's back in service from another call. he then asks officers searching
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for the suspects if they need his help. >> 21 to 25 or 22, need anything? >> seven seconds later, officers report the suspects have disappeared. >> dispatch to relay, i couldn't hear them. >> we think that they disappeared. >> clear. >> the paper says at 12:02, officer wilson responds. >> 21, put me on canfield with two, and send me another car. >> on august 9th, michael brown's friend, dorian johnson, says they were walking down the street when officer wilson told them to get out of the road. according to johnson, he and brown told the officer that they were almost at their destination and would be out of the street shortly, but johnson says the officer grabbed brown by the neck and drew his gun, eventually shooting brown. by contrast, a wilson family friend identified as josie told local radio station ktfk, that according to willson, brown started a physical altercation with him and grabbed the gun, which went off.
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both sides agree that brown ran and then turned back. the post dispatch says 41 seconds after wilson's call, another officer was about to arrive at the location. >> 25. >> the radio calls also show other officers arriving at the scene and a call for a supervisor, and then, according to the newspaper, this call at 12:07 p.m., with the apparent sound of a woman wailing in the background. >> 25? >> get us several more units over here. there's going to be a problem. >> are there any available ferguson units who can respond to canfield and copper creek, advise? >> reporter: the post dispatch also obtained surveillance video of officer darren wilson hours after the shooting. the paper says the video shows wilson in the white t-shirt leaving the police station for the hospital two hours after the shooting, accompanied by other officers and his union lawyer. the video then shows him returning to the police station. >> fred, based on this timeline,
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the interaction between mike brown and officer darren wilson was less than two minutes. two minutes that's now the focus of a grand jury decision. two minutes that changed one man's life and left an 18-year-old dead. fred? >> stephanie elam, thank you so much, in ferguson. all right. coming up, are russian war planes flying a little too close for comfort? why you can see them on your next trip to the caribbean. and america's nuclear arsenal in such disarray, crews were fedexing the same wrench from base to base. the frightening new information. and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night,nd. and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24, a circadian rhythm disorder that affects up to 70 percent of people who are totally blind. talk to your doctor about your symptoms and learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com.
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iraqi and kurdish forces fighting isis on the ground. arwa damon, cnn's senior international correspondent, joining me now from turkey. so arwa, do we know what the agenda is for the general? >> reporter: well, he's already met with the iraqi prime minister. his office putting out a statement that they spoke about the progress iraqi security forces had made and that they also spoke about what needed to be done to try to ultimately defeat isis. he's also met with the american commanders that are currently on the ground. general dempsey's mission is quite vital at this stage. the u.s., in the past, had grossly underestimated the capabilities of isis, hence their speedy advance throughout northern iraq over the summer that took everybody by surprise. the u.s. had also overestimated, perhaps, the capacities of the iraqi security forces and their
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cohesiveness, prior to the full u.s. troop withdrawal. general dempsey is a man who knows iraq very well. initially, as the commander of the first armored division in the early years of the war. and then he, himself, headed up the multi-national transitional forces iraq unit that effectively was in charge of training and equipping the iraqi security forces. so he knows the country pretty well. he knows the players pretty well. and the u.s., at this point, cannot afford to see the mistakes of the past be repeated, hence his need to be in iraq to make that initial assessment firsthand. >> and arwa, this is general dempsey said about his visit. and on the other side, we'll talk about it. >> we need to develop a ground campaign. we've got an air campaign that's ongoing. we need to integrate into that a ground campaign. we need to be able to put pressure on isil from multiple directions simultaneously. we need to continue to restore the capability, training, and
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equipping of the iraqi security forces into peshmerga. we need to keep pressure on isil in its safe haven inside of syria. we need to build up a syrian opposition to confront that. and we need a bit of patience. >> so, arwa, do we know what the interpretation there in iraq -- i know you're in turkey, was what the interpretation in iraq might be when the general says, you know, stepping up of this ground campaign. >> well, look, the main focus here, as far as anyone understands, is to try to get the iraqi security forces to actually do the job that they were trained to do. and that is to be able to effectively push isis out of its stronghold and then for them to be able to hold and secure the territory. the sense in iraq, though, is that all of this will be something of a moot point if those political pillars are not put into place. and by that, i mean, the real need for the shia-led government in baghdad to reach out to those
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sunni tribes. general dempsey's assessment of what needs to be done is, of course, spot-on, but how that translates and what other steps are needed in parallel, that's going to be something that is really going to lie in the political spectrum. this is not something that can be accomplished militarily. dempsey, of course, given his history in iraq, is very well aware of that. the question is whether or not the u.s. can put the needed pressure on the iraqi government in baghdad, and whether or not the government in baghdad can genuinely reach out to those sunni tribes. look, they've made pretty significant moves so far. the government has begun arming the sunni tribes, something that they have been asking for for quite some time now. remember, it was the sunni tribes that rose up against what was al qaeda back in 2007, 2008, that then allowed for the tides to be turned back then. so there is this realization that it's going to have to be a multi-tiered effort before even beginning to talk about defeating an entity like isis.
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>> arwa damon, thanks so much. meanwhile, russian president vladimir putin getting a very chilly reception at the meeting of the g-20 summit. leaders of the world's most powerful nations have been blasting putin over his aggression in ukraine. jim acosta is traveling with the president. jim? >> reporter: fred, this headline in this newspaper here in australia really says it all. it says, ice cold war, and it shows the russian bear duking it out with the australian kangaroo. you know, it's really been the g-19 plus one, very isolated vladimir putin at this g-20 summit. the russian president has gotten the cold shoulder from many of the leaders here in brisbane. the summit's host, australian prime minister, tony abbett, sent low-level officials to greet him at the airport. and we did see president obama walking into dinner with german chancellor angela merkel, deep in conversation, and in the
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video, you can hear the words cease-fire, and the president piled on putin earlier in the day, and vowing that the u.s. will continue to take on a lead role in standing up to russia. here's what the president had to say. >> we're leading and dealing with ebola in west africa and in opposing russia's aggression against ukraine, which is a threat to the world, as we saw in the appalling shoot down of mh-17. a tragedy that took so many innocent lives, among them, your fellow citizens. and as your ally and friend, america shares the grief of these australian families and we share the determination of your nation for justice and accountability. >> russia created a stir at this summit by positioning some naval ships off of the australian coast. moscow said they were in the area for putin's security, but australia responded by sending its own warships to keep an eye on the russians. besides putin, there are other big subjects at this, such as
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ebola, encouraging nations who haven't joined the fight against the deadly virus to start doing so. and the battle against isis is also a top priority. something president obama will be discussing with leaders tomorrow. the president will end this trip with a news conference before heading back to washington. >> thank you so much, jim acosta. all right, the cold war may have ended a quarter of a century ago, but tensions are indeed high between western powers and vladimir putin's russia. and plans for russian bombers to patrol near u.s. coastlines, it's raising those tensions. plus, the man who says he killed osama bin laden sits down with cnn's jake tapper. that's straight ahead.
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all right. world leaders are in australia for the g-20 economic summit. and russian president vladimir putin is traveling with military backup. he's brought along his very own warship, in fact. and russia says it's there for research, but call also be used as extra security. meanwhile, russia just announced plans to send long-range bombers into the gulf of mexico. here now is brian todd. >> reporter: a dangerous maneuver. a russian jet fighter buzzes right in front of a u.s. air force surveillance plane, within about 100 feet of the nose. a move which u.s. officials said
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endangered the american crew. another incident, a russian military aircraft comes within 50 miles of the california coast, the closest in years. get ready for more. russia's defense minister says his military is about to send long-range bombers to patrol near american coastlines. >> you're going to have bombers coming in this direction, from russia. you're certainly going to have longer range bombers coming down this coast, almost certainly. and you're also going to have bombers coming down this coast, and he also mentioned in particular, flying in the gulf of mexico. so we're talking about ringing the united states with the exception of the canadian border. >> reporter: the russian planes likely won't fly inside u.s. air space, within 14 miles of the coast. but u.s. officials call the action provocative and destabilizing. russia's defense minister says it's a response to aggression near its border with ukraine. >> this is a rationalization by russia, and in particular, by president putin, to strengthen his appeal with his nationalist base. >> russia's aggression, playing out around the globe. a scandinavian passenger jet
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nearly colliding with a russian surveillance plane. one innocent, right out of a tom clancy novel. in stockholm, a mysterious underwater vessel makes an emergency call in russian. it triggers the largest submarine hunt off sweden since the cold war. all these incidents have taken place since russia invaded crimea in february. more than 40 close military encounters in that period, according to one european report. analysts say this is one man, vladimir putin, flexing his muscle, desperate to restore russia's cold war power. >> putin is personified as the tough guy, the image of russia that he wants to present and those around him want to present now of a russia that will not back down, of a russia that will take on the west. and, in fact, a russia that will take on anybody. >> reporter: the dangers now that russian or western forces might miscalculate and there might be some kind of a military confrontation. that given all the air traffic around the united states, especially around the east coast, there might be some kind of an accident with a russian
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aircraft. or that some other american adversary might follow vladimir putin's lead and think they can act aggressively against the united states. brian todd, cnn, washington. >> okay. let's talk more about this. what is going on? and what might be russia's next move here? let me bring in angela instead, she is the author of the limits of partnership, a book on u.s.-russian relations. she's going us from washington, d.c. thank you so much for joining us. so what in the world is going on? you have studied vladimir putin for a long time, you know russia well. what is going on? is this simply russian provocation? >> certainly, russia is flexing its muscles. putin wants to show the world that they can't mess with russia. and he wants to intimidate people to throw people off guard. and we're all sitting here wondering, what's the next move? and as we've heard, it's been very dangerous. there have been these 40 near-misses in the air. and the problem is, none of these russian planes is communicating with air traffic
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controllers. so it really raises the bar here and it really does make it much more dangerous. >> and this really is a first, right, to have these long-range strategic bombers on regular patrol missions in the gulf of mexico. >> yeah, this is fairly new. in 2008, they did it a little bit after the russian/georgian war, they sent some of these bombers to venezuela, but then that did die down. so this is sort of knew. and russia has also announced it's planning to open naval bases in cuba, nicaragua, and venezuela. so that is aimed at the united states, right in our backyard. >> and we saw that particular near-miss in brian todd's miss. but can you paint a picture, particularly, if russia gets too close, you know, crosses the line, what would the u.s. options be? do you see that potentially it could mean a u.s., you know, ship shooting down or a u.s. aircraft, you know, potentially shooting down a russian aircraft, because of another
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near-miss or dangerous provocation? >> well, the u.s. would do everything it could to de-escalate the situation, to warn the russians. that would be very much, the very last option. but it certainly raises the stakes here, it raises the possibility of unintended consequences. and this is a dangerous game that putin's playing. >> it is dangerous. and then some would say, very dangerous in ukraine as well. you know, what does this say about the continued vulnerability of ukraine and russian continuing to flex its muscles? >> well, i think ukraine is vulnerable. we've seen evidence in the last couple of weeks of a russian troop buildup, of equipment going to ukraine, of russian troops inside ukraine. they really want to take back the airport in donetsk, these russian-backed separatists. the russians and the separatists are not abiding by a cease-fire agreement they signed. and the rumors are they really want sort of another land grab
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in that area so they can have a land bridge to crimea, which they annexed in march. so, again, we don't know what their intentions are. the russians keep denying that they're doing any of this. our facts are completely different, and so, you know, we're in for a long period, i think, of great tensions with russia. >> angela, thanks so much. i always love talking to you. i feel like you really put us there. so appreciate your expertise. thank you. all right. it is a brand-new police audio of what happened moments after the michael brown shooting. >> 25? >> get us several more units over here. there's going to be a problem. >> so with ferguson on edge as they await the grand jury decision, will the latest leak have an impact? we ask our legal guys, next. ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you have enough money to live life on your terms? i sure hope so. with healthcare costs, who knows.
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new police tapes reveal the moments leading up to the shooting of an unarmed black teen by a white police officer in ferguson, missouri. in the tapes obtained by the "st. louis post-dispatch," you can hear a dispatcher report a stealing in progress before the fatal confrontation between officer darren wilson and michael brown. the dispatcher gives the description of a suspect to another police officer, not wilson. >> 25, it's going to be a black male in a white t-shirt.
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he's running toward quick trip. he took a whole box of swisher cigars. >> black male, white t-shirt. >> that's affirmative. she said he just walked out of the store. >> minutes later, wilson joined the radio exchange and offers to join the hunt for the suspect. >> 21 to 25, you guys need me? >> from there, radio calls indicate other officers arriving at the shooting scene and there is a call from another officer, warning of possible trouble. >> 25? >> get us several more units over here. there's going to be a problem. >> is there any available ferguson units who can respond to canfield and copper creek? advise. >> in addition to the audio recordings, the "post-dispatch" also released this new surveillance video that shows wilson, the officer, just two hours after the shooting leaving the police station with other officers and a union lawyer.
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officer wilson is the one in the white t-shirt that you saw there. the newspaper reports brown was killed less than 61 seconds after the dispatcher acknowledged that officer wilson stopped the teen. meantime, the grand jury could make a decision about whether to indict wilson at any moment now. but will this latest leak of audio and visual reporting there have an impact on the investigation? let's ask our legal guys, avery friedman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland, good to see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman in new york, joining us from las vegas. good to see you as well. >> hi, fred. >> so richard, you first. might these tapes have an impact or is it your view the grand jury may have already made its decision, may have already seen these tapes? >> the die is cast, fred. i think the grand jury already has their decision. i think they're just waiting for the right time to release it, maybe early sunday morning, i don't know when. i do not believe there's going to be an indictment in this particular case. and that does not mean that it's
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over, fred. because as we saw in zimmerman, in the state of florida, they did not indict. the attorney general brought proceedings. even if the grand jury does not indict him, the state attorney general could bring charges against him, and then you'll be looking at zimmerman deja vu all over again. there is a reason this grand jury is not going to indict. there are serious issues here, fred. it's not simply to put, an unarmed black man was shot. he's 6'4", over 300 pounds, who struck the police officer in his car, two bullets went off inside the car, and then he aggressively attacked the officer. that's the first set of facts that we have. that's an acquittal, fred. >> okay, so go ahead, avery. i don't know if everyone feels that the facts are that clear. isn't that why we're at this juncture, avery? >> yeah, this is not a manner that is over. in fact, i think the new video that surfaced. and i mean, good for the
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"post-dispatch," that's good journalism. we now see that it's very probative, fredricka. but whether or not it's dispositive, it resolves it, is a completely different question. the question we don't know is, did the county grand jury see this video? and it's very important -- >> how could they not? doesn't it seem like they would have to see this, avery? >> well, they sure should. the county prosecutor has been loading the county grand jury with both prosecution and defense witnesses. but without this new revelation, this audio -- the video, wii think, is two hours after the fact, i'm not sure what probative value there. but the audio is very compelling and i think it is significant. so let's assume that the grand jury has heard these dispatch tapes, the willston tapes, the tape from the other officers, i think that factors in. while we don't know when we're going to get that decision, where i think there is agreement, that it's still going
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to be very tough to find out which one of those gradations of loss of life, of homicide, of murder, will be, you know, will come down by the grand jury. that's the issue and the issue is when we're going to hear from them. and honestly, nobody really knows. >> richard, i wonder, how coincidental is it that these recordings would be made available, meaning, you know, close to the proximity of when this decision could come down, or is it intentionally, perhaps, to best prepare the public for what's next? >> i think that's what's happening in ferguson, fred. i think they're preparing, you know, they're giving lessons to police officers, hours of education on how to handle the situation. i think they're preparing the town, because i think they know there's not going to be an indictment here. and, frankly, from what i've seen and what i've read and what i've heard, there should not be an indictment. but i do not like these leaks -- >> the question is the leaks. >> i do not like the leaks that
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are coming out. this evidence that's coming out right now, i hate that, especially when involved in a case and things like this come out, it should not come out. and i have a problem with that. but in the end, fred, put your seat belts on, because i think this thing is going to come down within the next week, if not the next day or two. >> avery, last word, quick, quick, quick. >> well, very, very quickly, i think why did it come out now? maybe it's an intentional leak. i think it is. i think the leak has diminished the process. bottom line, i think we're going to see something very soon. >> avery, richard, thanks so much. always love your brilliant minds and can't wait to talk to you next week -- >> we missed you, fred. >> i know, i missed you, too! i had avery and richard withdrawal. >> well, we had the same thing. we had the same thing. >> all right, feeling's mutual. thanks so much, guys. appreciate it! all right. he claims he fired the kill shot that took out osama bin laden. but wait until you hear what former navy s.e.a.l. robert o'neill was doing minutes after the raid. down.
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room on the third floor, where you thought bin laden was, what went through your head? >> well, there was two of us left on the stairs going up. we assumed they were rigging explosive vests to blow themselves up. so when we went up, my thought wasn't of, oh, we're about to shoot this guy and be heroes, my thought was, let's get up there before he blows us up. he was not surrendering, he was sort of moving and just based on the level of threat of him not surrendering and the likelihood of him having a vest, i engaged him, shot him twice in the head. he fell tonight floor, i shot him one more time, and i killed hmm. >> what did it feel like? >> the sense was first, recognition, the idea of him, and he's a threat and i had the to shoot him. and it wasn't the first time i'd done that on a target before. i recognized the individual we were after, as osama bin laden, and i engaged. at that minute, it was just, it
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felt like that was the initial threat that i had to take care of and then there were more threats -- threats aren't always -- threats are just potential unknowns. it wasn't until the room was fully cleared and it fully hit me and i had a moment to pause. and a friend of mine in the room came up to me and he put his hand on my shoulder, and i said, hey, what do we do now? and he kind of smiled and says, now we go find the computers. and then i was like, okay, i'm back, i'm back. that was quite a thing that just happened. >> when you got the computers and on to bin laden's body on to the helicopter, what happened then? >> we took him up to bagram and they were going to do more tests on to him to confirm, and the president wanted to have the numbers and be 100% certain. and once it was, we were standing there, watching a flat screen tv, watching the president address the nation and the world. >> so you were next to bin laden's body, watching obama talk about it? >> a number of feet away from him.
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i heard him say -- well, i had a breakfast sandwich in my hand, and i heard him say, tonight i can report to the united states of the world that the united states conduct admission that killed osama bin laden. i heard him say osama bin laden and i looked at osama bin laden, and i thought, had in the world did i got here from butte, montana. >> former navy s.e.a.l., robert o'neill, talking about the killing of osama bin laden with our jake tapper on "the lead." the united states military is considered the mightiest in the world. but a review of america's nuclear arsenal reveals some pretty startling problems. that's next. a dry mouth can be a common side effect. that's why there's biotene. it comes in oral rinse, spray or gel, so there's moisturizing relief for everyone.
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defense secretary chuck hagel says the u.s. nuclear program needs a major overhaul. and he cites a defense department review that revealed some pretty embarrassing deficiencies. . here's cnn's tom foreman. >> hey, fredricka, this new report from the pentagon is certainly dismaying to many people in the military and frankly alarming to others. in the dangerous world of nuclear missiles and strategic bombers, it's hard to imagine a simple hand tool could be a problem. but the pentagon review found supplies were so neglected, workers at three nuke sites were
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sharing a single specialized wrench for more than 400 missiles. >> now, how did they do it? they did it by federal expressing the one wrench around to each base. they were creative and innovative and they made it work. but that's not the way to do it. >> the pentagon is now acknowledging many such troubles, including an inspection regimen that nitpicked insignificant details while ignoring potentially serious issues, like leaky hydraulic seals on aging missile blast doors, making it impossible to close them properly. a culture of inefficiencies, micromanagement, and daily shortages in equipment, qualified personnel, facilities, and funding. even badly outdated helicopters being used to service nuclear operations. choppers that came into service under president nixon during the vietnam war. >> we just have kind of taken our eye off the ball here. and if we don't fix this, eventually, it will get to a point where there will be some
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questions about our security. >> officials say these problems grew in part from the fighting in iraq and afghanistan, which forced the pentagon to choose between sending resources to battle or to the nuke program. >> when you have to make a hard choice like that, you're going to support the war fighter. and you make as best as you can. >> reporter: still, embarrassing lapses have resulted, such as an incident last year in which a missile bay door was left open and unattended while one crew member slept and another went for food. and more recently, reports of missile officers cheating on proficiency tests. fixing all of this will not be cheap. the pentagon currently spending about $15 billion a year on the nuke program. they say that will have to be increased by about 10%, and even then, it's going to take years to undo the damage. fredricka? >> thanks so much, tom foreman. the death of a freshman at west virginia university has now prompted the suspension of all greek life activities. wvu officials say 18-year-old
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nolan michael birch died yesterday. he was found unresponsive yesterday at the kappa sigma fraternity house. students held a vigil last night. kappa sigma's national organization says the chapter at wva had been suspended last month on unrelated violations. police are now investigating birch's death. straight ahead, comedy legend bill cosby confronted about rape allegations. again, this time the comedian's reaction, next hour. the holiday season is here, which means it's time for the volkswagen sign-then-drive event. for practically just your signature, you could drive home for the holidays in a german-engineered volkswagen. like the sporty, advanced new jetta... and the 2015 motor trend car of the year all-new golf. if you're wishing for a new volkswagen this season... just about all you need is a finely tuned... pen. hurry in and get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on select new volkswagen models.
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all right. guess what, everyone. this is your last weekend to vote for your cnn hero of the year. the family of this week's
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honoree ran a mortuary business that has been a staple of a baltimore community for three generations. and now, this woman helps those in grief focus on getting past the trauma. meet annette march grier. >> chicken nuggets, french fries, ketchup and mustard and a milk shake. chicken nuggets, french fries, ketchup and mustard and a milk shake. my daddy ordered the same thing as me. that is my daddy. >> my son's father, he was murdered. their bond, it was just a bond that a lot of kids don't have with their father. i love my city. i have lived here all of my life. but people here are having crisis after crisis.
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i believe that the violence in this city and grief are directly connected. >> i feel sad that somebody hurt my dad. >> a child's grief can be very different from adult's. they can easily lose their identity and their security, and that can be very dangerous. >> there you go. write your feelings. how you feeling today? >> our program provides that safe place for a child to recover. >> hello? our volunteers help the children explore their feelings. >> why did you choose red? >> i was angry when my dad passed away. >> and talk about healthy ways of coping. >> get that anger out! >> we teach our children that it's okay to cry. >> his brother died. so he's feeling very sad. >> grief is truly a public health problem. we have got to begin to address it. >> coping is how we deal with our feelings. we're giving families a sense of
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hope. we're helping to heal wounds and bring families back together again. >> all right. you can place your vote at cnn.com/heroes. we have much more ahead in the "cnn newsroom" and it all starts right now. brand-new video of ferguson police officer darren wilson just hours after the death of michael brown. this as we also hear what police were saying when the shooting happened. then, a comedy icon confronted about old rape allegations. >> this question gives me no pleasure, mr. cosby, but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days. >> bill cosby's response, straight ahead. plus, it took them ten years to
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successfully land on a comet, 310 million miles away, but now a big problem. are the probe's batteries dead? hello again, everyone. i'm fredricka whitfield. welcome to the newsroom. brand-new audio and never before seen surveillance video just hours after a white police officer shot can killed an unarmed black teen in ferguson, missouri. this surveillance video shows darren wilson entering and then leaving a police station after he shot and killed michael brown. some eyewitnesss have said that brown rushed at wilson first and tried to grab his gun. other witnesses have said brown, the teenager, had his hands up when officer wilson repeatedly fired on him. i want to go to our stephanie elam in ferguson. stephanie, take us through these new tapes and what kind of
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reaction you're hearing there in ferguson. >> reporter: right, fredricka. well, when you take a listen to these take place, it's giving us perspective from the police side of exactly what happened leading up to and around that critical two-minute altercation between officer darren wilson and mike brown. the "st. louis post-dispatch" obtained the police audio and video through the state's so-called sunshine law. according to the paper's timeline of the august 9th encounter between darren wilson and michael brown. at 11:53 a.m., a dispatcher reports a stealing in progress at the ferguson market. >> we're taking a stealing in progress from 9101 west florissant. subject may be leaving the business at this time. stand by for further. >> reporter: the "post-dispatch" says about 19 seconds later, dispatch issues a description of a suspect. >> it's going to be a black male in a white t-shirt. he's running towards quiktrip.
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he took a whole box of swisher cigars. >> black male, white tex-shirt. >> that's affirmative. she said he just walked out of the store. >> he's with another male, red kar cardinals hat, white t-shirt, yellow socks, and khaki shorts. >> reporter: at noon, officer wilson reports he's back in service from another call. he asks officers searching for the suspect if they need his help. >> you guys need me. >> reporter: seven seconds later, officer report the suspect has disappeared. >> he think that they disappeared. >> clear. >> the paper says at 12:02, officer wilson responds. >> 21, put me on canfield with two and send me another car. >> on august 9th, dorian johnson says they were walking down the street when officer wilson told
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them to get out of the road. according to johnson, they told wilson that they were almost at their destination and would be out of the street shortly. but then johnson says wilson grabbed brown and drew his gun. but another witness says that brown started a physical altercation with wilson and then ran off. both sides agree that brown ran and then turned back. 41 seconds after wilson's call, another officer was about to arrive at the location. >> 25, i'm going out on canfield. >> the radio calls also show other officers arriving at the scene and the call for a supervisor, and then according to the newspaper, this call at 12:07 p.m., with the apparent sound of a woman wailing in the background. >> 25? >> get us several more units over here. there's going to be a problem. >> are there any available ferguson units who can respond to canfield and copper creek,
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advise? >> the "post-dispatch" also obtained surveillance video of officer darren wilson hours after the shooting. the paper says the video shows wilson in the white t-shirt leaving the police station for the hospital two hours after the shooting, accompanied by other officers and his union lawyer. the video then shows him returning to the police station. and here in ferguson, people are on edge. they are preparing for when the grand jury decision does come out, as far as the fate of officer darren wilson, whether or not he will be indicted. i've talked to several families here in the community, and it ranges from wide concern to packing up groceries and keeping them in their house in case they have to stay there for a couple of days, to other people who are worried about the small businesses. and fred, they're also worried about schools, because they don't want to see schools again, as they were in august, right when this incident first happened. >> and earlier, stephanie, we talked to a couple of business owners and they're taking different approaches. some are staying open and then
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others are boarding up because they just don't know what's around the corner. thanks so much, stephanie. appreciate it, from ferguson. meantime, overseas, a surprise visit to iraq. america's top military leader, general martin dempsey, telling reporters momentum is starting to turn against isis. cnn's arwa damon joins me now from turkey. arwa, earlier, we heard security forces appeared close to retaking the country's biggest refinery. do you agree with dempsey? >> reporter: well, look, iraq's a tricky country when it comes to trying to predict anything. gains can be made one day and lost just as quickly the next. and i think general dempsey amongst many is very well aware of that given his own experience in iraq. remember, he was the commander of the first armored division in the first years of the war, and then he went on to lead up the u.s. effort to try to actually train and equip the iraqi security forces.
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now, whilst he was in baghdad, he did meet with the iraqi prime minister, his office then putting out a statement that they spoke about the gains that the iraqi security forces had made, yes, but also about necessary steps moving forward to try to, first of all, ensure that those gains are not lost, but also to try to figure out exactly what the best way is going to be to tackle isis and beef up those iraqi security forces so that they don't turn and run away the next time. that being said, general dempsey also traveling on to erbil. that is the capital of the autonomous region of kurd stist meeting with the prime minister there as well. part of the next phase of the u.s.-led effort is going to be focusing on training the iraqi security forces. those 1,500 additional troops being dispatched to the country just for that. now, general dempsey is also really trying to get a firsthand genuine and honest assessment of what the situation is. when this all unfolded over the
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summer after isis' rapid takeover, that took everyone by surprise of mosul and other parts of iraq, it became painfully apparent that on the one hand, the u.s. had underestimated the capacity of isis and perhaps overestimated the capability of iraqi security force. and that's not a mistake that anyone wants to see happen again, fredricka. >> all right. arwa damon, thank you so much for your report from turkey. for more on general dempsey's trip to iraq, let's bring in cnn military animal, lieutenant general rick francona. colonel, good to see you. so, in your view, general dempsey's trip, is this a sign that things are going well in iraq? or is this, you know, strictly an assessment to see how things are going in iraq? >> i think it's an assessment to see how things are going there. general dempsey has been quite vocal over the past few weeks that he is willing to go to the president and recommend that we change what we're doing in iraq if he believes that to be
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necessary. and i think it's important and i think it's right that he goes over there and puts his own eyeballs on the situation over there. because he's the one that has to go to the president and say, mr. president, what we're doing is not working. we either have to beef up u.s. presence, we have to maybe commit some ground troops, whatever option hays going to recommend to the president, it's probably a good idea that he have been there, talked to the people on the ground, talked to the iraqis, and actually assess the iraqi troops himself. he's got a lot of experience in the country. he is, you know, a very qualified army general. he's probably one of the best we have. it's a good idea for him to see this in person and make whatever recommendation the president. i think it comes at a critical time, as arwa said, we're starting to see some improvement in iraqi forces, but that could be just today. we could see a reversal tomorrow. >> okay. now let's talk about nearby syria, because we understand that the senior administration official is telling us that president obama has ordered a review of u.s. policy towards syria. is this an admission that things
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are not going well, there was a miscalculation, or is it expected that there are modifications made all the time with military strategy? >> well, there are modifications all the time, but the situation in syria is very fluid. and you know, as you know, our tactic has always been, we're going to deal with the situation in iraq on the ground first. the air campaign will address the entire isis target set, but on the ground, we're going to focus on iraq. then we'll worry about syria later. we were hoping to get some free syrian army people trained up to be our boots on the ground. however, just over the past few days, we're seeing an alliance struck between the al qaeda element in syria that's called al nusra, the victory front, and isis itself. and they are going after the free syrian army, hoping to eliminate them as our boots on the ground. so our strategy in syria has to be shifting all the time. and you're going to have to really review what we're doing there. >> let's talk a little bit more about isis and kind of the money
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machine behind it. let's bring in janine d'vanny, the editor of "newsweek" and the co-author on "isis funding." isis says it will begin making its own currency using gold, silver, and copper. how can isis afford to maintain its own military and then also make its own money, pay the bills, so to speak, when it has been common knowledge that there was a lot of financial backing behind it. >> first of all, in terms of the currency, let's see if they actually get the copper, the gold, the silver to actually make the coins. if they do, this will be seen really as a symbolic gesture more than anything. that they're not under the reign of the oprepressooppressor, ie, using dollars and euros, that they will be using their own currency. and bear in mind that for isis, their philosophy is to bring back the time to the epic of the
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prophet, mohammad. so they don't want to use dollars, they don't want to trade in this currency. they want to have their own. but, really, during our investigation -- >> sorry about that. i forgot there's a delay, go ahead. >> there is a four-pillar way that they are getting their money. it's the oil, of course, which is why beijing is such an important -- if, in fact, the iraqi security forces have taken it back, this really will be a turning point. because oil is isis' cash cow. whether or not who they're trading with, it could be the syrians, it could be the kurds, it could be turkey, it might even be european partners. it was part of our investigation. one thing we did find is how much money they were making from the oil. the other is, of course, the antiquities business. they're looting their extortion. the third is they're kidnapping. and this is massive, because
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it's not just the western hostages that you read about, the 14 million that various states or countries pay. it's also the small on the ground extortion they're doing on a daily rate, to businesses in mosul, to people in raqqa, people who are living under their reign that have to pay for everything from smoking to shops, businesses that operate. so there's extortion, there's kidnapping, there's the oil, and there's antiquities. >> janine, thank you very much. >> they're very wealthy -- >> very wealthy, indeed. i want to get colonel francona's take on this. when you hear janine laying that out, there looks like a pretty impressive infrastructure in place to keep this machine financed. that is a problem, whether it be for the military strategy or even, really, the, you know, the pr strategy of the world trying to get together and trying to dismantle, trying to dissolve
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isis. it looks like it's going to be very difficult. >> it is. but looking at isis, they have got to feed, clothe, house their military. they've got to provide the fuel they require. they've got to move all the stuff around. all that requires oil and it also requires money. they've got to pay all these people. they've also got to provide the trappings of a state, that means goods and service to the people. so it's a very expensive proposition. on the other side of that, and it will work to our advantage is, it also creates vulnerabilities. because as they set up these institutions, there are things we can actually go after. either politically, diplomatic, economically, or if we need to, militarily. >> lieutenant governor francona and janine from paris, thank you both. very fascinating. straight ahead, stateside now, bill cosby confronted about rape allegations. the comedian's reaction that might just confuse you even more. i've had surgery, and yes, i have occasional constipation.
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all right. for years, rape allegations against iconic comedian bill cosby have simmered, mostly below the surface. but now, they've boiled over. it began monday when cosby's staff tweeted out this happy photo and invited fans to add a caption. well, alexandra field joins me now from new york to let us know what happened after that. and now bill cosby taking to the radio airwaves to respond to a question, but i guess a lot of listeners didn't get -- i don't know what they expected. like, an explanation? >> well, you saw that miehm that he or his staffers invited people to comment. they got the kind of comments that they weren't looking for. a lot of people lobbing these old accusation s and allegation of rape against him. he hasn't commented on the resurfacing of these allegations against him. in the past, they have denied
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any sexual abuse allegations against bill cosby. but he did go on the radio. this was a prerecorded interview with npr's scott simon. we knew he was going to be asked about those allegations. people were expecting some kind of response and here's what they got. >> this question gives me no pleasure, mr. cosby, but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days. you're shaking your head no. i'm in the news business. i have to ask the question. do you have any response to those charges? shaking your head no. there are people who love you, who might like to hear from you about this. i want to give you the chance. all right. >> all right. you heard nothing there. not a word from bill cosby on those rape allegations. but we are hearing from one of the women who accused bill cosby of raping her, barbara bowman.
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she has been speaking out and here's what she's saying in response to that interview today. she says, "i'm not surprised that bill cosby was speechless. he has met his maker. a simple shake of his head is implication of a man whose heart is heavily burdened with shame." bowman says that bill cosby mentored her when she was a young actress back in the '80s. she later accused him of drugging and raping her. the statute of limitations on prosecuting that crime has long expired, but bowman did come forward with another woman came forward in 2005 and filed a lawsuit alleging a similar complaint against bill cosby. that lawsuit was settled civilly. there's confidentiality agreements, fred, so we don't know the details of it, but cosby's campus continues to deny any allegations against him. >> alexandra field, thanks so much, appreciate it from new york. president obama issuing a stern warning to vladimir putin. we take a look at what it means for their already icy relationship. millions of us.
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i'm just looking over the company bills.up? is that what we pay for internet? yup. dsl is about 90 bucks a month. that's funny, for that price with comcast business, i think you get like 50 megabits. wow that's fast. personally, i prefer a slow internet. there is something about the sweet meditative glow of a loading website. don't listen to the naysayer. switch to comcast business today and get 50 megabits per second for $89.95. comcast business. built for business. president obama criticizing russian president vladimir putin as leaders of the world's most powerful nations meet in brisbane, australia, for the g-20 summit. cnn's aaron mcpike joining us now. so aaron, what did president obama say that has got so many people talking? >> well, fred, look, it's not just president obama. it's president obama and other
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world leaders coming down hard on putin because russia is still making these provocations into eastern ukraine that have been going on for the last eight months and escalating, again, recently. well, president obama in specific remarks, the university of queensland in brisbane had this to say about russia. listen. >> we're leading and dealing with ebola in west africa and in opposing russia's aggression against ukraine. which is a threat to the world, as we saw in the appalling shoot down of mh-17, a tragedy that took so many innocent lives, look them, your fellow citizens. and as your ally and friend, america shares the grief of these australian families and we share the determination of your nation for justice and accountability. >> now, putin is also getting the cold shoulder from australian dignitaries and the australian media, fred. >> all right.
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aaron mcpike, thanks so much, from the white house. all right. somebody's watching you and your cell phone. and no, it's not the nsa. but another government agency. the frightening way we are listening in on your phone calls.
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all right. bottom of the hour now. welcome back. i'm fredricka whitfield. the death of a freshman at west virginia university has prompted the suspension of all greek life activities. wvu officials say 18-year-old nolan michael birch died yesterday. he was found unresponsive yesterday at the kappa sigma fraternity house. students held a vigil last night. kappa sigma's national organization says the chapter at wva had been suspended last month on unrelated violations. police are investigating bisheis death. the man accused of killing one pennsylvania state trooper and wounding another is facing terrorism charges now. eric frein allegedly admitted he shot the officers in a bid to change the u.s. government. police arrested him last month after a weeks-long manhunt that reportedly cost more than $11 million. frein is also charged with murder and making a weapon of
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mass destruction, a pipe bomb found in the search. new surveillance video and police radio calls have been released in the case of the ferguson, missouri, police officer who shot and killed the unarmed black teenager in august. the video obtained by the "st. louis post-dispatch" newspaper shows officer darren wilson hours after his fatal encounter with michael brown. and police radio calls also released by the "post-dispatch" are shedding light on the moments leading up to the confrontation. have a listen. >> we've got a stealing in progress from 9109 west florissant. subject may be leaving the business at this time. stand by for further. >> 25, it's going to be a black male in a white t-shirt. he's running toward quiktrip. he took a whole box of swisher cigars. >> black male, white t-shirt. >> that's affirmative. she said he just walked out of the store. >> he's with another male. he's got a red cardinals hat,
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white t-shirt, yellow socks, and khaki short. he was walking up there. >> 21 to 25 or 22, you guys need me? dispatch, can you relay? i couldn't hear. >> he thinks that they disappeared. clear. 21, put me on canfield with two and send me another car. >> 25. >> get me several more units over here, there's going to be a problem. >> if there are any available ferguson units who can respond to canfield and copper creek, advise. >> a grand jury could decide any moment whether to indict officer wilson for that shooting. all right, in many places across the country, wintry weather is here in a very big way. jennifer gray back in from the chill outside, warming up the studio here. so, we should all just brace for more chill, shouldn't we? >> you're exactly right. we've been holding on to this for about a week now, and it could extend for an entire week
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or more, and still seeing temperatures well below normal. in the southeast, temperatures running about 15 degrees below normal. but in the midwest and the northern plains, we're seeing temperatures 30 and 40 degrees below normal. so very, very chilly. and look, the snow coming down, omaha, coming down at a pretty good rate. also, minneapolis seeing the snow. we have video right now, live of minneapolis. look at that. that has been one of the hardest hit areas, fred, with temperatures below freezing since monday and we could see temperatures stay below freezing for yet another week or more. so, minneapolis, we're feeling for you right now, because it is brutal right there. and let me show you what's going to happen over the next couple of days. chicago will get into that snow. it is going to push to the northeast, fred, but we are going to see another blast of cold air that's going to reinforce those temperatures, even bring the southeast and the northeast even colder. good news is, by the week of thanksgiving, we should start to thaw out a little bit. >> i don't know, my toes are cold. i just got frostbite looking at
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those pictures out of minneapolis. >> i know. >> oh, my gosh! i could not handle that kind of cold. >> we either. >> thanks so much, jennifer. appreciate it. all right, the federal government may be tracking your cell phone calls. small planes can fly overhead and gather data from most of the u.s. population. here now is cnn's pamela brown. >> well, fredricka, it's no secret that law enforcement has used controversial equipment that mimics a cell tower in order to locate a criminal, but now we're learning, according to the "wall street journal," that the u.s. marshal service can use equipment that has the capability to pull in cell phone data from an entire city. the u.s. marshal service put special devices on small cessna planes as a way to locate criminals located to the "wall street journal." these devices dubbed dirt boxes are supposed to trick them into thinking it's a cell tower.
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>> it's looking for a needle in a haystack, but to find that needle, it has to actually, for a brief period of time, look at every other piece of hay in that stack. >> reporter: the special equipment in the planes scans thousands of phones. when it finds the target's phone, the equipment locks on and uses that information to find a suspect's location. >> the advantage of the drone airplane or helicopter is that they can just search a much larger area, much faster, and thus, necessarily get information about a huge number of innocent people. >> reporter: the device is similar to this commonly used cell site simulator, known as a stingray. government officials say it's intended to be used with the defined, legally authorized purpose and serious violent crimes. cnn has learned that the technology was used in the capture of el "chapo" guzman, the former head of the notorious sinaloa cartel, and one of the most wanted men in the world. >> this is a military technology, originally designed for the intelligence community and special forces, that has trickled down, bit by bit, to
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law enforcement and eventually to the state and local law enforcement agencies too. >> reporter: in a statement, the department of justice would not confirm the existence of the technology, but says any investigative techniques, which the marshal service uses, are for the apprehension of wanted individuals and not to conduct domestic surveillance or intelligence gathering. >> and a justice department official also says that the marshal service does not have a database with the cell phone information from the general public, but it's still unclear when that data is deleted. fredricka? >> all right. thanks so much, pamela. government officials say they would obtain a court order or search warrant before using that device. anyone's data who is not the suspect is supposed to be discarded, but it's unclear how that's done and how often. all right. after making an improbable ten-year, 310-million-mile journey to a comet, the fille space probe mission may be over at least for now. the probe is landing on solar
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power, but it landed in a shady area, and the european space agency says its batteries have now run down. but there is one last hope. mission controllers can possibly position the probe's online solar panels to make it be able to take in more sun leiglight t power it back up. let's hope so. all right. betting on sports is illegal in most of the united states, but the head of the nba says sports gambling should be legal everywhere. do you agree? we weigh the pros and the cons, next. finally get in shape. not to be focusing, again, on my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. so i finally made a decision to talk to my dermatologist about humira. humira works inside my body to target and help block a specific source of inflammation that contributes to my symptoms. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to
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all right. gambling should be allowed at all pro sports. that's the position of nba commissioner adam silver. in a "new york times" op-ed, he writes this. quote, despite legal restrictions, sports betting is widespread. it is a thriving underground business that operates free from regulation or oversight. i believe that sports betting should be brought out of the underground and into the sunlight where it can be appropriately monitored and regulated. with me now is cnn sports commentator, christine brennan. christine, i'm so you're on board the cnn family now. i love having you. now we can have more of you. >> thank you, i am too, fredricka. great to be on with you. >> you're still with "usa today," but now you're a cnn contributor, too. so people bet all the time in these so-called fantasy leagues, for example, on the internet.
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so is the commissioner right? or is there some real momentum behind his words that at least all sports or maybe the nba, bet okay? >> this is an important conversation for us to have as a nation, i think, fredricka, and adam silver, when he talks, we need to listen to him. of course, this is the man, our first 21st century sports commissioner. he threw the bum out, he threw donald sterling out, that was in many ways the first anyone had seen of him, when he was doing that earlier this year. so silver, i think, has some very interesting points. this isn't going to happen tomorrow and it may not happen in our lifetime, until it goes to congress. but i do think that what he is talking about is a reality check. i think for all sports, as he learned in this piece, some estimates of over $400 billion being wagered on sports illegally in this country every year. yes, $400 billion. so, fred, if you think about that and you think about, maybe it's time to look into that, i think adam silver has a pretty
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good point. >> and how, is there a feeling that a lot of team owners feel the same way? we know the dallas mavericks owner, mark cuban says, yeah, he likes the idea. but does silver do this, does he take a stab at this issue, because he feels like there is that momentum, you know, from other owners, too, or is he the maverick, sneak? >> i think we could label him a maverick, that's a great point. but i think there are other owners there, especially younger owners who understand how things are changing. they are looking for every fan and every click. and if fans end up betting with their iphones, if that brings more eyeballs to the websites and to the games, that's going to be part of this equation. now, i understand, a lot of people will not be comfortable with this, this is a new concept. but i would present to you, if this occurred, if we had this 40 or 50 years ago, would they have been able to monitor pete rose, the most legendary of all gamblers in sports, and catch him as he was betting on
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baseball before it had gotten too bad or gone too far along? that's what, i think, we're talking about here. because it's really about the integrity of the game. and the notion of, can you catch the people within the game who might be fixing the game or trying to cheat? and that is a big part of this equation. >> wow. tough questions. christine brennan, always good to see you, thanks so much. >> fred, thanks, take care. >> all right. new research trials for an ebola treatment are now set to begin. why our own dr. sanjay gupta says this could offer new hope for patients worldwide? . and sometimes i struggle to sleep at night,nd. and stay awake during the day. this is called non-24, a circadian rhythm disorder that affects up to 70 percent of people who are totally blind. talk to your doctor about your symptoms and learn more by calling 844-824-2424. or visit your24info.com.
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in just about an hour from now, another ebola patient is scheduled to arrive in the u.s. for treatment. officials say dr. martin salia is a surgeon who worked at a treatment center in sierra leone. salia is a sierra leone national but also a permanent resident to have the united states. he is expected to be brought to a specially equipped hospital in nebraska. in the meantime, there's a new push to try to find help for ebola patients. starting next month in west africa, clinical trials begin. the aid group, doctors without borders, is hosting research projects at three of its treatment centers is and i asked chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta, about the trials and who the candidates might be.
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so we've got three vaccines. these are clinical trials. whose a candidate and what might these potentially do? >> these are two experimental drugs and the third thing is actually using blood transfusions. and the idea is you take the blood of someone who has survived ebola, give it to someone who's suffering from it, and maybe something in their blood can help athletreat it. right now they're looking at three different centers in west africa, about 100 people in each place, and everyone is a potential candidate. there's one potential drug that's not designated for women who are pregnant, but other than that, they want to start offering options to people. as they've described it, there's really been no hope in terms of treatment. this is the first sign of it. >> the blood transfusions, we have seen that that works. that has been tried and it's been effective here in the united states? what's different? >> the thing is that when you talk about studies, you really need to have large numbers of people to say that something works or doesn't work. we've certainly seen we've certainly seen is used and
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we know that those people have done well. was it the blood transfusion? was it something else? was it early diagnosis? we don't know the answers to that question. i think that surprises a lot of people. we've been giving these experimental medications and treatments almost as a hail mary because we have no other options. this is an attempt to at least get some sort of proof that these things work. who do they work in? when should they be given? how much should be given? how much of an impact can it have? those are all the questions they want answered. >> and these candidates will be selected how? >> basically, you have about -- you have several thousand people right now who probably have ebola infections. these are people who are currently infected. really, it's anybody who's potentially in these centers. there's 100 people they want to look at in each center. they're not going to do the standard sort of thing where you give some people the medication and some people you don't. they're just going to find people to give them the medication. they're going to see over 14
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days, are they more likely to survive than people in the past with the same infection? if they are, that's going to be a sign of success. >> will it matter what stage any of these candidates are in the disease or virus? >> that's what they want to know as well. people later stage versus earlier stage. the thinking seems to be the earlier you give the medication, the better. we had some evidence of that, you may remember, with mr. duncan. he got an experimental medication here in the united states. that's a medication that's going to be trialed. he didn't survive. the man in washington also got that same medication earlier, and he did survive. was that the difference? again, that's one of the things they want to try and figure out. >> is this encouraging to the medical community, that this is taking place at this juncture, especially since we heard the numbers from w.h.o. that the numbers would soar exorbitantly by december if something wasn't done at the source? >> you know, my -- some of my sources over there say what took so long? why haven't we done this sooner? so in that sense, i think
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it's -- it feels optimistic that it's finally happening in some way. but you know, these are extraordinary circumstances, fred. you're in the middle of a hum n humanitarian epidemic over there, and there's really been no options. this isn't the way science normally would unfold. but because there aren't any options, they're just sort of trying to give these medications in a way that can not only test them but also potentially help people and offer some hope. they want to prove that these things work. and they're already going back to the drug companies and saying look, we don't have the results yet, but start making more. because if these things come back positive, we don't want to wait another several months before we can actually start helping people. >> and one would think particularly in the united states there might be a lot of hesitation about clinical trials, being that first, you though, candidate. but when we're talking about so many people are dying at the rate of death in these countries in west africa, something tells me it's not going to be difficult to get anyone to cooperate. >> i think you're right. you know, in the united states,
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we have something that's known as compassionate care. and it basically, it's a risk balance. we're going to give you something that we haven't proven, but we don't have any other options. and if you don't do anything at all, you run a high risk of dying. it's tough. i mean, no one wants to be in that position. whether you live here in the united states or you live in west africa. but i think you're right. for people who are infected right now, what they're being told is that you have a 30% to 50% chance of -- you have a 50% to 70% chance of dying. i mean, that's -- those are tough odds. >> to me it sounds hopeful, but is that the interpretation by most, particularly in the medical community? >> i think it's hopeful for two reasons. one is there's some, as you alluded to, proof that these medications may work. the animal data was really good. a handful of patients now in the united states have received some of these medications. but i also -- you know, there's been this sense that west africa's just getting ignored in all this. in the united states, people got great treatment. they got early treatment. they got experimental drugs. the problem is west africa. and they've been largely
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ignored. so there's idea there's now this focus on it, a clinical trial, drug manufacturers stepping up, these big partnerships between doctors without borders and universities, all of that, it's a momentum that i think could make a difference. >> fantastic. dr. sanjay gupta, thanks so much. >> thank you. appreciate it. still ahead -- >> more than $600 billion. that's how much americans are expected to spend this holiday season. how do retailers plan to get you in the door and get a piece of the pie? it's the science behind black friday when we come back. down.
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and then speak with your gastroenterologist. with the expert advice tool at crohnsandcolitis.com. big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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well, it's becoming a thanksgiving tradition. huge crowds of people jamming into the stores after waiting in line for hours, sometimes even days, on black friday. but as our christina aleshi found out, there is a lot more science behind this kind of madness that just, i guess, stores are counting on. >> reporter: with thanksgiving around the corner, retailers are gearing up for a battle. and here's why. stores can make up to 40% of their annual profits in just the last six weeks of the year. but there's a problem these days. the shopping holiday season isn't what it once was. in 2004, sales grew nearly 7%.
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in 2013, the sales increase was less than half that. this year, retailers have a little bit of a unique opportunity. low gas prices. people have a little extra spending money. so with billions of dollars at stake, here are a few strategies that brick and mortar stores are using to get a piece of the action. one, retailers are rolling out promotions early. more people are shopping in november, before black friday. so names like target are promoting pre-black friday sales. and kmart and radio shack are opening stores on thanksgiving morning. two, minimize wait times. stores are increasing staff and mobile checkouts. fact is, shoppers are more valuable than ever before. so stores are really working hard to keep them happy. three, focus on online sales. researcher mpd group says 60% of consumers plan to shop online this year. so expect more special online
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and mobile deals and fewer shipping fees. but at the end of the day, these tactics can only go so far. ultimately, what people spend and where they spend it comes down to a feeling, how they feel about their job, the economy and how much money's in their pocket. in new york, i'm christina alesci. all right. hello again, everyone, i'm fredericka whitfield. here are the top stories. brand-new auto and never-before-seen surveillance video capturing the moments, hours after a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teen in ferguson, missouri. this surveillance video shows officer darren wilson after he shot michael brown. some

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