Skip to main content

tv   New Day  CNN  March 17, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
a passenger disturbance. >> breaking overnight, a frightening scene aboard a denver-bound jetliner. he ran forward towards the cockpit and he is being restrained by other passengers. >> this passenger was screaming and tried to rushed cockpit. but passengers on board subdued him shortly after takeoff. >> i'm so sorry. >> don't move david, you're okay we're going to get you off this plane. buddy. >> united airlines flight 1074 heading from the washington, d.c. area to denver at around 10:40 p.m. when the incident forced the pilot to turn around. >> the cockpit is secure. and we would just like to return to the airport and have the authorities meet him. >> a spokes map for the airline saying flight 1074 returned to the airport following takeoff on monday evening after a passenger failed to comply with crew instructions. local law enforcement officials met the aircraft at the gate and
3:01 am
detained the passenger. this video taken by one of the passengers during the altercation. bruises below his right cheek and near his mouth. several others holding down his head as one person tries to calm him down. >> relax and don't move. >> a spokeswoman for the airport saying no passengers were injured and no weapon was found. the passenger was removed by law enforcement and taken to the hospital for evaluation. >> you got him? >> tense moments indeed. now as for the remaining passengers on board, united airlines says that it plans on getting them to their destination, denver this morning. >> remarkable how the cockpit remaimed calm and the passengers even in the midst of trying to restrain the man kept calm. new york real estate heir robert durst has been charged with the first-degree murder charge in the execution-style death of his friend susan
3:02 am
berman in 2000. his extradition to california delayed where he faces criminal charges in new orleans where he he was arrested over the weekend. cnn's miguel marquez joins us with more. >> so many developments in this case. he is meant to go to california very soon to face murder charges. he didn't fight extradition. but now he is facing gun and marijuana charges in new orleans and he may in court again later today. >> this morning, new york real estate heir robert durst remains behind bars in new orleans. the millionaire picked up in the lobby of a hotel saturday staying under a false name with a fake driver's license. in his possession a .38 revolver marijuana and a substantial amount of cash. one official says it appears durst was preparing to flee to cuba. the 71-year-old facing felony firearm and drug charges, complicating his extradition to los angeles, where durst will be
3:03 am
tried for first-degree murder of close friend and crime novelist susan berman. >> bob durst didn't kill susan berman he's ready to end the rumor and speculation and have a trial. >> prosecutors citing new evidence alleged the millionaire was lying in wait before shooting berman execution style in her living room nearly 15 years ago. according to reports, police were set to question her over the 1982 disappearance of durst's first wife kathie mccormick that case remains unsolved. an nypd official says state police here are seeking information about the various timelines durst provided to detectives during his wife's disappearance. the hit hbo series "the jinx" possibly providing incriminating clues to the decades-old case. the documentary's shocking finale sunday reveals durst mumbling to himself in the bathroom seemingly admitting to
3:04 am
murder. >> what the hell killed them all, of course. >> the filmmakers going to police finding the bombshell off-camera comments two years after wrapping the final interviews the durst's lawyer calling it ramenings and the millionaire admitted nothing. >> we're ready to go to california and have a trial. >> not guilty. >> durst beat murder charges in 2003 after admitting he killed and dismembered a neighbor in texas claiming self-defense. >> the huge question is whether or not that admission, so-called admission will ever be heard by a jury. lawyers are split on that it's only a matter of time before he gets to california and all of that begins to get sorted out. he could beat the rap yet again. alisyn? >> miguel so much to talk about. let's bring in former fbi assistant director and cnn law enforcement analyst, tom fuentes and forker new york city police
3:05 am
officer eugene o'donnell. eugene it seems as though if this film the hbo film "the jinx" is what gave prosecutors the ability to break this cold case. i mean that's what -- this was cold for a long time. just because it aired. i want to ask you about the timing of this. why did they wait until the finale of the film to arrest him? >> i highly doubt that that's the reason. think it's a coincidence. no question it's been a full-court press, these are brutal crimes that people are on top of him for. so i don't know that the timing is anything more than coincidence. >> tom, let me ask you, it seems as though two damning pieces of evidence came out in the hbo film. the first, was this letter okay. so an envelope one written by the killer of susan berman to the police department telling them where to find her body. the other, that you're seeing on the bottom there, written by the guy himself, to his friend
3:06 am
susan berman robert durst. tom, look at these two handwriting samples. these are exactly alike. >> that's right, alisyn and think it doesn't take a document expert to look at that and say just what you've just said they look exactly alike. >> i mean even to the point where "beverly hills" is misspelled. tom, for the jury this is an open-and-shut case isn't it in. >> i don't know that anything is ever an open-and-shut case already, especially with durst. we'll have to see. but that certainly is very incriminating that the printing looks so close. almost looks exactly identical and then the other evidence that's been uncovered, such as the microphone where he's in the bathroom. sounding like he admits to murder. now i think that you know that's probably going to go before a jury. whether a jury gets talked out of thinking that it's a confession by his presentation from his defense attorney that will be another story.
3:07 am
>> eugene, let's listen to that moment okay? robert durst was wearing a hot mic. he took a break, he went into the bathroom and he is talking to himself in what sounds like an apparent confession. listen to this. >> what the hell are you doing? killed them all. of course. >> killed them all, of course. do you think that's going to be admissible in court? >> i think it's going to be admissible. i would argue that some people have a compulsion almost to confess, this guy is haunted by this case. that's the prosecutor side of me. i think the argument is clear, in this private place where he didn't think he was being heard. you have to look inside of his mind and his mind is a guilty mind for the crimes he has committed. >> you think the jury will hear sanaa. >> i think the jury will hear that. >> this comes from a harvard law professor who believes it will
3:08 am
be inadmissible. here are some theories about what he could have been doing in the bathroom. he could have been asking himself rhetorically about everything thinks he's done. he could be fantasizing, durst's statement will almost therefore certainly never reach a jury. tom what do you think of that jury? >> i disagree with it i'm not a harvard law professor, but in this situation, the jury will get a chance to hear it this is not law enforcement secretly wire-tapping him without authority. it's not even a journalist doing that. he knew he was miked up. he knew he was doing this interview for hbo. the mic, whether it was turned on or turned off. whether he believed it was on or off, in a sense doesn't matter. he knew he was micced up and wasn't careful enough to keep his mouth shut. in the statement by the professor, they're saying the jury might not believe it because of this reason they might not believe it because of that. that's all true i would agree
3:09 am
with that they might not believe that's what he's admitting to. but i don't think they're going to be able to exclude that from being heard by a jury. >> there's another theory eugene that when you're in the bathroom there's a presumption of privacy. >> usually that's an issue about the government eavesdropping, overhearing somebody's conversation. that's not the issue here. the constitution is to stop the government from overreaching. it's not an insurance policy against doing something stupid. which apparently he did. he left a mic on and implicated himself. this is a weighty issue, so the idea that the guy is rambling this is about murder he's been a suspect in murder cases, it's a serious thing to be just talking about and revealing your soul as i think did he in this case. >> tom, do you think robert durst's decades of eluding the law and some would say getting away with murder has come to an end? >> you would think so. but you know again anything is possible in court. some of the previous case for he was tried in texas you would
3:10 am
have thought was pretty clear and the jury decided he dismembered somebody in self-defense. you don't know what's going to happen for sure. but it would look like this time it might be. >> tom fuentes, eugene o'donnell, thanks so much for helping us break it down. later we'll talk to ellen strauss, she was a friend of robert durst's first wife kathy, who disappeared in 1982. should evidence if the hbo film be admissible in court? you can tweet us or find us on facebook. a fascinating discussion about what is legal and what is ethical. the u.s. and iran back at the negotiating table over iran's nuclear program as president obama fires back at the 47 senate republicans who signed the controversial letter to iran insisting that it is not the way that america does business. this morning, a new cnn/orc poll shows an overwhelming of majority of americans favor direct diplomacy with the
3:11 am
iranians. let's begin our coverage with cnn senior white house correspondent michelle kosinski. >> a large majority 68% feel the u.s. should be negotiating with iran over its nuclear program. and on that letter signed by 47 senate republicans, telling iran that congress plays a bigger role than iran might expect more people 49% felt it went too far. 39% felt it was appropriate. and president obama had a lot to say about that. in an interview he just did with vice news. >> i'm embarrassed for them. because it's not how america does business. they were effectively making common cause with the hardliners in iran, who also don't want any kind of diplomatic resolution. because they're invested in getting a nuclear weapon. >> well people weighed in on him, too. when asked, who do you have more confidence in to handle foreign policy and major issues facing america, about 47% chose him.
3:12 am
39% chose republicans in congress. although overall men chose congress and one in ten people chose neither. alisyn? >> okay. michelle thanks so much for that analysis. well the deadline to reach a nuclear deal with iran less than two weeks away european negotiators say talks have reached a critical phase with broad disagreements remaining. cnn's senior international correspondent nic robertson has more from london. >> the clock is ticking down to the march 31st deadline. a two-hour meeting this morning between the foreign minister of iran zarif and secretary kerry. we're not clear yet, we haven't been briefed on what came out of the meeting. we know that the five-hour session yesterday didn't seem to go well. state department officials saying there are still differences that need to be bridged. that iran needs to make some necessary and tough choices.
3:13 am
and that they and the state department are not clear that the 31st of march deadline is achievable. zarif came out of the meeting yesterday saying well finally we've got something. you know an indication there that he felt that he was making some gains, but then he went to europe yesterday, met with the french germany and british and told the "reuters" that significant gaps remain. despite the long session with the europeans, differences hadn't been narrowed. that seems to be the tone around the talks. the talks are going on. but the gaps are still there. and that's a problem. michaela? >> how to bridge those gaps is the biggest challenge. nic, thanks so much. a huge turnout is expected as israelis head to the polls this morning. prime minister benjamin netanyahu pledging if there were re-elected there will not be a palestinian state. reversing course on promises he made to the u.s.
3:14 am
cnn's orrin lieberman is live in jerusalem outside a polling center with the latest for us. good morning. >> good morning, michaela. a busy morning here and across israel. we spoke with election official who is say voter turn-out is up 2% from two years ago, it will mean 70% for the country, a high number. benjamin netanyahu making a final push yesterday in talking to a local tv station, he said if he is prime minister again, if he's elected there will not be a palestinian state. he says it's simply too dangerous. that would be a base from which to attack israel. he voted earlier this morning in and said he's against a unity government. with isaac hertzog, his main competitor. hertzog said if he's elected, he would make sure there's change. he said if you want different leadership, a new direction, vote for isaac hertzog. both politicians know how close
3:15 am
the race is in the final election polls, the opposition had opened up a lead. the biggest one we've seen in elections so far. the higher voter turnout could play a big part. and what's the arab vote. >> polls close at 4:00 p.m. eastern. we'll watch for the results, oren lieberman. the president of vanuatu. making a plea he said the storm destroyed all the infrastructure on the island chain. a state of emergency has been declared. aid is arriving but slowly. providing the basic needs for victims like clean water and food. officials say the death toll currently stands at 11 but is expected to rise. secret service chief joe clancy expected to be grilled this morning at a house appropriations hearing about the agency's latest black eye.
3:16 am
those two top-ranking agents suspended for allegedly driving a government vehicle onto the white house property. after reportedly drinking and disrupting an investigation into a suspicious package. the white house says president obama maintains full confidence in clancy. despite leaking classified information and lie together fbi about it former c.i.a. director and retired general david petraeus is still advising the white house. the obama administration confirms petraeus remain as trusted adviser on the u.s. strategy against isis. petraeus pleaded guilty this month to sharing classified information with his mistress and biographer. >> there are people who say he is getting unequal treatment being treated much more nicely than other people will for committing similar crimes. he's convicted of a crime. and still others who say his expertise is so crucial, he has to be. >> he's still an accomplished general, even though he had a lapse in judgment. so -- you know how why
3:17 am
disregard -- >> more than one. >> we'd love to know what you think. meanwhile, president obama lashing out at gop senators for sending that letter to iran. a letter that appears to have the iranians upset. has this damaged the chances for a deal? and the white house is crowing about the new obamacare figures. the number of insured americans has risen sharply. why are republicans doing everything they can to repeal the law? ass! here's our new trainer ensure active heart health. crowd: yayyyy! heart: i'm going to focus on the heart. i minimize my sodium and fat... gotta keep it lean and mean. pear: uh-oh. heart: i maximize good stuff like my potassium... and phytosterols, which may help lower cholesterol. major: i'm feeling energized already. new delicious ensure active heart health supports your heart and body, so you stay active and strong. ensure. take life in.
3:18 am
[ r&b slow jam playing ] ♪ yeah, girl ♪ ♪ you know, i've been thinking about us ♪ ♪ and, uh, i just can't fight it anymore ♪ ♪ it's bundle time ♪ ♪ bundle ♪ ♪ mm, feel those savings, baby ♪ and that's how a home and auto bundle is made. better he learns it here than on the streets. the miracle of bundling -- now, that's progressive. when laquinta.com sends craig wilson a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what he becomes? great proposal! let'stalk more over golf. great. how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! the ready for you alert, only at laquinta.com.
3:19 am
3:20 am
3:21 am
president obama firing back at 47 senate republicans who signed the controversial letter to iran calling their actions an embarrassment. according to a new cnn poll a majority of americans agree that that letter went too far. right now the talks are under way in switzerland with iranians reportedly asking a lot of questions about the gop letter. let's bring in cnn political commentator and contributing editor at atlantic media, peter beinart. and cnn global affairs analyst and managing editor at "quartz," bobby ghosh. given the day that's happening in israel we have to talk about that. peter we know you know the
3:22 am
issues that are going on. what was your reaction to netanyahu declaring the night before the election there will not be a two-state under his watch, especially when in 2009 he had said the exact opposite? >> it would be wonderful to know what people in the white house were thinking at that moment. it shows that the last six years of his prime ministership have been a charade on this front. i think people who knew netanyahu well never believed he was serious about a palestinian state to begin with. he had been against one his entire career. he ran for prime minister in 2009 opposing one and only switched under american pressure still never was willing to lay out the parameters of the supposed palestinian state he supported. but still it was quite remarkable that he would ditch all of that. and it does raise the question if he were to be re-elected how would his relationship go forward with the obama administration now that he's publicly broken -- >> interesting, bobby, where he made the comments, visiting a
3:23 am
jerusalem neighborhood where he authorized construction against the united states' wishes during his first term. that's a political employ clearly. >> all of this is sort of last-minute politics. and smacks frankly of desperation as the polls have shown that the voting public is moving away from him and more and more towards the isaac herzokbrks and the zionist union, he's been doubling down on the right-wing union.g and the zionist union, he's been doubling down on the right-wing union. this is his last roll of the dice. >> given what you've heard and what you're seeing and what you're hearing of the conversation and the tone of it what is the likelihood that he'll get elected for a fourth term? >> all the polling has been showing that the zionist union will get more seats, the polls show they'll get about four more seats, that's not the end of the
3:24 am
day in israel. zionist union will get about 25 seats, you need to get 61 seats to form a majority. we won't know for weeks. i think it's more likely if they will get four more seats they will be given the opportunity to form a coalition government. it doesn't mean they'll succeed, but they'll have the first opportunity. >> let's give it to iran we know the negotiations are ongoing. what's interesting to me is that during the negotiations twice, bobby, twice that gop letter has resurfaced. it's been brought up in the negotiations on the part of the iranians. is that a problem for the u.s.? or is this more could you look at it who from the perspective that iranians are seizing on a moment of weakness? >> absolutely. this is a bit of grandstanding from the iranians. they didn't need to wait until the negotiations in order to raise concerns about the letter. they could have picked up the phone and probably did. so this is a piece of this is a negotiating tactic. the republicans handed them the opportunity to do so. and it will be -- >> a softball pitch. >> if i were the iranian
3:25 am
negotiator why wouldn't i take that? >> let's show a poll a cnn/orc poll released show that 49% of the country believe the senators' letter went too far. agreeing with president and the democrats. 44%, i find this interesting, 44% if we look at the next poll says it won't have an impact at all. so first of all, the question is why bother sending the letter if it's not going to have an impact? what's the point of that? >> right. well i think that what you see is that republicans, especially tom cotton were trying to throw a wrench into this in whatever way they can. they're angry that the obama administration is not going to bring this to a vote in congress. and they have some degree of legitimacy there. that you know a pact of this magnitude would have been brought to congress. so they're trying to influence it however they can. but the problem is that the iranians the iranians want to do the deal because they will get some sanctions relief. if they're being told they can't rely on that sanctions relief
3:26 am
then it makes it less likely for them to make concessions on their end. >> do you think they're going to make headway before the deadline? it sounds as though the firepower negotiations didn't go well yesterday? >> i would put money down on an extension rather than a conclusive decision one way or the other. >> we'll have you hear to talk about more of it peter and bobby, great to have you. thanks so much. well an update now on the boston marathon bombing trial. jurors left the courtroom to go see the boat where dzokhar tsarnaev hid from police in the hours during a citywide lockdown. and wait until you hear who accompanied them on this trip. in my world, wall isn't a street. return on investment isn't the only return i'm looking forward to. for some every dollar is earned with sweat, sacrifice, courage. which is why usaa is honored to help our members with everything from investing for retirement to saving for college. our commitment to current and former military members
3:27 am
and their families is without equal. start investing with as little as fifty dollars. denver international is one of the busiest airports in the country. we operate just like a city and that takes a lot of energy.
3:28 am
we use natural gas throughout the airport - for heating the entire terminal generating electricity on-site and fueling hundreds of vehicles. we're very focused on reducing our environmental impact. and natural gas is a big part of that commitment.
3:29 am
3:30 am
united flight from dulles to denver forced to turn around after a passenger reportedly rushed the cockpit. the passenger was subdued by other flyers and take noon custody once the flight landed. the unruly passenger now at a local hospital being evaluated. the other 38 passengers and crew heading to denver this morning. new york real estate heir robert durst now formally charged with first-degree murder
3:31 am
in the execution-style death of his friend susan berman back in 2000. if convicted, durst could get the death penalty. he has waived extradition. it's not clear when he will be brought to los angeles, now he's facing drug and weapons charges stemming from his arrest in new orleans. new obamacare numbers out, the government estimates 16 million people have coverage. is health care coverage better now than before the law? cnn's suzanne malveaux live for us from washington. what's the answer? >> for a lot of americans, it's good news the department of health and human services says 16.4 million people have gained health insurance coverage since the affordable health care act became law five years ago. it translates into the biggest drop of uninsured americans. rate of uninsured now is 13.2%. it was about 20% in late 2014 before the marketplace was launched in 2013. so the health of hhs credits the
3:32 am
gains to the adults under 26 years old, who are able to remain on their parents' plan. two million folks, and the big number of latinos and african-americans who are able to benefit from the tax credits and the expanded medicaid components. the reason we're learning butabout this in part is because the administration is trying to get ahead of the debate with house republicans unveiling a proposed budget for 2016 today. and that calls for partly privatizing medicare and repealing the affordable care act altogether. republicans have tried and failed to repeal it in the past. now that they control both chambers they're going to try again. john? >> suzanne malveaux thanks so much. irish prime minister heading to the white house to meet with president obama. they'll attend the shamrock ceremony. and for the first time in 250 years, a gay group is marching in new york city's st. patrick's day parade.
3:33 am
mayor bill de blasio says he will not be on hand for a second year in a row because changes were not made to let more gay groups participate. time for cnn money now, business correspondent alison kosik is in our money center. what's happening with oil? >> we continue to see oil prices plunging. crude oil prices falling to the lowest level in six years, hitting $42.85 a barrel. the lowest since march of 2009. a month ago we were hearing of oil's comeback. now experts think the price could drop even lower than $40 a barrel. it's not getting cheaper to rent. in the past five years, rents have gone up 15% and they're outpacing income in most of the major cities in the u.s. according to a report from the national association of realtors. new york seattle and san jose california those were some of the places topping the list with the highest rent increases. apple apple is in talks with
3:34 am
broadcasters to offer a bundle of about 25 channels including big names, like abc, cbs and fox. it would cost between $30 and $40 a month. a lot less than the average household pays for a cable subscription. if it includes cnn, i'm tempted. >> i'm totally down. you don't have to scroll through trying to remember where the channel you just saw the great movie. it's gone. thanks alisyn. ahead, gripping testimony in the boston marathon bombing case. as eight minutes of horror at close range. new details about the defendants' final hours of freedom, ahead.
3:35 am
the real question that needs to be asked is "what is it that we can do that is impactful?" what the cloud enables is computing to empower cancer researchers. it used to take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome; with the microsoft cloud we can analyze 100 per day. whatever i can do to help compute a cure for cancer, that's what i'd like to do. imagine if razors could move up and down, and all around. hugging tight, swirling left and turning right. behold, new venus swirl. the only razor with five contour blades and a flexiball.
3:36 am
to contour to your tricky places, bends and all. going this way and that. bumps and grooves, curvy and flat. for skin as flawless as can be. new venus swirl. and try new venus with a touch of olay with five times more moisturizers when laquinta.com sends him a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what salesman alan ames becomes? i think the numbers speak for themselves. i'm sold! a "selling machine!" ready for you alert, only at lq.com.
3:37 am
3:38 am
jurors in the boston marathon bombing trial heard dramatic testimony about the firefight between police and the tsarnaev brothers and inspected the boat where dzokhar tsarnaev hid from the police and were
3:39 am
accompanied by an unusual observer cnn's pamela brown has more. >> the eight minutes of sheer terror, the main focus of testimony monday in the case against dzokhar tsarnaev. >> loud explosion. loud explosion! >> three police officers testifying about april 19th. the day of the watertown shoot-out. four days after the boston marathon bombing. officers say the tsarnaev brothers carjacked a mercedes suv. and when officer joseph reynolds passes the stolen vehicle in a residential neighborhood. he says the older brother, tamerlan gets out and begins firing at his cruiser. >> shots fired. >> within minutes, back-up response. this photo displayed in court shows the brothers ducking behind the suv for cover. police testifying both brothers were shooting and throwing pipe bombs and one pressure cooker bomb at them. >> they have explosives some type of grenades. >> oom tamerlan runs out of bullets, a sergeant says he
3:40 am
tackles him. trying to arrest him and that's when he says quote all of a sudden i can hear an engine revving. and the officer is testifying that the junger broke, dzokhar was behind the wheel of the suv driving straight for them. running over and killing his brother. the prosecution arguing this moment shows dzokhar's intent to kill the police all on his own. earlier in the day, the jurors took a field trip to the boat where dzokhar was arrested. hoisted on a lift, jurors saw the more than 100 bullet holes riddling the panels. dzokhar also present. expressing little emotion at the boat where list alleged terror spree came to an end. pamela brown, cnn, washington. >> thanks. really crucial moments at this trial. so let's continue the conversation with joey jackson, hln legal analyst, criminal defense attorney and mel robbins, cnn commentator and legal analyst there are two episodes that i want to discuss. the boat the issue of the boat and the field trip to the boat and the eight minutes of terror. the shoot-out which was only a
3:41 am
matter of a few yards apart. i mean the cops and the brothers were a few yards apart, shooting and hurling bombs at each other. let's start with the moments of terror mel. what are the key moments that the jury will take away from this? the fact that dzokhar tsarnaev was throwing bombs at the cops? the fact that he was behind the wheel trying to run down cops and perhaps even his brother? >> you know john it's an excellent question good morning to both of you guys. let's take a step back. because this could go either way. again, you've got a case where we're gearing up for the death penalty arguments, the prosecution as you already said john is going to be arguing he's throwing bombs, he's trying to kill the police he gets in the car and drives right at us? now here's an interesting thing. i think the defense will take the same moment john because one of the officers said he could have easily there was plenty of room to not hit the brother. to not run the brother over. and i think you're going to see
3:42 am
the defense argue in the death penalty phase, this was the tipping point where you've got a 19-year-old who you know look if he's of his right mind he's not going to kill his brother, he's going to escape. i think he just gun it is to try to get out of there, i think they're going to argue that it's at this moment he starts to panic. it's at this moment he starts to realize the weight of his actions, that's why he writes the explanation in the boat, john. >> that certainly is the defense's argument. you know what the prosecution's argument is this is a person who was attempting to save himself. he causes carnage. he did he have states a community, and then he attempts to get away. so selfish was he that he took his brother's life. so that he could spare and save his own. look at the police officers affected look at the community affected look at the nation devastated by his action. this warrants one thing, ladies and gentlemen, and that's death. remember mel, john that's what they're playing for. >> the only issue here. >> they're conceding and not
3:43 am
otherwise contesting any aspect of this case. yeah they looked at the tweets and did he tweet like a normal teenager would tweet. but the reality is he did it. he was so overly influenced. when you talk about the boat those scribblings and that manifesto hating america, was his brother alive to scribble that too? or was that his own ramblings of his own mind his own consequences his own actions, this warrants only one action put him to death. >> i want to talk about the car for a second. not just did he drive at the police officers he drove at his brother. he ran over his brother. how will lawyers use that fact in this case? >> well you better believe they're going to use that fact and they're going to use every fact from this point forward theemplt going to argue it both ways john. prosecution is going to argue you know that this was a guy who you know he and his brother
3:44 am
intended to not only kill and maim people. but they didn't care about dying themselves. >> martyrs. >> and he ran his brother over. he ran his brother over purposefully and writes in the boat how he's jealous that his brother is already dead and basically a martyr. the defense will show he loved his brother, he wouldn't have killed his brother, he was panicking in that moment. this is the moment where everything changes for him. this will come down to closing arguments, not necessarily testimony. the prosecutor and the defense attorneys, they're gathering bits that they can then hammer home in a closing argument. the closing argument in the death penalty phase of this case will be hours long as they argue every little single little twist and turn. >> let's talk about the boat because they got a field trip. they got to see the boat riddled with bullets here. let me read a tweet from a reporter there. covering this event when the jurors saw it.
3:45 am
dzokhar tsarnaev standing a little bit away. jurors seem to be struck by the sheer number of bullet holes in the boat 126. does that engender sympathy for the kid? >> not to the extent of prosecution will spin it this way. this was a person who hurled bombs at us projectiles, in addition to shooting feverishly kiting an m.i.t. officer. forgetting for a minute the devastation they caused at the marathon. in addition to killing the m.i.t. officer, there was another officer at that scene who almost died a at their hands, you better believe it was riddled with 110 bullets, it would have been riddled with 300 built, we didn't want to give them an additional opportunity to kill a police officer or devastate that residential neighborhood further that he was hiding in within that boat. >> and mel, you think that boat particularly what was written side of it. one of the two key pieces of evidence in the entire trial? >> yeah his own words, john
3:46 am
will either save him or kill him. the jury is going to focus in on what he wrote as he was in that boat and look if he wanted to be a martyr he could have stood up and done suicide by gunfire and had the martyrdom happen. he chose to surrender. the other major piece of evidence that will sway the jury one ware or the other, is the photograph of dzokhar, standing behind the little 8-year-old in his family. the 8-year-old that he killed as he placed the bomb and i think it's going to come down to that note to this powerful testimony and that chilling photo. >> a big, big day. mel, joey thanks so much for being with us. hillary clinton's approval taking a hit over the email controversy according to a new cnn/orc poll. what could this all mean for a clinton presidential campaign going forward? we'll examine.
3:47 am
3:48 am
the real question that needs to be asked is "what is it that we can do that is impactful?" what the cloud enables is computing to empower cancer researchers. it used to take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome; with the microsoft cloud we can analyze 100 per day. whatever i can do to help compute a cure for cancer, that's what i'd like to do.
3:49 am
3:50 am
congressional republicans begin to work to pass their first budget in ten years, but
3:51 am
there are issues. let's bring in cnn political commentator, republican consultant and sirius xm host margaret hoover and cnn commentator and editor of the "daily beast," john avlon. there are two different kinds of gop hawks, the defense hawks who want more military spending and the budget hawks who want to tighten the belt. who wins? >> it's interesting, because you even have hybrids, you have people like paul ryan who is sort of both. right he understands the value, our gop for military spending our spending on military spending per gdp is the lowest it's been since well certainly in the 20th century. you know there are people like paul ryan who understand that this is actually debilitating for the military and understand the argument that we've got to tighten our belt. the biggest spending outside of defense spending is entitlement spending and they're not going to take on the tough entitlement stuff. so in terms of the question of
3:52 am
defense hawks versus budget hawks, my guess is they end up striking a deal and no one is happy. >> what the country wants to do with the resources we have and there's a fundamental disagreement between the people there, it will play on the presidential trail, people like rand paul and ted cruz, who don't want to spend as much on the military. they'll have to come to terms with this. >> they say let's focus on economics tharks what we agree on. but the problem is they don't. there's a big conflict between the deficit hawks and the defense hawks. the deficit, which was a rallying cry in 2012or or2010 2012 the deficit has been cut in half. so instead they're looking at the basic constituencies. >> it's worth mentioning part the reason the deficit is better is because of the sequester, republicans. >> don't take credit for that
3:53 am
it's obviously the economic growth has been really driving it. >> democrats must be taking it a perverse pleasure in the fight between republicans. because democrats have been hit for the past ten years, however long. >> they haven't passed a single budget. what will happen is that a budget will be passed it's not going to be pretty. we don't have a leading republican forcing the congress's hand. instead you have warlordism in the republican party, boehner, jim jordan. the freedom caucus ted cruz rabbling up the conservative groups on the side to undermine mitch mcconnell. it's not pretty but this is democracy, democracy, is the sausage-making process isn't pretty. >> let's talk about some new cnn polls, they're very interesting, on -- on the findings of hillary clinton. so here's the first one, this is about her favorability rating. it has dropped, since, a few months ago, november of 2014 it was 59% favorable. 38% unfavorable. now it's 53% favorable, 44%
3:54 am
unfavorable. how do you see that? >> john do you think they would have gone down that same amount just as a factor of time. not even with the scandal? they've been headed that way since you left the office of the secretary of state. >> no, not necessarily. think hillary clinton has had a bad couple of weeks, by not having a campaign@apparatus by an accusation it's not really about the emails so much but about the connections being created. and as the campaign gets on the halo from the secretary of state is going to diminish. think there was an acceleration because of the bad weekend. >> i think the big headline here if you look at the arc of her popularity and her favoribility ratings, here now as low as the sumpl of 2008 when she and barack obama were fighting for the democratic nomination 53% was 2008 july and august. >> there's still net positive her favoribility ratings, a lot
3:55 am
of candidates right now cannot say that. there's a question about would you be proud to have hillary clinton as president? which is a strange question. i haven't heard that question before 57% say they would be proud to have her as president. i talked to both democrats and look there's no democrat right now who is happy with what's been going on with hillary clinton and there's every republican who is gleeful. but democrats say they're not, she's not hemorrhaging the way they thought she might and republicans i've talked to said the same thing. >> i think the number which i agree is interesting. doesn't that have to cut towards the historic nature of her potential presidency? ultimately it's saying would you be proud to have the first woman president of the united states? who doesn't think that's a great thing? finally. i mean that's and when you look at the cross tabs on the poll you see young people are proud, you see hispanics are proud. i mean pretty much across the board, it's positionve. >> so it's not about her personally it's about what she
3:56 am
represents. her people are they buoyed by these numbers, discouraged? >> i think margaret makes a great point about proud and the deeper dimensions that's a more important number than anything related to a short-term scandal. that's the deeper wind at a candidate's back. in he successful campaign has got to be bigger than the candidate. if you've got that significant majority of americans say they'd be proud to have a person as president, that's a strong ballast against any short-term winds of controversy. >> the complicated theme, how to announce in the next month while the scandal is still there, there's more of an operational thing than anything else. >> but the more they delay that the more they're going to be susceptible to the short-term scandals. >> john, margaret great to have you guys. we're following a lot of news so let's get to it. >> we've got a situation with a passenger. >> no fighting david. >> he ran forward. towards the cockpit. >> please.
3:57 am
68% feel the u.s. should be negotiating with iran. >> the best option is a diplomatic resolution. the deadline say approaching. the iraqi offensive to take tikrit back from isis has stalled. >> it worries me we've got a shia-led initiative into tikrit. he knew he was micced up and wasn't careful enough to keep his mouth shut. >> i still believe to this day in my heart. he's the responsible for the death of three people. this is "new day," with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. >> good morning. welcome to your "new day," our chris cuomo has the day off. mr. john berman joins us. we begin with breaking news a frightening ordeal for 40 passengers and crew aboard a united flight to denver. the plane was forced to return to dulles after a passenger reportedly rushed the cockpit. >> other passengers jumping into action to subdue the man. the end of the ordeal captured
3:58 am
on cell phone video. cnn's rene marsh is at dulles with more. >> you're about to see the mid-air takedown happening on board. and you're about to hear the pilots as they describe to air traffic control what this violent passenger was doing on board. >> declaring an emergency due to a passenger disturbance. >> breaking overnight, a frightening scene aboard a denver-bound jetliner. he ran forward towards the cockpit. and he is being restrained by other passengers. >> this passenger was screaming and tried to rush the come pit. but passengers on board subdued him. >> i'm so sorry. >> don't move david, you're okay. we're going to get you off this plane, buddy. >> united airlines flight 1074 heading from the washington, d.c. area to denver at around 10:40 p.m. when the incident forced the
3:59 am
pilot to turn around. >> the cockpit is secure. and we would just like to return to the airport and have the authorities meet us. >> a spokesman for the airline saying in part flight 1074 returned to the airport following takeoff on monday evening. after a passenger failed to comply with crew instructions. local law enforcement officials met the aircraft at the gate and detained the passenger. this video taken by one of the passengers during the altercation. bruises below his right cheek and near his mouth. several others holding down his head as one person tries to calm him down. >> relax and don't move. >> in this day and age, that passengers help themselves and they help the flight crew to get their flights safely to their destination. largely because of what happen on september 11th 2001. >> a spokeswoman for the airport saying no passengers were injured and no weapons were found. the unruly passenger was eventually removed by law
4:00 am
enforcement and taken to a hospital for evaluation. >> okay okay okay. i got him. >> you got him? >> yeah. >> well this violent ordeal mid air ended up grounding the flight overnight. but the airline says that they hope to get the passengers to their destination, denver this morning. back to you, allison. >> rene thanks so much for that. now to a fascinating crime case. and an update. real estate hair robert durst, facing criminals charges in two cities including los angeles, where he faces first-degree murder for a cold case involving the death of his close friend 15 years ago. prosecutors in new orleans saying not so fast. cnn's miguel marquez following all the developments for us. >> not so fast indeed. he was found with a .38 revolver and marijuana in his hotel room. so that he will be in custody in louisiana facing charges there. he bhamay be in court later today
4:01 am
to deal with those charges. this is we're still awaiting extradition. his lawyer says that he's not fighting extradition, he wants to go to los angeles over what has become now the interview. the famous interview in the hbo series "the jinx" where he apparently admits in the bathroom after being confronted with evidence over the 2000 death of susan berman. a long-time friend of his, where he appears to admit not only that murder but perhaps several murders. the big question now for prosecutors is whether or not he could, whether that admission constitutes an admission and whether or not a jury will ever hear it. michaela? >> so many questions. all right miguel. thank you for that. catty scott is an investigative journalist and the author of two books about this case. the murder is called "murder in beverly hills" and "murder of a mafia daughter" kathy. thanks for joining us.
4:02 am
i want to get your sense of this man. you have dug into this case and into this story. what's your sense of him? >> i think he's crazy as a fox. i mean he thinks you know he thinks he's the smartest person in the room and he thinks he can bamboozle everybody. and get away with murder. i mean it's amazing. he brags about lying. he's very good at lying. and he can't be trusted. i think he's a dangerous man and i'm glad he's off the street. >> the jig may be up now. we see that investigators have found marijuana, a gun, a whole lot of cash in his hotel room there. in new orleans. how close do you think he was to actually maybe getting away again? >> well, you know the feds arrested him and the word is that you know he was about to leave the country. he must have had a passport with him. that's his m.o. he goes on the lam.
4:03 am
and then he just goes around and you know is a menace to somebody else's community. but because you know he has odd behavior. but he's it's almost like he's a functioning sociopath. it's scary. he gets you know did you hear what he did in court yesterday when he appeared? >> no. tell us. >> he spoke to the judge and then he turned around and looked at the gallery, everybody in the courtroom and he smiled at them all. he thinks he's crazy as a fox. he thinks he can get away with this too, i guess. >> the people around him, what have they said? i'm curious, family acquaintances, neighbors? what have they -- we know one neighbor ended up dead. what do people la do they say about their interactions with this man? >> well people people who were friends with susan and knew durst. and i spoke to one of susan's cousins on sunday morning.
4:04 am
and he knew durst. you know durst gave her away at her wedding and he went to the wedding. and susan would invite the cousin to thanksgiving dinner and bobby would be there. and he said he always gave him, he was always aloof. he said there was something odd about him. he never felt good about him. and he talked to susan about him and she goes oh no that's just bobby, he's just eccentric. he would go and sit, he told me on sunday morning, he would go and sit, bobby, would when everybody was around and wouldn't talk. and it's because he thought he was smarter than everybody. it's almost like an entitlement. you know. >> he thought he was smarter than everybody -- yet now as we watch these pieces sort of fall into place, for example, the letter the handwriting sample. there's this letter that he wrote to susan berman and then the letter that was sent to the lapd leading them to susan berman's body. the word "beverly" misspelled.
4:05 am
spelled in the same handwriting. there are points where he's giving himself away seemingly. we don't know how much of this will factor into the case. but you are not surprised by the fact that he's now tripping himself up? >> no not at all. i mean he thumbs his nose at everybody. you know that's basically what he's doing. and i think he just -- who knows why he why he mailed that letter. it actually mailed it to the beverly hills police and he spelled "beverly" wrong. he thought she was in beverly hills, she was actually in the lapd's jurisdiction. of course it was mailed before her body was discovered. so the kill her to mail it. but he he just sort of thumbs his nose at everybody because he -- i think some of it he gets a kick out of it. he's almost become a caricature of himself, don't you think?
4:06 am
>> seemingly so. >> he's a billionaire. >> he's a billionaire. he has funds that he can somehow manage to help him escape and evade and move around quickly. 1982 until now. that's a long time. they've gotten close, he has faced charges. but many people have been left wondering why this has taken so long. i know you're among them. why has it? >> well yeah i think people are afraid of him. they're afraid of the power. when you, when you've got a district attorney facing trial, and police who are going to they've investigated it. and they're taking it to trial and you've got you know the dream team of you know with a billionaire who can hire the best in the business to represent him. you might not win that case. and so they have to weigh that you know is it worth it for to us put all of this money into a trial when he's got these top attorneys, the top defense attorneys in the country.
4:07 am
and dick dueggerin who is representing him, too, is one of them. he got him off in galveston bay, on the murder there, on self-defense. he's representing him in this one. should they go to trial? sometimes that's what they weigh, sometimes they don't prosecute. you have three jurisdictions, three different cases and none of them indicted. now they got him because he tripped up himself. >> fascinating case so great to have your perspective. thank you so much for sharing your information with us. coming up next hour we're going to speak with ellen strauss she is a friend of robert durst's first wife kathy, the woman who disappeared in 1982. should evidence from the documentary, "the jinx" be admissible in court? president obama lashing out at the senate republicans who sent the warning letter to iran. a cording to a new cnn poll the
4:08 am
public thinks the letter went too far. our coverage begins with white house correspondent michelle kosinski. >> we're seeing a big number of americans, 68% saying yes, the u.s. should be negotiate wk iran over the nuclear program. as for the letter that keeps on giving signed by 47 senate republicans, telling iran that congress plays a bigger role than iran might expect more americans, about 49% felt that it went too far. listen to what president obama said about those who signed it. >> i'm embarrassed for them because it's not how american does business. they were effectively making common cause with the hardliners in iran who also don't want any kind of diplomatic resolution. because they're invested in getting a nuclear weapon. >> this poll also asked who do you have more confidence in and foreign policy and big issues facing america, the president or republicans in congress?
4:09 am
and more americans chose -- the president. about 47%. overall, though men chose congress and about one in ten of those who responded chose the ever-popular -- "neither." john? >> i don't know if that's a viable option in this case but michelle kosinski thanks so much. european officials say nuclear talks with iran are in a critical phase, with broad disagreements remaining. cnn senior international correspondent nic robertson tracking developments for us. >> well the foreign minister of iran zarif, sat down with secretary of state john kerry this morning, so there was a chance they were going to begin to try to bridge some of those differences. it was a two-hour meeting. they had five hours yesterday. after that meeting yesterday, state department officials said look now is the time for iran to take tough and necessary choices. the deadline is looming, the 31st of march. and they're not sure frankly
4:10 am
that the ground can be covered, that the gaps and differences can be made up. zarif, the iranian foreign minister came out of the meeting seeming positive indicating that he thought they had made some gains on the iranian side. then he went to europe met with french german and british foreign ministers. a european diplomat talking with "reuters" news agency said afterwards yes, we had a long meeting with the iranians. but those gaps are still big. significant differences that need to be narrowed that are not being narrowed. the iranians seem to be trying to put things back on the table that everyone thought had been taken off. like a uranium processing enrichment facility and a heavy water reactor plant. they seem to be back on the table. but the state department saying very clearly, this is like getting a rubik's cube solved. it's not done until it's all done. that may be a big stretch right now, michaela. >> slow meticulous and important work thank you. meanwhile in lail a huge
4:11 am
turn-out is expected as people head to the polls in israel to decide prime minister benjamin netanyahu's political future. he's taking a hard-line stance on palestinian statehood. cnn's oren lieberman is at a polling station with the latest. busy there? >> it has been a busy morning, we've seen a lot of people and have gotten reports from israeli election officials it's been a busy morning across all of israel. voter turn-out running roughly what it was two years ago, 70%. a substantial number. indicative of how important it is. netanyahu playing to right-wing voters, trying to energize the right wing to makes sure he gets his support, when he said under his prmship, if hes were prime minister again, there would be no palestinian state. he insists that would allow attacks from that state on to israel. he says that won't happen. this morning right after he voted, he also said there's no chance for unity government. if you want a right-wing government you have to vote likud.
4:12 am
meanwhile, isaac herzog his main challenger the leader of the zionist party, said if you're okay with the economy and cost of living vote netanyahu but if you want change if you want different leadership if you're looking for a different direction, vote herzog. this is a very close race everybody knows how close the race is, all of the politicians and the public. voter turnout will be huge and we'll get our first idea of results at 4:00 p.m. your time. >> oren thanks so much. president vladimir putin flexing his muscles as he emerging from more than a week out of the public eye. putin ordering his northern fleet to full alert for military drills putting nearly 40,000 troops in combat readiness mode. his order comes as the u.s. and several nato countries conduct their own military exercises near russia's border. doctors treating an american health care worker infected with ebola say the patient is now in critical condition.
4:13 am
he was evacuated to the national institutes of health in maryland. ten clinician who is came to the worker worker's aid were flown to the u.s. for monitoring. one has developed symptoms but not tested positive for ebola. a life-or-death rescue caught on a rookie officer's body camera. deputy james collins, who i need to point out, has been on the job for two weeks, two weeks, he was the first to arrive at a house fire in holiday, florida. a woman tells him that her daughter was trapped inside the burning home. the deputy a former marine and as i mentioned, on the job two weeks, crawls inside finds the victim in the bedroom, i was hoping we would have the video to show you. >> you're doing such a great job of telling the story. >> breaks the window and safely hands off the woman to a colleague that was outside. and the victim is okay. >> dramatic radio story. even better on tv. >> i have a good radio voice. >> next hour we'll show you the story. meanwhile, iran raising
4:14 am
concerns over the letter sent by 47 republican senators as president obama slams the gom for it we're about to speak to someone actively trying to change minds on capitol hill about the iran deal. all of the frenzy over hillary clinton's emails is impacting how voters feel about her, according to a new cnn poll. what could it mean for a likely white house bid? john king will sort did out "inside politics." we want your daydreams your ah-has, your easier-said-than-dones. we want your sticky notes, sketchbooks, and scribbles. let's pin 'em to the wall. kick 'em around. kick 'em around, see what happens. bring us your need-it-done-yesterdays. your impracticals, your how-do-we-do-thats, impossibles, your what-do-we-do-nows, downright inaccessibles. bring us those things you're not sure how to pull off - and you're even less sure who to ask. because we're in the pushing- what's-possible business. the how-do-i-get-this-startup- off-the-ground
4:15 am
business. the taking-your-business- global-business. we're in the problem-solving business. more than 400,000 people around the world ready to help you solve problems while they're still called opportunities. from figuring it out to getting it done we're here to help. each day was fueled by thorough preparation for events to come. well somewhere along the way emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every eventuality. ...which meant she continued to have the means to live on... ...even at the ripe old age of 187.
4:16 am
life well planned. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you. introducing new flonase allergy relief nasal spray, now available over the counter in full prescription strength. when we breathe in allergens our bodies react by over-producing six key inflammatory substances that cause our symptoms. the leading allergy pill only controls one, flonase controls six. and six is greater than one. flonase the 24 hour relief that outperforms the #1 allergy pill. so go ahead , inhale
4:17 am
life. new flonase. six is greater than one. this changes everything. two weeks later. look, credit karma-- are you talking to websites again? this website says "free credit scores." oh, credit karma! yeah it's actually free. look, you don't have to put in your credit card information. whew! credit karma. really. free.
4:18 am
because it's not how america does business. they were effectively making common cause with the hardliners in iran who also don't want any kind of diplomatic resolution. because they're invested in getting a nuclear weapon. >> that was president obama, telling vice news that america with not afford the gop efforts to undermine nuclear deals with iran. new polls show a majority of americans support the ongoing talks. let's bring in retired u.s. army colonel, lawrence wilkerson, professor of government and public policy at william and mary. and former chief of staff to secretary of state colin powell. thanks so much for being on "new day." i understand that something has shifted in your perception over the past 48 hours, two days ago you did not think a deal would get done but today you do. so what's changed? >> i think what i'm hearing from both sides, the iranian side and
4:19 am
the permanent p5+1 side germany and the other members of the permanent five and the u.s. the what i'm hearing, the messages i'm getting is they're very close. they may not be able to forge a final agreement as it were but they will be able to put a political chapeau over the agreement and work out the details in may, june or july. i would give did a 60/40, whereas i was the other way before. >> what are you hearing, exactly? what do you like about this deal? >> what i'm hearing that makes me comfortable is that it is a win-win situation. which i've always thought was the essence of diplomacy. you're never going to get one side absolutely triumphant and the other side absolutely defeated. what you're going to get is a compromise which is very american if you think about it. and that compromise is going to be a deal if you will that
4:20 am
both sides can take back to their people to their parliament to our congress and say, this is a deal we can all live with and it's better than war. it's a win-win solution and both sides should feel good about that if it is achieved. now i hastily add, if it is achieved. because there's still a lot of obstacles. >> at this hour you like the looks and the sound of this deal. are you sharing your opinion with your fellow republicans on capitol hill? >> i'm trying to. i'm trying to as swiftly and as ardently and aggressively as i can. because the 47 who signed that letter that you spoke of earlier, are the program spoke of earlier, indicated to me that there is a significant content of my party that is not interested in the deal for what it might offer both sides, our side or whatever. it's interested in killing the deal. that is murdering the baby in the crib before it's even born.
4:21 am
i hope the democrats have calculated that themselves. people like angus king the independent for example, bob menendez and other democrats, tim caine, from my own state of virginia who has a really good head on this. i hope they realize that now and they don't join in any co-sponsoring any congressional legislation that might kill the deal. because there's a significant number in my party who are after that. there's also a small group i'm sad to say, that are after war with iran period. >> have you spoken to any of those 47 republicans? >> i have not in the last few days anyway i would like very much to get in to see senator corker of tennessee, who did not sign the letter. along with six other, in my opinion, moderate republicans. at least in the sense that they refrained from this very unwise act. and i'd like to talk to them about what killing a deal before it's even born means. i don't think some of them
4:22 am
understand the details here. >> colonel, you were chief of staff to colin powell when he was secretary of state, what would he have done about a letter like this to an adversary. >> i don't think it would have ever happened. that's a very good question. colin powell was constantly in conversation with the congress whether it was dick luger, joe biden at foreign relations, ted stevens at appropriations or a host of other people in the congress. plus we had an excellent assistant secretary for legislative affairs at the state department. so this would never have happened. because we would have been on top of it. we would have known what was coming and powell would have killed it. it's in a simple. >> i'm curious, is this letter a tempest in a teapot or has it been an impediment to the negotiations. >> i actually think it's been a help. i do. i think the president treated it rightly. even though i won't applaud the president for his personality
4:23 am
disorders, i don't think he's capable of working with the congress. i don't think he likes working with the congress at all. some of this can be laid at his feet. that said i do think that congress has been unwise in the way it's acted. and i think as i said before, that if people had led the fight to cut that off, and explain to some of the more conscientious republican who is for some reason signed up to this letter and i know a lot of them are regretting it right now, i think it would have been cut off at the ankles. i don't think it would have ever made it. >> interesting larry wilkerson, thanks so much for coming on and we will look to see if your predictions hold true throughout the day. all eyes on the israeli election today, especially true at the white house. how will the results affect the future of u.s./israeli relations? john king breaks it down "inside politics." aquinta.com sends craig wilson a ready for you alert the second his room is ready, ya know what he becomes? great proposal! let'stalk more over golf. great.
4:24 am
how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! the ready for you alert, only at laquinta.com. toenail fungus? don't hide it... tackle it with fda-approved jublia! jublia is a prescription medicine proven to treat toenail fungus. use jublia as instructed by your doctor. once applied jublia gets to the site of infection by going under, around and through the nail. most common side effects include ingrown toenail, application-site redness itching, swelling, burning or stinging, blisters, and pain. tackle it! ask your doctor now if jublia is right for you. you get sick you can't breathe through your nose suddenly, you're a mouth breather. a mouth breather! well, put on a breathe right strip and shut your mouth. cold medicines open your nose over time, but add a breathe right strip and pow, it opens your nose up to 38% more. so you can breathe and do the one thing you want to do sleep. add breathe right to your cold medicine shut your mouth and sleep right. breathe
4:25 am
right. and look for the calming scent of new breathe right lavender in the sleep aisle. real transformations can happen as much inside a person as out. that's why you should take the listerine® 21 day challenge. use listerine® and over 21 days you'll experience a transformation. take the listerine® 21 day challenge and start your transformation today.
4:26 am
4:27 am
overnight a united flight forced to turn around because of a disruptive passenger who took a run at the cockpit. the plane was headed to denver.
4:28 am
forced back to dulles. the passenger was subdued by other flyers and taken to a hospital for evaluation once the flight landed. the other 38 passengers and crew will head to denver this morning. robert durst formally charged with first-degree murder. the real estate heir accused in the killing of his close friend susan berman in 2000. if convicted, he could get the death penalty. durst now in custody in new orleans, may have to face drug and weapons charges there first. 20 medical workers in libya kidnapped by isis, a group of 30 gunmen attacked a hospital while a bus was waiting to take the workers to tripoli. cnn has learned most of the victims are from the philippines, ukraine, india and serbia. officials believe the terrorists need the staff since they are the only medical team left in the city. hey, remember when i was trying to tells the amazing rescue story this morning without video? let's try it again. a life-or-death rescue caught on a rookie officer's body camera
4:29 am
he was on the job two weeks and was the first to arrive at a house flyer in florida. an elderly woman tells him her daughter is trapped inside the burning home. this man is only on the job two weeks, crawls inside, is able to locate the victim in a bedroom. breaks a window and is able to hand her off to his colleague waiting outside. can you see why i wanted the video. it tells the story. >> it's very dramatic to see it from the perspective of the cop. >> the body cameras give awe different point of view. only on the job two weeks? i want him to work in my town. a lot going on in the world of politics today, today, the big elections not in this country. in israel even though he had had big implications here as well. john king goes "inside politics." >> good morning, let's go "inside politics" with me to share reporting and insight, julia pace of the "associated press." tamara keith of npr. it's odd to start the show with
4:30 am
the israeli election but it's very important anyway. any israeli election is important the to the united states because of the strategic alliance. this one is personal for president obama. that's what is fascinating, benjamin netanyahu seeking another term as prime minister. just a couple of weeks ago was standing in the capital, saying the president of the united states is wrong, don't trust him in these iran negotiations. just yesterday, he said if i'm re-elected if i'm the prime minister, there will not be a palestinian state while i'm prime minister. from the white house perspective, they can't come out and say we want the other guy to win, but isaac herzog is the leading opposition candidate. >> there's no love lost between president obama and netanyahu. if netanyahu stays prime minister you're looking at a relationship between the u.s. and israeli leaders over the next two years that will be a freeze. they would love the opportunity to work with someone else and netanyahu's position on iran has caused a lot of divide. but the position he's taken now on a palestinian state just adds another level of tension to
4:31 am
this. but the united states sees it as an untenable position for israel. they see it as unrealistic and if netanyahu is going to stay prime minister and hold this position then it essentially freezes peace talks and leaves the obama administration with no chance of pursuing that. >> bush/gore 2000 aside. we usually know on election night who the next leader is. we might not know this one for weeks. because number one, you have the two leading parties and you have several smaller parties and they range the political spectrum. whoever wins tonight gets the first chance to form a coalition government. but netanyahu once came in second and got to form a coalition government. so we may be at this coalition chess for a while, right? >> yes. and i think the obama administration is probably going to hang back for a while until this is all, until this all shakes out. though i certainly think that when they look to benjamin netanyahu, they don't feel like they have much of a partner. >> hang back or at least try not to leave fingerprints. >> as you mentioned, the reason
4:32 am
prime minister netanyahu was here was to essentially say don't trust these negotiations with iran don't trust the president of the united states when he says he can get a good deal. iran can't be trusted. brand new cnn polling we released last night. do you favor direct diplomacy to prevent iran from developing nuclear weapons, 68% of americans say yes. 47 republicans sent a letter to iran. 29% say no look at this 77% of democrats, and two-thirds of republicans, 65%, two-thirds of independents are these conservatives, are these, the 47 of the 54 republican senators who sent this letter did they get a little too far out over their skis? >> i think they did. i think americans have a good sense of what the universe of options are here. there is direct diplomacy, and if it doesn't work it seems possible perhaps likely that there will be some kind of military conflict. we know that the public is war-reary and doesn't want to
4:33 am
get into a military engagement with iran right now. i think there are some legitimate policy questions that republicans have but being so aggressive in going after the president's negotiations puts them at the opposite side of most americans. >> and i don't know that the poll proves that president obama has made an amazing case for diplomacy with iran. but it props that it's almost a poll about americans liking apple pie. i mean like of course americans want you to try the path of peace. really. >> especially after iraq and afghanistan. give it a shot. see how it plays out. the deadline is supposed to be the end of the month. secretary kerry involved with the negotiations. and the israeli elections also in our new poll some interesting data about hillary clinton and the email controversy. 51% of americans say it's a serious problem. her use of personal private email. 48% say no a relatively evenly
4:34 am
divided america when it comes to questions about hillary clinton. 53% of americans have a favorable opinion of her, down six points from november of 2014. some of it i would take about people being concerned about the email controversy and part of it is probably just because she's now a political figure again. she's not secretary of state, she's a candidate for president. >> i think some of the drop was inevitable for her. when she left the state department her approval ratings were sky-high these were crazy approval ratings for hillary clinton. she was coming back down to earth as she got more involved in politics. now she's on the cusp of actually running for president, i think we'll see her numbers perhaps dip a little bit. i don't think you can underestimate the impact of emails. i don't think it's what people will be voting on next november but it's the first thing that people are hearing about as she prepares to run for president and it's not positive. i think she's going to have to deal with it the one press conference is not going to be enough. >> even 30% of democrats think
4:35 am
there's a problem. it's interesting, you look at the data and you say, a majority of americans say they think it was wrong. 30% of democrats, that's a problem for her. most republicans do. so you see some numbers that are negatives are up. is she honest and trustworthy. her honesty numbers are down 57% in the poll say they would be proud to have hillary clinton as their president. so there's some conflicting data. she's viewed as someone who could make history. first female president, serious, has graphvitas to a wide swath of americans, yet they have questions. >> i think they've always had those questions about hillary clinton. if you dig in to the numbers in the poll you find that republicans still dislike hillary clinton. and democrats still like hillary clinton. and that's basically how you get all of these numbers. but i've called a bunch of people in iowa and new hampshire, which are the early voting states. and think it's really not as big a deal there as it is here in
4:36 am
washington, d.c. and it hasn't had the staying power, out in real america than it's had here. but it is a reminder of sort of the old narrative. and the way it reminds people of how they feel about hillary clinton and how they felt about her since 1991 or '2. >> i think it's a big deal that there's bernie sanders, martin o'malley the democrats who may run against her. they said they don't want to talk about this. if you had a democrat who wanted to raise this as an issue. you might have a different political dynamic. >> it speaks to hillary clinton's position in the party. even martin o'malley who might want to make a run for president, doesn't want to damage the person who is almost certain to be his party's nominee. >> the party understands it has invested all of this money, or just about all of it and they can't get it back right now. julie, tamara thanks for coming in. alisyn a busy day in washington we'll keep our eye on those israeli elections, we'll be back at 4:00 with the
4:37 am
first exit polls. we'll track them from israel here in washington, d.c. john king thanks so much. new secret service director joe clancy will have some explaining to do when he faces house lawmaker who is are ready to grill him over the agency's latest black eye. one congressman, who will meet with clancy joins us next to say what eel ask him. (mom) when our little girl was born we got a subaru. it's where she said her first word. (little girl) no! saw her first day of school. (little girl) bye bye! made a best friend forever. the back seat of my subaru is where she grew up. what? (announcer) the 2015 subaru forester (girl) what? (announcer) built to be there for your family. love. it's what makes a subaru a subaru.
4:38 am
the real question that needs to be asked is "what is it that we can do that is impactful?" what the cloud enables is computing to empower cancer researchers. it used to take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome; with the microsoft cloud we can analyze 100 per day. whatever i can do to help compute a cure for cancer, that's what i'd like to do. real transformations can happen as much inside a person as out. that's why you should take the listerine® 21 day challenge. use listerine® and over 21 days you'll experience a transformation. take the listerine® 21 day challenge and start your transformation today.
4:39 am
4:40 am
4:41 am
secretses if director joe sclancy will face intense questioning at a house hearing over the secret service agency's latest scandal. involving two agents that disrupted a bomb investigation outside the white house after a night of partying. this is the latest in a series of scandals leaving many to question what it will take to reform the agency for real. joining me now, is virginia congressman chairman of the house judiciary committee, bob goodlat. respect the tie this st. patrick's day. top of the morning to you. >> so you issued a statement last week saying the secret service looks less like it is designed right now to protect the president, and more like it's partying as if it's animal
4:42 am
house. animal house. >> it's an outrageous set of circumstances that have been going on for past year now. we know about drunken partying on secret service assignments with the president. overseas we know about the fence-jumper getting into the white house. and now you have someone who not only drinks and drives a bad idea but drinks and drives while headed back to the white house, at the white house, and into an actual bomb crime scene investigation. this is very disappointing. and we have very high hopes for the new secret service director jim clancy. he has come back to the agency to try to solve these problems. i and john conyers, the ranking democrat on the committee and jason chaffetz the member of the oversight committee and his ranking member elijah cummings will be meeting with director clancy to talk about what measures they're taking to solve
4:43 am
the problem. clearly there's a serious morale problem and a serious discipline problem at the agency charged with some of the most important responsibility the, protecting the life of the president and other people around him. >> when you're going over the events of that evening, you left out the part where a senior supervisor let the agents go home without forcing them to take a sobriety test. >> no breath test and yet the report is he smelled the alcohol on their breath and therefore, i don't think they're going to get away with this. but that again, is an example of you know protecting somebody's back rather than protecting the president of the united states. >> well then let me read a statement. you mentioned jason chaffetz chairman of the oversight committee and a statement from him and elijah cummings talking about the implications of what this means. it raises important questions about what additional steps should be taken to reform the agency and whether the problems
4:44 am
at secret service run deeper than the recently replaced top tier of management. do you have confidence that mr. clancy is up to the job? >> well we're going to find out. this is his first test of a serious problem since he was confirmed by the senate as the new director. he was put in in specific response to the fence-jumping incident where the individual not only jump the fence, but actually got in the front door of the white house and into several rooms before he was apprehended. so the director has obviously a make challenge. we're going to find out from him what his plans are. we're working on a legislative initiatives to make sure that the structure of this agency works properly. we still have a ways to go on that. we're gathering information and one of the most important parts of that will be interviewing director clancy. >> gathering information, what's the first question you're going to ask him? really there are so many about that night. >> the first question i'm going to ask him is what disciplinary action has been taken with
4:45 am
regard to these two agents and their supervisor? because obviously it's a serious matter. if you don't send the right message, that this is not going to be tolerated you're going to continue to see more of this. >> in fact isn't there supposed to be a zero tolerance policy for just this type of incidents, after everything that happened overseas with the drinking and what not? >> we're going to find out. >> what response is appropriate? you're going to ask him what he's going to do. what would be the minimum response that would be acceptable to you? >> well i want to hear from him what the standard has been and how it's being applied. but certainly it would include the possibility that these individuals would lose their jobs. >> the part of it that i think is concerning to a lot of people is that this happened that night at the white house, when the whole world is watching the secret service. if you had to list three of the things that secret service agents could not do in this current environment, they would be -- drink on the job, drive back to the white house, potentially drinking. drive through a bomb scene
4:46 am
investigation and be sent home without taking a sobriety test. i think those things would top list of things that would be scandalous in this environment right now. yet, they did it anyway. does that indicate there's a cultural problem here? >> i think it does. and the second question for director clancy is what is he doing to make sure that his agents understand in advance, not seeing somebody lose their job, but in advance, know that if they go to a retirement party for one of their colleagues that they shouldn't be drinking if they're going to be driving. number one. and number two, they dentally shouldn't be going back to the white house in that state. so does the director have a plan for making sure that when events like that occur, which presumably there are a lot of secret service agents at the event, that somebody is you know the big brother who is going to make sure that people know that they can't do this kind of thing? this is common information that people who go out for a new
4:47 am
year's eve celebration or on a friday night or whatever know that they better have a contingency plan ahead of time to not drink and drive. >> chairman bob goodlatte great to have you here with us on "new day." russian president vladimir putin resurfaces after more than a week m.i.a. where was he? we'll look at all the rumors and get putin's explanation. i bring the gift of the name your price tool
4:48 am
to help you find a price that fits your budget. uh-oh. the name your price tool. she's not to be trusted. kill her. flo: it will save you money! the name your price tool isn't witchcraft! and i didn't turn your daughter into a rooster. she just looks like that. burn the witch! the name your price tool a dangerously progressive idea. bring us your baffling. bring us your audacious. we want your sticky notes, sketchbooks, and scribbles. let's pin 'em to the wall. kick 'em around. kick 'em around, see what happens. because we're in the how-do-i-get-this-startup- off-the-ground business. the taking-your-business- global-business. we're in the problem-solving business. 400,000 people - ready to help you solve problems while they're still called opportunities. from figuring it out to getting it done we're here to help.
4:49 am
4:50 am
we no longer have to wonder where president putin is anymore. the bear apparently has emerged
4:51 am
from hiding. not before a whole slew of rumors popped up about his hibernation. jeanne moos explores some of the more outlandish theories. >> reporter: as if coming up for air, vladimir putin has resurfaced, and he didn't look bad considering all the things he was rumored to have suffered. >> either being dead having a stroke. >> in bed with the flu. >> was he at the bedside of his alleged girlfriend while he had their love child. >> reporter: his disappearance had people pointing wiggling fingers. >> where's he that's what i want to know. >> reporter: the ma cho man who baynes tigers and rides horses he hit the firing squad of cameras. the only thing he had to say was -- it would be boring without gossip. makes you think vladimir might enjoy seeing his missing mug on
4:52 am
a milk carton or his bare chested body on display in shocking footage from his funeral. here he is. instead, putin's still alive makes west moisturized appearance. watch how he sits down sort of gingerly. one report had it that a specialist from vienna traveled from vienna. maybe he slipped a disc on the wood pecker, but would the kremlin hide a bad back to maintain his tough guy image? you betcha. >> i come from strong genes. president obama he comes from mom genes. >> reporter: one of the most fantastical theories about his vanishing act was illustrated by ukrainian kids. in an animation workshop they drew president putin being beamed up by aliens. spacecraft took off after putin
4:53 am
was abducted by the ufo peace and calm came over the earth. knowing putin, he would have been riding that space ship. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> very busy in 11 days the russian leader was. >> you know what would you do if no one knew where president obama was for 11 days? there would be speculation like you would not believe here. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> there's no one else in that government. every part of the whole russian city system is run by vladimir putin. he was gone. >> still no explanation. >> he did look a little peaked in his first appearance. his color was off. he seemed jaundiced. >> he would not want to admit if there was a medical thing, that's what i'm saying. >> agreed. >> john's giving you the skeptical eyeball. >> i think there's a conspiracy. >> anyone? any conspiracy. >> something. i don't know what it is. there is one. >> let us know what you think. we'll read your twitter comments. one of our top stories, real estate heir robert durst facing
4:54 am
a first degree murder charge from killing his friend as the disappearance of his first wife remains unsolved. we'll speak with a friend of kathy mccormick his first wife, about this crazy case. ie's list app, you can get projects done in a snap. take a photo of your project or just tell us what you need done and angie's list will find a top rated provider to do the job. start your project for free today. ready for another reason to switch to t-mobile? get america's best unlimited 4g lte family plan. two lines of unlimited 4g lte data for just $100 a month. stuck in a contract? don't get trapped by the other guys. t-mobile will break you free. we'll buy out your contract up to $650 per line. so don't wait, get americas best unlimited 4g lte family plan with two lines for just $100. switch to t-mobile today.
4:55 am
in my world, wall isn't a street. return on investment isn't the only return i'm looking forward to. for some every dollar is earned with sweat, sacrifice, courage. which is why usaa is honored to help our members with everything from investing for retirement to saving for college. our commitment to current and former military members and their families is without equal. start investing with as little as fifty dollars. you get sick you can't breathe through your nose... suddenly... you're a mouthbreather. well, put on a breathe right strip and instantly open your nose up to 38% more than cold medicines alone so you can breathe and sleep shut your mouth and sleep right. breathe right.
4:56 am
4:57 am
major: ok fitness class! here's our new trainer ensure active heart health. crowd: yayyyy! heart: i'm going to focus on the heart. i minimize my sodium and fat... gotta keep it lean and mean. pear: uh-oh. heart: i maximize good stuff like my potassium... and phytosterols, which may help lower cholesterol. major: i'm feeling energized already. new delicious ensure active heart health supports your heart and body, so you stay active and strong. ensure. take life in.
4:58 am
come on. >> don't fight, david. >> we've got a situation with a passenger. he ran forward towards the cockpit. >> i'm sorry. >> u.s. and iran back at the negotiating table this morning over iran's nuclear program. >> the absolute best option is a diplomatic resolution. >> it appears durst was preparing to flee to cuba. >> he left a mic on and implicated himself. >> i still believe today in my heart he's responsible for the death of three people. >> the highest honor bestowed to anyone in the teaching profession. >> this reawakens the importance of teachers. >> good teachers are essential. this is "new day" with chris cuomo, alisyn camerota and michaela pereira. good morning, everyone. welcome back to your netanyahu kay
4:59 am
"new day." >> happy st. paddy's day. >> we have a green necklace. thanks so much. we begin with breaking news overnight. a united airlines flight to denver forced to abruptly turn around after an unruly passenger tries to rush the cockpit. >> other flyers jumping in then to subdue the passenger. the whole end of the ordeal it was captured on cell phone videos. you can see cnn's rene marsh joins us from dulles international airport with more on this breathtaking moment. rene. >> reporter: absolutely, michaela. not only is there video, but there's audio of the pilots as they make that emergency call to air traffic controllers describing this violent passenger who was on board. >> declaring an emergency due to a passenger disturbance. >> reporter: breaking overnight, a frightening scene over a denver bound jet liner. >> he ran forward towards the cockpit and he is being restrained by other passengers.
5:00 am
>> reporter: this passenger was screaming and tried to rush the cockpit, but passengers on board subdued him shortly after takeoff. >> i'm sorry. >> don't move david. you're okay. we're going to get you off this plane, buddy. >> reporter: united airlines flight 1074 headed from the washington d.c. area to denver around 10:40 p.m. when the incident forced the pilot to turn around. >> the cockpit is secure and we would just like to return to the airport and have the authorities meet us. >> reporter: a spokesman for the airlines saying in part flight 1074 returned to the airport following takeoff on monday evening after a passenger failed to comply with crew instructions. local law enforcement officials met the aircraft at the gate and detained the passenger. this video taken by one of the passengers during the altercation. bruises below his right cheek and near his mouth several
5:01 am
others holding down his head as one person tries to calm him down. >> don't move. >> in this day and age the passengers helped themselves and they helped the flight crew to get their flight safely to their destination largely because of what happened on september 11th 2001. >> reporter: a spokesperson for the airport saying no passengers were injured and no weapons were found. the unruly passenger was eventually removed by law enforcement and taken to a hospital for evaluation. >> okay. okay. okay. >> i've got him. >> you got him? >> yeah. >> reporter: well that unruly passenger did not reach the cockpit after september 11th. all aircraft were equipped with reinforced cockpit doors. as for the passengers who were on that flight their flight was grounded last night because of all of this. united says that they hope to get the passengers and they're planning to get the passengers to their destination this morning. michaela. >> a drama free flight we wish them and hopefully that other passenger can get the help he
5:02 am
needs. rene, thank you. real estate ir robert durst charged in the murder of a friend 15 years ago. he has waived extradition to california from louisiana but prosecutors in new orleans may want to pursue criminal charges there first. cnn's miguel marquez joins us with all the latest. so many twists and turns. >> they are very twisty and very turney. we expect to see mr. durst in court again today to face charges of marijuana and gun possession in louisiana. this as new york authorities are looking into the time line the time line from the disappearance of his first wife back in 1982. >> reporter: this morning new york real estate heir robert durst remains behind bars in new orleans. the millionaire picked up in the lobby of a marriott hotel staying in a false name and a fake driver's license. in his possession a .38 revolver marijuana and a substantial amount of cash. one official says it prepares
5:03 am
durst was preparing to flee to cuba. the eccentric 71-year-old faces felony firearms and drug charges complicating his extradition to los angeles where durst will be tried for first degree murder of close friend and crime novelest susan berman. >> bob durst didn't kill her and he's ready to end the speculation and have a trial. >> reporter: new evidence alleged the millionaire was lying in waitore shooting burman execution style in her living room 15 years ago. according to reports they were set to question her over the 1982 disappearance of kathy mccormick his first wife. meanwhile, an nypd official says state police are seeking information about the various time lines durst provided to detectives during his wife's disappearance. the hit hbo docu series the jinx is providing includes.
5:04 am
>> there it is. >> reporter: the shocking scenario shows him mumbling to himself seemingly admitting to murder. >> killed them all. of course. >> reporter: the film makers going to police finding the bombshell off camera comments some two years after wrapping the final interview, durst's lawyer called it ramblings and that the millionaire admitted nothing. >> we're ready to go to california and have a trial. >> not guilty. >> reporter: durst already beat murder charges in 2003 after he admitted he killed and dismembered his neighbor claiming self-defense. >> cnn and hbo are owned by the same company, time warner. it all comes down to that admission in the bathroom. will it be admissible as evidence? if it is will a jury ever hear it? alisyn? >> miguel great questions. our next guest was a close friend of robert durst's first
5:05 am
wife kathy. good morning. >> good morning. >> i know you wapd this hbo owatched this series with great attention. what was it like to watch this? >> what was it like? i have to say, there's no such thing as closure and there's no such thing as justice. if i wanted justice i would have gone to divinity school. what it was like was a great deal of satisfaction knowing that this has come to an end. i feel vindicated because i've spent 33 years on it. >> do you feel vindicated because he was arrested this weekend or because you got to see the film? it's possible you could have watched this and he could have walked off again into the sunset. this time is different. he's been arrested. >> right. right. absolutely. i think that bob thought he wanted to be able to tell his side of the story and he thought he was clever enough to get away with it. part of him, i think there's a
5:06 am
dichotomy here is the fact that people like to confess. when i did criminal law i would have people say to me well i had a gun just like it. because they were trying to tell me as much as they could without actually admitting to me. >> we should mention, of course you are an attorney yourself. >> yes. >> let's play the pivotal moment from this series "the jinx," the most jaw dropping of many jaw dropping moments where he still wearing his microphone goes into the bathroom by himself after he thinks the interview is over and he says this -- >> what the hell did i do? killed them all. of course. >> killed them all, of course. how do you explain that moment? >> well bob likes to talk to himself. it's not the first time he has talked to a hot mic without realizing it. and for me the most jaw drapg
5:07 am
moment were the two envelopes with the handwriting. that was -- that to me is you know real hard evidence forensically. >> it sure is. here you can see them. he misspelled -- someone misspelled beverly hills in exactly the same way in exactly the same writing. one of these envelopes is from the killer of susan berman who is telling police where to find her body and the other is from bob durst himself, and they are shockingly similar. >> exactly the same. he put a check in there for susan for probably 25,000. he gave her 50 in two separate checks over the years. and when you think about the fact that this was his best friend in the world, what he did was so cold. >> shot her execution style allegedly. >> yeah. i knew susan and she was not a trusting person. i didn't know her well. i had had dinner with her and so
5:08 am
forth. actually kathy introduced me to her. >> so you were close friends with kathy, his first wife -- >> yes. >> -- who disappeared in 1982 mysteriously. what was their relationship like? >> in the beginning it was prince charming and cinderella. as time went by i would say it became more and more violent. when i was in law school and she was in medical school i had calls forwarded to my -- where i was. she would call me late at night for hours about his violence and not just to her. i remember one occasion where she had a friend they had all been out partying bob included. she had a friend that was sitting cross legged on the floor, peter schwartz and bob kicked him in the eye and broke the occipital bone around it and ended upsetling around the court. it annoyed kathy because she said bob is getting away with it again. the other dichotomy, there were times she felt she could handle him. i used to say, leave, get out. the guy's crazy.
5:09 am
he talks to himself. leave. you can always get a settlement later. and then you know she'd stay up late and be all night at medical school or during one of her internship residency things and she would just you know maybe have a couple of drinks take some drugs and she'd be in the space and i think that the murder her murder was not as premeditated as the other ones after that. i think when she came back from that so-called family party, which it wasn't, she was after him and she was right in his face. >> you say her murder. >> yes. >> but of course she's just disappeared. there is no evidence necessarily, there was no body found, no weapon that she was murdered. what do you think happened to kathy? >> i think that she came back into the south salem house. >> that she shared with bob? >> that she shared with bob. "the jinx" portrays the person telling the story, bobby kept calling her to come home. it was just the opposite.
5:10 am
she was calling him. she was getting really annoyed. when she left there she was in a snit. i think she went back there and started a fight which he finished. >> how do you think he got away with it? there was no evidence? >> because he got rid of the body. he's not stupid. and also here's one of the major issues. he lied and said that she got on a train and he spoke to her later in new york which he admitted on "the jinx" was utter nonsense. he lied to get the police off his back. however, this all happened in westchester. he had a head start. i think you know if you watch "the jinx" that i went through the garbage. i found that he was throwing her things out right away within five weeks at least of her disappearance. he knew she wasn't coming back. >> let's quickly take a look at his history because it's interesting. in 1982 your friend kathie mccormick disappearance. in 2000 his friend is executed.
5:11 am
and in 2001 he killed a friend and he admits to doing that. in 2003 he is acquitted of black's murder. this weekend he's arrested in new orleans on weapons and drug charges and los angeles police have finally charged him with first degree murder of susan berman. that's not related to your friend kathie. >> i'll take it any way i can get it. >> you'll take -- you will take this man going to trial for a different murder because on some level that is justice for you? >> yeah. and as i said if i wanted justice i would have gone to divinity school. it certainly doesn't take a great deal of strength to pull a trigger. he may be frail. he may look like he's hobbling around but he can still pull a trigger. >> what has kathie's family said about this? >> they feel the way i do. i was with them. we watched it together. >> what was that like? >> you could have heard a pin
5:12 am
drop until, you know at the very very end when, you know that -- we were listening so closely. everybody was kind of leaning forward in their chair and then we took it in and then we -- you know everybody clapped. i think it was -- jim or his wife somebody put their arms around me or his daughter looks exactly like kathie. when i first met her my knees were weak because she is the spitting image. so we just all did like a group hug. >> i mean and that moment where he appears to confess, that is a bombshell. >> it is a bombshell. two bombshells in a row, and i'm going to seem -- his lawyers are great. they're smart. they're going to try to you know diminish this in any way they can but, remember as an attorney i will tell you that when he made those admissions he was not in custody. those -- he volunteered to meet with the producers of that show on his own after he saw ryan
5:13 am
gosling portray him in "all good things." >> so his ego got the best of him and you're saying that confession if that's what you want to call it is admissible in court? >> i think it would be. they'll make motions. listen greater legal minds than mine are going to be arguing this until the cows come home. we'll see. >> is this the end of the road finally for bob durst? >> i hope so. no one can tell the future. you saw what happened in texas to that jury. you've seen other jurors in california acquit. i hope this time they get a really smart special prosecutor because this is going to take someone who can go against bob's legal team and they are the best. >> ellen strauss, it's great to get your personal perspective and we're sorry for the loss of your friend kathie. >> thank you. >> we hope some justice is muted out. >> i hope so too. >> thanks so much for coming in. >> thank you. >> fascinating, alisyn. president obama says he is
5:14 am
embarrassed for the republican senators who signed that controversial warning letter to iran. according to a new cnn poll a majority of americans agree with him. michelle kaczynski has the story. >> reporter: this is a big story. 68 perfection percent 68% of americans say, yes, america should be negotiating. on the thing we call the letter more of the respondents, 49% felt it was out of line went too far. president obama didn't hold back much either on those who signed the letter. >> i'm embarrassed for them because it's not how america does business. they were effectively making common cause with the hard liners in iran who also don't
5:15 am
want any kind of diplomatic resolution because they're invested in getting a nuclear weapon. >> now this poll also asks the question who do you have more confidence in for foreign policy and other big issues facing america. the president or republicans in congress? and more of the people about 47% chose the president. we should say though that men overall roz overall chose republicans in congress and 11% decided on neither. >> michelle kaczynski, thank you. european negotiators say talks with iran have reached a critical phase with broad disagreements remaining on several key issues. nic robertson is tracking all of the developments for us live from london. nic. >> reporter: good morning, michaela. for two hours secretary kerry meant with his iranian counterpart, foreign minister zarif. we are told they made some progress on discussing some of the issues over some of the
5:16 am
technical details of those gaps that they still have to bridge but the state department is saying you know on the one hand while that is you know a small step the reality is, the bigger headline remains that there is still a lot to be done. they talked about reactors reactor design fissile weapons, material. this sort of if you will slight narrowing of the gaps or understanding and discussion of what some of those gaps are doesn't include the questions like sanctions. this is only on the technical issues. so really it seems some small steps made on the technical issues but it's really been more of a discussion about what those technical issues are about how they sort of fit into a -- you know the breakout that amount of time that iran if it went rogue, if you will could build a weapon. so these are not nailing down final solutions, they're merely
5:17 am
talking about it in the broadest of terms. the president of vanuatu asking for help after they were slammed by the massive cyclone. he said the category 5 storage destroyed nearly all infrastructure. a state of emergency has been declared. aid is slowly arriving providing the basic needs of life for victims like clean water and food. officials say the death toll currently stands at 11 but it is expected to rise. despite leaking classified information and lying about it to the fbi, former cia director david petraeus is still advising the white house. the obama administration confirms that petraeus remains a trusted adviser on the u.s. strategy. he pleaded guilty earlier this month to sharing classified information with his miss stress and biographer. chris borland, a star rookie for the san francisco 49ers, announcing that he is retiring from the nfl. the 24-year-old star linebacker
5:18 am
cites concussion safety concerns. borland says he feels as sharp as ever but after having many many discussions with his friends, his family teammates, even doing some research with head injury specialists, he said he wanted to be proactive. he does not believe it is worth the risk to continue playing. startling thing to think that a young man at 24 can look at this. >> people are saying this is a watershed moment. his career was on the rides. he played one year. he had no major injury. there was no one incident that led him to re-evaluate his entire life. he's saying none of it is worth it. >> one would argue if you have an incident it's too much late. it's closing the barn door after the horse is out. >> retiring makes a statement. >> five guys have walked away. something is happening. rhetoric still flying over that letter that republicans sent to iran. what does the president say and could the letter really derail the talks? our christian a.m. ma poor
5:19 am
breaks it all down next. so what about that stock? actually, knowing the kind of risk that you're comfortable with i'd steer clear. straight talk. multiplied by 13,000 financial advisors it's how edward jones makes sense of investing. introducing new flonase allergy relief nasal spray, now available over the counter in full prescription strength. when we breathe in allergens our bodies react by over-producing six key inflammatory substances that cause our symptoms. the leading allergy pill only controls one, flonase controls six. and six is greater than one. flonase the 24
5:20 am
hour relief that outperforms the #1 allergy pill. so go ahead , inhale life. new flonase. six is greater than one. this changes everything. ♪ it's not about hugging trees. it's not about being wasteful either. you just gotta find that balance. where taking care of yourself takes care of more than just yourself. lease an mkz hybrid for $299 a month, plus competitive owners and lessees get $1000 bonus cash only at your lincoln dealer.
5:21 am
nobody told us to expect it... intercourse that's painful due to menopausal changes it's not likely to go away on its own. so let's do something about it. premarin vaginal cream can help it provides estrogens to help rebuild vaginal tissue and make intercourse more comfortable. premarin vaginal cream treats vaginal changes due to menopause and moderate-to-severe painful intercourse caused by these changes. don't use it if you've had unusual bleeding breast or uterine cancer blood clots, liver problems, stroke or heart attack, are allergic to any of its ingredients or think you're pregnant. side effects may include headache pelvic pain, breast pain vaginal bleeding and vaginitis. estrogens may increase your chances of getting cancer of the uterus, strokes, blood clots or dementia so use it for the shortest time based on goals and risks. estrogen should not be used to prevent heart disease heart attack, stroke or dementia. ask your doctor about premarin vaginal cream.
5:22 am
. millions of israelis going to the polling stations today voting as prime minister benjamin netanyahu fights to keep his job. and in the home stretch his re-election campaign netanyahu is vowing there will not be a palestinian state. what does this mean for u.s./israeli relations. let's turn to christiane
5:23 am
amanpour. what a delight to speak to you. really curious, christiane about what you think netanyahu's strategy is here and do you think it's going to back fire? >> reporter: well look it's really hard to determine that but certainly the fact that he told an israeli news operation that under his prime ministership there would be no palestinian state essentially throws the baby out with the bath water and throws out decades of u.s./israeli foreign policy and the whole peace process idea. and as you remember last year there were months and months of negotiations which eventually came to nothing, but the whole idea has been a two-state solution. otherwise, what a one-state solution with full rights for the palestinians who will make up the majority or as some said, an apartheid one-state solution with no rights for the palestinians. most of all, israelis have wanted to focus on housing, on the economy, on things like that. and the truth of the matter is
5:24 am
according to all the experts, whoever wins unless they win an overwhelming 61 seats, will inevitably have to form a coalition. so the question is who will be best positioned to form a coalition. >> "new york times" article suggested this election has really become a referendum on netanyahu's time as prime minister. a political blogger in that article goes on to make the suggestion that in israel there's bibi fatigue. do you sense that's true? >> you know probably from a lot of people but that is based on polls that were obvious up to about five days before today. a lot of the uncertainty comes from there are no public polls since friday. that's according to the election law there. so for sure bibi was ahead. bibi called the election. he didn't have to have an election. he still had time to go under his prime ministership but he thought he would be able to win easily and he called an early
5:25 am
election. he was roaring ahead, then he was sort of neck in neck and then in the last couple of weeks the zionist union, left of center party with isaac herzog and zippy went ahead to be set to win a handful of seats than netanyahu's party or the coalition. that's where people are right now. certainly in certain quarters of israel after nine years of prime ministership there are many people tired of his leadership tired of no peace with the palestinians tired of what they consider you know unnecessary friction with their biggest ally the united states. but israelis also an increasingly right of center country, so that is where people believe that he may sweep up votes. >> i want to pivot now to iran if you'll indulge me. we know that at the start of this month you sat down with the iranian foreign minister talking about the ongoing negotiations with iran nuclear negotiations. i'm curious if you can give us
5:26 am
some context. given that conversation what he thought the likelihood of reaching a deal would be and what he thought some of the sticking points might be and what you might sense he might feel about where negotiations stand now. >> reporter: well here's the thing both sides are always careful to say, a deal is possible but, you know nothing is signed until it's all signed and that everybody has to make tough choices and that you know it's going to require a lot of compromise. the truth is it is going to require a lot of compromise on both sides. it's not clear at all whether a deal will be signed. president obama has made this sort of the hallmark the center piece of his administration's diplomacy, and there's no doubt that many experts believe that such a deal would go a long way to more stability in that region but, for instance prime minister netanyahu as you know because he came to the united states and made a big deal about it doesn't believe that there should be a deal and a lot of people in the region a lot of
5:27 am
arab states feel the same way, that they don't believe there should be a deal because they're worried about iran's intentions. so what seems to be holding up the situation right now is a lot of issues around for instance iran is very concerned and this is what the foreign minister zarif has also said to iranian television lately they're worried about the speed of lifting sanctions, for instance. u.s. sanctions and u.n. sanctions. they're worried, some say, about the extent of intrusive inspections iran would have to agree to under such an agreement. the united states obviously wants that as part of any agreement. so these are issues that are still out there to be negotiated. they're there. secretary kerry, foreign minister zarif will stay another day today to continue negotiating head to head. apparently this round wraps up on friday. the iranians go back to iran for their new year's holiday. then you have a march 31
5:28 am
deadline looming. >> christiane amanpour always great to have you. we appreciate your expertise. thank you. >> thank you, my kill la. his guilt is not in question. will dzhokhar tsarnaev take the stand in his own defense in hopes of avoiding execution?
5:29 am
when account lead craig wilson books at iaquinta.com. he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can settle in and practice his big pitch. and when craig gets his pitch down pat, do you know what he becomes? great proposal! let's talk more over golf! great. better yet, how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! your 2 0'clock is here. oops, hold your horses. no problem. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only at iaquinta.com. laquinta!
5:30 am
5:31 am
5:32 am
time now forty-five things you need to know for your "new day." number one, united flight from denver forced back to dulles bass a passenger reportedly charged the cockpit. he was subdued by other passengers and was taken to the hospital after that plane ended. real estate heir robert durst has been charged with murdering his friend susan berman in 2000. he faces weapons and drug charges in new orleans. president obama says he's embarrassed for the gop senators who sent the letter to iran. a majority of senators agree they went too far and backed direct talks with iran. a huge turnout expected as israeli's head to the polls.
5:33 am
prime minister benjamin netanyahu making a last-ditch effort to win over voters. new obamacare numbers out. it estimates 16 million people have coverage since the health care law was passed in 2010. for more on the five things you need to know go to newdaycnn.com for the very latest. a desperate plea for help from the president of vanuatu after a monster cyclone slams that island nation. ivan watson gives us a firsthand look. >> reporter: this is the ward where people wounded in the storm are being taken care of and the only real hospital on tana island. we've been listening to her whimper in pain. she's 9 years old. she suffered a severe head wound when the roof collapsed. it also killed her mother and brother. that's the storm four days ago.
5:34 am
now we've spoken to the head doctor here. extensive damage. extensive damage in this hospital and they haven't been able to communicate at all with the outside world because radios are down the telephones are down to tell the capital city and the outside world the damage here and the help that they need and the doctor says that this little girl needs to be medivaced. she could lose her life if she doesn't get taken to an intensive care ward. what do you need most right now? >> that would be water and food for the patients and some medical supplies to deal with injuries iv fluids oral rehydration foods for dehydration. i think water would be the number one on the list. >> reporter: this used to be the maternity ward.
5:35 am
as you can see now, unusable. still flooded under several inches of water. the only doctor here says that all of the medical machines that this hospital was equipped with have all been damaged by the storm. i'm going to bring you over here and you can just see kind of the improveisational news. good news. a baby born one day ago. the mother is alina. hi. how are you? congratulations. the baby is healthy right now, but as you can see, since the storm there are new medical problems and challenges that are coming up. and this is not a facility that is equipped to deal with that. ivan watson cnn, tana in vanuatu. >> what a stark illustration of all that they need there. if you want to help the victims of the cyclone in vanuatu, go to
5:36 am
cnn.com/impact. >> really powerful. really powerful. jurors in the boston bombing trial hearing from 58 witnesses so far, but will they hear from dzhokhar tsarnaev? our legal experts are ahead. the real question that needs to be asked is "what is it that we can do
5:37 am
that is impactful?" what the cloud enables is computing to empower cancer researchers. it used to take two weeks to sequence and analyze a genome; with the microsoft cloud we can analyze 100 per day. whatever i can do to help compute a cure for cancer, that's what i'd like to do. thank you for being a sailor, and my daddy. thank you mom, for protecting my future. thank you for being my hero and my dad. military families are thankful for many things. the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. our world-class service earned usaa the top spot in a study of the most recommended large companies in america. if you're current or former military or their family, see if you're eligible to get an auto insurance quote. (mom) when our little girl was born we got a subaru.
5:38 am
it's where she said her first word. (little girl) no! saw her first day of school. (little girl) bye bye! made a best friend forever. the back seat of my subaru is where she grew up. what? (announcer) the 2015 subaru forester (girl) what? (announcer) built to be there for your family. love. it's what makes a subaru a subaru. shopping online is as easy as it gets. wouldn't it be great if hiring plumbers, carpenters and even piano tuners were just as simple? thanks to angie's list now it is. start shopping online from a list of top-rated providers. visit angieslist.com today.
5:39 am
5:40 am
this is now the third week of the boston marathon bombing trial. so far the jury has heard from 58 witnesses. the big question right now, will dzhokhar tsarnaev take the stand in his own defense? we're going to get to that question after we go through some of the key pieces of evidence in this case so far with paul callan. former prosecutor and joey jackson, hln legal analyst. gentlemen, thank you so much for being with us. paul i think this trial started off with a notable really barrage, a parade of witnesses,
5:41 am
people who suffered at these bombings. the graphic images this carnage, these awful pictures of what happened here. what effect do you think that had? >> it's going to have an enormous effect. this case has been moving very very quickly as we know but when you talk about the death penalty, even people who are conscientiously opposed to the death penalty often have one exception. in a case that involves a family member a friend or carnage of this extent and that's what prosecutors are showing here. this is a special case. it's a poster child for the death penalty. massachusetts is a liberal place. they generally oppose the death penalty up there but prosecutors are making a persuasive case. >> i think the images are extraordinary even for the people that were there at the time. >> joey we've been talking about key pieces of evidence and the boat keeps coming up. the boat and the message he wrote inside the boat dzhokhar tsarnaev. we're looking at the messages
5:42 am
bullet riddled talking about the united states attacking civilians saying this was in defense of islam. what's the effect here? >> john understand this is compelling for the following reason. the whole defense is predicated upon the notion that he did not have a mind of his own. his brother put him up to everything. he led him. he radicalized him. he was in that boat john by himself. he had an opportunity by himself to give his views about what he felt about america, about what he felt about the actions that he engaged in with his brother in the bombing and killing innocent civilians that in his view deserved it. so i think what the prosecution is going to do is to align that with his tweets to make it clear that he acted, he acted knowingly, he acted intelligently and he acted on his own volition to kill and destroy. >> here's one of these tweets right here. listen to anwar al wacki. paul callan if your a a juror,
5:43 am
you see that. >> once again, the portrayal is this is a soldier in furtherance of an ideology that wants to kill innocent americans. he clearly understood what he was doing when he did this. >> surveillance in and around the bombing. i think the one that most people are talking about is this one here this simple moment where dzhokhar tsarnaev after killing three people maiming dozens of others goes and buys milk. what effect does a video here what does a jury think when they see that? >> he did not care will be the prosecution's argument. he affected a nation devastated a community, changed lives forever and took other lives, and what did he do after that? he went and he purchased milk? and then his brother said we don't like this milk. let's take it back. certainly thereafter he goes for a workout and does other things that are just inconsistent with
5:44 am
a person who really cares about anything. >> i think there are two pieces of video. i think, john you're right on this one because it shows colt heartedness after this carnage. he's placing a bomb where there are children where there are women, where there are innocent people. you get a sense that he knew exactly who was going to be destroyed, utterly destroyed by this explosion. >> this is all prelude to this trial. the big question if you are the defense, do you have your client do you have dzhokhar tsarnaev take the stand. it's a two-part question right? you can have him take the stand before the determination of guilt or innocence or you can have him take the stand after or during the sentencing phase. >> john no way would he take the stand. you're talking about skilled attorneys who would rip him to shreds. if your ultimate argument is he had no mind of his own, didn't know what he was doing. the defense is not contesting guilt. they stood up during the opening statement and said our guy is guilty but let me tell you why
5:45 am
he's guilty. the defense will confront him with what was in that. the evidence in the boat. the defense will confront him with running over his brother in addition to other police officers. they'll confront him with "inquire" mag a seep and reading and reviewing it. confront him with his tweets. >> paul, even at sentencinge ingsentencing? >> unlikely that he takes the stand. this case is going so badly for the defense. they're crashing and burning. the one shot the hail mary pass they might have is putting him on the stand and making him sympathetic to the jury that he's the pawn of his brother. you know something, i've never met him. you've never met him. only the defense attorneys can know how he will project to a jury. will he be human? what would they have to lose by putting him on? they know what's going to happen if they following this road. the death penalty. >> thank you. john you know most teachers don't get the recognition they deserve.
5:46 am
we are going to speak with one teacher who just received the most incredible award, giving her 1 million reasons to smile. you have to hear her story.
5:47 am
5:48 am
5:49 am
sir, we're going to need you on the runway later don't let a severe cold hold you back. get theraflu. it has the power of three medicines to take on your worst pain and fever, cough and nasal congestion. theraflu breaks you free from your toughest cold and flu symptoms. so you never miss a day. theraflu. serious power. i love shining a spotlight on this. teachers don't get the recognition they deserve, however, an english teacher in maine won the highest honor ever
5:50 am
bestowed on a teacher. her name is nancy atwell. she received a $1 million award referred to as the nobel prize of teaching. nancy atwell the founder of the center for teaching and learning joins us this morning, fresh off a plane, jet lagged and doesn't know where she is. first of all, our congratulations, nancy. >> thank you. >> this must feel like a nod in your favor for your life's worth? >> i think it's a recognition of the entire profession. that's the way i'm looking at it. that was the intention of sunny varkey to acknowledge all teachers and validate the profession at a time where i know he said you know kim kardashian gets a million times more press than any teacher in this nation. >> but there's something special that you do because you won this. what is it that you bring to the classroom do you think? >> my work has been in the area of literacy, especially teaching
5:51 am
writing and reading. for 40 years my students have chosen the topics they write about and they've selected the books they ride. >> choice. >> that's so important. >> they have time in class every day to practice writing and to read. so they read 40 books a year on average. they finish 21 pieces of writing on average across a range of genres essays reviews, short fiction, poetry memoirs. they are authentic writers and readers. they write and read the way that you do and because they do they know what writing and reading are good for. they become skilled, fluent passionate writers and readers with never an exercise in sight. >> what was their reaction when they found out you won this award. were they like yeah? >> i wasn't there. i was on a 13-hour flight back from dubai, but we have an assembly every day at our school. >> there's the picture right there. have you seen this? >> no. called morning meeting. >> look at all the kiddos. >> man, i love them. >> i think they love you.
5:52 am
>> luckily they spelled it correctly after all that great teaching you did. >> they had ideas for how to spend the money because i'm giving the entire $1 million prize to the school. >> hold the phone a second. i won a million dollars. this is what we need to highlight. this is what the spirit of a teacher is about, giving giving giving. you're giving the million. >> yes. >> to your school. >> yes. >> a school which you founded back in 1990. >> yes. i have everything i need but my kids don't have what they need and the school doesn't have what it needs including two new boilers, two furnaces because it's a 25-year-old school we've got some 25-year-old furnaces. so i need to make sure that school exists for another 25 years. but i need to also make sure that we continue to attract a range of regular kids which our school does. it's a nonprofit demonstration school and teachers come from all over the country to see the work we're doing across the curriculum. they need to see regular kids. so we've got kids that live below the federal poverty line
5:53 am
and we need to be able to keep them there k-8 to maintain this as their school. i will establish a tuition assistance endowment with some of the money and the rest will be spent on books. >> you're amazing. >> books, books, books. our kids can't get enough and because on our website we have lists of the books our kids recommend to other children. >> that's a good idea. >> it's visited at least 10,000 times a month by teachers around the country. it's a go-to resource if you want to teach with children's a literature. we need to keep it current. >> pay it forward. >> i can't wait to check that out. >> if you have children and you're looking for books to give them that they will love these are the books our kids say they will love. >> what do you say to kids who are trying to figure out what they want to do when they grow up and might be considering teaching? >> honestly right now i encourage them to look in the private sector. >> why? >> because public school teachers are so constrained right now by the common core standards and the tests that are
5:54 am
developed to monitor what teachers are doing with them. it's -- it's a movement that's turned teachers into technicians, not reflective practitioners. >> wow. >> and if you're a creative, smart young person i don't think this is the time to go into teaching unless an independent school would suit you. >> we need teachers across the board. >> can i do one thing? maybe we can show the video of you receiving the award. do we have that? i think we do. i want to show this because this is a really beautiful moment. and what you see there is the beautiful prize. i think you're probably getting a little teary watching this. this is a beautiful moment when you're accepting the award. i want to come back here live and ask john berman picking that up and handing it over. >> oh, my god. >> it's very very very -- >> you have to pass a physical test before you won the award. >> i think it weighs about 100 pounds. >> they gave all the nominees -- we didn't know who the winner
5:55 am
was, but they made us all practice holding it so nobody would drop it. >> nancy, we are so very proud of you. keep up the good work. >> thank you. >> inspire lots of teachers like you to pick up when you decide that you've had your time you pass on the mantle to other teachers just like you, okay? >> thank you. >> thanks so much. congratulations. >> it's been a pleasure. a cincinnati doctor doing surgery. what makes that the good stuff? we'll tell you.
5:56 am
[ male announcer ] how do you make cancer a thing of the past? well...you use the past. huntsman cancer institute has combined 300 years of family histories with health records to discover inherited genes for melanoma, breast colon and ovarian cancers. so we can predict and treat cancer. and sometimes even prevent it from happening in the first place. to learn more or support the cause go to huntsmancancer.org.
5:57 am
5:58 am
when account lead craig wilson books at iaquinta.com. he gets a ready for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can settle in and practice his big pitch. and when craig gets his pitch down pat, do you know what he becomes? great proposal! let's talk more over golf! great. better yet, how about over tennis? even better. a game changer! your 2 0'clock is here. oops, hold your horses. no problem. la quinta inns & suites is ready for you, so you'll be ready for business. the ready for you alert, only at iaquinta.com. laquinta!
5:59 am
stuff." in today's edition a doctor serves up second chances. check out these guys. these are ex-cons. they've paid their debt to society but they still feel like they're paying a life sentence because of their permanent tattoos. they want to look like they feel like law abiding dads. >> to take care i've got to have a job. in order to have a job i can't look like this. nobody wants to hire me. >> i want my self-esteem back i want my confidence back. >> enter dr. john mendle son from cinci nasincecincinnati. he's offering this technology
6:00 am
free of charge to felons trying to enter the work force. >> we all make mistakes. the fact that we can finally clear tattoos really does give people a second opportunity. >> wow. that cannot feel good. that cannot be easy to get those off but worth it. >> all right. a lot of news to get to. let's go to randi kaye in for carol costello. >> that was as painful as getting the first one. good for them right. nice to see you all. "newsroom" starts right now. happening now in the "newsroom," charged. millionaire real estate heir robert durst behind bars as prosecutors start laying out their case. he is facing firearm and drug charges. air emergency. frantic moments in a cross-country flight. a man trying to break into the cockpit tackled by other customers. hillary clinton and the e-mail

228 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on