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tv   CNN Newsroom With Poppy Harlow  CNN  April 18, 2015 12:00pm-3:01pm PDT

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recommends quote, treatments to patients and has medical conflicts of special. thanks for being with here this afternoon. much more straight ahead in the newsroom and it all begins right now with poppy harlow. 3:00 eastern, you're in the cnn newsroom. i'm poppy harlow with you this afternoon from new york. this just into us at cnn. tulza, oklahoma where an armed reserve deputy shot and killed a man earlier this month. so far the sheriff's department had not been able to provide the paperwork that showed that this reserve deputy or volunteer police officer was properly trained, had all of the hours that he needed to be able to be on the streets policing with a gun. well hour ed lavandera is in tulsa. he has just obtained some of those training documents, 64 pages worth from the attorney that is not representing robert bates. ed are you with me? >> reporter: i am poppy.
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as you mentioned, 64 pages worth of documents and this is the most detailed picture we've got goten so far of robert bates' training background. this is information that has been requested of the sheriff's department in tulsa since just after the shooting. the sheriff's department citing investigatory reasons for not releasing them. now clearly the attorneys for robert bates going on the offensive here in starting to provide a lot of the documentation. what we see in these documents is several years worth of what lawyers say are the documents for firearm certification, several years worth of that as well as the score -- you see the scores on this firearm training that mr. bates received as well. and then also some comments in there, poppy, where there was actually favorable reviews of mr. bates and his interaction with the public and his
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performance in some of those roles as a reserve deputy. so this is 64 pages worth of documents. now, there is one thing in particular that still stands out in all of this and the lawyers for mr. bates do acknowledge there are several years worth of documents around 2012 2013 that are not accounted for. according to the lawyers for mr. pats they say that these documents probably might not exist anymore. they might have been destroyed inadvertently or for whatever reason they simply of not been found. so again this is the next step in all of this. we haven't had any reaction from the lawyer for eric harris' family yet. we just got these documents a short while ago and are beginning to pore through them. as we mentioned off the top, this is really the most significant kind of description and detailing of mr. bates' training history since he became a reserve deputy back in 2007
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2008. >> and i know ed that the tulsa sheriff's office had said this week that look some of these records are old, that they were not digitized, they were paper and therefore may have been misplaced. first to you, has the sheriff's office there corroborated these documents yet? have they responded to them and said yep, this checks out? >> reporter: no. we just got these a short while ago, so i'm not really sure to what extent they have seen them or if they were involved in the process of helping out mr. bates and releasing these documents. i'm just not clear on that at this point. but all of this poppy, remember significant because the "tulsa world" newspaper there in tulsa has reported that these documents -- many of these documents perhaps were falsified, the training records for mr. bates were falsified by several deputies there within the department. the sheriff's department and lawyers for mr. bates have denied all of this.
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but that story is still out there. the lawyers are also going to great lengths in the statement in this document release to criticize what they believe is one of the sources for that story, saying that this is a former deputy who is now sitting in jail accused of murder who would sign an affidavit saying some of these documents are falsified. the problem is that's one source. the newspaper there in tulsa is actually saying that it has five sources that corroborate what they say are allegations of falsifying these records. so still a lot of questions about how all of this is going to play out, but there's definitely a strong public relations battle under way now, as both sides try to lobby and convince you know the public of what they believe is right in this case. >> ed i'll let you get back to poring through those 64 pages of documents. get back to us when you have more. this is significant because eric harris the 42-year-old that was killed in this sting operation, was killed because as the
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deputy reserve officer, robert bates, said he accidentally pulled his gun he says instead of his taser. he meant to strike harris with a taser and instead he shot and killed him. let's bring in our panel to talk about this. harry houck, cheryl dorsey is a retired lapd sergeant and the author of the book "black and blue the creation of a manifesto." thank you both for being with me i appreciate it. harry, let me turn to you first. looking at this the lawyer has now turned over to cnn these documents. "the tulsa world" paper has said some of them are falsified, that this reserve officer did not have the 480 hours of training necessary. regardless of if he did or not, does this call into question whether reserve officers basically voluntary police officers should be able to carry guns and potentially kill people? >> well they do all over the country. you know we don't do it here in new york city but there's reserve officers that carry all over the country. >> but should they be able to?
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>> should they be able to? i don't know. we have an incidence here where -- i think we've got to look at the age of the gentleman. >> 73 years old. talking about his reflexes. >> i know police officers are forced off the job in some departments at 62. so here's a guy that was 73 years old on the scene where he shouldn't have been and resulted in this horrible shooting. so i think the big issue here is the department itself. i've never been an opponent of politics and law enforcement blending together. i've never been an opponent of any law enforcement official being voted into office either. i think this will show you right here on example of why that's a problem. >> you're talking about the fact that this is someone who had donated a lot to that police department. >> sure. >> who was friends with the sheriff. but he says and the sheriff's department maintains that had nothing to do with it. he was helpful to the group policing where he lived and wanted to do everything that he could to help. cheryl to you, what is your
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reaction to this? >> first of all, i find it interesting that mr. bates' attorney would try to discredit the deputy that he says is sitting in jail charged with murder because, after all, isn't mr. bates charged with something very heinous? so who do you believe? and understand just because those documents exist, we this necessarily know if they're valid because there is that rumor out there that those who didn't speak the company speak and weren't willing to falsify records were moved. so it's very telling to me when the sheriff stands before a bank of cameras and is asked about mr. bates' verification of his credentials and qualifications what he says is as best i know or to the best of my knowledge. that sounds like double talk. that sounds like cold talk for if you catch me later and he wasn't qualified, i'll just say to the best of my knowledge i thought he was. >> cheryl one thing -- wung thing i want you both to respond to this. one thing that robert bates did and showed when he was on the
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"today" show yesterday being interviewed is the very different location on his body where his taser is held versus where his gun is held. let me ask you first, cheryl, as someone who served in the lapd is it possible that even with the required training that could happen or that has happened to anyone else that you know? >> certainly i don't know if it's happened to anyone else. what i would say is based on my training and experience it should not happen. you train so that when you're in a moment of excitement in stressful situations you act on second nature. you just do that thing that you've practiced over and over. we understand according to mr. bates he received 300 hours of training between 2008 and 2015. if you do the math we're talking about maybe 42 hours of training per week on average over a seven-year period and he hasn't fired his weapon at the range since the fall of 2014? it's inadequate. the training is inadequate.
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he performed in a way that would explain the lack of training that he's had over these last several months and maybe years. >> harry, there are professions -- i mean most professions you cannot be a volunteer. you cannot be a volunteer brain surgeon, right? >> exactly. >> should you be able to be a volunteer officer? >> well volunteer officers are utilized by police departments in the country basically just for things like traffic and parades and things like that. >> but this was a set-up sting operation. >> this is the problem. i said this is the problem before as to what happens when you inject politics into law enforcement. this guy was allowed -- it appears to me that this guy is allowed to be on scenes like this where he's not a professional. i tell you what you probably won't get any of these officers to speak out about it but i bet you they don't like the idea of a man like that being on the scene either. >> let's remember that the oklahoma naacp has now called for an investigation into this because they say, look none of the other officers have been charged. you know there was another officer who had his knee on eric
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harris' head during this situation, so we'll see how that develops. today right now the friends and family of eric harris are saying good-byes at his visitation as he is about to be laid to rest. appreciate it. we'll take a quick break and talk more about this on the other side. also something we're following very closely. the center of the republican universe is in new hampshire today. those are live pictures. mike huckabee a man who hasn't yet set whether he'll run for the highest office in this nation is speaking along with all of his other potential competitors. they're all trying to separate themselves from the pack. who's succeeding? a live report, next. ♪ when you're living with diabetes steady is exciting. only glucerna has carbsteady clinically proven to help minimize blood sugar spikes. so you stay steady ahead.
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the general election may be more than a year away but you wouldn't know it if you were in new hampshire today. 19 count 'em, 19 potential republican hopeful, including all the big names and heavy hitters are in town for a big leadership summit. it's a chance to meet with voters and test out their stump speeches before new hampshire's first in the nation primary. one of the latest candidates to take the stage in just the past few minutes, south carolina senator lindsay graham. >> barack obama's foreign policy is a miserable failure. razz cal islam is on the rise. those who want to hurt our country are stronger than ever on the our friends like israel are afraid. somebody needs to change it and they need to change it quick. so when you elect somebody in 2016 i hope you vote for a commander in chief that knows what the hell they're doing. >> not mincing any words. athena jones joins us from nashua new hampshire. this is the beginning of a long long race just even in the
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primary. look are they mainly attacking president obama and hillary clinton or are they sort of making jabs at one another? >> reporter: well they're mostly attacking president obama's policies and of course hillary clinton, who as you know is the only officially declared candidate on the democratic side. let's play what carly fiorina had to say about hillary clinton. she's, of course the former ceo of hewlett-packard. had and play that. -- go ahead and play that. >> hillary clinton must not be president of the united states because she does not have a track record of accomplishment because she lacks the candor and transparency that are so necessary to leadership and because she will pursue policies that will crush this great nation. >> reporter: and she is not the only one to bash senator clinton. senator rand paul criticized her handling of the attacks in
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benghazi libya, saying her dereliction of duty should maybe you disqualified to run for higher office. so a lot of bashing of clinton and president obama along with their touting of conservative prips like cutting taxes and cutting government spending. >> so it's one thing to be on stage trying out your stump speeches but it's another thing to be among is it the people in new hampshire, to spend time with them and talk to the voters as we saw hillary clinton do in iowa this week. by the way she's going to start doing in new hampshire on monday. how are they doing making connections with voters on the street there? >> reporter: well we know that a lot of these candidates have been not just speaking at this summit in the hotel here behind me but also holding other events smaller town halls. we saw governor chris christie in the days leading up to this weekend and holding another event at a bar last night. we also have seen a lot of them speaking at the new hampshire politics and eggs breakfast. we saw former florida governor jeb bush trying to connect with
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the audience there. that's going to be an important part of this the retail politics. the thing about new hampshire, it's small enough for these candidates to go all around the state more that once. it's something that governor bush told me he really enjoys. this event right here it really is about the activists and the super engaged voters. the people who are paying attention already right now so far out. but moving beyond a summit like this they are getting into the towns around here and trying to reach the voters where they are, taking questions, introducing themselves and trying to make their case. poppy. >> athena jones, live for us in new hampshire. thanks athena. we'll take a quick break. back with more news on the other side.
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turning overseas someone on a motorcycle blew himself up and killed 33 other people in a crowded street outside a bank in the second largest city in afghanistan. isis is claiming responsibility. what makes this even more troubling is where this happened. so far isis has not before now staged a suicide attack within afghanistan. in addition to those killed more than 100 people were injured in the explosion. you see some of the wounded there. let's bring in bob baer who knows the regional well. how significant is it in your opinion that a, this wasn't carried out by isis proper it
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was sort of an offshoot of isis and also the fact that it happened within afghanistan? >> well poppy, what it tells me is that the isis franchise is growing rather than getting smaller. you know afghanistan, the resistance should be the taliban. they denied participation in this attack it was too violent for them. so the fact that people are claiming allegiance to the islamic state is bad news. and, you know you couple that poppy, with attacks in egypt and sinai, the attacks on ramadi even isis in yemen, and the idea this virus as i call it seems to be spreading rather than retreating. and, yes, they may have lost tikrit but then they pop up somewhere else. they have given up the refinery in iraq and appeared somewhere else. so this is a fight that's going to go on for years and years and is not going to be easily
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accomplished from the error with a few troops. >> these were civilians in line at a bank just trying to pick up their paycheck trying to get their salary. what do you make of the statement that this isis offshoot group is trying to make by killing these civilians by all we know not tied with any sort of group, just fearly people trying to get their paycheck. >> and these people are from the same sect sunni muslims. what you're seeing the islamic state doing is attacking anything associated with the west whether it's archaeological ruins or banks or airplanes. anything that postdates the prophet mohammed they're going to go after and destroy. this is a movement that frankly, i haven't -- i've never seen this. you know in a thousand years in the middle east. out to kill randomly in our terms. >> and, therefore, if you haven't seen it you know in
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the course of the history of conflicts in the region you know just imagine what the u.s. is dealing trying to lead the coalition fight against it. i want you to take a listen to what u.s. ambassador to the u.n. samantha power, had to say yesterday on "new day." she was responding to the critics of this administration who say, look not enough was done soon enough and that's why isis has been able to seize so much ground. listen. >> we trained the iraqis we supported them over the course of a decade. they assured us that their security preparation was sufficient and then isil gathered more momentum more quickly than i think a lot of people anticipated. >> she's saying look the criticism is not warranted. when you look at the situation of the deterioration in iraq and how much land isis has been able to grab in iraq how likely is it that something of that magnitude happens within
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afghanistan? >> i think it's going to happen there and a lot of the other places where this administration is frankly, not paying attention to what's happening in the middle east. they're relying on governments like baghdad to tell us what's going on. all these years, maliki and the former prime minister and his cohorts have been stealing the money that should have been going to the army. all our training went for naught. same thing in yemen. it's not capable of ruling that country. i think really the tragic thing is that we are not being told the truth, just how bad things are in the middle east and i think the american people should know that and i foresee it getting worse. >> we're not being told by who, bob? >> we're not being told by the administration. they're keeping their fingers crossed. you know their people should have known that the islamic state was about ready to take mosul. what happened to u.s. intelligence $80 billion a year? we can't figure that out? this has been another pearl
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harbor in a lot of senses. i just don't see it any other way. >> bob baer thanks for the insight, appreciate it. coming up switching gears here in a major way we're going to talk about a lot of the newest millionaires in america, as you know made their fortune off the internet right, in silicon valley. but the seeds of success for the latest crop of millionaires is coming from a plant that is still illegal in most states. hey, girl. is it crazy that your soccer trophy is talking to you right now? it kinda is. it's as crazy as you not rolling over your old 401k. cue the horns... just harness the confidence it took you to win me and call td ameritrade's rollover consultants. they'll help with the hassle by guiding you through the whole process step by step. and they'll even call your old provider. it's easy. even she could do it. whatever, janet. for all the confidence you need td ameritrade. you got this. this is brian. every day, brian drives
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it has been over a year now since colorado legalized recreational marijuana. in february the state reported a $53 million tax revenue increase just from the sale of recreational pot. now there are dozens of publicly traded pot stocks. of course there are a lot of entrepreneurs, some of them are becoming marijuana millionaires. our anna cabrera has been reporting extensively on it of course because she's based in
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denver and she joins us now from the 4/20 festival. >> >>. >> reporter: a lot of hopefuls and there are millionaires since cannabis became legal to sell for recreational use. businesses are making millions the state is making millions off of those marijuana taxes, $53 million in the first year of legal rec sales. and they're really expecting to roll in the dough this weekend with thousands of out of town visitors coming to colorado for the 4/20 festival for the cannabis cup, which is sort of like the super bowl of the marijuana industry. it brings a whole new meaning to the mile high city. >> the willie waurngonka of weed. >> reporter: a couple of budding businesses. >> i am an inventor at heart. >> reporter: three men in their mid to late 40s now marijuana millionaires. >> i can tell you're the loose cannon.
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just a little bit, right? >> very much so. >> reporter: pete and andy williams are brothers and co-owners of medicine man marijuana dispensary. >> we'll probably do $15 million this year. >> reporter: $15 million of revenue projected for 2015. about $9 million last year. what began in 2010 with a few plants in pete's basement. >> look at this beautiful leaf. >> reporter: has blossomed into a 40,000 square foot facility. >> we have uvc bulbs. >> reporter: a high-tech family grow operation with 80 employees. sisters, sally and shelly and even mom. >> chief money counter. >> reporter: are among them. sorting a sea of green. planting then selling. 50 plus different strains of recreational and medical marijuana. this is a plant that's been harvested ready for trimming. what i'm holding here retails for about a thousand bucks. >> this is also a big seller. >> reporter: they went from
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commercial kitchen to commercial manufacturing plant almost overnight. >> literally tens of millions of dollars of intellectual property are being established here. >> reporter: 46-year-old trip keever is ceo of one of the most successful marijuana edibles company in the country. his sophisticated oil extraction and purification machines help pump out about 8,000 pot products a day. >> the most popular product? >> the elixir. it represents about 50% of our revenue. >> reporter: they are sold in hundreds of pot shops around the country. he predicts his business could be worth a billion dollars in the next two years. >> this is more than just a full-time job. in some respects it's a movement. you have to be fanatical in your commitment to it. >> reporter: both he and the williams brothers says most of their money goes back into the business. >> i have dreams, though. >> yeah? what are the dreams? >> i want a house with a dock and a boat so i can just go
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fishing any time i want. some day. >> reporter: for now focused on building an industry that's still federally illegal. a looming risk that their pot profits could still go up in smoke. of course those are just a couple of business success stories in the marijuana industry. there are literally dozens of entrepreneurs in this industry just in colorado alone. in fact when you look at the state licenses there are now nearly a thousand marijuana licensed businesses here in colorado from those marijuana dispensaries to cultivation facilities testing facilities as well as product manufacturers. it is very tightly regulated, this industry here in colorado and it's still illegal to smoke pot in public. >> it certainly is. i know a lot of people are having a hard time figuring out what to do with all the cash because since it's federally still not legal, a lot of the banks won't take it. we'll talk about that a lot more in the next hour. appreciate it thank you. so what happens when
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cannabis meets capitalism? next hour you're going to meet this businessman who's cashing in on selling pot, but struggling to find a bank to hold all the cash. also tomorrow night cnn's new original series "high profits" follows two visionaries with the plan to be the first ever moguls of marijuana. "high profits" series premiere tomorrow night 10:00 p.m. eastern right here on cnn. just ahead, hillary clinton is trying to win over liberals by taking hedge funds to task over tax rates. but could she bite the hand that is feeding her campaign coffers? that's coming up. first, each year our dr. sanjay gupta selects six cnn viewers to join his fit nation team. they have eight months to get in shape and train for a tie@lawn. he caught up with one participant, erica moore. >> forfeit nation athlete erica moore, her size was never a concern. >> i have a lot of self confidence. i've never been ashamed of my
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body and i'm not ashamed of my weight. >> but it was her first experience with swing dancing which left her out of breath after just one song. she said that was a wake-up call. >> it was the first time that i felt like this body was preventing me from doing something and i didn't like that feeling. >> determined to get in shape, moore joined our fit nation team back in january, ready to make a permanent change. >> you're here this is new. meet your teammates. you're starting this incredible journey. dark moments at all? do you worry, are you concerned? >> i'm not. i feel so positive and hopeful. coming here has helped me realize that it's not some big dark unknown, it's a lot of little logical steps that add up to make big change. >> since that day, moore has taken to water like a fish. >> i just want to swim in july. >> biking and running, even competing in several big races. in sufficient a few weeks, we'll
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be back together in sunny southern california to put the team's new skills to the test. >> it's going to be really exciting. >> dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, reporting. ♪ [upbeat music] ♪ defiance is in our bones. defiance never grows old. citracal maximum. easily absorbed calcium plus d. now in a new look. he says she's an undisciplined overwaterer. she claims he's a cruel underwaterer. with miracle-gro moisture control potting mix, plants only get water when they need it. fight ended. or shifted? miracle-gro. life starts here. meet the world's newest energy superpower. surprised? in fact, america is now the world's number one natural gas producer... and we could soon become number one in oil. because hydraulic fracturing technology
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is safely recovering lots more oil and natural gas. supporting millions of new jobs. billions in tax revenue... and a new century of american energy security. the new energy superpower? it's red, white and blue. log on to learn more. all these networks keep making different claims. it gets confusing. fastest, the strongest the most in-your-face-est. it sounds like some weird multiple choice test. yea, but do i pick a, b, or c. for me it's all of the above. i pick, like the best of everything. verizon. i didn't. i picked a. maybe c. and how'd that work out for you? not so well. can i get a do-over? why settle for less when you can have, well, everything. and get 2 lines for $100. verizon. people ship all kinds of things. but what if that thing is a few hundred thousand doses of flu vaccine. that need to be kept at 41 degrees. while being shipped to a country where it's 90 degrees.
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in the shade. sound hard? yeah. does that mean people in laos shouldn't get their vaccine? we didn't think so. from figuring it out to getting it done, we're here to help.
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she is less than a week into her presidential campaign but we're already seeing hillary clinton take a sharp turn to the left. her mission, win over the progressives who think that she might be a little too tight with wall street. >> and there's something wrong when hedge fund managers pay lower tax rates than nurses or the truckers that i saw on i-80 as i was driving here. >> in iowa this week clinton took on those hedge fund managers for the low tax rate they pay on a lot of their income. here's the thing, wall street has long been a fan of clinton and could be huge for her fund-raising efforts. let's bring in cnn.com political reporter m.j. lee who's reported extensively on this. they're talking about carried interest and all that means a way that a lot of their money comes to them. that gets taxed, carried interest for hedge funds, at 20% versus 39% for the highest income bracket that makes their money in other ways. how significant of a turn is this from the hillary clinton we
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saw campaigning in 2007-2008? >> i think we should be very clear about the position that she's taking on this carried interest loophole. this is a position that she has taken in the past so i think we should be careful not to confuse it and to think, you know she's taking a very different take on a controversial issue. >> but she said it in her first week. >> right. so in that way it is definitely significant. it signals that she is taking very much a populist tone in the earliest days of her campaign. look i think the carried interest debate actually is not a risky political stance for someone like clinton to take because she has taken that before and because there actually is quite a bit of widespread consensus that this is a loophole in the tax code that does need to be fixed. you talk to tax experts and they will say that. you talk to some republicans and they will say that. >> i think it's interesting, so she brought on, and you wrote about this she brought on a new cfo, gary gensler.
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he's been known as very tough on wall street when he took over the commodity futures trading commission he was looked at someone who implemented reform. >> it got a lot of attention that she would hire someone like that at such a top position in her campaign and that does send a strong message. i think the question though is how much power will he have in the campaign. is he put in place mostly to send a message or will he have the power to shape her policy views. we don't know yet. >> take a look at these poll numbers coming from pew, what they show us. 64% of americans are bothered a lot by the idea that corporations they think don't pay their fair share of taxes. skin% are 61% think wealthy individuals don't pay enough taxes. you've got a pretty strong majority on both those fronts. i understand if you think taking this populist stance early on in the campaign coming out and talking about the way some on wall street makes its money is something she's sort of been forced into just by the existence of elizabeth warren?
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>> yeah. i think that she is feeling an immense amount of pressure from progressive groups and those to the left of her to embrace progressive ideas early on in the campaign. and that's sort of the reality of running as a democrat in a presidential campaign. you run to the left during the primaries and then go a little more center when you're in a general election. so there's no doubt that she's feeling a lot of pressure. i think as we get further into the campaign we're going to see her being put on the spot to answer questions asked of her on specific policy issues. i think the transpacific partnership deal was the perfect example of that this weekend. she landed in some hot water because she wouldn't take a position on it and liberal activists said you have to say no. >> they're also going to come after her because she's given a lot of paid speeches at big banks. she spoke at a goldman sachs event so she's going to come under pressure for it but it's going to be interesting how she walks the line. thank you so much m.j. appreciate it. coming up thousands of bags your bags, suitcases,
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pilfered each year sometimes by airline handlers themselves. now they're trying to crack down and keep your luggage and belongings safe. we have an investigation from drew griffin on this. first, a recent study shows that more than half of all american children will likely live with a single mom at some point. when a single parent gets cancer everyday tasks like cleaning and cooking are a struggle and that's where this week's cnn hero steps in. >> i was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer just about a month after my daughter's dad and i split up. all i could think about was, oh my god, my daughter. i can't do this to you. >> here i go mom. >> with chemotherapy there's a lot of fatigue. when you can't really do much and you're looking at the dirt on the floor, it's like one more level of stress. >> being a single parent having cancer you don't know where to turn. >> but that wasn't on the list. >> but it's $1.88.
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>> disability it's 66% of your salary but your bills are still 100%. it's hard. >> my friend michelle was a single mother of four when she was diagnosed. she struggled with just day-to-day. when she passed away we realized other people like her needed help. >> good morning. >> good morning. >> singleton moms provides practical support for single parents battling cancer. >> you have these people that don't know you and you're going to help me with cleaning my house? we help them pay a couple bills and then we provide day-to-day needs for their house. >> do you have a protein preference? >> it's about being that support. >> it's a lot of help. >> they go out of their way to make sure that you're taken care of. they're there for the whole family. >> neighbors helping neighbors,
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family helping family. this is what we should be doing for one another. >> appreciate it. >> singleton moms definitely helps me with this fight. i've got all the motivation in the world looking in my daughter's eyes. wow. sweet new subaru, huh mitch? yep. you're selling the mitchmobile!? man, we had a lot of good times in this baby. what's your dad want for it? ..like a hundred and fifty grand, two hundred if they want that tape deck. you're not going to tell your dad about the time my hamster had babies in the backseat, are you?! that's just normal wear and tear, dude. (vo) subaru has the highest resale value of any brand... ...according to kelley blue book ...and mitch. love. it's what makes a subaru a subaru. huh, 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. everybody
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it's remarkable video that might make you cringe if you're about to board an airplane. luggage thieves caught red handed rifling through your checked bags. across the country airport security officials are trying to stop thousands and thousands of luggage thefts happening every year. it goes beyond just stopping the thieves. here's correspondent drew grimpb griffin with the video. >> reporter: these are airport baggage handlers thieves inside the belly of a plane rifling through passenger's bags. what are they looking for? the valuables that you pack that you thought would be safe. but in never-before-scene video obtained by cnn, undercover cameras and the police are catching the baggage handlers in the act stealing on planes and in supposedly secure areas of
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the airport. the video even caught a security guard apparently in on the act. >> my reaction to those videos is disgusted. >> reporter: the video comes from a sting set up by miami-dade police to stop a rash of thefts. 31 workers and baggage handlers have been arrested since 2012 caught on camera red handed. >> when you catch them in the act like you did on these videos what's their response? >> a lot of times there is no response other than shock that they were caught. that's okay with us. as many as we can take away, the better it is for everybody that travels through miami international airport. >> reporter: it's certainly not just happening in miami. a cnn analysis finds over the past five years nearly 31,000 passenger claims of items missing from luggage filed with the tsa. about 25,000 of those claims alleged valuables missing from
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checked bags. the rest they disappeared from a tsa check point. 513 tsa officers have been fired for theft since 2002. including one who hid stolen items in this secret compartment. it adds up to $2.5 million worth of passenger belongings gone. these petty thefts are a big deal to police chiefs like pat began nonat los angeles international airport. >> there's no connection between baggage thefts and potential terrorism. >> reporter: he believes stealing an ipad rifling through bags is a potential first step towards something much worse. >> i think that is a breakdown in their moral fiber and that's why we take it very seriously. if we don't pay attention to the small things that happen around here, it will lead to larger things. >> reporter: the airport for items reported missing from
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luggage jfk in new york. so many insider baggage thefts were going on here the airline ll set up their own cameras and found workers rifling through luggage stealing money out of wallets. seven baggage handlers were arrested for stealing iphones, ipads, watches, rings, cameras. in los angeles police last year raided homes of baggage handlers. according to the police chief the case led to a major reduction in missing items from luggage. >> we cut thefts in those two terminals by 60% because of doing that aggressive investigative work. >> it's scary for us in law enforcement. certainly taking somebody's cell phone, ipad computer what's next? >> reporter: for the traveler, the concerns can be eliminated with one simple tip. don't pack anything of value inside a checked bag. and in that last minute push to check bags at the gate make
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sure you remove anything that a common thief would find appealing because those thieves are everywhere even in the belly of an airport. drew griffin, cnn, miami. >> great reporting. you should be able o to check your stuff and believe it's safe. next new documents in the case of the armed reserve deputy the volunteer police officer who shot and killed a suspect this month. these documents shed light on his training and role within the department. we'll discuss, ahead.
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pickpocketing a ais a major concern for anyone on vacation but one expert is sharing the secrets of the trade to keep you from becoming a victim. this master thief calls himself the man of steel. >> reporter: i have my wallet in my pocket and i have just shofed it back in here. my phone is in my inside pocket. my keys are in this pocket. and i'm in the middle of just a busy day. >> that's not a good idea. with your phone in this pocket, take it out. what fraudsters will do is set off a text alert and you see if it's you. now they know where it is. what was in this pocket?
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>> i have my keys. >> you should never carry your house keys and car keys in the same bunch. they can direct them to the house. you have a nice watch. if i get it, can i have it? i'm going to try to take things one at a time from you. the phone or the wallet or something else? phone or wallet or something else? >> try the wallet. >> the wallet was, it's gone. your phone is still there, i think. but your wallet is down here. put it in the outside pocket. how long did it take to rob you? you wouldn't know because i have your watch. >> how long would it take? >> it's known as the mug pocket. something obvious. leaving something in the front i might be able to steal like your tie. i'll explain it all later on.
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i'm poppy harlow, you're in in the cnn newsroom. it's 4:00 here on the east coast. this just into cnn. we are going through dozens of pages of documents given to us by the attorney for robert bates. he's the tulsa, oklahoma volunteer sheriffs deputy who shot and killed a suspect on april 2nd after he made a terrible mistake mistaking his gun for his taser. so far, no one has been able to come up with the paperwork showing he got the adequate training required to carry a gun and a badge on the street in tulsa. but on the phone with me now is ed lavendera. what's most significant? you're going through 64 pages of documentation. what stands out to you?
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>> you really have to look at this through the prism of what has been going on with this story and the great deal of criticism is a lot of this is based on a newspaper report from several days ago saying that the field training documents that is needed to certify robert bates with the sheriffs department there's a report saying they had had five sources saying these documents had been falsified. the attorneys for robert bates say that is not the base. robert bates himself said that's not the case. he can prove he was certified to be able to work the streets of tulsa as a rederveserve deputy. so this is the first glimpse we have looken into the most detailed accounts of his training since he became a reserve deputy. what you see in some of these documents is what stands out the most is several of the
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firearms certification documents that show that he was qualified and trained to use a firearm, those are significant. there's also some comments in there talking about how mr. bates was a good deputy and able to relate well with the public and those type of favorable comments. all of this is really based on the criticism when you look at the fact of what mr. bates has done here is in the state that many people are having a hard time wrapping their head around how can you mistake a bright yell e low tase eer strapped to the front of your chest for a small black handgun on your waist, it calls into question whether or not he was properly trained to be in an undercover sting operation. that's what a lot of this stems from. mr. bates's lawyer is going to great lengths taking the offensive to show he was properly trained and was working
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in proper capacity to be out there in that swing operation. >> i want our viewers to listen to what robert bates said in his interview on "today" yesterday morning about having the certification needed. >> that is not correct. i have a written piece of paper for first-degree murder 40 mile.s east of here signed off to say i had done a good job. the law firm has been most interesting. they seem to represent all the people that have been terminated by the sheriffs office -- >> without getting off on a tangent, you did the training and you can prove that you are certified? >> that is absolutely the truth. i have it in writing. >> and now it appears these documents handed over to us from
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his lawyer. the lawyer asserts show that. however, we don't have anything corroborating these documents, do we? >> i think the question is going to be now -- from this tulsa newspaper report saying they have these five sources that these documents were falsified as e we look at these documents, if that report is true what we're looking at it's hard to say whether we're looking at something that's fully accurate. clearly he and his lawyers believe that is the case. they have taken with quite exception the allegations made in the newspaper report and very frustrated by the way it's been reported by other news media organizations. but that is still the allegation that is out there. mr. bates and his lawyers are going to say this proves that mr. bates was properly trained.
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everything was done the way it was supposed to be done. but i'm not sure we have heard the end of this part of the story. mr. bates's lawyers acknowledge in the 64 pages and a statement that came along with it there are several years worth of documents that are missing. and we haven't. gotten a clear explanation from the sheriffs department as to exactly why that is and where those documents might be and if we'll ever be able to see them. >> ed, appreciate the reporting, thank you. let's not forget as we cover this it development that eric harris, the 42-year-old that was shot and killed, is being remembered today by his friends and family who are saying their final good-byes today before his fun funeral. ed, thank you for that. let's bring in a former nypd officer. you have been looking through these documents. a few things stand out to you, if indeed they are correct and if they were not manipulated or forged as the tulsa world paper has reported.
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>> i took a first look at everything. i didn't get a chance to study everything, but there's a couple things that stand out to me. one of them is that he has had a significant amount of training according to these records. but what i see here is he got a 24-hour homicide training course. i don't want him on the scene of a homicide. crime scene photography, why would he be getting that kind of training? is he paying for this training or is the city paying for it? >> the screen says tulsa deputy but he is a volunteer officer. that is very different than a hired and paid officer. >> there are some records where he puts in 20 hours a week. some up to 60 hours a month. that's a lot of time this man puts in. >> can we step back and talk about why these reserve positions exist? a lot of viewers, i was asking myself there's a lot of positions where you cannot volunteer for something. you cannot be a volunteer brain
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surgeon. you can be a volunteer doctor helping with something if you are already a doctor. why are there so many reserve deputies across the country right now? >> as you know law enforcement doesn't get as much money as needed so there might be budgetary constraints so they utilize officers in different situations where they can put professional officer on patrol and officers like him for parades, parties, things like that where you have block parties. >> here in new york city the nypd does not allow reserve deputies to carry guns. should that be how it is across the country? >> i don't know. i'm thinking to myself, as long as somebody is trained, a lot of these officers are in uniform. they might have to protect themselves if somebody attacks them. they don't have an armed officer with them all the time. i think the training is proper, this is only one incident right
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now. so i don't have a problem with it it. >> thank you, i appreciate it. i'll remind you that robert bates has been charged with second degree manslaughter. his attorney said it should be excusable homicide. turning now to politics the fight for new hampshire is on. virtually the entire field of potential republican presidential hopefuls 19 in all, are duking it all in this important primary state. they have been taking the stage at a leadership summit. former governor mike huckabee was one of them. >> when do we have term limits in this country and say when you go to congress it's not going to be the proverbial roach motel where you come in and never come out. after a reasonable period of time you come out, go home and find out what it's like u to live under the laws that you passed for the rest of us. >> arkansas thee na jones is live with more.
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how are they doing? >> reporter: it's been a very jam packed day when it comes to speakers. we have heard a lot of talking about conservative principles. we heard about cutting taxes, cutting the size of government. we have heard from focus like ted cruz saying abolish the irs and send those folks to the border and follow the border crisis u at the same time. we have heard from folks bashing hillary clinton, who is the only candidate on the democratic side who has officially thrown her hat into the ring. criticizing her on several fronts. she got applause when she said like hillary clinton, she's traveled the world a lot. and she knows that flying is just an activity a mode of transportation and not an accomplishment. so that's a dig at the former secretary of state touting her
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own experience all around the world. e we also just heard from ted cruz speaking somewhat hyper bollically. he bashed the president on foreign policy, the fact that president obama does not want to use the term radical islam. the next 20 months under this president are going to be a dangerous time. so a little bit of political philosophy and hyperbole. but this is what a lot of these folks here want to hear. very red meat conservative principles. >> it's interesting they are not taking on one another, which is what they have to do in the primary season. they are taking on the administration and hillary clinton. why that strategy? >> reporter: well i think -- i spoke to a political scientist who said this is really far out. you have to have -- it makes more sense for these candidates and potential candidates to keep their fire aimed at the other side. but i should mention that at
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least one speaker we heard from governor rick perry, did warn the crowd yesterday afternoon that maybe it's not such a good idea to choose another first term senator as their republican nominee. that's no so vail dig at ted cruz marco rubio and rand paul. there has been a little bit of talk about each other, but a lot more focus on president obama's policies and hillary clinton. >> athena jones, thank you, i appreciate it. coming up next, bush versus clinton, haven't we seen this before? 2015 could feel a lot like 1992. is that a good thing, bad thing and will voters have fatigue with that? we'll talk about it, next. photos are great... ...for capturing your world. and now they can transform it with the new angie's list app you can you can get projects done in a snap. take a photo of your project or just tell us what you need done... ...and angie's list will find a top-rated provider to do the job. start your project for free today.
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people ship all kinds of things. but what if that thing is a few hundred thousand doses of flu vaccine. that need to be kept at 41 degrees. while being shipped to a country where it's 90 degrees. in the shade. sound hard? yeah. does that mean people in laos shouldn't get their vaccine? we didn't think so. from figuring it out to getting it done, we're here to help. hey, what's up? i'm ted. rudy and i have a lot of daily rituals. namaste. stay. taking care of our teeth is one of them. when i brush my teeth, he gets a milk-bone brushing chew. just another way to keep ourselves healthy. i'll go change.
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all of the republican candidates well they are not even candidates yet, presumptionive candidates are in new hampshire this weekend and no one is getting more attention than jeb bush, the former governor is on a mission to prove he's not a carbon copy of his father or brother. >> everybody knows me as george's boy, barbara's boy, w.'s brother i have some other family members, but if i'm going to go beyond the consideration of running for the highest office in the land i need to share my heart to show a little bit about my life experience. for those that have family members, i think you can appreciate this. we're not always like our brother or sister or mom and dad. we all have our own unique dna and own life experiences. >> analyst and former adviser to four presidents david gergen joins me now. what's your reaction? it seemed effective to me.
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a lot of us have siblings and we're not like them. is he doing well on that front? >> he's doing well. senator feinstein of california has had the best line of the campaign so far. she said not long ago, it looks like jeb bush is going to get into this and run for president. we finally know what the bush family has menlt when they argued no child left behind. there is that element here. he's good natured about it. look at the end of the day, two things. dynasty or not, healthy for a country? one of the things george washington did was not leave a dynasty, he never had a son. that helped the country get started. so i think dynasties are unhealthy. at the same time as we approach 2016 the question is not dynasty but who is the best qualified among these contenders on both. sides to be the next president.
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that's the most serious issue. that's where i think jeb has to distinguish himself here as he goes to these shows and is matched up against the others. how does he stack up? he's in a race with 20 other candidates. >> we have seen some of the candidates basically pointing to their peers in the senate who may be running and saying, look being in the senate is not like running a state or running the budget of a state and therefore you need someone who has been a governor before. what do you make of that and how effectively that translates with the voter? >> history proves that governors, especially of larger states tend to be better presidents. it's not always the case but if you look at the 20th century teddy roosevelt came out of governor of new york. franklin roosevelt was governor of new york. both of them were well prepared. jimmy carter and bill clinton
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came from smaller states. bill clinton was so talented that he got. over it quickly, but it was a challenge for him. but what we found is if you're in the senate, with all due respect to senators because they are some of the best political minds in the country. but the fact is you don't manage very much. you manage a staff of 35 people. if you're president of the united states you manage you oversee, you lead the largest organization in the world. the pentagon itself is the largest single organization in the world. so you need some management background at least an understanding of it. some voters have concluded that one of the issues of president obama is he didn't have a chance before e he got there to manage a larger organization. >> let me ask you this. one of the things that the candidates are talking about is this lack of even holding a hearing yet to confirm the attorney general nominee loretta lynch.
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we heard jeb bush talk about it this week and say every president has the right to pick their team. even if you oppose her, every president has the right to pick their team. on this it front, are some republicans getting it wrong by not -- it's been like 160 days delayed just to have a vote. >> it's time for a vote. she deserves it, up or down, let's get it done let's move on. it's unfair to her. it sends chilling signals about how dysfunctional washington can be. i must say, trying to sort out the candidates this weekend, two, i thought, who stood out. one was for courage they showed. one was chris christie of new jersey. he was the first person out of the box saying we must reform entitle entitlements and gave us an example of what he would do. he would cut benefits for higher income levels. and it's a gutsy thing to do. the other was jeb bush in saying
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not only does he support the loretta lynch vote and move forward on it but he also came up and said he was not a climate change skeptic. he wanted to understand this and was open to -- that's a big issue among conservatives. it will make it harder for him to get the nomination. if he were it would make him a stronger candidate for president, in my judgment. >> david, thank you so much. we'll talk more about this on the other side. including how does a potential white house contender rise above the rest in new hampshire and elsewhere across the country and get lasting momentum. we'll talk about that. but first, hillary clinton doesn't have any official rivals in her party, but she has her own challenge of selling herself to voters a second time around. can he turn the page on her past and effectively repackage herself for the presidency? that's next.
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we're keeping a close eye on the gathering of republicans, but we also have plenty to to talk about when it comes to hillary clinton. david gergen is back with us former adviser to four presidents. thank you both for being here. let's talk about how the first week has gone for hillary clinton. martha you wrote a fascinating
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op-ed. you think she's been really evidentive to the video and the tour around iowa. >> the marketing has been evidentive effective. in terms of how she's presented to the public in changing the orientation of her relationship to the consumer from i to we. and i think that was the central strategic challenge for what they needed to do with the launch. make it about the voter and not about hillary and use the marketing tools at their disposal to position her as a more accessible and connected and frankly softer candidate to voters. >> here's what you write, quote, what we know is that over time voters see a lot of unscripted moments of a candidate where the real character comes through. if they spot hypocrisy between ads and the candidate, that campaign will get in trouble fast. is that the real danger you're
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seeing for clinton? >> i think if they launch an exceptional marketing campaign which it seems like they have the capability to do. they are on the verge of doing that. i think there are two issues. one is she's got to walk the walk. so it's not enough to say what she put it into a marketing campaign. she's got to behave in a way that's consistent with how she's being presented in the marketing campaign. so any daylight between what they are presenting through the media and how she's actually behaving will mean that there's an inconsistent message out there and be a troublesome thing for her campaign. >> in. the days of social media, anything can be caught on camera. >> she will be caught in a second. consistency is critical. >> so david, you have been involved in shaping candidates and shaping president's messages. you know the clintons well. you knew the clinton white house well. how effectively in this first week do you think hillary clinton can and has repackage,
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rebrand herself as a candidate? >> well there are certainly disagreement. s about ss on this on the internet. martha's blog has stirred up a storm of argument. there's some support for her position. strikingly politico asks activists on both sides how the week has gone to assess things. 72 republican strategists majority said it went well better than expected. so there's support out there. i personally feel the danger sois very strong that this campaign like this will seem to be contrived, scripted and it's far more important at the end of the day that she be herself and not wear some kind of mask invented by her handlers. >> it's an interesting point because my team and i were talking about this yesterday. some have said does every candidate have to make
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themselves of the people? because clearly when you're talking ant someone who has millions and millions of dollars like hillary clinton and a lot of the other potential candidates do you think you have to make yourself of the people to be effective? >> i think you have to make yourself access in a way that's consistent with the message you're trying to create around what you stand for. and if there are s aaspects of that that have to do with authenticity and being of the people that are going to achieve that goal then use that in how you market. hillary clearly has an issue of accessibility. that's a different issue than another kind of candidate might face in this race. marco rubio may have an issue of name awareness. you see that reflected in his logo. the issues are different for each candidate. i think aweuthenticity is frankly subjective and in the end much of what you take away of the candidate has a lot to do with how you're going to relate to
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how they position themselves. >> this is jeb bush having a little bit of fun with that stop that hillary clinton made at chipotle. >> yeah i go there. drive my own car, park my own car, get out of my own car, buy chipotle, take it home. we normally cook our own food at home. it's pretty good. >>. the fact that his wife is mexican. is that effective coming from a bush? >> i thought it was fine. he's very low key. let me go back to martha's point. awe then tis authenticity is very, very desirable in today's politics. voters are hungry for it. my point about hillary is this. she's a very complex person. there is a side of her that is warm that is accessible and caring. happy to sit down with both.
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but there's another side that is tough as nails, will make hard calls. i wrote a book about hard decisions. there's part of her that can get angry. there are different parts to her that i think -- what i hope in the campaign is that we see all of hillary and doesn't stress one aspect which can be a distortion. the warm and fuzzy hillary is not all of who she is. >> david and martha thank you very much. it's a face gnatscinating op-ed. thank you so much. coming up next only the strong will survive at the gop summit in new hampshire. who will come out on top and is time running out for would-be contenders to become candidates? we have a long road ahead, but when do they officially have to jump in? that's coming up. ♪ live a full life.
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republican presidential hopefuls on the stump in new hampshire this weekend. the question becomes how does one break away from the pack? here to discuss is two people who know a lot about the political right. let me begin with ben ferguson. when we look at this i see them and they are all bash inging the current administration. they are not really taking on one another yet, which is an interesting strategy. who is standing out to you the most and why? >> this weekend or overall? >> this weekend. >> i think this weekend we had had a couple of interesting stories. marco rubio continued on with the momentum he's had had since his announcement on monday where he's raised about $40 million, or at least pledged that much. he's becoming flush with cash which is always a good thing when you're a candidate. i think that a couple people
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continued on with momentum as well. rand paul took a little bit of a swipe at lindsey graham a little bit. i think someone that didn't stand out as much as people probably would have hoped is jeb. jeb had a mediocre performance. he came off a little -- not ano, i don't, but just a little people who know him know he's a little temperament tall. he hasn't learned how to answer the family legacy question without a little attitude. >> interesting. ben, we saw this common tallality in some of the speeches, attacks on hillary clinton. let's listen to some. i think we have it do we have that sound? >> i'm starting to worry that when hillary clinton travels, there's going to be two plans.
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one for her and her entourage and one for her baggage. >> is that an evidentive way in the primary when you're trying to be the one it o win your party? >> i think it's smart. you don't want to get into beating each other up too soon because it's still a long way before anyone gets to vote in a primary. what you're seeing is the candidates are trying to decide who they are going to be and how they are going to market themselves. the first fight you're going to see is going to be between marco rubio and jeb bush. they are very close, they have a lot of the same people same donors. i think rubio honestly shocked most people in the gop with the amount of money he was able to raise. people thought he's like the kid brother to jeb bush, no way he's going to beat him out. he's really become his own man. i think that's pretty impressive. at this point in the campaign you're still trying to find out who is your base and who are r
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your donors and there's no reason to beat up one another just yet. >> it's interesting, i want to pull up a quote from an interview that one of the bush supporters gave to politico. it says quote, i love jeb more than anything but rubio has the same ideas and he's a better messenger with a better story. is that true? >> absolutely true. this is going to be one of the biggest fights we're going to see intraparty is going to be between bush and rubio. marco rubio brings a more authentic story. he comes from an immigrant background. his story is compelling. he's fresher. he is a better communicator much more comfortable in front of people. not saying that jeb wasn't a great governor but he's been out for a long time and comes from a political dynasty and people don't want this. >> ben, respond to that but
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david just said that traditionally, former governors made more effective president. s. you have a first termer in congress with rubio. >> i'm not disagreeing with that per se but the big court issue here is when you look at rubio, is he a guy that people are still aren't that familiar with? one of the reasons governors do so well is people pay attention to them and their ideas for the first time. what rubio has been able to do is he's been able to come out as somewhat of an outside of washington unknown. a lot of people may have mentioned the name or heard the name or known there was something funny with a water bottle one time back in the day but they really didn't know him as a person. he's incredibly energetic, charismatic and the biggest issue, the biggest perk of being marco rubio is his last name is not bush. and i think that may be one of
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the things that people totally underestimate is how tired people are of hearing the last name clinton and how tired they are hearing the last name bush. rubio, i think a lot of people underest underestimated him. >> even though they keep saying he's polling at 6% just like ben said people don't know him yet. that's an asset for him. >> we have to go pup thank you so much. coming up next totally switching gears talking about decades. the only people making money off marijuana were those willing to break the law to sell it. in places it's legal, more and more people are finding it to be a real cash crop.
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marijuana lovers across the country are gathering in denver's 420 festival today. live pictures of the festival. it's been more than a year since colorado legalized recreational marijuana use. cnn's serious "high profits" follows a couple on their way to making millions off marijuana. >> it's cash only. everyone is cool with that. sorry, guys end of the night. >> our last transaction has to happen at 10:00. but 8:00 a.m. tomorrow. thanks. >> good job, first day really
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working there. >> you guys count your tip jars yet. they made an extra $60 over there. >> kate how did we end up? >> over $47,000. >> holy [ bleep ]! >> it's so much unorganized money. >> we did 30 times our normal daily sales for medical marijuana by switching to retail marijuana. this is why we had to be open on the 1st. >> unreal. >> this is what happens when you legalize marijuana. >> you just saw the piles of cash that that couple made from legally selling marijuana in colorado. they have to take cash and a lot of that can cause a big problem in terms of how to bank it. the owner of four pot dispensaries joins us. thank you for being with me.
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>> it's my pleasure thanks for having me. >> this is one of the things that i think people don't think about when they say, wow, i could make millions selling marijuana. this is a sure fire business venture. the problem is it is still illegal on a federal basis, so banks doesn't want to touch it. how have you handled that? >> well it really is a big challenge to being in the industry. one of the things that i have done is i pay most of my venders in cash. i pay my net payroll in cash. and i have been buying some real estate and found some sellers willing to accept cash. it is an ongoing problem. i haven't pulled a credit card out of my pocket to pay for dinner in the last four years. >> wow, so it's interesting you bring up real estate. you're buying real estate to put the money somewhere. what are you doing to move the
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money? >> i really haven't been moving it. what i have been doing is diversifying because i'm so vested in the marijuana industry. buying some commercial properties to just hold on to them and rent. and i have been using cash flow to expand my business as well. so we're opening two additional dispensaries in the next 90 days. >> your story is pretty remarkable. a lot of people might think is this like a stoner who all of a sudden just launched had this business. no you went to law school and you said you had to sort of love affair with marijuana and then you told your family you weren't actually a lawyer, you were going to go into this instead. how hard of a time have you had getting people to take you serious lir as a businessman? >> well when i first transitioned from practicing law to growing and selling marijuana, it was very hard. but now the public opinion has
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changed in colorado especially. marijuana has become much more mainstream. i think now more people look up to someone like me and i get a lot of people that want to get into the industry seeking my advice. so it's definitely been an evolution over the last several years. >> what do you say to children? there's still an age restriction here. with it being legal recreational recreationally there's also that line you have to walk. >> well very important, marijuana is not for children. colorado is very strict about that. this is a product for adults 21 and over. and all the dispensaries mine and everyone in the state, every single person is carded. so even if you look 70 you'll be carded. >> thank you for joining us. it's been interesting to see how many entrepreneurs have had such success with all of this. appreciate it and good luck to you. for our viewers, you can follow the adventures tomorrow night
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"high profits" tomorrow night at 10:00 p.m. still to come, scientists are starting to find new medical uses for marijuana. one of those could soon be a treatment for those with ptsd. more, next. ( music throughout) ♪ ♪ one time ♪ one coat coverage, one coat guaranteed. ♪ one happy couple. marquee, behr's most advanced paint and primer, exclusively at the home depot. hey, girl. is it crazy that your soccer trophy is talking to you right now? it kinda is. it's as crazy as you not rolling over your old 401k. cue the horns... just harness the confidence
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our dr. sanjay gupta is back with his investigation into marijuana. the marijuana revolution follows the journey of a veteran with ptsd who tried to commit suicide, failed and turned to marijuana at the last resort. >> i really came to the conclusion that it was really the medicine for him. >> it seemed very effective. >> it does seem very effective. >> for shawn it's trial and error. how much to use? when to use? or even the best strains? and how will it effect him long-term? that's why the studies are needed. >> how much does it concern you that there's not a lot of science behind this? >> if he wasn't doing this the fear is he wouldn't be here. so if there are some side effects we'll have to deal with down the road that haven't been studied yet, i figure we'll take that when it comes.
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. for now, the children have their father and husband with us. >> dr. sanjay gupta joins us. congrats to you and your team. let's talk about shawn. what was stunning to me is he struggled so much with ptsd he even tried to take his own life. he says marijuana has changed the way he thinks dreams concentrates. >> it's pretty remarkable. it's his story, but we want ed to show it yo to you because we think of so many other stories out there. post-traumatic stress is hard to treat. 22 veterans are killing themselves every day in this cow koun country. the options available to them are not very effective. that's part of what shawn's story was as well. he got to the point he was suicidal. it seems to work for him. it's now part of a study, a federally approved study, which is going to answer some of the
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important questions. when to use, what do you specifically how to use, all these questions need to be answered. for him it's trial and error. that's not an ideal situation for him. it worked, but it's got to be better than that. there have been more studies approved in the last 12 months than in the previous 12 years. mainstream scientists are now jumping into this area where they have previously been unwilling to dip a toe. they have a better idea of how it works. with post-traumatic stress want to show you an example of what scientists think is happening in the brain. >> reporter: people have an imbalance in their brain. too many receptors associated with intense emotions like fire and anxiety and not enough of a chemical that binds to the receptors to keep them calm and in check. marijuana is filled with a chemical that can bind these receptors and restore balance to the ptsd brain. >> it gives you an idea.
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now we're seeing it can work. starting to prove that in studies and showing the mechanism by which this can all happen. >> this has been a personal journey for you. as a doctor as a journalist you just wrote this fascinating op-ed on cnn.com. for you what has stood out the most? what's been the most surprising part or toughest part in reporting all this? it's still very controversial. >> it is very controversial. the first documentary a couple years ago now, it was a bit of a lonely process in some ways because no one really wanted to talk to us. government officials, heads of the agencies a patients were suspicious about talking to the media. and i have been hard on medicinal marijuana in the past because i didn't find the evidence that compelling in years past. i think what was surprising to me was that once you started to look at the data differently whrks you started to dig deeper and say why were these studies done looking at harm and not benefit, you started to question
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a lot of the things that you receive, a lot of the data you receive you learn how to dig much, much deeper than you normally would. in this case, it took us around the world. but as journalists, it's our responsibility to always do that. we try and do our best we dig, dig, dig, but as you dig deeper in this particular story, you find that the odds are always stacked against medicinal marijuana. and finally, some of that is starting to change. >> sanjay gupta thank you, it's a fascinating look at this. go to cnn.com and read his op-ed. then tune in for "the marijuana revolution" at 9:00 eastern. it tastes better when you grow it. it tastes even better when you share it. it's not hard, it's doable. it's growable. get going with gro-ables. miracle-gro. life starts here.
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my name's louis, and i quit smoking with chantix. i had tried to do it in the past. i hadn't been successful. quitting smoking this time was different because i got a prescription for chantix. along with support chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. the fact that it reduced the urge to smoke helped me get that confidence that i could do it. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. some people had seizures while taking chantix. if you notice any of these stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix or history of seizures. don' take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these stop chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or develop new or worse symptoms. get medical help right away if
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i'm poppy harlow in new york, we begin with this across the middle east this weekend terrorist groups making some gains in their goal to do just that. take a look hat this map from syria where a branch is running a major city.
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this is afghanistan where a suicide bomber on a motorcycle blew himself up on a crowded street killing 33 people wounding more than 100. isis claimed responsibility saying one offshoot of that group went out to kill afghan government workers who were trying to cash in their paychecks. if isis is behind this suicide bombing, it would mark the first time the group has carried out an attack inside of afghanistan. isis is growing in that country because people are switching their loyalty to isis from the taliban. nick paton walsh found some men who made the switch. >> reporter: look closely at these men itching for a fight. . you can just make out the new seismic tremor in the war here. the masks, even the breathless clumsiness at altitude
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afghanistan has seen before but not this. the flag of the islamic state, isis. these men are afghans and wanted to show our cameraman their allegiance to isis, an act that could get them killed by isis rivals. we established contacts he says through a friend. he sadistist had come to afghanistan rgs let's join them. we pledged allegiance. our cameraman wasn't allowed to film the phones they use to talk to iraq and syria. they say there are religious students who watch propaganda and at night go into villages to recruit. we don't recute ordinary people he say us. only people with a military background. at the moment we have no leader but talks are going on to choose one for us in afghanistan. isis is only just beginning but
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their timing is good. either fighting hard or thinking about talking peace in the young and angry have only known war here might find it appealing. even washington has heard the threat that isis may pose in the vacuum ahead slowing the u.s. troop withdrawal. >> it is critical that the work understand the terrible threat that the forces pose. from the west it's already sending advanced guards to southern western afghanistan. >> reporter: yet whatever their strength in the swirling chaos of post america or afghanistan, even those home made flags portray a purpose in brutality ripe for blooming. cnn, kabul. >> thank you for that report. let's talk about it with bob bahhier and former jihadist.
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when we look at what happened here, if indeed there's this switch going on between those afghanistan pledging allegiance to isis, do you think we're looking at isolated cases or is this the beginning of a much more dangerous movement? >> i think more the former at this point. if you look at the very interesting story, there were five recruits in the frame. that doesn't suggest some fast movement. we have had reports of an isis group in southern afghanistan. the leader of that group. was a former commander of the taliban. he was killed in a drone strike reelt recently. we're looking at maybe a couple hundred, 300, 400, that kind of number. this is not isis showing its flag in afghanistan. this is former members of the taliban rerouting themselves as isis because that's the baddest
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dog on the block kind of thing. they are trying to sort of differentiate themselves from the traditional taliban. one final point on this. omar disappeared and haven't seen anything of him in the last 14 years. there's an occasional statement, but the leader of the taliban hasn't shown his face or been very out there at all. some of the younger members of the taliban are saying what's going on? let's affiliate ourselves with isis, which seems to be a much more formidable group than the taliban itself. >> bob, if this is indeed an attack in afghanistan carried out by an isis affiliated group, it would be the first within afghanistan. how likely do you think that afghanistan goes the way of iraq, for example, with large parts of the country falling to isis? >> i agree with peter on most points. it's nothing we should worry about today, but it depends on the chaos in afghanistan. if it turns out something like
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yemen where there are a lot of war lords operating on their own, a lot of destruction and total chaos, you're going to see the idea of the islamic state to be very attractive to them. you have to look at the islamic state through their eyes and it's a state, in fact which controls nearly 20 million people in syria and iraq. it is also making headway of sorts in the egyptian army which is well organized. as we have been talking about, they have some allegiance in yemen and places like that. i think ultimately this is a movement that's going to collapse but in the meantime if it continues to fight on a lot of battle fronts you're going to see a lot more. adherence and a lot more people claiming allegiance and killing people in the name of the islamic state. >> what do you think isis is looking for? bob points out isis control ingling
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20 million people. they clearly think of themselves as a state. they have a police force, they collect taxes, revenue. what do you think their aim is within afghanistan? >> well their aim is to -- what they are doing everywhere else is to have a monopoly on authority. i mean the very fact that they claimed call fate that plays on traditional classical islamic ideas of the muslim state, it being run been aunderstanding, but even planting there or opening up branches whether it's in libya, tunisia or elsewhere, like afghanistan or pakistan even they are just doing the same thing that they have been doing. just alerting their authority as the sole group for islam. >> if they have aspirations within afghanistan, how does this attack gain them movement? how does this gain them followers within afghanistan?
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>> well, in these contexts, it's all about who can hit the enemy. at the end of the day, as far as they are concerned, there's an occupying force and they need to get rid of the occupying force. the one who does the more damage to it is the winner, so to speak. that's really the reason why. >> thank you all very much. stay with us. the panel will join us later in the hour. just ahead, the mention of al qaeda once made people sit up and take notice but the terror group's dominance has been dismantled as isis has proven to be r more formidable. we'll discuss the changing fortunes of the two groups, next. ♪ ♪ live a full life.
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♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you wouldn't ignore signs of damage in your home. are you sure you're not ignoring them in your body? even if you're treating your crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis an occasional flare may be a sign of damaging inflammation. and if you ignore the signs, the more debilitating your symptoms could become. learn more about the role damaging inflammation may be playing in your symptoms with the expert advice tool at crohnsandcolitis.com. and then speak with your gastroenterologist. we're back with our panel talking about isis and al qaeda and how they are making grain fwans throughout the middle east. let me begin with peter.
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you wrote an op-ed describing al qaeda as an organization that is quote, deteriorating. at the same time, defense secretary ash carter told us a week ago that he sees al qaeda as more of a threat than isis. tell me why you think al qaeda is deteriorating. >> in the op-ed i was trying to point out that the organization that attacked the united states on 9/11 is basically on life support. almost all of its leaders are dead. but it hasn't conducted a successful attack in the west since the london attacks of 2005. it's only capable of attacking inside pakistan. but what the defense secretary may have been saying was that elements of al qaeda and other parts of the world are a problem. that includes al qaeda in the pe nins la that's benefitting from the chaos there. has tried to put bombs on planes. but it wasn't really addressing
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that point. it was addressing the core organization that attacked us on 9/11. . >> i want you to listen to this sound from u.s. ambassador to the u.n. samantha power insisting that the west is chipping away at isis. >> isil controls 25% fewer territory than they did back then. so there will be back and forth and there will be incidents and isil is monstrous that they will gather headlines around the world. it's a time of turmoil, it's a fluid time but particularly as it relates to isis we're in a much stronger position than we were in a year ago. we're chipping away. >> as a counterterrorism analyst with your background do you agree with that assessment? >> i mean they are chipping away at isis. everyone understands you can't really win a war from the air.
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you have sure as heck kill a lot of people from the air. that's what's being done. there's a part of the whole counter narrative from the wen institutional level. in order to desuede people from joining, you show them they can't even hold ground. they can take cities as hostages entire cities but they really can't -- they don't have real authority. they can't hold on to the ground. i think this is the strategy here that the more pressure that's put on them the more land they lose, the greater the argument that this is not a legitimate cally fate. >> at the same time when you talk about ra ma day being in focus this week isis on the brink of taking over you had some u.s. military officials this week saying look even if it falls, it's not the end of the campaign, not the end of the world. senator mccain came out responding to that saying that's absolutely the wrong assessment and saying, quote, disregard inging
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the strategic importance is a denial of reality and an insult o to the families of hundreds brave young americans who were killed and wounded during the surge fighting to free ra ma day from the grip of al qaeda. how important is it? >> i think it's very important. i hate to say it but. i agree with mccain. baghdad is known for a long time that isis is e preparing to take the city. they have infill straited -- infiltrated for months now. and yet they couldn't protect this it city. secondly, the government in baghdad has not won any legitimacy with iraq. they may not like the islamic state, but in their view the worse would be for the shia militias to move into a place where there would be reprisal
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killings. until we sit down with the parties involved and divide up iraq like it should be in a federal system this war is going to go on for a long time and islamic state may lose ground but it's not going to die easily. >> turning our attention to yemen, we saw it is increasingly powerful in terms of an offshoot of core al qaeda taking over an airport outside of the capital. how much credence do you give to the progress made by them within yemen? >> well this thing waxes and wanes. it's like a discussion about isis. if you go back to 2010 al qaeda controlled large chunks of southern yemen. then as a result of government pressure and also u.s. military action there were really rolled
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back and really not doing particularly well about a year ago. then it sends them into this equation and take over the north of the country and seize the capital and the government falls and chaos, which is a situation that benefits al qaeda, is now reigning in yemen. so al qaeda is taking advantage of that. right now, we have a war of all against. all in yemen. who exactly is going to come out on top is not clear at all. but they are capable of taking large chunks of territory in southern yemen as they have in the past. >> thank you all very much. we're going to stay on this topic and turn our attention after the break to syria because with all of the turmoil in the region, some argue syria has nearly been forgotten. we'll show you the powerful video, an alarming video, that moved the u.n. council to tears
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prompting new calls for action. ♪ live a full life. the lexus ct hybrid with an epa estimated 42 mpg. the further you go the more interesting it gets. this is the pursuit of perfection.
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imagine the population of pittsburgh wiped out. that's how many syrians have been killed since the civil war broke out in 2011. 310,000 deaths have been recorded so far. that's nearly double the number from a year ago and represents more than 1% of syria's entire
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population. according to the united nations, more than 12 million syrians -- are in desperate need of aid. roughly the size of boston have fled their homes op of those more than half are now in neighboring countries living as refugees. the toll keeps climbing horrifying video, reports to show the effects of a poison gas attack earlier this week. first, i want to caution you these images are incredibly difficult to see. >> reporter: this is the video that brought some in the u.n. security council to tears. this bayby is wounded because of toxic gas a man with a trembling voice says. moments later this entire family a mother a father and three toddlers killed in a chlorine gas attack. the poison packed in barrel
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bombs and dropped by the syrian government on their home shown this in video on march 16th. cnn has not independently confirmed the attack. samantha powers spoke to reporters following the closed-door meeting. if there was a dry eye in the room i didn't see it. it was -- it's just devastating to see the effects of what this regime is doing. people were visibly moved. as diplomats wept in new york, activists say two more chlorine bombs struck the same area. here a group of volunteer rescuers seen here carrying children away from the scene of thursday's attack say this is part of a trend to regain control of idlib. the city was captured by islamist rebels. in an inter. view friday president bashar al
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assad denied the gas attack allegations calling them quote, an attempt to demon news the state. they adopted a resolution specifically ban. ing the use of chlorine as a chemical weapon. the testimony thursday by a volunteer doctor asserted that chlorine gas is still killing people. syria's civil defense urged a no-fly zone. with every attack that goes. unchecked, the red line is being turned into a green light for mass slaughter. more than 206 people 20 of them civil defense workers, have been affected by the recent attacks, according to human rights watch. the group says evidence the government is violating the global prohibition against chemical warfare is mounting. syria's people now waiting for the horrors that moved the u.n. to tears to move them to action. cnn, atlanta. >> let's bring in our panel to
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discuss. bob bayer is with us. also cnn national security analyst peter bergen. this video was reported back in 2013. bob, to you first, what can the international community do that is not already being done that you think would be most effective? the u.s. was this close to airstrikes. what needs to be done now? >> poppy, we need an international effort. the russians continue to supply bashar al assad with advanced weapons, maybe even chlorine. the turks are supporting the war. what we're seeing is a conflict that if it continues to go on will remain a huge magnet for jihadists from all over the world. what we're going to see is they are going to be showing up in syria fighting and they are going to be coming west and it's
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going to affect us. this truly is a tragedy of incredible dimensions for a country like syria to break up. we need to sit down and start talking. if we need to divide that country up. i just don't see the borders of syria ever coming back together. the only way to fix this is diplomatically and by talking. >> peter bergen do you agree with that assessment? there has to be new lines drawn? >> the problem about action on syria is the fact that both the russians and the chinese will veto any effective action that the u.n. might take. so diplomatic talking isn't going to get us very far. we're in an unfortunate situation where the three groups that run syria are al qaeda, the local al qaeda affiliate isis and the government itself. and the defacto position of the united states appears to be
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keeping assad in power because he is actually as ghastly as he is from an american perspective, he's better than an isis-run syria or al qaeda-run syria. and that is a very sad and hard fact. now maybe if these chlorine attacks, which are not gas attacks. chlorine is readily ineffective. the mortality rate was relatively small in world war i, but it did produce the chemical weapons ban, which the syrian regime is clearly violate inging here. so maybe this changes the kind of calculous in the international community. but we have scene in the past that the regime has done appalling things and nothing has
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really happened. >> when it comes to backing more moderate rebels fighting against the assad regime this was a point of contention. how much do you do it? you had hillary clinton when she was secretary of state diverging from president obama on that front. looking at the state of things now, does that need to change the amount of u.s. support and arm arming of the rebels? >> yes, it does need to change. i mean there are some plans underway for some rebels to be trained. but this idea of moderate rebels what does that mean? do we expect that the fighting that's been going on for four years is somehow going to produce a group of individual who is are like the west? that's not going to be the case. you have religiously minded people who are fighting. the majority of syria are sunni muslims. many are religious minded, they
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are not islamists, but a lot of the groups cooperate on the ground because there hasn't been any help really for the past four years. so as one u.s. trainer mentioned from d.c. that the so-called secret here is that the rebels have been killed off in the past few years. you can see the coordination between isis and assad. anywhere the rebels take over, low and behold, there's isis on one side and assad on the other side. we saw this in a camp under siege by the assad regime and isis comes in. we need to be realistic about who is doing what and who the government is collaborating with. >> thank you all very much. i appreciate the discussion. it's one we'll continue to have on this show. coming up next new documents that emerged in the case of the armed reserve deputy who shot and killed a suspect earlier this month. these documents shed some light
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on his training and role within the department as a volunteer officer, that's next. it tastes better when you grow it. it tastes even better when you share it. it's not hard, it's doable. it's growable. get going with gro-ables. miracle-gro. life starts here.
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ask your doctor about it by name. cnn obtained law enforcement training records from the attorney for robert bates. he's a 73-year-old reserve deputy in tulsa, oklahoma who fired his gun and killed a suspect by mistake when he meant to grab and use his taser instead. this past week the tulsa world newspaper raised questions about whether his training records had been falsified, forged to make it look like he had more training than he actually did. the sheriff there denies the claims. joining us on the phone is ed louisiana venn. you looked at the documents. what do they tell us? >> these are documents that show that bob bates received firearms
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training and certification necessary to pass over the course of several years. he became a reserve deputy around 2007-2008. as you mentioned, the tulsa world newspaper is questioning whether or not bob bates was properly trained and. also allegations that the documentation to get that certification to work as a reserve deputy might have been falsify falsified. that is the real question that is at the heart of all of this. bob bates's attorney is releasing these documents o to us as their way of trying to show that they believe that bob bates was properly trained, but in full capacity to work as a reserve deputy with the sheriffs department. as you might imagine, we're going to get a great deal of reaction to this story as it continues to develop and people start taking a closer look at these documents. these are documents we have been
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asking for for more than a week now from the sheriffs department. they say they couldn't release them because the case was under investigation, but there will be a great deal of scrutiny on these documents that have just been released. the question is whether or not these documents have been falsified just because we have them doesn't mean they have or haven't been falsified. so that's one of the questions we're going to be digging deeper into. >> the tulsa world newspaper, which was the first to allege that the documents were forged to make it look like he had more experience than he had, they and the family are both questioning their legitimacy. do we have reason to question that ourselves? have they been cooperated by the sheriffs department? anyone saying these are correct? >> we have not heard from the sheriffs department yet. we do know that the tulsa newspaper and the attorney for the eric harris family are
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looking at those documents now to verify all of that. but remember the tulsa world newspaper says it has five sources that have come forward to tell them that these documents were falsified. we don't know if this is a complete and sole picture of all of the documents. we know it's not fully complete because the lawyers for bob bates did say that there are several years worth of documents that are indeed missing, that they have been misplaced and it's not clear whether they will be able to find those documents. but even base edd on what we have seen so far, we do not know yet if it's a complete and full picture of every possible training document that was ever put into. bob bates's file. >> ed thank you so much for the reporting. we'll stay on this. one thing we know is the sheriffs department is reviewing their entire volunteer officer program to see if it is being managed correctly. also this story, we have new
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information on what happened before a police officer used his cruiser to take down a man with a rifle. miguel marquez walks us through video, as well as new questions about how walmart handled the incident. >> man down. >> reporter: did this ever need to happen? >> oh, my god. >> reporter: new video shows a prevention officer telling police officers on the scene the gun this man had just stolen had a safety lock on it and couldn't be. fured. >> it's locked. he can't get the lock off. i'm positive. it's locked. >> reporter: ten seconds later. the walmart lost e prevention officer wearing shorts and sandals listening to the radio has his young son along for the
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ride. police finally yell at the employee, back off. minutes earlier, a mentally unstable on a crime spree all morning is handed a rifle by a walmart clerk who told police he seemed normal. in the video you can see him inspect the rifle closely appearing to work the lever and trigger. he then turns his attention to ammunition telling the clerk don't do anything stupid give me the ammo. the employee first resists trying to buy time but tells police she handed over the am ammunition because he was threatening to break the case and if glass got on the other boxes of ammo they could not be sold. she also told police it's walmart policy to give over items during a robbery. walmart says the store clerk acted appropriately, even alerting security to call police beforehanding over the ammo by dialing a code brown.
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one 911 call makes clear the gravity of the situation. a walmart asset protection manager tells the operator valencia was trying to load the rifle in the store. >> i have an armed customer in the sporting goods department. >> is he threatening anyone? >> i'm trying to find out. he's loading the weapon in the sporting goods department at the moment. >> he's loading it? >> a photo of the rifle shows the cable lock still on wrapped through the lever once with enough slack that the lever could still be operated. police said the lock appeared to be a handgun cable lock. a walmart spokesperson insists the gun had the proper lock correctly installed in the store and either valencia did something to it or the patrol car affect eded the lock. the walmart lost prevention officer and son were witness to him being taken down by the patrol car.
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walmart says it constantly reviews all its policies and procedures and this incident is being discussed right now. cnn, new york. still ahead in the newsroom republicans considering a white house run are in a granite state of mind. their pitch to voters in new hampshire, when we come back. hey mike, it's lucy from lifelock. good news. we just learned your case is closed and your stolen retirement funds are finally
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now to new hampshire and the biggest event so far in the 2016 election. a slew of gop hopefuls just wrapped up their speeches at a leadership summit. the last to take the stage was ted cruz who made a pitch for abolishing the irs. >> there's nearly 90,000 employees at the irs. we need to padlock that building, take every one of them and put them on our southern border. now to our friends in the media i say that somewhat tongue and cheek. but think about it for a second. imagine you had traveled thousands of miles through the blazing sun. you swim across the rio grand. the first thing you see is 90,000 irs agents. you'd turn around and go home too. >> cruz was one of two declared candidates to speed today.
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the other is senator rand paul, who says republicans should not dilute their conservatism to succeed. >> we need to find someone who is going to represent us be the leader of the republican party and make the country a better place. how are we going to get that? some in our party say let's just dilute the message. let's become democrat light and then we'll get more votes. . i couldn't disagree more. i think what we need to do is be boldly for what we are for. >> in all 19 gop hopefuls spoke at the two-day event. on monday new hampshire will play who host to hillary clinton. switching gears here the mile high city is living up to its name certainly today at the 420 festival. a year after recreational marijuana was legalized in colorado pot fans from all over are flocking to that festival.
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we'll take you there live next. fussbut first, san ja gupta selects six viewers to join his fitness team. he caught up with one more of the participants erica moore. >> for fit nation athlete erika moore her size was never a concern. >> aoife lot of self-confidence. . i have never been ashamed of my body or not ashamed of my weight. >> reporter: but it was her first experience with swing dancing which left her out of breath after just one song she says that was a wakeup call. >> it was the first time i felt that this body was preventing me from doing and i didn't like that feeling. >> reporter: determined to get in shape, moore joined our team back in january. ready to make a permanent change. >> this is new. you're starting this incredible journey. dark moments at all? are you concerned?
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>> i'm not. i feel so positive and hopeful. i think coming here has helped me realize that it's not some big dark unknown. it's a lot of logical steps that add up to make big change. >> since that day she's take on to water like a fish. >> i just learned to swim in july. >> biking and running, even competing in several big races. in just a few weeks we'll be back together in california to put the team's new skills to the test. >> it's going to be really exciting. >> cnn reporting. ♪ [upbeat music] ♪ defiance is in our bones. defiance never grows old. citracal maximum. easily absorbed calcium plus d. now in a new look.
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flushing, upset stomach and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. ask your doctor about viagra. so,as my personal financial psychic, i'm sure you know what this meeting is about. yes, a raise. i'm letting you go. i knew that. you see, this is my amerivest managed... balances. no. portfolio. and if doesn't perform well for two consecutive gold. quarters. quarters...yup. then amerivest gives me back their advisory... stocks. fees. fees. fees for those quarters. yeah. so, i'm confident i'm in good hands. for all the confidence you need. td ameritrade. you got this.
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it's been over a year since colorado legalized recreational marijuana. in february the state reported $53 million in tax report. pot owners are cashing in. the festival is free. i have no doubt ha that a lot of folks are bringing money to the festival. >> no doubt about.
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>> 23 states have some form of marijuana that has been legalized. this is the 420 festival so you see a lot of the festivities happening. the civic center park we're talking to people from all across the country who were here this weekend for the cannabis cup, the super bowl of marijuana's industry. joining me now is somebody who has joined us from south carolina. it's one of the state's whereo cf1 o it's one of the states where even medical marijuana is not legalized. jeremy grove is here with me. thanks for joining me. i know you came just for the festivities here this week. what are you thinking about everything so far? >> it's the future. it's the future. it's awesome. the best. >> reporter: you're a marijuana enthusiast. >> i am. >> reporter: you use pot. >> yes. >> reporter: tell me what it's
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been like to purchase marijuana legally here in colorado at the marijuana dispensary snz. face a little bit of a hassle it's a long line. they have a lot of rules, standards which is understandable. overall it's ksh -- i mean nothing like i've seen before. >> reporter: there are hundreds of different marijuana products. what do you use? >> i prefer shattered jabs wax, oil like more than bud. i don't like edibles. they are too much. >> reporter: a lot of people are hearing words like shattered, dabs, edibles. there are dozens of -- shattered an dabs are the high concentrate concentrated thc. when you talk about marijuana and being here in colorado ground zero of this legalization experiment in the country, i asked you earlier, is this about novelty or is this really about
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making a statement? and your answer? >> to me, like this whole thing and like the legalization, what it really is about is the fact that, for so long people have been, you know hiding in the dark with marijuana and all of the negativity that they've looked on it from a countrywide standpoint is stuff they don't know about. they don't know about marijuana. dhoent they don't know it doesn't make you go crazy. you chill, have fun, laugh with your friends and sit around and joke. but doctors give people pills all the time they get addicted to and die from and we just let that happen as a society. but we make marijuana illegal? it doesn't make sense. >> reporter: thank you for talking with us jeremy. >> thanks ana. we'll keep talking about this all weekend and also what happens when cannabis meets capitalism, "high profits" follows two business-minded relentless lsless visionaries to be the first moguls of marijuana. series premiere tonight night here on cnn.
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back in a minute. solve. to defend ourselves. to declare victory. so cvs health provides expert support and vital medicines. make a fist for me. at our infusion centers or in patients homes. we help them fight the good fight. cvs health, because health is everything. big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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time now to meet cnn's hero of the week. >> i was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer just about a month after my daughter's dad and i split up. all i could think about was, oh, my god, my daughter. i can't do this to you. >> here we go, mom. >> the chemotherapy there's a lot of fatigue. when you can't really do much, i'm looking at the dirt on the floor. just one more level of stress. >> they're two for $1. >> being a single parent having cancer, you don't know where to turn. >> that wasn't on the list. >> but it's $1.88. >> disability, it's 60% of your
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salary, but your bills are still 100%. it's hard. >> she was a single mother of four when she was diagnosed. she struggled with just day to day. when she passed away we realized other people like her needed help. >> good morning! >> singleton moms provides practical support for single parents battling cancer. >> you have these people that don't know you and you're going to help me with cleaning my house? >> we help them pay a couple of bills and then we provide day-to-day needs for their house. >> do you have a protein preference? >> it's about being that support. >> we need a hand out with these? >> it's a lot of help. they go out of their way to make sure you're taking care of. >> neighbors helping neighbors, family helping family. this is what we should be doing
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for one another. single moms definitely helps. i've got all the motivation in the world looking into my daughter's eyes. >> some amazing women there. thanks to them for all they do. thanks for being with me. i'm poppy harlow in new york. i'm michael smerconish. welcome to the program. campaign 2016 is already heating up. and right now new hampshire is the place to be. all the gop heavy hitters, 19 to be exact, are in town for the first in the nation republican leadership summit. jeb, marco, rand, they're all there. it's the first can't-miss event for the 2016 republican field, and there's no doubt several hot button political issues are on the table that could help decide who'll punch that gop ticket. let's dig right into it. joining me now is "the new york times" national correspondent jonathan martin and republican strategist and cnn political commentator kevin mad

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