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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 16, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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shaping it and that's the naked truth. i'm laurie segall, for cnn money. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com a rising death toll in tianjin, china. we have the latest in a live report. and donald trump thinks hillary clinton is in trouble over her email handling as the issue raises its head in a key state. and brazilians will take to the streets. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world, you are watching cnn "newsroom" live from cnn in atlanta. i'm natalie allen.
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we begin in tianjin, china, where the grim numbers are rising. is 12 -- 112 people are now dead in last week's devastating chemical explosion. government officials fear the numbers will go up. they are combing the debris for any survivors. miraculously, a 56-year-old man was rescued earlier. he was found barely conscious and rushed to the hospital, reported in critical condition. our will ripley is live for us in tianjin. we've seen the aerial shots of this of the scope for this. you are up close and right there in the thick of things. what's the latest? >> reporter: that's right, natalie. you can look at all of the destruction but behind a lot of
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this devastation are thousands of people who are going through a very difficult time right now. one of them is this man who i met just a short time ago and he gave me a tour of his building, it was a condo. he and his wife and her parents and his parents have been saving up for years so that they could have a home together. this newlywed couple and you saw it for the first time. he doesn't speak much english. how are you feeling seeing that? >> very bad, very bad. it's very bad. very -- >> sad you too yeah? >> yeah. >> to see the window blown in and to see everything that you've saved up for and what he was telling me is that nobody has given him any answers, the government hasn't reached out to
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them. they were supposed to move in less than two months. now they don't know what's going to happen, and so he is not homeless at the moment but he has made plans to be moving and certainly now you see the damage of the building and it's even worse when you step inside the hallways. some of the ceilings are caving in. it's going to take a long time to repair all of this and when you step outside, you can see the scope of the destruction here. this was a complex that they were almost finished with. now every window is blown out and inside the hallways of all of these buildings, it be looks as if a bomb went off and it goes to show you and we'll show you the video later today when we get back in just how powerful this blast was and you have to feel in a sense grateful that there weren't people living in this building because it's really badly damaged and imagine there were families and children sleeping in their rooms a few
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hundred meters that way. >> i wanted to ask you how are you able to be to close to this. how do you know that the atmosphere is safe? is that the area that you are in is not kamted in some way? >> we have to trust what the government officials are telling us. there was a press conference earlier today, where they say they are monitoring the air. even at the actual blast site itself, they say the air is for the most part safe, except for heightened ammonia levels. there are workers there in hazmat substitutes. there are 2,000 soldiers searching for the missing. . there are 95 people still missing. they don't expect to find anybody alive at this point. it's been too long, the condition of the remains that
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they are finding indicates the explosion was just too powerful. there have been two, 19-year-old firefighter and a 56-year-old man were found. it's little consolation for people who are wondering if there's going to be another batch of chemicals. are we still going to be safe? the government is trying to reassure them. you can understand why they would be uneasy. >> will is live from tianjin. days after the blast, there's still a lot we don't know about what caused it, what dangers could be ahead. the manager director of the cooperative research center for contamination assessment and remediation of the environment. thank you for being with us
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first of all. we just saw a reporter walking through that area and the chinese government can already said it was safe. how can they know that when they don't know yet what happened? >> good evening from new castle australia. that's a really good question. why the government officials believe that it is quite safe there are a number of issues that we still need to take into consideration. on the one hand, china does have very strong team working on pollutants and therefore they might have had a look at the presence of par tick cue lat matter and having said and what i have read, it seems there was a cocktail of a number of very toxic substances and therefore if i was one of the officials, i would go back and reconsider
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monitoring the area's water and air and soil as well. >> that's a lot to think about. the soil, the buildings, animals, people, organisms, and as you say there's a cocktail of chemicals. we don't really know all of the chemicals that were involved here. >> yes. there are a couple of things here. one it is apparent from the blast that you are dealing with very, very high temperatures and, therefore, you might also convert these hazardous chemicals into forms that may not be toxic anymore. for example, you might convert cyanide into nitrogen gas.
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you could still have residues present in the environment and the soil as well. the concentration of these may vary. this is why i suggest the monitoring of the environment would begin. >> short term risks and certainly some long-term risks to the environment as well. the type of chemicals, let's just take one for example, sodium cyanide, what is that and how dangerous is that? >> sodium cyanide is an extremely toxic chemical, often used for processing gold and in tinyist of concentration, a mix of it it can be quite toxic and quite fatal, so that's the kind of chemicals that worry people and i would be quite concerned.
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>> we appreciate your expertise. there's much more to learn here and it's a very frightening thought to think what they might be dealing with in tianjin. thank you so much, robby nadu. we appreciate it. the death toll in the mediterranean sea keeps rising. at least 40 migrants were found dead in the hold of a fishing boat on saturday. 300 were rescue and taken to a nearby supply ship in the area. an italian official tells us they died inhaling exhaust gases while attempting to cross the sea to europe. >> they approached a fishing boat that was 25 miles off the coast of libya and they boarded the ship and they started rescuing people. they saved over 300 people who were on the deck, but when they went down into the hold of the
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ship, they found it waterlogged and they found about 40 people who had died presumably from sufficient foe indication -- suffocation in the hold. we are shocked how many people are losing their lives in this way, trying to find safety in europe. >> that's from italy. this is greece. tempers are flaring amid lack of food and water. they are all desperate to reach mainland europe. iraqi police are investigating a deadly car bombing. the explosion killed at least 10 people and wounded 70. the blast targeted a busy area filled with cars for sale. there's no claim for responsibility yet but isis said
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it carried out another bombing on thursday that kill 3 dozen people at a market. commanders who abandoned their posts in ramadi i will will face court-martial. today's iraq's prime minister approved their recommendation for court-martial. ramadi fell to isis in may in a huge setback for iraqi forces. israeli authorities say an officer was stabbed south of of the west bank on saturday and the palestinian's president office is couldn't telling me the killing of the suspect. israeli troops shot and wounded
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a palestinian suspect. in that case, he's now under arrest. hillary clinton and several other u.s. presidential hopefuls spent their saturday meeting and greeting voters at the iowa state fair. that is a tradition on the campaign trail. the democratic frontrunner told reporter, partisan supporters are causing controversy with about the email campaign. >> donald trump is making the most noise about this. >> it's a criminal problem. it's going to be a very serious problem for her, jeff, it's going to be as serious as it gets. when you look at general pe t y
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trayio trayious, it was much less. >> any worry that republicans could overplay their hand on this email controversy? >> it is what it is. it is a terrible thing that she did. it was a foolish thing, there's no reason to do it and she's got a big problem. >> the question over these emails is were they classified when secretary clinton was actually using them. donald trump compared it to david petraeus, it's a bit of an old story. not quite the same thing at all. donald trump has been trying to conflate these. secretary clinton said she did not any emails were classified. they only became classified later on. questions is democrats believe that republicans are on a fishi fishing expedition. that's why i asked him if it's
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possible republicans will overreach on this. he said simply it was a foolish thing to do. the real question is whether democrats find any concern about this, whether democrats believe this is a vulnerability for her in a general election. we'll find out all that in the coming months here, but it's one of issues on the top of people's minds here at the iowa state fair. >> and along with the email controversy, hillary clinton could face another snag in her bid for the nomination. there's speculation vice president joe biden may jump into the race. he's been personally calling supporters. meantime in tennessee, saturday, biden attended a memorial service for four marines guntd down last month. he called their killer a perverted jihadist. >> we have a message for those perverted cowards around the world. america never yields, never
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bends, never cowers, never stands down. endures, responds, and always overcomes. for we are americans. and never, never underestimate us. it's always been a bad, bad bet to do that. >> the gunman died in the attack in a shoot-out with police. it was anything but normal on the eastern satisfy -- sea board. at least 640 flights were canceled. the glitch has been fixed but thousands of travelers were left stranded at airports. thousands of protesters are expected to flood into the streets of brazil within hours.
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many want this woman, the president, to step down. we'll tell you how brazil got to this point, next. plus have volcanos on opposite sides of the ring of fire are threatening two countries. we'll have the latest. wish your skin could bounce back like it used to? new neutrogena hydro boost water gel. with hyaluronic acid it plumps skin cells with intense hydration and locks it in. for supple, hydrated skin. hydro boost. from neutrogena. bill's got a very tough 13lie here...... looks like we have some sort of sea monster in the water hazard here. i believe that's a "kraken", bruce. it looks like he's going to go with a nine iron. that may not be enough club... well he's definitely going to lose a stroke on this hole. if you're a golf commentator, you whisper. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance,
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welcome back. iran has met a deadline to deliver a written description and other documents on its nuclear program to the international atomic energy agency. the two parties struck an agreement july 14th that required iran to provide material by saturday to clarify outstanding detail issues regarding its nuclear work. the iaea will analyze the documents over the next month. brazil is bracing for huge protests later today. thousands of people are expected to hit the streets of rio de you can't narrow and other cities. right now, the president has an approval rating of just 8%. brazil's economy is in recession, its currency in free fall. how did the host nation of the
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next summer olympics get to this point? cnn's shasta darling ton takes a look. >> a booming brazil is surpassed britain as a booming economy. last october, the president won re-election in a tight run-off race. ♪ ♪ >> so why have thousands of people now vowed to take to the streets in protest while the president's approval rating sinks below 25%? for critics, the answer is economic recession and political corruption. >> no, we are not in a good moment. inflation is up. everything is more expensive, like petrol and even food, no.
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>> brazil is bracing for a protracted recession and high inflation that many blame on mismanagement during the president's first term. at the same time, the state run oil company is hammered by a massive corruption scandal. the highest court is investigating dozens of politicians, most of them from the ruling coalition as part of an alleged bribery scheme where construction companies paid millions under the table for lucrative contracts. the president was not implicated but she was president of the company when the corruption took place. now many brazilians say they will march to demand her impeachment. concerns are growing we could see a repeat of the massive demonstrations of 2013. >> translator: we have to treat protests in brazil with complete
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calm. everyone has the right to protest and criticize whoever it may be. there's one thing that we cannot accept, that this turns into violence against other people or anyone's property be it public or private. >> government supporters held their own marches on friday. >> i think the president was elected democratically, and the country is under crisis at the moment and people are mixing them up. >> shasta darlington, cnn new york. a volcano in japan that sits 50 kilometers from a newly reak at this at this vatd plant could erupt any moment.
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in ecuador, a volcano not far from quito, officials say there's a small chance of a major eruption there. >> we've been talking about this and derek van damme is joining us. >> this is all on the ring of fire, and the ring of fire is this, quite literally, a kind of a half arc shape moving from the western pacific to the eastern pacific that's where 75% of the world's active volcanoes survive. >> these folks are used to volcano evacuations like we are with hurricanes. >> there's one in ecuador, one in mexico, and the other in japan. >> and you look kind of busy because you are also monitoring that right there. >> that's right.
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two different tropical storms that have the potential to become super typhoons. double trouble in the western pacific. let me explain. we'll zoom in a little bit closer you can see where they are. these storms continue to strengthen and they are deepen very quickly and it's a great indication to meteorologists that these storms have the potential going forward over the next three days to become super typhoons. we're talking about sustained winds of 240 kilometers per hour or higher. here's a look at their projected paths. remember just about a week ago or just over a week, taiwan in southeast china were dealing with the effects of a tropical storm. look, another typhoon is charging that way. we're going to continue monitor the latest updates as we go forward in time this week. here's the two storm systems
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barely fitting on my television screen behind me. however, they are lining up one after another. this is all in the warm pacific waters. we're in our strong el nino season. tropical storm goni 110 kilometers per hour winds. this one too, actually another 20 kilometers per hour with the sustained wind. satellite loop is clearly identifying these things are strengthening. look at the rotation center of this storm. you can see both of them charging west ward. itsides does appear one will veer slightly away from southeast asia. and look at this, six and a half million acres of burnt
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forest and then shrubs. you are looking at one of the largest fires in the u.s. at the moment, larger than new york city. >> that's amazing, that the west has been taking it hard. >> it's a very difficult season and they are exhausting all of their resources too. very tough on the firefighters. hillary clinton is trying to lighten the mood when it comes to her developing email scandals, critics aren't laughing. the state of new york spends over $60 million in overtime to catch those two prison escapees. more about that.
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welcome back to our viewers here in the u.s. and around the world. you are watching cnn "newsroom." live coverage from atlanta, i'm natalie allen. here are top stories. the death toll from wednesday's explosions at a chemical warehouse in tianjin, china has climbed now to is 12. on saturday, china's president xi jinping said learn about the lessons. 40 migrants were found dead in a waterlogged hold of a fishing boat on saturday. the italian navy reports rescuing 312 migrants. more than 2,300 people died this year making the journey to europe.
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iran has met its deadline to deliver a written descripg of its nuclear program to the international atomic energy agency. the two parties struck an agreement last month that stipulated iran must provide scplagses of its past nuclear war by -- work by saturday. indian arrives in the united arab emirates. the uae is home to 2.6 million indians. in the u.s., democratic presidential frontrunner hillary clinton spent her saturday meeting and greeting voters at the iowa state fair. she told supporters partisan
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supporters are making an issue of the email. she loves that the messages disappear within seconds on snapchat. the allegations against clinton are no laughing matter. he spoke with cnn's jonathan mann. >> it means a lot to me. you don't get any more secret than that, tk is tal enlt key hole. it relates to classified satellite photograph, si special intelligence which could relate to code breaking. the be national security agency. even snowden didn't get into that. if this were a private server, you and i would get jailed. the information did get to her, but she is saying as secretary of state she didn't see any reason for alarm. should we believe it?
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>> if this was on her server and it got into her smart phone, there's a big problem there. seriously, if i had sent a document like this over the open internet, i would get fired the same day, escorted out the door and gone for good and probably charged with mishandling classified information. >> there's a school of thought that says the u.s. government does things crudely. it's a big instrument. it's not always a precise one. state department handles thousands of documents a day. i understand what you are saying. should anyone think stuff happens? >> i had encrypted communications. we're worried about leakage and the rest of it. storage. leaving it in hard drives. this is very, very serious stuff, and in the discipline the national security establishment, you never let this stuff out of
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your hands and especially on a hand held. if this in fact was on her handheld or sent to her or she forwarded if any way, i'm wondering if she's capable of being president. >> you think this is a deal-breaker for her candidacy? >> yes. i can't tell you how bad this is. a lot of things get talked about and a lot of gossip but having documents like this sent across the internet that could be hacked very easily and probably were hacked is a transgression that i don't think president of the united states should be allowed to, you know, to have committed. >> we have just received word that u.s. civil rights pioneer julian bond has died. bond was at the forefront of the civil rights movement protesting for equal rights in the 60s and serving as a founding president of the southern poverty law center in 70s.
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he also fought against apartehiid for several years. he was chairman of the board of the naacp for more than a decade. he died saturday night from an unspecified illness. he was 75 years old. new york state spent more than $58.6 million in overtime in the pursuit of those two prison escapees. that comes out to nearly $1 million a day in overtime between june and july, almost $23 million more than the same period last year. david sweat and richard matt escaped from the clinton correctional facility on june 26th leaving the facility. this week, the connecticut
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supreme court terminated its death penalty law in its entirety. alexander field takes a look at methods of execution and what can go wrong in the process. >> the death penalty is one of the most controversial issues in the country. just as controversial, the methods of execution. there are five different legal methods of execution in the u.s. human rights ak at this vafts say each can cause unnecessary suffering and each method has been called cruel and unusual. one study found between 1900 and 2011 about 3% of executions were botched. during lethal injection, an an thes tick is supposed to put the inmate to sleep. it always doesn't go by the book and sometimes the drugs are administered incorrectly by the
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technician. a 2005 study found that 21 of 49 executed prisoners had anesthesia levels consistent with consciousness. meaning they may have been aware of what was happening but unable to express pain. then there's the electric chair. 500 to 2,000 volts were sent through the inmates body. if after administering, they are still alive, it was repeated. when the gas chamber was introduced in the 1920s, it was spend to be a more humane alternative. inmates are instructed to inhale deeply when they get in but they die more quickly. witnesses have seen inmates hold their breath and joking -- choking and gagging.
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there are also reports of firing squad executions going wrong. typically, five shooters load 30 caliber rifles and if the shooters miss, the inmate can bleed out slowly. it reportedly took 27 minutes before one inmate died. some say the gil low teen is the most effective and least painful method of execution. many think it's inconsistent with our national ethos. >> we put together some numbers about the death penalty from around the world. this was compiled by amnesty international. as of july of this year, 101 countries abolished the death penalty for all crimes. last twreer -- year, at least 22 countries around the world carried out executions. 2,466 people were sentenced to death worldwide. that's up 28% from 2013.
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and of the ten countries with the most executions, they are china, iran, and saudi arabia. stay with cnn. more news coming up right after this. if your purse is starting to look more like a tissue box... you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin®. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec®. muddle no more™ .
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north korea is threatening to attack the u.s. if it participants in military exercises with south korea this week. the exercises happen every year as do the threats from north korea. but a representative for the national defense commission says now north korea is better equipped to stand up to the u.s. and an official from the u.s. state department says the department is aware of the threat, but that the exercises are only to protect south korea in a defensive manner. north korea is marking 70 years since the korean peninsula was liberated from japanese
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occupation in world war ii and because of that the government's has moved its clocks back one half hour to the region's precolonial time zone. not everyone is happy. [ speaking foreign language ] >> a message from north korea's state run television. from august 15th, the country will turn back the clocks, reverting to the time zone used before japanco logical nies -- japan colonized them. [ speaking foreign language ] >> across the border, south korea warned that things might not run like clock work after the time shift, especially in
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the shared industrial park north of the demilitarized zone. where it will be one time in north korea and another in the south. >> translator: there could be some problems caused in the matter of exchange between south and north korea, such as entering the industrial complex. >> the half hour shift backward will put north korea at 8 and a half hours ahead of universal time and this season the country's first intervention in time keeping. instead of using the gre gorian calendar which puts us in the year 2015. north korea's kal dear comes from the founding of kim il sun, making it 104. north korea season the only place with an off the hour time zone. india also has a half hour offset.
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in nepal, the offset is 5 hours and 45 minutes ahead of utc. on an island in australia, the time zone is 10 1/2 hours ahead only in winter. in summer, it's 11 hours. in venezuela, the president turned the clocks back 30 minutes. can you remember all of that? we will test you later on what time it is somewhere else. just kidding. in israel, rare findings at an ancient town could shed light in a pivotal time on jewish and christian history. magdala, uncovered so far. >> dawn on the sea of gallilee. each swing of the pick axe, an
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effort to uncover what life was like some 2,000 years ago. hiss attorneys believe -- historians believe jesus may have walked these cobbled street. >> this is a holy site. i'm sure of that. here we have only -- >> six years ago, this father purchased the land to build a retreat. he was required to excavate and he uncovered a sin agoing. >> this is the only synagogue in this area. >> it's considered ornate with mosaic floring and frescos. >> this is for millions of
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people who will enjoy this and hopefully they will be able to discover our common roots. >> the center, the alter, what is known as the magdela stone. . this is the first time ever that a mennora is found. >> arc yolingss uncovered this bowl some 2,000 years old that jesus may have used to wash his hands before praying. we're shown the town's purification baths. remarkably, they still work to this day. they have also found coins and are working to restore pottery. >> it's a story about common life, about the cooking, about the materials. >> and about the intersection of
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judeaism and christianity. from the rugby to the gridiron, all-star gerald haines makes his american football debut. how did he do? we'll tell you after this. ly sut i wasn't finding all of these germans in my tree. i decided to have my dna tested through ancestry dna. the big surprise was we're not german at all. 52% of my dna comes from scotland and ireland. so, i traded in my lederhosen for a kilt. ancestry has many paths to discovering your story. get started for free at ancestry.com. listerine® total care strengthens teeth, after brushing, helps prevent cavities and restores tooth enamel. it's an easy way to give listerine® total care to the total family. listerine® total care. one bottle, six benefits. power to your mouth™. go to ziprecruiter.com and post your job
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former rugby league star turned american football hopeful jared hain had a spectacular debut for the san francisco 49ers. in his first game, he shed a tackle in this 53-yard line. the eye catching performance caused a flurry on social media. he's twice been named the rugby most valuable player. at the national zoo in washington, panda cub watch is under way. zoo keepers there aren't sure if the famous giant panda is actually pregnant, but a lot of people are hoping and waiting as we learn from jeanne moos.
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>> she isn't eating much, not doing much of anything, except cleaning. -- sleeping on her back. sleeping on her back, yawning, scratching. what's up? >> she's definitely acting pregnant. >> oh, boy or maybe it's a girl on the way. is she or isn't she? not even her zookeepers know for sure. she was artificially inis sem natd at the end of april. they put the wand on her belly while distracting her with treats. but lately she isn't hungry and she's too tired to cooperate with ultrasounds that rarely spot a panda fetus because it's so tiny. this could be a pseudo pregnancy. >> we usually know she's pregnant when she gives birth. >> you don't know until the cub
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pops out? >> that's it. >> here's her last birth almost two years ago. now, if she has a cub, sher going to figure out who is the daddy that's because two pandas contributed to her insemination. a panda in china and the other one who lives here at the national zoo. is he's as bad a lover as he's made out to be? >> he's not bad. he's inexperienced. if we have twins, there's a potential that each could have a different father. >> next stop, the maury povich show. >> the favorite thing is there's a drain cover, she picks it up and cradles it to practice. >> you can see how well that practice paid off. well, we certainly hope she's with child or panda.
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two disney parks are about to get galactic upgrades based on the star wars movies. they announced plans to build star wars themes in disneyland in california and disney world in florida. no word on when the new parks will open. thanks for joining us this hour. i'm natalie allen. after i a short break, becky anderson brings you another hour of news live from abu dabi. will damage your teeth? introducing listerine® healthy white™. it not only safely whitens teeth... ...but also restores enamel. lose the nerves and get a healthier whiter smile that you'll love. listerine® healthy white™. power to your mouth™!
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anger grows in tianjin in china where families want to know what happened to their loved ones. after a chemical explosion that may have left deadly toxins behind. plus, hillary clinton heads back after donald trump brings up an old controversy as the race for the u.s. presidential election of 2016 heats up. and under threat of a volcano on opposite sides of the world, two countries are bracing for what could be major eruptions. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world. i'm becky anderson and this is cnn "newsroom." we begin in tianjin in china where the grim numbers are rising. 112 people are now confirmed dead in last week's devastating chemical explosion and government officials fear that count will continue to go up. 95 people are still missing and
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grief-stricken families are demanding answers about their loved ones. [ multiple people speaking ] >> these family members of missing firefighters were attempting to protest outside city hall earlier. meantime, tianjin officials say they still can't yet provide a detail list of chemicals that were stored at the warehouse where the blast erupted. however, at least one deadly toxin, sodium cyanide was found there. will ripfully has -- ripley has more from the city. >> reporter: desperate screams outside a chinese government press conference. parents of missing firefighters demand to know the truth. even now, no one has contacted me, she says. i just want my son back. >> their children are
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contractors who fight fires like their official counterparts without military benefits. whether they live or die, they deserve equal treatment, this father says. the government says contractors used water to fight wednesday's chemical fire, apparently unaware of the explosive reaction when volatile compounds get wet. the death toll continues rising with dozens still missing. massive military convoys are bringing reinforcements, soldiers securing the area, searching for survivors. 19-year-old firefighter laid on the charred ground for 31 hours before his rescue on friday. i only remember the first blast was very loud he says. i was on the ground, hands covering my head. i don't remember what happened after that. firefighters saturday also rescued a 50-year-old man and a wounded pregnant woman gave birth to a premature baby. both survived. new explosions and fires at the
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blast site saturday triggered fears are of toxic smoke billowing back into populated areas. bus loads of families brought to this emergency shelter. hundreds on the ground still don't know the list of toxins. there are a lot of questions about a lack of oversight. >> chinese personnel at this site interrupted our live report. the government has sensored critical news reports and media posts, fueling reports of a cover-up. >> turn off your camera. >> that's will ripley reporting for you. israeli forces shot and killed a palestinian man suspected of stabbing an israeli border police officer. he was stabbed in the west bank on saturday.
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the palestinian's president's office is condemning the killing of the suspect. the israeli military says this follows a similar incident earlier in the day. israeli troops shot and wounded a palestinian suspect in this case who is now under arrest. at least 40 migrants were found dead in the waterlogged hole of a fishing boat on saturday. an italian navy commander tells migrants died inhaling exhaust gases. refugee and migrant families on the greek island of kos is waiting to get on a ship. it's been docked since friday.
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the tempers are flaring on kos amid a lack of food and water with fights breaking out from migrants all desperate to reach mainland europe. a hef influx of high grants -- migrants into europe have created another dire situation. cnn spoke with a senior communications officer on the severity of conditions for many fleeing their home countries. have a listen. >> this is awful, this is yet another tragedy happening in the mediterranean and we are just shocked at how many people are losing their lives in this way, trying to find safety in europe. >> the migrants who succeeded in getting to kos obviously have made it there. they are survivors but they are not having an easy time. what's the latest you can tell us about the situation there? >> the situation there is also
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very serious. every day, hundreds of people are landing in the -- on the greek islands. most of them are people fleeing the slawr -- slaughter in syria. they have refugees. they fleeing for their lives. they are arriving in europe and they are finding the conditions there very difficult. they have to wait sometimes ten, 15 days before they are registered by the authorities so that they can continue in their journeys, but in the meantime, they are placed in completely unacceptable conditions. they don't receive the minimum services, water, food, a place to sleep, and many of them, families with children, pregnant women, elderly, people with disabilities, they are sleeping rough or wherever they can find a place. >> the international organization for migration says
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more than 2300 migrants are died this year making the journey to europe, making it the deadliest year ever. iran has met a deadline to deliver a written description and other documents on its nuclear program to the international atomic energy agency. the two parties struck an agreement as you'll remember on july 14th that required iran to provide material by saturday to clarify outstanding detail issues regarding its nuclear work. the iaea will analyze the documents over the next month. to the u.s. and to the 2016 race for the white house. now, it was a political stampede on saturday at the famous iowa state fair as presidential hopefuls from both parties shook hands and mingled with potential voters in the first caucus state. andy rose reports. >> reporter: republican hef hitters paid visits to the iowa
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state fair. >> i will fight as hard as i can to earn every vote here and across the country. >> democratic frontrunner hillary clinton was candid about the controversy surrounding the investigation into her private email server used while she was secretary of state. >> i used a single account for convenience. obviously, these years later, it doesn't look so convenient and the facts are i did not send nor did i receive material marked classified. >> arriving later via helicopter, gop poll leader donald trump addressed the controversy. >> she's got a lot of problems with the email situation. >> then talk about u.s. defense policy, saying the u.s. has to have the strongest military in the world. >> we have to be so tough and so strong and so smart that nobody will ever mess with us. >> cln ton talked about foreign policy too, focusing on the fight against isis. >> this has to be an iraqi-led
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mission. i'm very committed to supporting the efforts within the region to try to take on the threat that they pose to everyone. >> all of the day's events were not so serious. in keeping with the atmosphere, trump promised to take a group of children on a helicopter ride. and followed through. i'm andy rose, reporting. hillary clinton is leading the polls in iowa. nearly 20 points ahead of her nearest competitor, bernie sanders, but the biggest challenge could be from someone who isn't even a candidate yet. vice president joe biden is weighing a presidential bid. making his calls to his supporters as he tries to make up his mind. here's what carl bernstein told us about the possible run. >> the big beneficiary of this
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changing environment is joe biden if he chooses to enter the race. he's looking at it right now. his people believe he may do it. some say yes. some say no. but the distrust factor with hirk, the whole trump excitement and bubble that will probably burst gives a great opportunity to biden to capture the imagination of the press, of this race, of democrats who don't want to see hillary clinton, who are worried about the distrust factor with her. >> u.s. vice president also took time this weekend to attend a memorial service in tennessee for the four marines and a navy sailor who were gunned down last month. an emotional biden called their killer a perverted jihadist. he vowed the u.s. will never succumb to terror. >> thank you for sharing this memorial with us. i know it's hard.
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it's hard. because it brings back every single -- it brings back that very moment when you got that call. we have a message for those perverted cowards around the world. america never yields, never bends, never cowers, never stands down, endures, responds, and always overcomes. >> five u.s. service members died in the shooting rampage at a facility. police killed the gunman. the fbi are still trying to determine his motive. >> just a short time ago, we received world that u.s. civil rights pioneer julian bond had died. he was at the forefront of the
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civil rights movement, he served as a founding president as the southern poverty law center in the 70s. he also found fought against apartheid in south africa. he served as a professor at the university of harvard and university of pennsylvania and was chairman of the board for naacp for more than a decade. he died of an unspecified illness. he was 75 years old. we'll get back to our top story this hour to tianjin, china, where the death toll is rising after a deadly chemical blast. cnn is there live and will we know what happens at this point are we any closer to finding out why? >> that's the big question, becky, is what ignited that chemical fire in the first place. investigators do believe that what may have triggered the series of powerful explosions
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was the initial fire response, the fact that firefighters apparently did not know which chemicals they were dealing with and in fact we still don't know exactly which chemicals were at the blast site just beyond those trees behind me. when the firefighters sprayed water on the chemicals, there was a volatile and explosive reaction, and that may have triggered the explosions with the damage that's behind me a couple of kilometers. i want to swif on the front camera on my phone. this is a construction site where migrant workers were building these apartments right here. this is where they lived and this is where their offices were. the fact that this explosion happened late in the evening on wednesday perhaps saved many lives here. had this been full of workers, as it normally would have been, it could have been a much different outcome.
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you can see the housing units here where people were sleeping, and there were families living here. you can actually see some of the construction helmets still scattered about. why these did suffer quite a bit of damage, it wasn't as anything as severe as the sprary offices and becky this is just one area of many. thousands and thousands of homes in and around the blast zone are uninhabitable right now and we saw a protest of family members, they want the government to help them, government assistance, the public feels the government allowed this to happen by not paying close enough attention to the industrial chemicals that were being stored at the shipping port back there. they say that the profits were above people's lives, and there are more lives sadly that are expected to be lost as a result of this. 95 people missing, and the hope of finding any survivors after only finding two in the last 48
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hours or so, that hope is fading quickly. 112 confirmed dead. 95 still missing. 85 of them firefighters who went to that scene trying to help, becky. >> remarkable access there from will. the picture, of course, not as steady as it might be but given that he is on his phone, getting you right to the heart of the story, remarkable stuff, will. thank you very much indeed. coming up, chaos for thousands of airline travelers, the effect of a computer glitch saturday are still being felt at airports across the united states east coast. plus volcanoes on opposite sides of the ring of fire are threatening parts of japan and ecuador. right now, we'll bring you the very latest. taking a break. back after this.
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on saturday. hundreds of flights were canceled. aviation officials say the glitch has been fixed but the damage has been done. we captured this photo of stranded passengers at ronald reagan airport in washington, d.c. the problem was made worse by a failure of backup systems. >> the real root problem is going to be when that power shuts off, there's supposed to be a back up system like you buy those battery systems for those systems at home to make sure when the power goes out you still have power. that's the uninterruptible power supply. these are hundreds of million of products that need to be there to make sure that these computers don't have to reboot every time there's a loss of power and it appears that system didn't work here and that's an essential system that has to be up and running and so there's going to be some heads rolling on this one. this is a really big deal.
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>> today, more than 190 flights have been delayed and at least 60 others have been canceled. it's still not clear what caused the computer glitch. >> federal air marshals play key roles in keeping passenger safe in the united states but a report by harvard researchers paints a picture of stressed out sleep-deprived armed federal air marshals struggling to do their jobs. cnn found what is extremely troubling. >> a federal air marshall committed suicide within hours of the arm air marshall's next schedule mission to fly on a commercial u.s. air flight from syracuse, new york, to washington, d.c. since 2002, cnn has learned 10
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federal air marshals have committed suicide. several more have died in questionable accidents, and armed federal air marshals sleep deprived are breaking down on assignments, turning to medications and alcohol. >> would i sitting on a plane want a stressed-out federal air marshall, potentially suicidal air marshall on that plane with me? >> you would not. >> sonia hightower says the threat of a suicidal air marshall is just the beginning. on board an aircraft, they must respond to a threat at any moment. some are falling apart. >> they are exhausted. they are having memory loss. they are being forgetful. they condition move. they can't respond fast to things and the agency was not prepared for someone to document that as well as har vrd did in
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their study. >> this is that study. it's from 2012. tsa commissioned it. got the results and had it classified as sensitive security information. cnn obtained a copy of the report and the results are disturbing. 75% of air marshals flying on domestic missions were sleep deficient. on international runs, the figure rose to more than 84%. in a job where it's critical to be alert and accurate at a moments notice, the study finds the acute and chronic lack of sleep substantially degrades a federal air marshall's ability to react and think quickly. it gets even worse. the study conducted by harvard medical school found half of federal air marshals take some medication or supplement to get to sleep. others commend they turn to alcohol. they responded to survey questions saying most of the
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sleep pattern i have are broken. this is not healthy. i need to take sleep aids. alcoholic drinks mixed with sleeping pills. one air marshall responding to a question asking five or six weeks, give us a break, eight to 12 per night on an overnighter and just the same to sleep at home. the study says it is likely a significantly proceed porpgs of fams suffer from undiagnosed sleep disorders. we wanted to speak to the federal air marshall service about the suicide but our interview request was turn down. instead the tsa issued this statement. saying it is committed to providing air marshals with the resources and support they need to carry out their mission and any loss of life is unacceptable. the statement goes on to say that the air marshall service
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maintains a robust system of mandatory physicals and psychological assistance programs which are readily available to the workforce and their families. a tsa official insists air marshals schedules have appropriate rest periods. an official told cnn recommendations were adopted, including the creation of an educational training dvd. not enough, say air marshals who say they are wasting their lives and some even taking them, carrying out a pointless mission. drew griffin, cnn, orlando. cnn has learned of only one incident during an actual flight. sources say an air marshal had to be restain by other members during a security officials in africa. he got into an altercation with
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the flight crew. both japan and ecuador are under volcano threats at this hour. on saturday, japan's weather agency warned those living near the volcano to evacuate. and in ecuador, a volume can -- volcano not far from the capital of quito. they are on the ring of fire that roughly encircle the pacific ocean. derek van damme joins us. >> i love a little twang on that. that was wonderfully put. it really is quite infamous. this is the area where the
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world's tectonic plates come together. 75% of the active volcanoes are located here. it's no wonder that 90% of the world's earthquakes are also found right across the edge of these plates as well. this is the volcano outside of kyshua japan. it is in the southern section of the japanese mainland. what i want you to notice is the cone i kal shape that it takes. this is called a strato volcano. the alert level is 4 is for residents not to attempt to go toward this particular volcano. we're not a level 5 just yet because we're not seeing any eruption, particularly from this
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volcano just yet, an eruption that could cause damage to any surrounding areas. now, ecuador on the other hand, these are the scenes coming from that particular area. take a look at the volcano. this is another volcano characterized by those steep terrains. this one towers over 5 and a half thousand meters into the sky, making it once of the talest active volcanoes on the planet. i want to update you quickly on the fires that are ongoing across the western u.s. we have broken a 10-year average. we have already burned to date six and a half million total acres normally around by august 15th, we would have about 4 and a half million burned acres. this is exhausting resources across this area. take a look at this footage coming from idaho. this is the nation's burning fire.
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it is larger than all of new york city combined. over 340 square miles. unbelievable. >> that is absolutely remarkable. thank you. >> you are welcome, becky. you've probably heard of carrier pij i don't knows. -- pigeon. what about a narco pigeon. it was smuggling cocaine and marijuana into a prison. it was groomed by an inmate who trained it to ak as a courier. brazil braces for round three of massive anti government protests. why some protesters are demanding the country's
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president face impeachment. that is up next. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. i earn unlimited 2% cash back on everything i buy for my studio. ♪ and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business... that's huge for my bottom line. what's in your wallet? can a a subconscious. mind? a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought. can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive?
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welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. this is cnn "newsroom." hear is an update on the top stories that we're following for you this hour. death toll from wednesday's explosions at a chemical warehouse in tianjin in china has climbed to 112. on saturday, china's president urge authorities to, quote, learn from the lessons paid for with blood in the blasts and demanded improvements to workplace safety. at least ten people are dead. 70 wounded in the car bombing in iraq's capital. there's no claim of responsibility as of yet but
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isis has said it carried out another attack in the same baghdad district on thursday. meanwhile, iraqi army commanders who abandoned their posts when isis attacked ramadi this year will face court-martial. and israeli officers shot and killed a palestinian man who stabbed a israeli officer. at least 40 migrants were found dead in the waterlogged hull of a fishing boat attempting to across the mediterranean sea on saturday. the italian navy also reports rescuing 312 migrants. brazil is bracing for huge protests later today. thousands of people expected to take to the streets of rio de
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janei janeiro. right now, president dilma rousseff has an approval rating of 8%. brazil's economy is in recession. its currency in free fall. how did the host nation of the 2016 summer olympics get to this point? cnn's shasta darlington takes a look. >> it wasn't that long ago. >> a booming brazil is surpassed britain as a booming economy. last october, the president won re-election in a tight run-off race.
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♪ ♪ >> so why have thousands of people now vowed to take to the streets in protest while the president's approval rating sinks below 25%? for critics, the answer is economic recession and political corruption. >> no, we are not in a good moment. inflation is up. everything is more expensive, like petrol and even food, no. >> brazil is bracing for a protracted recession and high inflation that many blame on mismanagement during the president's first term. at the same time, the state run oil company is hammered by a massive corruption scandal. the highest court is investigating dozens of politicians, most of them from the ruling coalition as part of an alleged bribery scheme where construction companies paid millions under the table for lucrative contracts. rousseff her self hasn't been implicated but she was the president of the company when the corruption took place. now many brazilians say they will march to demand her impeachment.
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concerns are growing we could see a repeat of the massive demonstrations of 2013. >> translator: we have to treat protests in brazil with complete calm. everyone has the right to protest and criticize whoever it may be. there's one thing that we cannot accept, that this turns into violence against other people or anyone's property be it public or private. >> government supporters held their own marches on friday. >> i think the president was elected democratically, and the country is suffering a crisis at the moment and people are mixing up corruption and politics. >> it is under rousseff the country may start aw start
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measures. india's prime minister arrives at the united arab emirates sunday. it's more than 3 decades since an indian ambassador has arrived here. >> the fact that after such a long gap the prime minister is coming adds a lot of significance to this visit. what can be discussed? well, bilateral issues. we have a lot already happening bilaterally between india and the uae. as you know, india and uae are one of the largest trading partners of each other. we also have significant indian investment in uae and a very large indian community, one of the largest outside india, 2.6 million indians are here. >> 60 billion in bilateral
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trade. nahendra modi will be here to discuss a variety of issues. it's just under a month when the pope arrives to the united states and when he arrives in washington, he will be met with one woman to bring immigration to his attention. she's organized 100 miles and 100 friends. >> after spending five months in a cell, he was released by a judge. a move that was nothing short of a miracle. >> i'm sorry, i get very emotional every time i tell my story. >> it's okay. >> i guess because everyone told me, even the attorney telling me that it was going to be very difficult to get him out, based on his reentry back in 2013.
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so he told me the chances were very slim, basically, maybe like 5%. >> that he would be released. >> yes. >> but he was released, and we have a picture of you and him with a couple of your children, with two of your children there. >> uh-huh. >> what is life like right now for you? >> well, we're still -- we still have a hearing coming up in december, so i guess we're still in limbo. you know, we're still -- our future is still uncertain because we don't know what's going to happen next. >> so let's talk about this walk that you want to take. 100 miles to the white house where the pope will be meeting with the president. what's your plan once you get there? >> well, i'm actually very excited to meet the pope. our plan is, i guess, for him to see that what we're doing, it's basically a pilgrimage that we're doing, and we want him to
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see that what we're doing, so that hopefully he can talk to the congressmen and tell them to be able to tell our stories, like mine. >> so your hope is that the pope will actually be able in some way to effect change in this country regarding immigration? >> hopefully. right now, he's our light through this dark tunnel that we're going through right now. >> if you can meet with him, what would you say to him and what would you want to hear from him? >> well, if i could meet with him, there are a lot of things that i can tell had him. it's just not me. it's everyone else's story similar as mine. you know, i will try to tell him, you know, try to please to talk to the president and to the congressmen people there and try to be able to touch their hearts and let them know what's going on. >> the week long march to
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washington will begin september 15th at the detention facility in pennsylvania where her husband was held. in the u.s., some states use the death penalty to punish criminals convicted of some of the most vicious crimes. coming up after the break, the argument against how it is carried out. that after this. wow! this toilet paper reminds me of a washcloth! new charmin ultra strong, dude. cleans so well it keeps your underwear cleaner. (secretly) so clean you could wear them a second day. tell me i did not just hear that! (sheepishly) i said you could not that you would! new charmin ultra strong with its washcloth-like texture, helps clean better than the leading flat-textured bargain brand. it's 4 times stronger, and you can use up to 4 times less. it cleans better. you should try it, "skidz." we all go. why not enjoy the go with charmin? so you're a small business expert from at&t? yeah, give me a problem and i've got the solution. well, we have 30 years of customer records. our cloud can keep them safe and accessible anywhere. my drivers don't have time to fill out forms.
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we're following some breaking news out of indonesia for you at this hour. a domestic passenger plane believed to be carrying 54 people including children has gone missing in a remote region. the plane lost contact with air
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traffic control. the aircraft reportedly belongs to trigana air service. the more we get in that in the hours to come, we will get to you here on cnn. in the u.s. this week, connecticut's supreme court terminated the state's death penalty law in its entirety. this effectively saves the lives of 11 men serving death roll sentences there. alexandra field takes a look at methods of execution and what can go wrong in the process. >> reporter: the death penalty is one of the most controversial issues in the country. just as controversial, the methods of execution. there are five different legal methods of execution in the u.s. human rights activists say each can cause unnecessary suffering and each method has been called cruel and unusual. one study found between 1900 and 2011 about 3% of executions were
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botched and the rate for lethal injection may be even higher. during lethal injection, an anesthetic is supposed to put the inmate to sleep. a second drug causes paralysis and the final drug stops the prisoner's heart. it always doesn't go by the book and sometimes the drugs are administered incorrectly by the technician. a 2005 study found that 21 of 49 executed prisoners had anesthesia levels consistent with consciousness. meaning they may have been aware of what was happening but unable to express pain. then there's the electric chair. 500 to 2,000 volts were sent through the inmates body. if after 30 seconds he or she is still alive, the process is repeated. a supreme court justice once described electrocutions as extremely violent. witnesses have seen vomiting blood, burning skin and occasionally the body catches on fire. when the gas chamber was introduced in the 1920s, it was spend to be a more humane alternative. inmates are instructed to inhale deeply when they get in but they
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die more quickly. witnesses have seen inmates hold their breath and choking or gagging for several minutes. hanging is the most common worldwide. if the rope is too long or too short, the inmate will asphyxiate or die from a lack of oxygen. there are also reports of firing squad executions going wrong. typically, five shooters load 30 caliber rifles and if the shooters miss, the inmate can bleed out slowly. it reportedly took 27 minutes before one inmate died. same death penalty advocates say the guillotine which is not used in the us is the most effective and least painful method of execution. many think it's inconsistent with our national ethos. some interesting facts
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regarding the death penalty compiled by amnesty international. as of july of this year, 101 countries abolished the death penalty for all crimes. last year, at least 22 countries around the world carried out executions. 2014, at least 2,466 people were sentenced to death worldwide. that's up 28% from 2013. and of the ten countries with the most executions, they are china, iran, and saudi arabia. the united states is the only country in the americas where the death sentence is still legal and since 1973, 150 people have been exonerated and released from death row in the united states after evidence emerged that overturned their convictions. the next great novel may never be what you would call a page turner. instead, it could be a mouse scroller. ahead, we'll show you how authors are rewriting the publishing business. no sixth grader's ever sat with the eighth grade girls.
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but your jansport backpack is permission to park it wherever you please. hey. that's that new gear feeling. this week, filler paper and folders just one cent. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. ♪ ♪ it took serena williams years to master the two handed backhand. but only one shot to master the chase mobile app. technology designed for you. so you can easily master the way you bank. [whirring drones] just stay calm and move as quietly as possible. ♪ [whirring drones] ♪ no sudden movements. ♪ [screaming panic] ♪ [whirring drones]
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google search: bodega beach house. ♪ ♪ [drones crashing] ♪ welcome to fort green sheets. welcome to castle bravestorm. it's full of cool stuff, like... my trusty bow. and free of stuff i don't like. we only eat chex cereal. no artificial flavors, and it's gluten-free. mom, brian threw a ball in the house!
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and 25 minutes past 1:00 in the afternoon in abu dhabi. welcome back, i'm becky
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anderson. the women's number one tennis player is upset is he rogers cup semifinals by a teenager. serena williams was beaten by the swiss player, belinda benjich on saturday. williams can become the first woman to win a calendar grand slam if she wins the u.s. open which begins later this month. how do you celebrate a royal birthday? in thailand hundreds of thousands of people are getting on their bikes. they are cycling through the streets of bangkok in honor of the queen's birthday. this is expected to be the biggest mass bike ride thailand has ever seen with more than half a million people expected to take part. more reerds are consuming
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their contend on line so it's only make sense authors top find their fans on the world wide web. they are rewriting the path to publishing. we report. >> meet this 24-year-old londoner part of a new generation of authors rewriting the traditional code of publishing to go on line rather than to the library. >> i wrote my first book when i was nine, and i was just -- it was a dream of mine, rather than something i thought that could be a reality. >> that dream did turn into reality in 2013, thanks a canadian start-up. >> we have millions of writers sharing their works every day and success means different
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things to different people. to most writers, the most important thing is the connection to the fan base. they can connect and interact directly with their fans. >> with 40 million monthly users, it says its mission is to spread the written word. >> it all comes down to three things, mobo, social and contact. mobile is device you can carry with you all the time and for word pad users, it has all the users to carry their contend wherever they are. >> sales of e books increased 25% and hard copies shrunk back. >> for authors, today's self-publishing tools have
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afforded the best of both worlds. the first novel in his fantasy adventure series hit the shelves in may. he says it's been translated so far in several languages. >> for me, it was my launch platform. it was how i built a following. it was encouraging and there's a lot of books that started out as self-pbled books. publishers saw they are selling well and they work with the author to get them into stores and improve the writing and improve the book. emp dreams -- everyone dreams of being a published author. it's official and it means that the people who know what they are talking about have said this is good. >> which means the writing isn't quite on the wall for the printed page, but traditional publishing is entering a new
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chapter. cnn, london. that's it for us at cnn "newsroom." i'm becky anderson in abu dhabi. can save you up to 50% on ink, so print all you want and never run out. right now, buy an eligible printer, and get three months of free ink with hp instant ink. available at participating retailers. the most affordable way to print. hp instant ink.
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so grateful to have you with us. from the u.s. and around the world, a good morning to you. >> we want to start with breaking news that's coming in this morning. a passenger plane carrying 54 people has disappeared in a remote area of papua province. >> the plane lost contract with air traffic

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