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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  December 12, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PST

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♪ ♪ climate consensus. an historic agreement on ways to save the planet will soon be on the table at the global planet talks. will all nations sign on? the taliban claim responsibility for a suicide attack in afghanistan's capital. we have the latest. and ka ban -- and cobb akob rises. good morning to our viewers around the united states and around the world. i'm issa soares, you are watching "cnn newsroom." i want to begin in paris this hour.
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this is where we are getting closer. the french prime minister submitting a global proposal to combat climate change. negotiators have nailed down a plan after weeks at the conference. this is what he said, "i hope that all parties will be committed to shouldering their responsibilities and seize this opportunity as the agreement will be positive for every single country and give the whole world a chance. the ultimate goal of the agreement is quite simply to allow humankind to live decently." earlier, we heard from the head of the chinese delegation. take a listen. >> translator: today, china will fully show its constructiveness, impetus, and flexibility to ensure that all cop-21 parties work together. our final goal is to achieve the agreement to convince people around the world that the mechanism still works. all parties should fully deliver their opinions to make the agreement comprehensive, balanced, powerful, and
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ambitious with restrictions. the agreement should also adapt to the requirements of all parties. >> the head of the chinese delegation speaking now. i want to take you live to paris where we find our senior international correspondent, jim bittermann, for the latest. we know from previous occasions that a deal tends to be watered down. is that going to be the case this time around? what are you hearing this hour? >> reporter: at this point, we're not hearing very much. the fact is that this morning around dawn they finally came to a conclusion that they were going to present at 11:30 local time, an hour and a half from now. and that text has been changed from one that started two weeks ago, but just considerably in the last 48 hours as the brackets within the text were eliminated, as consensus was found on certain issues. and of course, a couple of big issues are the question of financing, who's going to pay. the question of restrictiveness.
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can they put in the agreement, for example, two of degrees. tell appear in the agreement? we don't know at this point. it's top secret. it's being translated into six languages. we passed out to the press at about 11:30 our time. so one weather we see it, we'll is a little -- so whether we see, it we'll have a little better idea. even then, there's a question after that, are the countries going to stick with it. there will be a vote at certain hours. we're not sure what the timing will be. some hours after the text is released. there will be a vote, all-or-nothing vote, take it or leave it. of course, if you leave it, you're going to stand out. that's one of the things, that's probably the only power of enforcement of any sort is that if you not part of the agreement, it will be obvious to the world. >> reporter: you mention thursday have been significant issues raised throughout these
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two two week. in -- these two weeks. talk about this particular. >> reporter: the countries believe they should get a whole lot of aid because they're not going to be allowed to use carbon fuels the way the industrialized countries have over the last century. they believe that in order to bring our economies up to par they've got to do a lot in the way of carbon fuel management, and they should be paid and reimbursed for that. the kind of figure talked about by the lesser developed countries is something like $100 billion each year over the next few years until 2020. whether that kind of money is going to appear in this document, it remains to be seen. we've heard that perhaps it won't. that, in fact, there will be a commitment to perhaps ensure that funding, but not a real commitment to guarantee it. one of the things that president
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hollande and french negotiators have said from the beginning is that they wanted to see a document come out of this that's ambitious and restrictive. restrictive in the sense that it guarantees the countries actually do something. remains to be seen how far that will go. how far the ambitions of the world will go. isa? >> we'll wait to see the details of the proposed agreement, jim. no doubt there will be plenty of bleary-eyed delegates there in paris. jim bittermann for us there in paris. thank you very much, jim. whatever emerges from the climate conference will have repercussions around the world. cop-21 hopes to produce the first-ever legally binding plan to combat global warming. the agreement would essentially be a legally enforced protocol, the kyoto protocorr, expiring in 2020 and excludes top greenhouse producing countries. attempts to reach a similar agreement in copenhagen earlier
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failed meaning all eyes on cop-21 were a lasting solution. many people waiting for this. this perhaps is the moment for a deal. with news on a potential agreement, it's important to regular significant climate milestones reached this year. derek van dam, talk us through the milestones. >> two important milestones for 2015. firstly, we roach eed -- reache global temperatures of one degree celsius, above the global average temperature before we started to basically mess with the climate system. that would be preindustrial-era times. we also reached a milestone to my right of 400 parts per million of that carbon dioxide output that we talk about so frequently. this is part of the global greenhouse gas, that almost heat-looking gas that allows for global warming to take place.
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we reached that over the month of march this year. this has ramifications across the planet including the moisture available to us in the atmosphere, that could increase the frequency and intensity of heavy rain events. and also with this increase in our warming temperature, we have the potential of melti ining glaciers as well as arctic sea ice raising sea levels. this november 10th in london compared to now. if we were to see this warming trend, perhaps four degrees of warm, you see how it will impact the coastal cities. not just london. we've got sydney as well as shanghai. remember, 44% of the world's population live within150 kilometers of the sea. so a lot of susceptible cities thanks to the sea level rise. we certainly want to maintain that 1.5-degree climate change
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in paris as we'll see in the next couple of hours. this is the average temperature across the united states. we've had the warmest fall on record. september to november. and the warm weather will continue into this weekend. is it global climate change? i'll let you be the -- the purveyor of that information. but it sure looks like it has the climate fingerprint written all over it. back to you. >> before you go, you were talking about the 1.5 difference. what difference does this really make on the climate? >> it matters so much in how much moisture we have available in the atmosphere. also just how much our seas will continue to rise has ramifications on all kinds of climate patterns. >> thank you very much. the afghan interior ministry says a siege in the capital that started friday is over. police special forces have killed all the attackers.
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the taliban are claiming responsibility for the suicide attacks. a source says a car bomb exploded near the spanish embassy in kabul. two police officers died, and clashes continued into the night in the embassy quarter. this comes as the afghan government tries to revive peace talks with the taliban. guards carrying machine guns are standing watch this hour over the united nations complex in geneva. one of many unusual security precautions underway in the swiss city. that follows an american warning of a possible terror plot. authorities are also searching for two people linked to the past attackers. more from nic robertson. >> reporter: the heightened threat level here already leading to one security situation friday at geneva airport. part of the airport in a lockdown for 20 minutes while police investigated two suspicious pieces of luggage. one was discovered to be a piece of lost luggage. the other was destroyed by a controlled destination. that really gives you an
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indication of the heightened security alert that this area is under now. why is this happening? swiss authorities have released three pieces of information. one of them coming from u.s. intelligence saying that they picked up chatter among four isis operatives inside syria indicating they were potentially planning an attack in geneva. those four isis members, their whereabouts unknown. also in the past few days, a vehicle or van with belgian registration plates driven into switzerland. when swiss authorities investigated it, they found that the owner of that van was associated, connected with some of the paris attackers from last month. that's given them additional cause for concern. and also, another one of the paris attackers, his identity is clear. he was recruited to isis by a -- by a radical who lived in this area. that radical is in jail in france. however, another associate of his in syria went to join isis,
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is now back. his whereabouts unknown. he's a swiss national. all of these three paces, do they add up to anything? do they have connections? that's what authorities are looking at. the u.n. behind me, biggest u.n. headquarters outside of new york, bigger weapons in their hands than you would normally see. this is a city very worried now with its security. nic robertson, cnn, geneva, switzerland. in the u.s., u.s. presidential candidate donald trump isn't backing down from his call to ban muslims from entering the united states. however, a cbs news poll shows 58% of americans don't agree with the republican's proposal. just 38% of republicans are against it, meaning really a slim majority support it. cnn host fareed zakaria says trump's views on muslims appall him as an american. he spoke about the elections so far.
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you had an interesting op-ed in the "washington post" about being a muslim american. when you hear donald trump's proposal, this idea that he wants to ban muslims from the u.s., it is certainly untrial that would happen. when you hear that kind of rhetoric, what do you fear the most? >> what i fear is that the damage is done whether or not the proposal ever happens. donald trump is not going to be president, this proposal is not going to get enacted. but what it does do is it paints a whole community with this broad brush, and it makes mainstream americans suspicious of them. it makes the community, muslim americans, more fearful. it makes it more likely that they will isolate themselves, self-segregate. look, i've seen this around the world when i'm traveling. the balkans in the 1990s. iraq before the civil war there. the india that i grew up in. it's very easy for communities that have lived together to start getting very fearful and mistrusting each other and
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self-segregating. and then all it takes is a spark. and you can get a very mighty conflagration. >> and they feel so isolated, especially in wake of remarks that are so controversial. but why do you think that someone that says someone like trump who says controversial things and somewhat racist things to be honest, how can someone like that still be so popular in the united states? polling now at 35%. >> it's 35% of likely republican primary voters. you know, i don't know what the math works out to, but something like 10% of americans. so it's not as high as it sounds. look, trump is a genius at one thing -- he's figured out that there's a large group of republican primary voters for whom they are voteding with their gut. they're not voting with their heads. they're not even frankly voting with their hearts. it's their guts. what i mean, he doesn't even
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have an economic plachbl here's a businessman -- plan. here's a businessman running for president. >> it's visceral. >> right. he has no economic plan. he just knows how to get at their gutted. mexicans, muslims to a certain extent, he talks about the chinese and japanese. mostly now, you know, muslims. he touches these buttons to figure out what's going to get the biggest charge, and right now in the wake of these terror attacks it's been muslims. >> even when he does talk about talking about proposing muslims from the united states, he doesn't say how that's going to work. one of our anchors, sat down with donald trump. >> he singled out muslims. he didn't say terror suspect. -- terror suspects, he said muslims. >> i don't think that's unreasonable. we need to make sure the people here are safe. until we can figure out who is
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allowed to come in, in f we don't know who they are, we need some protection. >> when you hear ordinary americans saying that is not unreasonable, what is your reaction? >> look, these are probably good people. they're scared. they're fearful. i don't blame them for having anxieties. they're responding at a gut level. i blame politicians like trump for taking advantage of that anxiety and fear mongering. look, the task of leadership in moments is crisis is to really appeal to the better angels inside us. we all have dark sides, anxieties. it's easy to think of some group as the other and to despise them. the task of leadership is to show people how to live together, ton blame everybody else for your troubles. >> that was zain asher talking to fareed zakaria. for more on fareed's take on
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trump and his anti-muslim record, go to cnn.com. there you'll find more of his opinions. right here on cnn, a friend of one of the terrorists makes a startling admission. next on cnn, find out what he claims he built with syed farook. and cnn got exclusive access to the place where the u.s. had weapons taken from its enemies after this break. i have asthma... ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back
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welcome back. investigators in san bernardino, california, tell cnn that a friend of attacker syed farook has admitteded to making pipe bombs with the killer. enrique marquez said he nothing to do with the devices investigators found at the killer's home and attack site. investigators are also searching a lake in san bernardino as they try piece together the events surrounding last week's attack. cnn's kyung lah has more on that very search. >> reporter: as far as we know, this doesn't look like something that they are going to abandon. the fbi says that they are going to be here for days, and what they are looking for is a
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meticulous search. they're scouring the very bottom of this lake looking for items that were missing from the franconia ho farooque home. the -- farook home. the hard drive was missing from inside the home. they're trying to find electronic evidence that helps build a case, helps them understand the picture here, the reason why in lake is so important to them. there was a report that two the killers were here on the day of the massacre. >> 14 people, of course, killed in the san bernardino attack. now the u.s. is keeping a close eye on how terrorist are getting their weapons. our jim sciutto got exclusive access to america's own rocket program. he saw their collection of dangerous foreign weapons. it's a stash they say might come in handy as they try to stay a step ahead of isis. >> reporter: a passenger plane headed from the netherlands to malaysia suddenly falls from the sky. malaysia airlines flight mh-17
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brought down near the ukraine, russia, border by russian-backed rebels. using this surface-to-air missile system. the ramifications far reaching and incredibly alarming. because of who may be trying to obtain similar missiles now. is there any concern today that terrorist groups would have their hands on something like this? >> i think it's probably safe to assume that at some level there are efforts underway. >> reporter: folks back home will immediately say, god, look at that missile, can a group like isis get their hands on it? >> it would not be possible, but we would certainly say there's going to need to be training involved. >> reporter: mark clark is director of of the missile and space intelligence sector, a member of the u.s. intelligence agency or dia. located far from the battlefields of iraq and afghanistan in huntsville, alabama. the home of america's own rocket program.
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filling the grounds are rogue weapons, some captured, some purchased, some acquired by mean the dia won't reveal. so to help train pilots and other war fighter who might come into contact with a weapons system like this in a combat situation, they keep these systems operational. this is still a fully functioning scud missile. proliferation of missile technology preoccupies analysts here more than any other threat. >> we have greater concerns about the smaller missile threats and the likelihood of the proliferation of those. >> reporter: small only in size, but not in capability. okay, this is one of most common shoulder-fired missiles you'll see out in the world today. >> yes. yeah. there has been well over a million heads produced, not only of this but other kinds. there's still hundreds of thousands out. there. >> reporter: to date, shoulder-fired missiles have targeted some 60 civilian aircraft. and you can buy them on the black market for just a few
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thousand dollars. one of the main dangers of a missile like this is both speed but also ease. so someone like me with no experience can put it together and acquire a target in less than a minute. sites go up, power goes on, you find your target in the air -- you fire your missile. it's incredible. often the agency here comes into action after rather than before an attack. this is the first time a reporter has been allowed inside the center's technical analysis room. >> so it's a csi for combat space -- >> a csi forensic cape ability similar to crime scene investigation, a fingerprint here and dna there begins to piece together a compelling story. >> reporter: within minutes of mh-17's crash, analyst here sprang into action.
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desperate to as quickly as possible determine the cause of the crash. as luck would have it, they had visitors that day who could help. >> a group of representatives from across the intelligence community who do just this kind of analysis. we had them here in the building. >> reporter: all the experts happened to be here on that day -- >> happened timing-wise to work out that way. >> reporter: as the outside world debated the cause, the dia already had a very likely suspect. >> within the hour and a half, we were confident that it was a missile that shot it down. a surface-to-air missiles that shot it down. we had a fair idea of which one, although we still had homework to do. >> reporter: homework done at lightning speed. within hours, they were confident they had pinpointed the murder weapon and the perpetrators, telling president obama that russian-backed separatists had fired a russian-made missile that sent nearly 300 people plunging to their deaths. >> a look there from our chief national security correspondent,
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jim sciutto. now the defense for the first of six baltimore police officers to be tried in the death of freddie gray has rested its case in a maryland courtroom friday. character witnesses described officer william porter as caring. he has pleaded not guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter and second-degree assault. authorities say freddie gray broke his neck on april 12th while being transported by porter in a police van, shackled but not wearing a seat belt. cnn's miguel marquez reports now from baltimore. >> reporter: after eight days of testimony, 16 witnesses for the prosecution, and 12 witnesses for the defense, this first trial in the death of freddie gray is that was officer william porter will soon be in the hands of the jury. the defense arguing very strongly that it wasn't officer porter's responsibility to put freddie gray into seat belts. they're also arguing using experts, medical experts that officer porter dealt with freddie gray only before he was
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critically injured. the prosecution hitting back very hard, saying it was officer porter's responsibility all along, and that it was he himself who acknowledged that mr. gray was having trouble breathing. that he was clearly ill and still did not get him a medic. on monday, they will go to closing arguments very quickly. and then the jury will have it. we expect that the jury could come back with a verdict by tuesday or wednesday. miguel marquez, cnn, baltimore. a crucial plan years in the making finally appears to be complete. the latest on the climate agreement set to be released soon and analysis from an environmental activist. also, in syria, the town of kobani in ruins. the people determined to bring it back to life. has two layers of pain relief. the first is fast. the second lasts all day.
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you are watching "cnn newsroom." i'm isa soors. spain is mourning two police officers killed in the diplomatic district in kabul. a car bomb exploded near the spanish embassy friday. afghan forces killed the attackers and ended the siege. the taliban are claiming responsibility. heavy armed guards are watching over the united states building in geneva after the u.s. warned the swiss city may be a target of a terror attack. the warning comes as authorities there search for at least two people linked to the paris killings.
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geneva's police chief says possible t's possible that isis has -- it's possible that isis has a terror cell in the city. attacks on three military sites in burundi. the army says its soldiers were only wounded, and 12 attackers were killed. it's the worst violence the nation has seen since a failed coup in may following political turmoil. now, our top story this hour -- in about an hour or so, the french foreign minister is expected to present the final draft of a plan to slow climate change. it comes after almost two weeks. tense negotiations. a deal, a vote on the deal is expected later on this saturday. more this top story we're following. and michael bruin is executive director of the sierra club, grassroots organization. he joins me from paris. thank you very much for taking the time to speak to us on here on cnn. as our viewers will know from the last half-hour, no details of the proposed agreement have been released so far.
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from what you're hearing on the ground, do you get a sense of the deal, perhaps, going far enoug enough? >> we're hearing optimism from almost all quarters. it's about an hour until we see the final text. what we are hearing from almost anybody is that what the final text will do is it will bind every country in the world to reducing their own emissions and improving emissions five years over time. what we will see is an agreement that won't solve the climate crisis but will make more progress on climate change than anything we've ever seen. >> we know there have been sharp divisions along the way, and we'll know the details once we have the agreement. what have you made of the agreement this time around between china and the u.s.? it seems china wants to make sure the u.s. holds up its end of this. what are your thoughts?
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>> yeah. the breakthrough we saw was about a year ago when the u.s. and china announced their first agreement to reduce both countries' emissions. what we've seen in the last year or so is significant progress on monitoring and reporting and verification of those emissions reductions not just for the us and china but for all countries. what we're looking for is an agreement in which every country is contributing. we want transparency and the ability to strengthen those agreements every five years starting before 2020, and an opportunity for each country to review the progress and hold each other accountable. we're not yet whether or not there will be a significant transparency in this agreement. and of course we're also looking for climate financing agreements that will help the developing countries to accelerate their transition away from dirty fuels and toward clean energy. >> let's break that down. you talked about financing. you also talked about transparency. let's focus first on funding.
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that's been a crucial issue, isn't it, between the developed and developing nations. and at stake here really is the terminology, which countries are developing and which countries are developed because one will pay for the other. what are your concerns regarding thi this? >> what we want to see is a significant amount of funding, of course. both before, between now and 2020 and after 2020. the floor, what has been established as the floor, is money coming from country and transferring to developing countries. we also want to see funding both for mitigation, for reducing carbon emissions and accelerating the transition to clean energy, as well as funding for adaptation, to help countries that are already feeling the effects of climate change, to make sure that they're protecting their own communities and their own families. we are again cautiously optimistic that we'll see a
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significant amount of funding and an opportunity to expand that funding over time. again, we won't see the final text for about another hour. >> perhaps we can touch base in an hour to see whether the cautiously optimistic has changed at all. thank you very much, michael. syria's president is accusing washington of wanting what mr. assad calls terrorist groups to join next month's planned negotiations. the u.s. and russia helped organize a planned peace talks which includes members of more than a dozen rebel factions. the goal is a peaceful political transition in war-torn syria. now the syrian town of kobani is a major kawesch tee of the assad's war with isis. before kurdish forces reclaimed kobani, the siege left the town in ruins. cnn senior national correspondent ben wedeman says the people there are determined
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to rebuild it. >> reporter: this 17-year-old sends his pigeons flying over his hometown of kobani. flying over a town of ruins and rubble, but where hope lives on. "what makes me happy now is that i'm home despite all the destruction around us," he says. for five months, from september, 2014, to january of this year, an intense battle raged between isis and kurdish fighters, accompanied by heavy air strikes by the u.s.-led coalition. isis is gone. and many of the town's residents like mustafa have returned to find homes damaged almost beyond recognition.
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"daesh fighters were upstairs on the second floor, and kurdish fighters came from below. there was a battle here." he lived here with his wife, married son, and families, 19 in all. now he's hoping just to make one room livable. there is life among the ruins. kobani took a beating, but shops are open. some areas are a wasteland. or to the children, a rocky playground where they re-enact with stones the battles of just a few months ago. more than 70% of the buildings in kobani were either damaged or destroyed. despite that there's a will to rebuild this town. the challenge is finding a way to do it. this is the general coordinator for kobani reconstruction. "we're building this new neighborhood for people who have
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lost their homes," he says. "as you can see, we've stopped because we can't import any cement from turkey." wary of kurdish ambitions to build a state on the ruins of northern syria, turkey has closed the nearby border crossing. as a result, desperately needed building materials are in short supply. rebuilding this town could take a very long time. like a phoenix rising from the ashes, it will rise again. ben wedeman, cnn, kobani, syria. >> fascinating look at kobani. now, for the first time ever, women in saudi arabia are voting in the country's municipal elections happening right now. there are also women running for office. this milestone is being marked as a significant step toward kwauts. there are 979 human rights candidates.
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restrictions make it difficult for female voters who have complained of difficulties in proving their identities. and female candidates are not allowed to speak to male voters. u.s. and peruvian police worked together to crack a child sex trafficking ring. an american suspect inexists he's innocents -- insists he's innocents. that's coming up. i've smoked a lot and quit a lot, but ended up nowhere. now i use this. the nicoderm cq patch, with unique extended release technology, helps prevent the urge to smoke all day. i want this time to be my last time. that's why i choose
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if you've been keeping a close eye on the markets, you have noticed it has been quite % rough week for investors. in u.s. markets, friday was especially gut wrenching. the dow industrial average took a big dip on fears of economic weakness as crude oil slid to just over $35 a barrel. that's a new seven-year low. cnn's richard quest recaps friday's fall for us. >> reporter: the markets have closed down 310 and change. and it's off nearly 1.75%.
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what drove that market lower was the energy stocks which were a hard hit as crude oil prices dropped. the selling was broad based. if you take a look, you see the nasdaq was down 2.2%. s&p was off nearly 2%. the dow industrials was off. and to put this in perspective, it's the third triple-digit loss this week. >> quite a shock. investigators waiting to see -- investors waiting to see whether or not the federal reserve raises interest rates this week. that's all the markets care about now. if it does, stocks could potentially bounce back. now, peruvian and u.s. authorities say an american man has been running a child sex ring at the city of lima for several years with children as young as 4 being caught in the horrifying web. as part of cnn's "freedom project," our ongoing awareness of modern-day slavery, we have
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the details. >> reporter: an early morning operation targeting a foreigner accused of trafficking underage girls in peru. 64-year-old joshua david brown, an american from new hampshire, was still in bed at his lima home when officers stormed his bedroom. peruvian and u.s. authorities say brown facilitated sex tourism and exploitation of children. the raid was the result of a joint peruvian and american operation. >> translator: the american police informed us that the american citizens were traveling to peru seeking to have sex with underage boys and girls. that prompted our investigation. >> reporter: police targeted brown's home as well as eight other houses where five additional suspects, all peruvian nationals, were detained and now face charges of human trafficking, pimping, and pandering. authorities rescued 36 victims including 11 minors. none of the victims were found at brown's residence. one of the girls rescued was only 4 years old.
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a victim, police say, was being offered on line for $7,000. police executed nine search warrants in total which yielded large amounts of child pornography. officers with the peruvian national police seized one gun and an unspecified amount of drugs. the drugs were found at different locations. authority say brown legally commercialized sex merchandise in peru and had been living in the south american country for 14 years. he was under surveillance for the last four months. brown says he's innocent. >> translator: i know exactly what's happening. a person i've trusted has been trying for weeks to get me in trouble. i have nothing to do with this. >> reporter: cnn has been unable to reach brown's attorney in peru. police say brown told him he's not a trafficker, although sometimes acted as matchmaker for friends visiting from the united states. brown insists that he was not
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many money doing. this he says he has some american friends who will visit. he will introduce them to peruvian friends, peruvian girls, little friends. and on more than one occasion, his american friends who were in a better financial situation, will have a romantic relationship with those little friends and will marry them and go live with them in the united states. >> reporter: the rescued minors are now in the custody of authorities. >> translator: they were very scared at first about what was happening. some of them knew, and others didn't know what was happening because they didn't know why they were there. they were told they were invited to a party. that's what they were told. >> reporter: the crime of human trafficking for the purpose of sexual exploitation carries a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison in peru. brown may also face charges in the united states under the protect act. a law that seeks to protect children from sexual predators. rafael romo, cnn.
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>> to find out more about how people around the world are making a difference in the fight against modern-day slavery and learn, of course, what you do to help, go to the cnn freedom project home page at cnn.com/freedom. much more "cnn newsroom" after this short break. i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed.
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now the new "star wars" film, "the force awakens," has its premiere monday. as you can imagine, millions of fans can hardly wait. our issa sesay talked with one of the stores, lupita nyong'o. >> reporter: what on earth is it like to be joining the "star wars" mega franchise? >> it is a trip. to a galaxy far, far away. >> are we really doing this? >> cba -- hold on! it is a trip, it's kind of crazy and beautiful and fun and exhilarating to be a part of this franchise. >> reporter: tell me about the character you play, maz. >> yeah. she is a pirate and runs a bar.
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she's been around for a while. >> reporter: tell me about playing her and the actual experience of playing a character, the technology and what that experience was like for you as an actress? >> yeah. i'd wanted do it because it was a unique acting experience i thought that not many actors get to have where you are not restricted by your own physical circumstances. the opportunity to play something completely different than yourself, than how experience the world physically. ♪ >> i was very lucky to be part of paragraph photography. i was on the real set. >> reporter: i was going to ask that, did you get the opportunity to engage with the other actors? >> i did. i did. >> reporter: or were you just on a green screen? >> no, i was a part of principal photography which was really, really a blessing because i got to be a part of the galaxy far, far away. i remember being on set and looking around at the set and
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feeling like i office another planet because there was so much artistic detail to everything. even the way things felt was specific to that world. it's been an interesting journey. very different from what i did right before which was "12 years a slave." i got this from mistress so how. for me, why i wanted too do this is because it was a complete departure from patsy in "12 years a slave." that role was so much about my body. here's a role that is completely not, and i liked that departure. it offered me a new challenge, something to really sink my teeth into and learn about a totally different thing that is motion capture. >> reporter: another thing that j.j. is getting a lot of praise for is that it is such a diverse cast. there's so many strides being taken in this film. >> that is a reflection who've j.j. is and what he's interested in. he's interested in the spectacle
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of the truth. that's what it is. the world we live in is that colorful, that diverse. j.j. organically -- it's not effort for j.j. it's just the way things are, and to have that matter-of-fact casting culture is great. it's beautiful. it's what we need. so true to what george lucas created. it's a seamless continuation of that story. it embraces the old and new and integrates new technology and new cultural ideas or more accepted cultural ideas. >> that was issa sesay. last year nyong'o won a role for her role in "12 years a slave."
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the personal flying machine. that's what students at the national university of singapore are working on. take a look. it's called snowstorm. this is a prototype. the person flying it can control it, or it can be steered remotely. it uses solar power and now can fly for about five minutes. the students are trying to make it go longer. ♪ if you can use some exotic booze there's a bar in bombay ♪ ♪ come on fly with me today would have been the 100th birthday of this man who did it really his own way. frank sinatra -- i'm a big fan of his. around the world, the singer and oscar-winning actor is being toasted with rat pack parties, radio, and tv rhett specktives. the chairman of the board died in 1982. from all of us here, happy birthday, old blue eyes. that does it for us this
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hour. thank you very much for joining us. i'm isa soares. back with another hour of "cnn newsroom" right around the world. i've smoked a lot
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the talking is over. now it's time for action. this hour in paris, reppists from almost 200 -- representatives from almost 200 countries have the chance to mold the future of our planet. we're live from the french capital as the climate change conference comes to an anxious close. taking on this texas senator at home and saudi royalty overseas. all the latest on donald trump's tifs and battles to the white house. this galaxy far, far away is
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getting a lot closer to cinema-goers. we're hearing more on "the force awakens." a warm welcome to our united states around the world. i'm isa soares. are you watching "cnn newsroom." in just about half an hour from now, we expect to find out what's inside a much-anticipated climate meeting. that's where the french foreign minister will present the deal in paris and details how the world will work together to slow global warming. negotiators have been working on the draft for two weeks and finally came to an agreement early this morning. world leaders will vote on it later on today. our senior international correspondent jim bittermann is in paris waiting for the announcement to come out. after two weeks of debating, we are getting closer to finding out the details as a proposed
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climate change agreement. talk us through the vote. how likely is it that the agreement will pass with no hiccups? >> reporter: that's a big question. i don't think it's a question of any hiccups appearing right now. just an up-or-down vote, all ornologor -- all or nothing. the delegation will be asked do you approve this document or not. one scenario we heard, in fact, is that the delegates would be asked to stand. those who oppose the agreement would be asked to stand. that would be a really obvious symbol to the world. if you're a head of a delegation and decided tnot to accept this agreement as it stands and everyone else in the room sitting down, that's obvious negativity going there that other people in the world might look down on. if it happens that way, it's
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going to be within two or three hours of the release of the document right now being translate into six languages and distributed to the various delegations. we'll see how it unfolds. there aren't -- at this point along the line, there's no possibility for any hiccups. as you said, the fact is it's either you like there thing or you don't. >> like you said, we don't have the details of the agreement as of yet. of course, the devil will be in the detail once we get in 25 minutes or so. is there a sense you're getting on the ground that this finally will be a legally binding agreement? what are you hearing? >> reporter: that was one of the intentions all along. the united states caved in its position saying that it would be legally binding. president obama himself saying that when he was here. i think the issue has gone away. the question is to what extent it will be legally binding. one of the things we know for sure is that this is not the be
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all and end all agreement. this is a first step. they've said from the beginning that there's going to be a review process. one of the last points and argument we understand from the questions that were raised overnight here is exactly when there would be a review of the country's various target and whether they made the targets. would it come in one year or five years and how frequently the document would be reviewed. hopefully the target will be raised each time. you did this in 2015, what are you you going to do in 2016 and down the line. that's the beltway's meant to work. legally binding? it's a question of naming and shaming -- no mechanism to restrain the -- to constrain the nations of the world conform but
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to show that this or that country is not living up to expectations. >> and then the implementing and monitoring. a lot of hard work ahead. jim bittermann, we'll catch up with you in about 25 minutes or so once we hear news of the details of the proposed agreement. thank you very much. good to see you. scientists say if we keep the average global temperature from rising two degrees celsius from preindustrial levels, we may be able to avoid some of the worst aspects of climate change. if temperatures change more, sea level will rise, swamping lands and forcing millions to migrate further inland. droughts in other areas could damage crops and cause thousands of animal and plant species to go extinct. there would be an increase in malnutrition as well as infectious diseases. there would be more deaths from heat waves as well as floods. scientists say the earth's
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temperature has grown 0.85 degrees celsius since the 1880s and industrial revolution. with news of a significant agreement, it's important to realize changes this year. >> a couple different milestones that we've reached in 2015. one of which was average global temperature, preindustrial levels, just about reaching that one-degree celsius. that's halfway to the two-degree cap that they're trying to hold on to at the paris climate talks as we speak. and the notorious 400 part per million. that is the level of average carbon dioxide emissions in the earth's atmosphere. this record was actually reached in march of 2015. and it's astounding because this has ramifications on our global climate system from sea level rise, as you mentioned a moment ago, to how warm our atmosphere can actually become.
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let's talk about sea level rise and put a few things in perspective. this is an artist's rendition of what the world could look like. some of the popular cities, if we had that two-degree and above warming scenario that we are so desperately trying to prevent. this is london, the river thames. there's westminster. let's look at two degrees warming. you see some of the suburbs being intill freighted by that water -- infiltrated by that water. streaming across many populations. not just london, it's lots of coastal cities to contend with. we have upwards of 44% of the world's population living roughly 100 miles from the ocean, within that space. we've got the sydney harbor house and shanghai financial district susceptible to sea level rise and overall climate change and global warming. something scientists are trying to prevent. as we look toward the united states, north america, some
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interesting information coming from the national climate data center. just recently this fall or this autumn has been the warmest on record for the contiguous united states, lower 48, breaking records across many states. and that warm weather is going to continue into this weekend. i'm not going to say that's directly related to climate change because there's several variables out there. we are currently underway with a strong el nino season. it certainly has the fingerprints of climate change and global warming all over it. back to you. >> derek van dam, thank you very much. heavily armed guards watching over the united nations in geneva. that after the swiss city may be the target a terror attack. two people linked to the paris killings have been investigated. gene geneva's police chief says it's possible that isis has a terror cell in the city. nic robertson with more on this developing story for you.
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>> reporter: that heightened threat level here already leading to one security situation on friday at geneva airport. part of the airport in a security lockdown for about 20 minutes while police investigated two suspicious pieces of luggage. one was discovered to be a piece of lost luggage. the other was destroyed by a controlled detonation. that really gives you an indication of the heightened security alert that this area is under. swiss authorities have received three pieces of information. one coming from u.s. intelligence saying that they picked up chatter among four isis operatives inside syria indicating they were potentially planning an attack in geneva. the four isis members, their whereabouts unknown. the past few days, a vehicle, a van with belgian plates driven into switzerland. when the swiss authorities investigated, they found the owner was associated, connected with some of the paris attackers from last month.
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that's given them additional cause for concern. also another of the paris attackers, his light is clear. he was -- his identity is clear. he was recruited to isis by a radical in this area. he's now jailed in france. however, another associate of his in syria went to join isis is back. his whereabouts unknown. he's a swiss national. do these pieces add up to anything, are there connections? that's what the authorities are looking at. the u.n. behind me, the biggest u.n. headquarters outside new york. the guards there bigger. the automatic weapons in their hand bigger than you would normally see. this is a city worried now about its security. nicaragua, ck -- nic robertson,. in the u.s., presidential candidate donald trump isn't backing down from his call to ban muslims from entering the united states. however, a cbs news poll shows 58% of americans don't agree
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with the republican's proposal. you're seeing the numbers broken down for you. just 38% of republicans are against it meaning a slim majority support it. democrats are overwhelmingly opposed at 73%, as you see on the screen. trump had a few targets -- a new target to the friday rally in iowa. that's fellow candidate ted cruz. our senior washington correspondent, jeff zeleny, is on the campaign trail with much more. >> reporter: donald trump came to iowa as the leader of the republican pac. he had plenty of bravado. he said if we win iowa, we will win the rest of the contest. of course, he is leading in every national poll and most state polls. with 50 days remaining before the iowa caucuses, some candidates are coming on stronger than others. and ted cruz is one of those. the texas senator is right in donald trump's kos hairs. that was -- cross hairs. that office donald trump's mind.
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within minutes of his opening statement in iowa, he mentioned ted cruz and fact that he's opposed to ethanol subsidies, a key initial iowa. >> with the ethanol, really he's got to come a long way because he's right now for the oil. i understand it. oil pays him a lot of money. he's got to be for oil, right? the oil companies give him a lot of money. but i'm with you. i'm with everybody. >> with trump saying that snared cruz is beholden to oil companies, it's clear that the republican race is entering a news phase. as republican candidates gather in las vegas next week for the final debate of the year, of course donald trump will be front and center. ted cruz, as well. the final hunt for many of these candidates to have -- the final opportunity for many of these candidates to have an impression on voters. we talked to many tonight. donald trump certainly has a lot of support, as does ted cruz. voters often change their minds in these final two months. that's why the debate and
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campaigning is critical. des moines, iowa. trump isn't just picking fights at home. the u.s. billionaire is being followed by a prince tweet, "you are a disgrace not only to the gop but to all america. withdraw from the u.s. presidential race as you will never win." trump then shot back with this tweet, i'm quote, "dopey prince talal wants to control our u.s. politicians with daddy's money. can't do it when i elected." donald trump's international detractors aren't limited to the muslim community. here's a taste of what other had to say about his controversial proposals. british prime minister david cameron british prime minister david cameron claimed donald trump's comment as "divisive, unhelpful, and quite simply wrong." in an online petition to ban the
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billionaire from britain has 540,000 signature. trump postponed a trip to israel after prime minister netanyahu issued a statement rejecting the tycoon's remarks. the dutch foreign minister joined the tlon calling his proposals "very unhelpful and discriminatory." and le pen defending all french people regardless of religion. "have you ever heard me say something like that?" he asked the interviewer. much more on that. u.s. senator jeff flake is trying to show that republicans aren't all like trump. he and his family visited a mosque on friday in their home state of arizona. amanda goodman from kpho brings us the story. >> reporter: afternoon prayers at this scottsdale mosque looked different today. senator jeff flake, his wife, and two of his children were in attendance. >> we have much in common with our brothers and sisters in the muslim faith. we have much to learn from them.
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>> reporter: the senator says given the events of last week in san bernardino and the resulting anti-muslim rhetoric, he wanted to share a message of solidarity. he also addressed republican presidential front-runner donald trump's push to ban all muslims from entering the country. >> it's the antithesis of all we stand for in america and freedom of religion that we all embrace so much in this community and other. >> reporter: those in attendance were grateful for the support and show of faith. >> hopefully it will open eyes to fellow americans that we're all in this together. we're all in it to fight extremism and combat terrorist activities. >> reporter: the religious director of the mosque says he can't remember the last time a u.s. sitting senator attended the mosque, making the visit that much more powerful and uplifting. >> this is really an opportunity with senator flake to be here showing our city and nation the more we talk to each other, the more we find out about similarities and commonalities
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that we have, not just as americans but human beings. >> that was amanda goodman reporting from scottsdale, arizona, for affiliate kpho. a syrian town shattered by isis. now its people have their town back, and they say they will rebuild it brick by brick. we'll go inside ka baen. plus, why a climate change summit really matter? a detailed look at what is at stake. we expect an announcement in about 15 minutes or so.
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i believe in our future. i believe in our roots as a female, supporting our country. >> for the first time ever, women in saudi arabia voting in the municipal elections, happening right now. there are also women running for office. this milestone is being marked as a significant step toward equal rights in the country. critics say several restrictions make it tell for women. a second spanish police officer has died after a siege in the diplomatic quarter. afghan forces killed the attackers. more now. >> reporter: explosions and gunfire heard in the heart of kabul as darkness fell on the afghan capital.
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sources tell cnn the spanish embassy was hit pie an apparent -- by an apparent car palm. the taliban claiming to have begun suicide attacks in the area. an eyewitness described a massive explosion saying the powerful blast shook the ground. afghan security forces cordoned off streets in the area amidst reports that the gunmen may have been holed up in one of the nearby buildings. >> this is a secure place in the city and a place with high-profile targets. the taliban and others have carried out attacks in this part of the city before. [ siren ] >> reporter: friday's attack comes on the heels of another days ago in kandahar where taliban gunmen stormed the airport, killing at least 50 people and lead leaving dozen -- and leaving dozens more windowed. leaders of afghanistan and pakistan met in islamabad in an effort to repair strained relations as they battle increasing attacks by islamic extreme youisists in their resp
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countries. the latest attack serves as a reminder of the ongoing war. the challenge facing afghan security forces, and the fact that the taliban are still a force to be reckoned with. >> russian president vladimir putin has vowed to immediately destroy any threat to russian forces in syria. he issued a thinly veiled threat at a defense meeting in moscow. that's two weeks after turkish military forces downed a russian jet on the syrian border. take a listen. >> translator: extremely tough. any targets threatening russian armed forces group or infrastructure are to be destroyed immediately. meantime, u.s. secretary of state john kerry plans to meet with mr. putin in moscow on tuesday to discuss the situation in syria. last year the syrian town of kobani came under siege from isis for months, if you remember. kurdish forces fought back, and
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we took the town with the help of coalition air strikes. kobani was left in ruins, but the people this are determined to rebuild it. cnn's senior international ko t correspondent ben wedeman. >> reporter: this 17-year-old sent pigeons flying over his hometown of kobani. flying over a town of ruins and rubble, but where hope lives on. "what makes me happy now is that i'm home, despite all the destruction around us," he says. for five months, september, 2014, to january of this year, an intense battle raged between isis and kurdish fighters accompanied by heavy air strikes by the u.s.-led coalition. isis is gone, and many of the town's residents like mustafa
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have returned to find homes damaged almost beyond recognition. >> translator: daesh fighters were up above and others below. >> reporter: he lived here with his wife, married sons, and families, 19 in all. now he's hoping to make at least one room livable. there is life among the ruins. kobani took a beating, but shops are open. some areas are a wasteland. or to the children, a very rocky playground where they re-enact with stones the battles of just a few months ago. more than 70% of the buildings were damaged or destroyed. despite that, there's a will to rebuild the town. the challenge is finding a way to do it.
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this is the general coordinator for kobani reconstruction. "we're building this new neighborhood for people who lost their homes," he lsays. "we've stopped because we can't import any cement from turkey." wary of kurdish ambitions to build a state on the ruins of northern syria, turkey has closed the nearby border crossing. as a result, desperately needed building materials are in short supply. rebuilding this town could take a very long time. but like a phoenix rising from the ashes, tell rise again. ben wedeman, cnn, kobani, syria. fighting isis isn't just about dropping bombs. it's also about blocking cash. cnn money senior reporter explains the u.s. treasury is
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taking steps to cut off isis money. >> reporter: isis by far is the wealthiest terrorist organization on the planet. we're talking billions of dollars here. to have a shot at stopping it, you have to go after its money. the u.s. treasury department outlined thursday that it's working with the coalition of more than 30 partners to block isis from amassing more money and spending it. isis made up to $1 billion in 2014 by stealing from local bank whether it took -- when it took control of new territory. ransacked the money, and that helped it become more powerful. the u.s. has worked with the iraq government to shut down 90 banks in about the region. this cuts off isis from the international financial network, making it harder to move money. iraq has also tried to stop paying salaries to civil servants that live in isis-controlled regions. they know that isis often takes a chunk of this money and calls it a tax. in another move, the treasury issued sanctions against more than 30 individuals who are
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helping isis shift money around. and it's trying to find new ways to stop money smuggling across borders. turkey's border is a top priority. the treasury also wants to slow down the production, movement, and sale of isis oil which is a critical money maker. it's working with military forces to shut this down. the ultimate goal is to strangle the isis cash flow so fighters can't buy new military equipment and other critical items. alana petrov, cnn mountain, london. you are watching "cnn newsroom." cnn got exclusive access to the place where the u.s. keeps weapons it's taken from its enemies. we'll take you there next. plus, in a moment, we expect the french foreign minister to hand out a final draft of a climate plan that could change our future for the better. we'll be live in paris for you ahead. what's in the trunk? nothing.
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a very warm welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm isa soares. let me bring you up to date with the top stories we are following this hour. in the afghan capital, a second spanish police officer has died after a siege in the diplomatic quarter. the taliban claiming responsibility for the suicide attacks that rocked kabul on friday. a car bomb exploded near the spanish embassy. afghan forces killed the attackers and ended the siege. guards carrying machine guns are standing watch over the
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complex in geneva. one of the unusual changes following an american warning of a terror plot. authorities also searching for two people linked to paris attackers. as donald trump stumps for votes in iowa, a slim majority of americans are against his muslim ban. a cbs news poll find nearly six in ten oppose the presidential candidate's proposal to ban him from traveling to the united states -- ban muslims from traveling to the united states. in minutes, we expect the french foreign minister to present the time plan to slow climate change. you're looking at live pictures of delegates gathering at the venue in paris hoping for that presser to start shortly. this comes after what's been two weeks of intense negotiations. a vote on the deal is expected later on today. we'll bring you the announcement as it happens. as you see, delegates taking to
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the auditorium, waiting for the press conference from the foreign minister. let me tell you why the climate conference called cop-21 matter. delegates hope to produce the first-ever legally binding plan to combat global warming. the agreement would essentially be a more comprehensive legally forcing successor agreement to the keep kyoto protocol. a similar proposal in 2009 failed meaning all weisz been on cop-21 for a lasting solution -- all eyes have been on cop-21 for a lasting solution. we have more now. we know from previous occasion that's a deal like there tends to be watered down. what are you hearing on the ground this hour? >> i think tensions are high as everyone's waiting for this text to come any moment. we've seen several iterations of
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this over recent days. there is expected to be the first clean version, meaning there won't be any places marked in the text with brackets saying that this is days peted piece of the agreement -- disputed piece of the agreement. we'll see all 196 parties coming together to decide whether or not to adopt the agreement. this is hugely important. the stakes are so high. this is the chance for the world to sort of turn the corner and move out of the fossil fuel area toward a cleaner economy and fight global warming. the marshall islands has emerged as an important delegation even though it's a small country in the middle of the pacific. they sort of have the moral call to action saying that if we allow warming to increase above two degrees celsius or 1.5 degrees celsius, the country could be wiped off the map. the stakes are high. we're waiting for these details to become clear as the draft text is released soon. >> as you and i talk, bring our viewers up to date. those are live pictures from paris.
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delegates taking to their seats, waiting for the french foreign minister to address them. the final details of the global climate change. the global proposal. we need to know the details. and that we are waiting for. john, there have been, of course, as we know in these past two weeks, significant issues that have been raised throughout. in particular, that was funding. talk us through some of the disagreements that we've heard. >> we've seen similar fault lines emerge as have happened in other u.n. climate change. essentially, groups of countries have been causing global warming in the e.u. in the u.s., the e.u. has done nor contribute than any other country. you have the more emerging countries like china and india. china is now each year the largest polluter of climate change emissions. you see the two arguing over who should finance the transition to clean energy, who should pay for countries to adapt. there are a lot of countries around the world seeing the effects of climate change.
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more droughts, more floods, things that have expensive for them. and there's the issue of who should pay for that, pay for the adaptation to take place and for resilience to be built into the systems. i think that's like the fundamental thing here is which parties are really on the hook to fix this, and to what degree those commitments are legally binding. we've seen all the parties from around the world including china and india come forward with their own plan for tackling global warming and reducing their own emissions. i've seen it described as a potluck dinner of sorts with each country bringing its own dish to the table. that is something fundamentally new and giving people a lot of optimism that there will be an agreement that can be reached here. >> of course not just china and india, but last 24 hours or so brazil coming to the table, willing to join the so-called high-ambition coalition. why is that important? talk about that. >> this high-ambition coalition is something that emerged
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publicly here at the paris attacks. it's an alliance of about 100 countries. it's led in part by the marshall islands. the country i mentioned to you that has this existential threat that it's facing. but also the u.s., the e.u., newly brazil as you mentioned. i think there is something that has surprised a lot of people here including me. the level of ambition that these countries including the biggest polluters in the world are putting forward in saying they want to limit climate change to two degrees celsius or 1.5, something sort of unheard of before the talks emerged. there are all these countries coming together to say this is the moment the world can do something about climb change. we made it this it change to be firm and lasting. we need it to turn the global corner away from the fossil fuel area and toward a economy. that group is driving this, but china and india haven't joined the alliance. we'll see what issues they've been able to haggle out as part of the negotiation that's have continued overnight.
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>> john unsettleder in paris. thank you very much. -- sutter in paris. thank you very much. we'll check in with you as soon as we hear from the french foreign minister. elsewhere in the city of light, a message for climate negotiators and the world. the eiffel tower emblazoned with emergencies like no plan b and 1.5 degrees, referring to efforts to keep the planet from warming by 1.5 degrees celsius, below the danger zone. we're keeping an eye on the crucial climate talks. stay with us. we'll bring you more as we get them. first, a short break.
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now the u.s. is keeping a close eye on how terrorists are getting their weapons. our jim sciutto got exclusive access to america's own rocket program. and he saw the collection of dangerous foreign weapons at a stash they say might come in handy as they try to stay a step ahead of isis. >> reporter: a passenger plane headed from the netherlands to malaysia suddenly falls from the sky. malaysia airlines flight mh-17 brought down near the ukraine/russia border by russian-backed rebels. using this surface-to-air missile system known as the book. the ramifications far reaching and incredibly alarming because who've may be trying to appropriate simple lar missiles now. is there a concern that terrorists are getting their hands on this? >> i think it's safe to assume that at some level are their are
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effort underway. >> reporter: people at home will say, guy mmy god, can a group l isis get their hands on it? >> we need to get training involved. >> reporter: this is a branch of the military's own intelligence operation. the defense intelligence agency or dia. loathed far from the battle -- located far from the batt battlefields of iraq and afghanistan. home of a rocket program. filling the agency's grounds are a rogue's gallery of dangerous foreign weapons. some captured, some merchandised, some akbicquireda. to help train fighters and pilots who might come into contact with a system like this in a combat situation, they keep these systems operational. this is still a fully functioning scud missile. proliferation of missile technology preoccupies analysts here more than any other threat. >> we have greater concerns about the smaller missile
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threats and the likelihood of the proliferation of those. >> reporter: small only in size but not capable. this is one of the most commonholdecommon shoulder-fired missiles today. >> there are hundreds of thousands of them out there. >> reporter: to date, shoulder-fired missiles have targeted some 60 civilian aircraft. and you can buy them on the black market for a few thousand dollars. one of the main dangers of a missile like this is speed but ease. so someone like me with no experience can put it together and acquire a target in less than a minute. sites go up, power goes on, you find your target in the air, and you fire your missile.
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it's incredible. often the agency here comes into action after rather than before an attack. this is the first time a reporter has been allow inside the center's technical analysis room. so it's a csi for the combat spot? >> a csi forensic capability. similar to a crime scene investigation. a little dna here and fingerprint there begins to piece together a compelling story. >> reporter: within minutes of mh-17's crash, analysts sprang into action, desperate to as quickly as possible determine the cause of the crash. as luck would have it, they had visitors that day who could help. >> a group of representatives from across the intelligence community who do just this kind of analysis. we had them in the building. >> reporter: all the experts happened to be here on that day? >> happened timing-wise to happen that way. >> reporter: as the outside world debated the cause, the dia already had a likely suspect. >> within an hour and a half, we were confident that it was a
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surface-to-air missile that shot it down. we had a fair idea of which one, although we still had homework to do. >> reporter: home workwork done lightning speed. they were confident they had d the murder weapon and perpetrators telling president obama russian-backed separatists had fired a russian-made missile that sent nearly 300 people plunging to their deaths. >> that was our chief national security correspondent, jim sciutto. of course, we continue to watch events in paris where those crucial climate talks are coming to a head after almost two weeks of debating do. stay with cnn. we'll bring you developments as we get them. these are live pictures for you from paris. hey man! hey peter. (unenthusiastic) oh... ha ha ha! joanne? is that you? it's me... you don't look a day over 70. am i right? jingle jingle. if you're peter pan, you stay young forever. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more
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♪ the dark side. a jedi. >> the new "star wars" film "the force awakens," has its premiere monday. as you can imagine, millions can
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hardly wait to see it. it is the seventh installment of the franchise that started more than three decades ago. the sequel has a diverse cast. isha sesay talked to one of the cast, lupita nyong'o. >> reporter: what on earth is it like to be joining the "star wars" mega franchise? >> it is a trip to a galaxy far, far away. >> are we really do this? >> cba, hold on. >> it is a trip. it's kind of crazy and beautiful and fun and exhilarating to be a part of this franchise. >> tell me about the character you play, maz. >> yeah. she is a pirate and runs a bar. and she's been around for a while. >> reporter: tell me about playing her and the experience of playing a motion capture
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character. the technology and what the experience was like for you as an actress. >> yeah, i wanted to do it because it was a unique acting experience that not many actors get to have where you're not restricted by your own physical circumstances. the opportunity to play something completely different. different from yourself and how you experience the world physically. ♪ >> i was lucky to be part of principal photography, though. i was actually on the real set -- >> reporter: i governorsing to ask, did you get -- i was going to ask, did you get the opportunity to engage with other actors, or were just on a green screen? >> no, i was parts of principal photography really, really a blessing because i got to be part of the galaxy far, far away. i remember being on set and looking around at the set and feeling like i was on another planet because there was so much artistic detail to everything, even the way things felt was
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specific to that world. it's been an interesting journey. very different from what i did right before, "12 years a slave." i got this from mistress shaw. for me, i wanted to be a part of this because it was a complete departure from patsy in "12 years a slave." that role was so much about my body. here is a role that is completely not. i liked that departure. it was a new challenge, something to sink my teeth into and learn about a totally different thing that is motion capture. >> reporter: another thing that j.j. is getting a lot of praise for, if you will, is the fact that it is such a diverse cast. and there's so many strides being taken in this film. that is a reflection of who j.j. is and what he's interested in. he's interested in the spectacle of the truth. did the world we live in, is it that colorful, diverse? j.j. organically -- it's not
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effort for j.j. it's just the way things are. and to have that kind of matter-of-fact casting culture is beautiful. it's what we need. so true that what george lucas created, you know. and it's a seamless continuation of that story. it embraces the old and new and integrates new technology and new cultural ideas, you know, more accepted cultural ideas. we'll take you live to paris now. of course, we're expecting details of a proposed climate change agreement. let's listen in. >> translator: here we are almost at the end of the road and without doubts and beginning of another wound. i'd first of all like to thank
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you, all of you, for your work not just of the past few days but the past few years, but all these last few months. for many of you, the last few years. the final draft agreement which has been put before you this morning and which will be distributed when the session is over does a lot, shows a lot for the progress that has been carried out here. but none of us forgets what has been obtained in particular since durbin. i'd like to thank in particular the secretary general of the united nations and president of the french republic who show us, give us the honor of their presence and who both of them
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have shown great personal dedication to the success of this purpose, cop-21. for four years, the group has been able to implement considerable work. i'd like to show my respect to the presidents of the different groups, facilitators, and negotiators of the groups. i would like to thank affectionately the peruvian presidency of cop-20, in particular our friends, who gave us the necessary impulse. [ applause ]
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>> he gave us the necessary impulse and impetus before our moroccan friends take over next year. i have a particular thought finally for all of those ministers, negotiators, activists who would have wished to be here in these probably historic circumstances, but who act the but were not able to -- who acted but were not able to know this day.
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were not able to see this day. during this paris conference, we wanted the conditions for receiving you, for preparation were the best possible. his announced two methods of listening, transparency, ambition, research, and seeking for compromise, a compromise, a cop in which each party can be felt heard and understood. i hope that collectively we achieve this. dear friends, following the exceptional political impulse given by the 150 heads of state and government, we met at the beginning of our conference. the adp group carried out its work during the first week.
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last saturday which always seems a long time ago by putting forwards the text by the presidents, we set up an informal body for confrontation by this paris committee. we've all worked a lot, slept relatively little, and a number of ministers have helped us in bringing about compromises. i have to thank them. i thank you very warmly. several meetings in four months of debates took place under difficult circumstances. there have been no less than two successive versions that have come from the work of the parties this week before proposing today the final text. at each stage, the objective was to bring us closer together so
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the agreement could be wished by all. at each time the parties were consult consulted on the best ways to move forward as well as on substance. all of this was done in a constructive sphere, and i particularly want to exercise this. and today we are close to the end of this process. we wish -- and this is my deep conviction -- to an ambitious draft balanced agreement that reflects the positions of the parties. it will be distributed in a few minutes. i'm not going in this moment to go into all the details, but i'd like to nevertheless family size a few details. this text is necessarily balanced. it contains the principal advances which when many of us were thinking would perhaps be
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impossible to obtain. the proposed draft agreement istiis differentiated, fair, sustainable, balanced, and legally binding. it is loyal to the durbin mandate. five subjects with the different responsibilities of the countries of their respective capacities in the light of the national circumstances. it confirms our central objective, vital objective to contain the rise -- average rise in temperatures well below 2 degrees and to make an effort to limit this raise to 1.5 degrees, which should make it possible -- [ cheers and applause ]

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