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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  January 10, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PST

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claiming all those unclaimed people. they existed and i'm so glad we took the time to remember them whomever they were. ♪ . mexican drug lord known as he wi"el chapo" may be extradit the united states. days after its neighbor claims it tested a nuclear weapon. the largest jackpot in u.s. history just got even bigger. hello. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world. i'm lynda kinkade. welcome to "cnn newsroom." we begin in mexico where one of the world's most dangerous and notorious drug lords is facing extradition to the united states. joaquin guzman best known as "el
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chapo" was recaptured on friday and is back behind bars at the maximum security prison from which he escaped back in july. the u.s. began requesting the extradition in january of last year. guzman's lawyer, however, is fighting to make sure that doesn't happen. >> translator: mr. guzman should not have been extradited to the united states or any other country. what's the reason? because mexico has just law that is are detailed in the general constitution of the republic. >> the mexican navy arrested guzman in a morning raid in sinaloa state on friday. these images are from the hotel room where authorities held him once he was captured. martin savidge as the latest from where the fugitive had been hiding out. >> reporter: this hotel is locate odd n the outskirts of the town, maybe six kilometers,
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three or four miles. when you look at it, it's a perfect place for federal authorities to bring "el chapo." remember, it's just after they've had a shootout and chased him allegedly through the sewer system. look at this. this is a hotel room that has its own garage space. now, the federal authorities could have pulled right in here, taken "el chapo" out undercover and walked him right into this room. and if you look, this is the room. it's the room that you see that's been made famous now as a result of the photograph. in fact, just sort of guesstimating "el chapo" would have been sitting right about here looking off in that direction. with a rather sullen look on his face. there is one thing missing. you might have noticed in the background, certainly a lot of men did in the photograph. there was another photo of a woman not wearing a whole lot up in this area. it appears that's been taken down. who has it or why?
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we don't know. we do know that federal authorities had "el chapo" in here for about an hour and a half until they could get reinforcements and essentially get their act together to be ready to move him and transport him. fairly standard room. got a toilet, got a shower. and got a sink and wash-up area. it's located right by the highway. so there are a lot of things that make this room almost ideal for the job that they had. and it's hidden away. it's almost like a fortress. thanks to that photograph, thanks to the most wanted man in all of mexico and america, this room is now world famous. martin savidge, cnn, mexico. >> in l.a., we spoke with drug war analyst sylvia long mire who says the biggest gain from the capture is information.
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>> obviously the biggest benefit is the intelligence value that he has. ironically yuf, that's one of the bigger reasons that the mexican government didn't want to give him up for extradition when he was caught in february 2014. the mexican government was somewhat upset that the u.s. government hadn't shared more intelligence from other individuals that had been extradited before. obviously, the importance and value of guzman as an intelligence asset, i guess you could say, kind of trumps the concerns about mexico's sovereignty in that regard. >> we're learning more about "el chapo's" time on the run. the notorious drug boss met with sean penn before his recapture. and penn wrote an article for the rolling stone magazine. guzman says he didn't have a choice when it came to entering the cartel world.
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>>. [ inaudible ] [ inaudible ] [ speaking foreign language ] >> make sure you keep right here on cnn. we will have more from the interview with "el chapo" in our next hour of newsroom. we're now to a show of force over the peninsula. swept overt skies over the dee militarized zone. it made the flight four days after north korea was said to have detonated a massive explosion that it said was a
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hydrogen bomb. will ripley joins us from pyongyang. he's the only reporter for the u.s. in north korea. first, we turn to paula hancock in seoul. how powerful is this b-52 bomber and what is the u.s. hoping to achieve with this show of force? >> reporter: well, lynda, the message is very clear. it is a show of force. it is proof according to the u.s. specific command that they're going to stand by their allies in south korea and in japan and protect the u.s. homeland is what he said today. you have the u.s. bomber flight by south korean fighter jets. it couldn't be a clearer message to pyongyang that they will stand by one another and they will show military force if need be. if they feel the need to do that. it is real -- they are trying to put across at this point. the b-52 is a powerful plane.
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it can carry conventional and more modern and nuclear weapons. it has a very long flight range as well. so it is a particular flight for a plane to be choosing by the u.s. military. now, we do know that they did exactly the same two years ago when tensions were very high on the peninsula, just after the third nuclear test. interestingly, though, that time it took about a month before they deployed these bombers. at that point, they said it's part of the ongoing defensive drills that the u.s. and south korea were carrying out. this time around, there are no drills. they've done this unilaterally, this show of force. it only took four days. there's something to be read into that. lynda? >> stand by, paula. let's bring in will. will, give us a sense of whether you believe that the regime in north korea actually sat up and took notice as this flyover happened. as paula mentioned, they did this back in 2013, the last time north korea tested a nuclear
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weapon. how do you think the north korean regime is responding? >> reporter: they absolutely took notice. a lot of north korean military commanders find u.s. bombers especially threatening given the destruction here in pyongyang during the korean war when much of the city was flattened. the bombings from the american planes, for example the pyongyang metro system is built 360 feet underground so the station ks double as bomb shelters. last time in 2013, it was the stealth bombers that flew from the united states to the border and dropped dummy bombs, 2,000 pounds each. it was infuriating to the north koreans. they said they were burning with hatred and put missiles on stand by to attack u.s. bases in the pacific and south korea. they even aimed long-range missiles toward the mainland united states. that eventually dee escalated.
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we've been monitoring state media and spoke with officials here, requested information. haven't heard anything et why. there will be undoubtedly some response and rhetoric in response. >> things are pretty tense in that region already. is it likely that this fly by will escalate those tensions? >> reporter: it could very well escalate. but keep in mind, it's been a very tense situation really ever since on wednesday north korea detonated what they claim is an h-bomb even though experts disclaim that. it was believed to be a nuclear test of some kind, strong enough to cause an earthquake. two days later, they turned on the propaganda loud speakers. there hasn't been much of a response to the loud speaker broadcasts whereas over the summer for example, they amassed additional troops at the border. they said they were putting their troops in a state of -- a
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semi state of war. that hasn't happened this time around with the loud speakers. so whether the response will differ, whether there will be a strong response as a result of this fly-by from u.s. bombers or whether we'll continue to see silence has yet to be determined. but this action by the united states and south korea together certainly very provocative, very threatening for the north korean regime. really, that partnership between the u.s. and south korea is how they justify developing the nuclear weapons in the first pla place. >> absolutely. paula, china is a key trading partner with north korea. what sort of pressure can china put on north korea? >> reporter: well, most think that it's fairly limited given the fact that the relationship between north korea and china is nothing like it used to be when kim jong un's father was in charge. certainly the relationship was far better.
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he went and visited beijing and it was a much stronger alliance between the two countries. it's suffered since kim jong un took control. by all reports, the chinese weren't even warned before the nuclear test took place. that has not happened before. certainly, it is an expectation that this would anger the president and embarrasses the regime in china. they didn't know this was going to happen. we have heard from beijing they're calling for the denuclearizing of the peninsula. they're not condoning this test by any stretch of the imagine mags. observers imagine that they will supporting sanctions within the united nations as they have in the past. the question is whether the sanctions have any bite, whether or not the beijing will be pressuring the united nations to water down those sanctions. quite frankly, beijing is supporting the north korean regime. it does trade with the north korean regime without china.
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it's feesable to believe that north korea could well collapse. in that respect, china doesn't want to see a collapse of north korea. it will be careful in what it's calling for. we will expect a strong reaction from china and certainly we would have seen one when kim jong un's father was in control. >> the situation and the relationship between china and north korea has deteriorated. we do know that the foreign minister from china reached out to his countser part in south korea in the last few days. describe the relationship between south korea and china. has that become any stronger? >> well, it's interesting because the chinese president chose to visit south korea before he visited north korea. that's going to sting in pyongyang. he has what appears to be physically and publicly at least a very close relationship or a fairly close relationship with
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president park. the trade between the two is particularly strong. it would appear publicly. it's tough to know what happens behind closed doors. it appears that relationship is strong. we know there have been phone calls between officials in china and in south korea since this nuclear test, and they are considered allies when dealing with this kind of issue from north korea because neither side wants to see a provocation happen on the -- neither side interested for tensions heightened. they will be working together to try and figure out a way to diffuse the situation. but south korea does see the north koreans way to what china does. >> great analysis there. paula hancock in south korea and will ripley in the north. thank you very much for joining
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us. well, in about an hour a ceremony in paris begins to honor those killed in the shoots at "charlie hebdo." all week, france has been remembering the 17 people killed last january in a string of terror attacks. french president hollande will be at the ceremony today at the plaque a de la republique. we will have a live report from paris after the break. stay with us.
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more than 1700 protesters crashed in cologne, germany on saturday. still angry about sexual assaults on new year's eve. they happened during ants migrant protests. there were dozens of assaults on women believed to be silence seekers or illegal immigrants. we have more on the saturday demonstrations. >> reporter: today a protest in cologne, this is the first one to kick it off. solidarity from both women and men who live here in cologne who
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want to protest against these apparently dozens of assaults of women right here in this jair on new year's eve. take a listen to what some of the protesters said about why they came here today. >> translator: i want to keep our space. i don't want to give it to someone else. i have daughters. i may not be young anymore, but i don't want anything to happen to them. we have to be loud. do what these women are doing right now. if someone comes up and touches a woman, she should point the finger at them and stand up so other people can come and help her. >> reporter: an outpouring of solidarity. but this is only the first protest of the day. we're following alongside with another protest, the right wing protests here. police have just announced that they won't be allowed to wear face coverings, any masks and that they must stop firing these
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firecrackers, these fireworks as they mara long. the numbers are much smaller here. just several hundred. maybe 300 or so according to police estimates. that's much smaller than the 1300 on the left protest, on the other side of the train station. there is heavy, heavy securities. riot police in place here to keep the two groups apart, to keep them from clashing. there's been a few scuffles of police and they've brought in -- pull around to take a look. sorry. there's some bottles being thrown here at the moment. we might have to move back. that blue truck is a water cannon. it's being put into position now. that is a firecracker. they've been letting these firecrackers off all day. it is one way for these protesters to cause chaos and disorder, to intimidate people. really, it's just a loud sound.
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it's not a danger to anybody nearby at this point. but it also allows them to scuffle with police, push forward and so forth. as you can see, demonstrations from both the left wing and the right wing have now died down. many have gone home. riot police here just really here as a precaution. they've taken off their helmets. it was a very tense few hours there in cologne. in the days ahead, this is the challenge for police and authorities to try and deal with that public anger about those mass assaults that happened here atika shubert, cnn, cologne. let's turn now to paris and a more wal to remember those lost in the "charlie hebdo." gym bitter man joins us now from paris. jim, it's been a week of memorial events. take us through what we can expect today. >> reporter: well, i think in the next hour or so we're going
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to see president hollande here along with the mayor of paris for what will be an official ceremony. it's invitation only, there will be about 1,000 guests, basically families of the victims and survivors of the various attacks. this ceremony, unlike the other ceremonies this week, doesn't relate to just "charlie hebdo." the attacks there. but also to the attacks of november 13th where 130 people were killed here. this is going to be a ceremony to remember both of those. we're going to hear from one of france's iconic pop stars, johnny holiday. he's going to sing a song about what took place here a year ago. that was this huge march which brought 4 million people from across france into the streets and many of those millions were here in paris marching along with world leaders. so we'll see that as well. but it's a ceremony reduced to a half hour or so.
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later in the day, after the sun has set here towards 5:30 or so local time, there's going to be a candlelight ceremony here. the public is encouraged to come, bring candles, as well as a lighting around a 30-foot oak tree that has been plant here to memorialize the victims of the various attacks of 2015. lynda? >> you mentioned a thousand guests invited to the first event. give us a sense of how many people you think from the public will turn out to the events today to honor those killed in 2015. >> reporter: at this first event, the public is not allowed in. there's a perimeter of security around here and only the people invited are only allowed in. for the rest of the day, there may be more people coming here. i must say that this place de la republique is a place where
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people come and when the attacks happened in november, people have been gathering here and they've been gathering here. on a normal sunday, people would be lighting candles and leaving wishes and memorial statements about those that were killed. it's become a place to gather and to show some kind of feeling about what took place elsewhere in paris. by the way, not so far from here. in fact, november 13th attacks are just a few blocks away, as well as "charlie hebdo" is a few blocks away. >> 2015 a tough year in paris. we appreciate your time today, jim bittermann. we'll talk to you very soon. pope francis is celebrating mass and baptizing newborns in the sistine chapel this sunday. it's the first sunday after the epiphany since the feast of the baptism of the lord. this, of course, is all coming in the wake of another scandal
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affecting the catholic church. according to "the new york times" article, a lawyer says at least 231 boys who sang in an historic bavarian choir were abused over the span of almost four decades. 30 of those years, the choir was led by the older brother of pope benedict. the allegations were detailed in a report released by the choir's diocese on friday. joining us for more on this is senior vatican correspondent, analyst, rather, john allen. he's the associate editor of the boston globe's website covering catholicism and the author of ten books and the vatican and catholic affairs. john, thanks for being with us. now, these allegations include beijing's torture, sexual abuse and the cases date from the '50s to the early '90s. what have you made of this report? >> well, first of all, these are not new charges. they first emerged in 2010 while
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a series of sexual abuse scandals involved in the catholic church was sweeping across europe, beginning in ireland and exploding in germany. at that time, former members of this choir, famed boys choir in the decease in bavaria came forward to allege that they had been abused. we should be clear, there are no allegations of abuse against pope benedict's brother, monsignor ratzinger who was the director of this choir. the vast majority of the allegations concern the top official at a school to which the choir is connected. the choir at that time decided to hire a lawyer to look into these charges, and it has taken him almost four years to do so. so this is actually a report from the choir's own lawyer trying, in effect, to come clean
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about what happened. >> you mentioned reverend ratzinger, the brother of the former pope, isn't facing any sort of allegations or accusations. but the lawyer for that choir says it must be assumed that he knew about the abuse. if he didn't, how difficult will it be for him to clear his name? >> reporter: the lawyer's point was when you look at the scale that we're talking about here, something like 231 victims, every third member of the choir in effect, his point was it is difficult to believe that the person running the choir wouldn't have been aware of it. monsignor ratzinger at this stage is 91 years old. of course, his brother is retired and living in a monastery in the grounds of the vatican. i'm not sure at this stage how impressive he's going to be to try to clear his name. when it first came up in 2010, he said that he didn't know anything about physical or sexual abuse. he conceded that on occasion he
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had slapped members of the choir saying that was simply kind of what you did at that era. he was glad that the practice had gone away but insisted that beyond that, he didn't have knowledge of a pattern of abuse. i suspect he's going to allow that to stand as his last word. >> okay. john allen, we'll have to leave it there for you. we really appreciate you joining us today for all of this. we will talk to you very soon. we're going to take a very quick break. we'll be right back.
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hello.
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i'm lynda kinkade. welcome back to the viewers in the u.s. and around the world. here's an update of the top stories. mexican authorities will begin proceedings to extradite notorious drug lord "el chapo" guzman to the u.s. but the process could take months. guzman's lawyer already filed papers to prevent extradition. "el chapo" was recaptured on friday after a six-month manhunt. in the next half hour, french leaders will honor the victims of the "charlie hebdo" massacre. a ceremony wraps up a week of remembrances of people killed last january during three days of terror in paris. protesters angry over the sexual assault of women in cologne, germany, clashed with police during anti-immigration protests. man ift suspects believed to be asylum seekers. at least 15 demonstrators were arrested and more arrests are expected. an american b-52 bomber made a low pass over the korean peninsula south of the
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demilitarized zone. a show of force came after an explosion was set off they claim was a nuclear test. syrian activists say at least 60 people were killed or wounded in an aerial bombardment. we need to warn you the video is graphic that you're about to see. the syrian observatory for human rights says four missiles targeted a court, a prison and the road between the court and a public market in another area. the death toll is likely to rise. there were also eight air strikes in another town but no losses reported. relief work is planned to deliver desperately needed food to syria on monday. the town of 40,000 people has been under siege by the syrian government since july. we want to warn you that some of the images you're about to see are disturbing. eight groups or doctors without
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borders says 23 people died in madaya since december 1st. starvation is rampant throughout syria and areas held by both the rebels and the syrian government. a spokeswoman with the u.n. world food program joins us live via skype. if you could just give us a sense of how grim the situation is for people in syria living in cities that are essentially cut off from the rest of the world. >> the situation is quite bad for many thousands of people spread throughout syria. we're talking about 400,000 people who are in besiegement. they have no access to food, basic supplies. surviving the harsh winter of syria in this area. madaya, thousands of people cut off from food supplies for three to four months. people need food to survive on every day. what we're hearing is really
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grim. children living, drinking boiling water with some herbs just to keep them alive. we've seen this happen before when we reached areas in beseechment. we've seen children severely malnourished kids, elderly suffering from severe health issues because of the shortage of foods. >> before the graphic images emerged for people on brink of starvation from madaya, were groups like the world food program aware of how grim the situation was there? >> we're aware of how grim the situation is in besieged areas. extremely concerned about that. but it's images like this move the world and move the international community and put pressure on all parts of the conflict to give humanitarian aid workers access. we've been pushing and pursuing all the parties on the ground
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for two or three months for access. never got the clearance once to move these convoys. >> a convoy is expected to arrive on monday. do you know what it will include and how long the supplies could last? >> well, the convoys that are moving tomorrow, which is monday, will be carrying food for 40,000 people for the people in madaya. that's enough for one month to feed them. in addition, it would carry items that include specialized nutrition products for children suffering severe malnutrition in addition to blankets, winter clothing, water purification systems, water and all kinds of humanitarian aid and supply. in addition, another convoy will be heading to the two besieged communities carrying supplies for 20,000 people. this is going simultaneously. it's a one-time convoy. we hope it will continue. we hope we have continued access
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to these communities in addition to the many others which are spread out throughout syria. >> you mentioned that it was difficult to get access into madaya. give us a sense of the challenges groups face to get supplies into those areas. >> it's rounds and rounds of negotiations with all the parties on the ground. you need to have the green light and the permissions to move from one point to the other. we've been waiting with this conflict in syria for the last five years. we learned very much that you cannot move convoys and force food or supplies into besieged areas until you have the guarantees from the people who are controlling the access in and out of the besieged area so that you can enter safely with these trucks, guaranteeing the safety of aid workers as one of the people who are inside the these besieged communities so that we can hold distribution of the food and humanitarian supplies in a safe manner.
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>> abeer etefa. thank you for joining us. all the best with your work. >> thank you. the iraqi military says they've killed a top isis leader in air strikes over anbar province. he was the second deputy of isis leader al baghdadi. military officials say they hit the iraqi city of bar juana, 140 kilometers northwest of ramadi. he was a former prisoner at abu ghraib and served in saddam hussein's special forces. last week's attack on a saudi embassy is being called a terrorist attack. more on what this means for the growing diplomatic tensions between iran and saudi arabia. >> they met for three hours. saudi, bahrain i, qatar i, and
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others coming together. it's a week after the saudi embassy in tehran was torched. we've seen the gulf allies chime in helping to ratchet up the diplomatic tensions some of the countries severing or downgrading diplomatic ties with tehran. we're hearing from the gcc, it ratchets up and keeps the tensions at a high level. accusing tehran of terrorism. although they're tower chg the saudi embassy in tehran last week. this really shows the tensions are staying high. the gcc, the saudis saying they will take unspecified measures to stop what they describe as iran's interference in the region. when they talk about terrorism here, considering that last week the chicago a cleric in saudi arabia was executed on the basis that officials said was his inspiring terrorism, sends a
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very clear message to iran that any further interference as the gcc see it in internal affairs could be met with similar punishment. the rhetoric, the tensions still up there. nic robertson, cnn, riyadh, saudi arabia. just ahead on "cnn newsroom," donald trump rams up his attack against ted cruz. we'll tell you how ted cruz is responding. i am about to embark on a long and dangerous journey.
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welcome back. a new study published by the geophysical union is showing lakes -- we're joined now by someone to talk about the study. >> are you surprised by the findings? >> i think so, yes. it's incredible. we know our planet is warming.
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we know the oceans are warming. this is one element that wasn't looked at. of course, there were organizations keeping track of it. it's a long-term study. the data remarkable to think that 250 lakes were looked at. almost every single one was warming. not only that, they were warming faster than oceans and the atmosphere. it's significant and we'll break down what it all means. the perspective, about 235 lakes monitored around the world in a 25-year study, the warming on .34 degrees celsius. about .16 degrees fahrenheit. the air is warming on the global scale about .18 degrees celsius. the oceans .07 degrees celsius. this is well above that mark. think about what this means. freshwater supply, about half of the lakes account for about half of the freshwater supply on our planet coming from these lakes. when you warm them up, algae blooms, they take over what's happening and depletes oxygen
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levels by 20%. toxic algae can form and that impacts marine life in this region. when you release algae, you're releasing methane gas and that's more harmful than carbon dioxide is. we use it for energy production, irrigation and also other uses as well. incredible to think this would be occurring and it is occurring and you take a look at the global scale, red and orange dots indicating the temperatures above normal and the areas across the great lakes of the united states. that's where the warmest occurrence has been happening. lake tahoe for example. .36 degrees warmer. almost 1 degree warmer across portions of lake superior. northern europe into the sea north of iran, significant warming also taking place across that region. talking about the opposite end of the spectrum, want to show you the midwestern united states.
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massive, massive surge of cold air, one of the coldest air outbreaks in two to three years' time there. windchills this morning, 30 degrees below zero across minneapolis in minnesota. a big football game taking place out there. temperatures with windchills at 15 to 20 below potentially. be very, very dangerous and difficult for the players as well. >> no fun if you're watching as a spectator. >> freezing cold. thanks. good to see you. >> likewise. well, republican presidential candidate donald trump is ramping up attacks against rival ted cruz in the crucial iowa primary. some are calling it another birther conspiracy, targeting his legitimacy of -- here are the latest comments. >> donald trump on saturday training his fire on ted cruz reviving the birther issue.
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speaking in clear lake, iowa, trump says because cruz was born in canada, that could raise serious questions about his eligibility to be president. here's what he said. >> he was born in canada. i say to ted and as a republican i said, i think it's very importantp you got to get it straightened out. you cannot put somebody there who is going to be in and immediately sued by the democrats because they're saying he was born in canada, not allowed to run for president. if there's that doubt. don't forget the lawsuits, who knows more about lawsuits than i do. i'm the king. i'm the king. these lawsuits take two, three, four years. so you can't have somebody running, you cannot have somebody running and have a lawsuit and people have already said they're going to bring the lawsuit. they say if he gets the nomination, we'll bring in a lawsuit as to natural born citizenship. >> this attack a clear sign that ted cruz is his biggest threat in iowa. we're three weeks from the iowa
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caucuses and trump says in order to bring up poll numbers, he needs to go on the offensive against cruz. in recent weeks, trump has raised questions about cruz's stance onne ethanol subsidies. it looks like it's going to be a two-man race between trump and cruz in iowa. m.j. lee reporting. who wants to be a millionaire. >> the new jack port worth over a billion dollars. coming up after the break. we'll have the details.
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welcome back. the jackpot for the u.s. powerball lottery has reached a record breaking $1.3 billion. that's because there were no winners in last night's record draw of $949 million. excitement really started to build last weekend when the jackpot had $400 million. prompting mms of people across the country to try their luck at the big prize. but no one won that one either. so the jack got kept growing. the previous record high in the u.s. lottery payout was $656 million.
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the current jackpot is already twice that amount. and the next draw is this wednesday. so it wasn't to be on saturday. this wednesday, if you do hold the winning powerball ticket, what happens next? here's a look at the lottery system and the options you'd have should you find yourself with a ticket and the fact that you might suddenly be a billionaire. have a look. >> your odds of winning powerball jackpot, 1 in 292 million. you're more likely to be struck by lightning or have conjoined twins. people keep playing because dreaming about winning millions of dollars is more fun than about being attacked by a shark. americans spend $70 billion on lottery tickets each year. 60 to 70% spent on scratch tickets. the rest spent on powerball and mega millions. the red powerball number. to win the jackpot, you must match all six numbers.
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the odds of winning never change despite how many play. the only thing that changes is how much you can win. the total is just an estimate. the percentage of every ticket sold goes into a pool. that money is split evenly if there are multiple winners. winners are offered two options, a cash payout or annuity jackpot. if a winner chooses the cash payout, the lottery gives him or her the entire amount. state and federal income taxes taken out immediately. if they pick the annuity, they invest the cash in government securities. they're given 30 payments over 29 years plus any interest earned. it's treated like income each year on the winner's tax form. the u.s. wasn't the only country with a big jackpot on the line. 66 million pounds was the uk's lottery. it had two lucky winners. the prize money there is
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tax-free. not bad if you can get it. last month we told you about the fellas. some stray golden retrievers rescued in turkey. it was popular to adopt them as puppies. once they grow up, people are abandoning them on the street. the so-called turkey dogs are finding new homes in lantz. >> in the streets of istanbul, turkey, to a comfort home in atlanta, georgia. daisy has come a long way. she's one of more than 100 golden retrievers that were rescued from turkey and brought to the united states in the hope of giving them a better life. this is the fifth group to arrive in atlanta this year. i was in turkey and met with the group that rescues these dogs and they have partnered with adopt a golden atlanta that is trying to help these animals find their forever homes in the united states. adopt a golden founder says
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adoption day was a grand success and these dogs are doing really well in their new homes. >> they're thriving. you see pictures daily of them. they have their own beds and toys. they're loving the american life. >> nearly everyone who came to adoption day went home with a new family member. the libbys adopted jelly, the 100th gold tone arrive in the united states for their granddaughter. now the two of them are inseparable. >> good boy. >> one of them, lira, got to be best dog at the wedding of her new friend amanda dukes. of course, dogs like daisy don't have to worry anymore about where their next meal is coming from. in fact, they don't have to worry about anything at all really except to sit in the sun in the backyard and play. sara sidner, cnn, los angeles.
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>> they look like they've found themselves at home. that does it for this edition of "cnn newsroom." i'm lynda kinkade. i'll be back after the break with more news from across the world. stay with us.
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at this hour, paris is remembering those who died in the terrorist assaults of last january and november. these are live pictures from the capital of france right now. one year after the attack at charlie hen dough, magazine. also ahead, the recapture of "el chapo" where he was held. where he was taken. the billion dollar lottery.
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when nobody wins, the jackpot just keeps growing. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world. i'm lynda kinkade. this is "cnn newsroom." we begin in paris where a ceremony is getting under way remembering the victims of the november 13th, terror attacks and the massacre at "charlie hebdo" magazine a year ago. french president francois hollande is expected to unveil a plaque and a remembrance three will be bit. france spent the last several days honoring people killed after three days of terror. jim bittermann joins us from paris now. it's been a big week of memorial events. tell us what the mood is like today. >> reporter: well, i think a pretty somber mood actually. as you mentioned, this is a ceremony that is recognized not
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only the events of a year ago, "charlie hebdo" in which 17 people were killed but the events of november 13th in which 130 people were killed. not far from this very square in paris. this is the place de la republique, only a few blocks away from the bataclan, the concert hall where many of the 130 people were killed and more than 300 people injured in the attack. so it's a very somber mood. we see there the president hollande and ann hidalgo, the mayor of paris and prime minister to the right. standing at attention in front of the various memorials here. including that plaque you mentioned which has been unveiled by the dignitaries. and that plaque is in front of a tree, an oak tree planted especially to memorialize the victims. now, we're going to have a little musical interlude here and expect to see some speeches and what not later on in the
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day, lynda. >> jim, of course, this time last year, more than a million people, including many world leaders marched through the streets of paris in a show of solidarity. just explain for us how many people you expect to come out to the various events today and have you seen any foreign leaders? >> reporter: well, there won't be any foreign leaders. this is strictly organized by the city of paris. it's basically a memorial that's, this morning at least, is just for 1,000 invited people. they're going to be the families of the victims, as well as some of the survivors of the various attacks who are invited there in a special area here and we're kept a long way away from that. later today, the security will be dropped and anybody that wants can come out here and are expected to bring candles as the
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mayor of paris urged them. there will be a number of people who will memorialize the various victims of the attacks here. later on, it will be more moving as the evening wears on, they'll light this oak tree that's been planted and there will be a candlelit ceremony around this square. i would imagine there would be hundreds, perhaps thousands of people come out to the square. lynda. >> jim bittermann live for us in paris as that memorial ceremony gets under way. we'll talk to you soon. thanks so much. we will, of course, have more from paris as we continue to cover the ceremony in remembrance of all the paris terror attack victims of 2015. mexican authorities have begun the extradition proceedings of fugitive drug lord guzman known as "el chapo." he was recaptured on friday and is back behind bars outside mexico city in a maximum security prison. this is the same prison he escaped from back in july.
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the u.s. began extradition proceedings last year. guzman's lawyer is fighting to make sure that does not happen. >> translator: mr. guzman should not have been extradited to the united states or any other country. what's the reason? because mexico has just law that is are detailed in the general constitution of the republic. we're learning more about "el chapo's" time on the run. he met with sean penn before his recapture. penn wrote an article for the rolling stone magazine. in this cell phone video recording by "el chapo's" associate, guzman talks about his role in the drug world. [ inaudible ] [ speaking foreign language ]
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>> reporter: this hotel is locate odd n the outskirts of the town, maybe six kilometers, three or four miles. when you look at it, it's a perfect place for federal authorities to bring "el chapo." remember, it's just after they've had a shootout and chased him allegedly through the sewer system. look at this. this is a hotel room that has its own garage space. now, the federal authorities could have pulled right in here, taken "el chapo" out undercover and walked him right into this room. and if you look, this is the room. it's the room that you see that's been made famous now as a result of the photograph.
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in fact, just sort of guesstimating "el chapo" would have been sitting right about here looking off in that direction. with a rather sullen look on his face. there is one thing missing. you might have noticed in the background, certainly a lot of men did in the photograph. there was another photo of a woman not wearing a whole lot up in this area. it appears that's been taken down. who has it or why? we don't know. we do know that federal authorities had "el chapo" in here for about an hour and a half until they could get reinforcements and essentially get their act together to be ready to move him and transport him. fairly standard room. got a toilet, got a shower. and got a sink and wash-up area. it's located right by the highway. so there are a lot of things that make this room almost ideal for the job that they had. and it's hidden away. it's almost like a fortress.
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thanks to that photograph, thanks to the most wanted man in all of mexico and america, this room is now world famous. martin savidge, cnn, mexico. spoke withville via long mire about whether mexico can keep him in prison this time around much. it still takes time to plan. his lawyers have time obviously to work up the appeal and i think it's up to 20 days to get all the details sorted out. most likely, that will be denied. i think it's in mexico's best interest to put him on a plane to the u.s. as quickly as possible. >> what does the u.s. gain as far as having guzman in their purview and perhaps him giving up information to the u.s.?
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>> sure. that's obviously the biggest benefit is the intelligence value that he has. ironically enough, that's one of the bigger reasons from what i understand that the mexican government didn't want to give him up for extradition when they caught him in february 2014. the mexican government was somewhat upset that the u.s. government hadn't shared more intelligence from other individuals extradited before. obviously the importance and value of guzman as an intelligence asset, i guess you could say, kind of trumps the concerns about mexico's sovereignty in that regard. >> long mire also say that his capture will not cause much of a disruption in the drug cartel since they most likely have a strong plan of secession in place. a bomber over a show of force in the korean peninsula. the b-52 flew in the demilitarized zone after a massive explosion that was detonated they say was a hydrogen bomb.
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will hripley joins us. but first we want to turn to paula hancocks from seoul. talk about this flyover. how powerful is the b-52 bomber and what is the u.s. hoping to achieve with this show of force? >> reporter: well, lynda, the message is very clear. it is a show of force. it could carry conventional and -- it's flanked by fighter jets doing a fly-by over south of the border here in south korea. it couldn't be a clearer message. they are showing that they are standing side by side they say it's a demonstration of the ironclad -- in south korea and japan and to the defense of the american homeland. the timing is interesting. i must mention that this has happened once before or twice
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before. back in march 2013 after the third nuclear attack by north korea. but that time it took the u.s. about a month before it brought these b-52 bombers in and then they said it was part of the ongoing military drills with south korea. this time, it took four days since that nuclear test and the u.s. has been very clear that it is in response to that nuclear test. lynda? >> certainly much faster response this time. paula, stand by. i want to bring in will ripley for the reaction out of north korea. is it likely that anyone in the regime there will sit up and take notice of this fly-over? >> reporter: absolutely, lynda. while we don't have an official reaction from pyongyang, you can bet that the military officials here in north korea are very aware that this has occurred. u.s. bombers coming close to north korean territory is extremely infuriating for many
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of the military higher-ups here. they have designed this city essentially, there's a giant underground bunker system, the me row. it's a subway line that's underground. one of the deepest in the entire world because it doubles as a bomb shelter. people receive weekly education about history and the korean war prominently plays in how the military policies are to this day. it's really the threat from the united states or the perceived threat of an invasion from the united states and allies is how north korea continues to justify to its people spending a tremendous amount of resources developing its military, including nuclear weapons and missile technology. >> will, do you think this latest fly-over by the u.s. and south korea will escalate the tensions we've already seen in that region? >> reporter: well, if you think about what happened last time and you remember paula mentioned
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that there were b-52s in march and stealth bombers flown later on in the month of march. so two actions from the united states that upped the game. in response, north korea put out statements saying things like they were burning with hatred. they put missiles on stand by to launch to u.s. bases in south korea in the pacific. they even aimed their long-range missiles towards the u.s. homeland before the situation did eventually deescalate. obviously the united states doesn't want to provoke north korea to the point they would actually fire a missile and the north korean regime doesn't want that to happen either. if you look at the weaponry from both sides, north korea can't speet with the united states armed forces and that's what the flyovers are intended to do, send a message to the north. but the nuclear tests earlier this week on wednesday was also intended to send a message to the world that north korea is ready to defend itself. if their national sovereignty is
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compromised, they say they will stop at nothing to protect themselves. >> will, stand by. back to paula. paula, china is a key trading partner and ally of north korea. the u.s. hoping that china uses its influence on the north. what can we expect from china? >> well, lynda, we've seen in recent days, china almost on a defensive footing. a lot of people around the world have said, if they wanted to, china could fix the problem. the foreign ministry spokeswoman has had to come out and say that china doesn't hold the key to solving this issue. saying the origins of the issue don't lie in china. they lie elsewhere. the fact is, with kim jong un's father, the late kim jong-il, a case could have been made that china held the key to solve the issue. there was a closer relationship between the then president in china and kim jong-il. he advice theed the country and
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it was a more amicable relationship. this time around, according to official reports, china wasn't warned about this nuclear test. it was warned the previous three times. as was russia and the u.s. a couple of times. nobody was warned. it is an embarrassment to beijing. it is a slap in the face and would anger the administration there. to say that china can wield a tremendous amount of power with north korea would be inaccurate. it has some power, though, because it is the strongest ally and the largest trading partner. lynda? >> that clearly shows that china's relationship with north korea has deteriorated. paula in seoul and will ripley in pyongyang. we appreciate your time today. thanks so much. hundreds of people are marching in hong kong outside the beijing representative's office. they're protesting in support of five missing book sellers from hong kong.
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they disappeared under mysterious circumstances in late december after garnering a public reputation for publishing work critical to the chinese government. hong kong opposition leaders have suggested chinese authorities are behind the disappearance. the foreign minister would only say what happens in hong kong are internal chinese affairs. donald trump has been on the offensive against ted cruz. we'll tell you what some are calling the new birther conspiracy. plus, we're watching a ceremony in paris happening now honoring the people killed in last year's terror attacks. we'll have more on that just ahead. ♪ we stop arthritis pain, so you don't have to stop. because you believe in go. onward. today's the day. carpe diem. tylenol® 8hr arthritis pain
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♪ give me a mile and a half ♪ for every buck i spend. ♪ double my miles when the first year ends. ♪ ♪ no annual fees, ♪ no blackouts, ♪ let the fun begin. ♪ don't fence me in. get the discover it miles card. back now to paris where french president francois hollande and other leaders gathered for a ceremony to honor the people from a string of shootings in january and the terror attacks in november. mr. hollande unveiled a plaque and later a remembrance tree will be lit. republican presidential candidate donald trump is ramping up his rhetoric against rival ted cruz. trump is targeting him as he battles cruz for a crucial win
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in iowa. the main thrust of the recent attacks has been what some are calling a new birther conspiracy. targeting cruz's legitimacy as a u.s. citizen. m.j. lee reports on trump's latest remarks. >> donald trump on saturday training his fire on ted cruz reviving the birther issue. speaking in clear lake, iowa, trump says because cruz was born in canada, that could raise serious questions about his eligibility to be president. here's what he said. >> he was born in canada. i say to ted and as a republican i said, i think it's very important, you got to get it straightened out. you cannot put somebody there who is going to be in and immediately sued by the democrats because they're saying he was born in canada, not allowed to run for president. if there's that doubt. don't forget the lawsuits, who knows more about lawsuits than i do. i'm the king. i'm the king. these lawsuits take two, three, four years. so you can't have somebody
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running, you cannot have somebody running and have a lawsuit and people have already said they're going to bring the lawsuit. they say if he gets the nomination, we'll bring in a lawsuit as to natural born citizenship. >> this attack a clear sign that donald trump understands that ted cruz is his biggest threat in the state of iowa. we're three weeks from the iowa caucuses and trump says in order to bring up poll numbers, he needs to go on the offensive against cruz. in recent weeks, trump has raised questions about cruz's stance on ethanol subsidies. an issue very important in the state where farming is a very big industry. it looks increasingly like in iowa, it's going to be a two-man race between trump and cruz in iowa. m.j. lee reporting. cnn's jake tapper sat down with ted cruz and asked the candidate about the citizenship and the controversy that now surrounds it. >> carly fiorina saying the other day, she says it's odd
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that it wasn't until 2014 that you were announced your dual citizenship, your citizenship with canada. i know you say you didn't know about it until the dallas morning news wrote the story in 2013. did you ever go back after that dallas morning news story and try to find out more about your parents' time in canada, whether they did -- did they vote in canada when they were there? >> no, they did not. >> my mother didn't because she was a u.s. citizen. the internet has all sorts of fevered swamp theories, but the facts are simple. my mom was born this will ming tan, delaware was an american citizen all 81 years of her life. never been a citizen of any other place. >> you can watch jake tapper's full interview with ted cruz on state of the union at 9:00 a.m. eastern time. 2:00 p.m. in london and 10:00 p.m. in long hong kong.
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dangerously cold air settled across parts of north america. >> winter is here. >> you're here too. how cold is it? >> cold enough to freeze antifreeze in vehicles. 8 to 10 below zero. very cold. dangerously cold as you said. we'll talk about what's happening here. incredible pattern here. last time it was this cold, a polar vortex pattern, as we discussed several years ago, similar setup when it comes to the arctic air farther to the south. it dives towards the midwestern united states. you look at the temperatures this morning. 34 degrees below zero. international falls, by the way, that's the icebox of the united states. well-known for cool temperatures. look at minot. that's the town in northern north dakota. they have a saying in that town, they say why not in minot. 27 below is probably the reason not to be around that part of the world this time of year. the temperatures dangerously cold again when you get to these
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levels. multiple waves of arctic air, 25 to 30 degrees below average. a major football game taking place across that area. the seahawks, the vikings. game time around 1:00 p.m. 15 or so to 22 below zero. in five to ten minutes, frostbite begins to set in. five minutes of windchills at 50 below zero for frostbite to set in. pattern going to persist for a couple of days. hard to believe, it's counterintuitive when you think about extreme cold or climate change and global warming. there's studies done that the melting of of the ice caps displaces the jet streams. the cold air drops south. certainly could play a role in what's happening. want to touch on this. studies coming out in the last several days touching on the incredible warmth on the lakes around the world. a 25-year study conducted over 235 lakes around the world that noticed and observed temperatures on the lakes, the water temperatures up about .34
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degrees celsius every single decade. that's an alarming number. you look and compare that to the atmospheric warming per decade that's happening, the oceanic warming that's occurring, lakes take the largest chunk there when it comes to the increase in temps. why is this significant? a big percentage of freshwater comes from the lakes. it reduces oxygen inside the water. the marine life significantly impacted. it could become toxic. algae releases methane gas that's more destructive as a greenhouse gas in trapping heat than carbon dioxide. about 25 times more destructive. this is an incredible finding. oceans and the atmospheric temperatures are warming at the lakes warming at a much more rapid rate as well. >> incredible study. good to have you with us. >> thanks for having me. still to come, diplomatic tensions arising after the saudi execution of a shiite cleric. we'll tell you why six countries
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are saying that iran incited terrorist acts. french leaders are holding a ceremony honoring the people killed in last year's terrorist attacks. hey, you forgot the milk! that's lactaid. right. 100% real milk, just without the lactose. so you can drink all you want... ...with no discomfort? exactly. here, try some... mmm, it is real milk. see? delicious. hoof bump! oh. right here girl, boom lactaid®. 100% real milk. no discomfort and for a creamy and delicious treat, try lactaid® ice cream
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i'm lynda kinkade. an update of the top stories we're following this hour. mexican authorities will begin proceedings to extra died notorious drug lord joaquin "el chapo" guzman to the u.s. the process could take months. guzman's lawyer has already filed papers to prevent extradition. "el chapo" was recaptured on
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friday after a six-month manhunt. the catholic church is facing another scandal. that's according to a insuring times article. a lawyer spoke to the times saying at least 231 boys who sang in a bavarian choir were abused for 30 decades. for 30 years, it was led by george rat sing zinger. >> a ceremony to honor the victims of paris terror attacks. they're remembering both those killed in the jana tax as well as the 130 people killed in the nova tax. later, a tree will be lit in remembrance of the victims.
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it was for france a terrifying end to innocence. if the shots and shouts and bloody scenes had long been predicted, no one, not the police, nor government officials nor the public could have anticipated the awful reality of homegrown terrorists striking at the heart of the french capital. it was not just on the cartoonists and others who were killed. it was an attack on the fundamental right of freedom of expression, which the edgy, satirical newspaper, "charlie hebdo" always exercised to the fullest. a year later, commemorative plaques have gone up, freedom of expression lives on. the newspaper lives on as well, albeit from a much more secure and secret location. in fact, financially, "charlie hebdo" has never been stronger. before the attacks, it struggled to survive, printing 30,000
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copies a week. since then, there's been a six-fold increase in circulation and mulls of euros in -- >> the act which made "charlie hebdo" the target of fundamentalists. he sees no need to do so at the moment. still, he admits the tone of the newspaper has changed. >> translator: so here we are, one year later, with a vision which might be a little more pes pessimistic. >> is it more difficult to be funny now? >> translator: no we find the urge to laugh because we have the will to live. >> the newspaper is something of a reflexes -- it's seen more than its fair share of tragedy since the "charlie hebdo" attack. that targeted attack was one thing. but as many here pointed out,
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the kind of indiscriminate attacks that killed and injured hundreds on november 13th were entirely different. >> i think france has changed. i think the events of january last year were an enormous symbolic shock beyond the actual physical violence of the events. i think it's raised a lot of questions about french identities, perhaps some of the causes of this awful attack. >> reporter: shortly after the newspaper was attacked, one observer thought they were going to kill "charlie hebdo" but in fact they've made it stronger. a year later the words ring just as true. not only for the newspaper but perhaps even for france itself. jim bittermann, cnn, paris. i'm joined by journalist stephan devries, one of the first people to arrive on the scene of the attacks in paris. thanks for joining us today.
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give us a sense of how you're feeling and what you remember about that day. >> reporter: well, it was a very strange day. like you said, i was one of the first to arrive on the scene on january 7th because my office is only five minutes away from the "charlie hebdo," where they were having their offices at the time. when i arrived, actually maybe at the same moment as the emergency services and the situation was very unclear, trying to gather information from the police who was running around very frantically. they had no idea either. first there were reports of two people injured by a shooting. then it was three people injured, one dead. two dead and then about -- took about a half hour when we learned that 12 people had died within "charlie hebdo's" premises and amongst them, a lot of members of the magazine. then suddenly we realized that more journalists had gathered at that moment already. suddenly we realized that 12 colleagues had been killed in cold blood on a clear day in
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january 2015. >> that day, of course, was one year ago on thursday. on thursday we saw a man that was killed by police as he approach a police station in northern paris with a meat cleaver wearing what turned out to be a fake explosives vest and claimed to be doing it in the name of isis. just talk to us about the concerns in paris, about fears about another terrorist assault. what's the feeling like there? >> reporter: well, of course, the reasons are very tense. in january, "charlie hebdo" attacks, they thought it was a targeted attack. but then the attacks in november showed that basically everybody in paris could be a target. people just enjoying life. having a drink on a terrace. something all the parisians do every day. it's changed very much. the attitude of the parisians in daily life. when you go into stores and supermarkets everywhere, your
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bags are being checked. there's a lot of police in the streets, also very heavily armed military troops. this has changed completely. the parisians stay resilient, say we're not afraid. if you look at the restaurants and bars and hotels and even museums, they all have -- well, they have a big problem that people are not coming. it has a huge economic impact. of course, a mental impact. parisians are very afraid. as we've seen this week again with the attack on the police station north of paris. the danger has not gone. attacks happen every day, everywhere on every single moment. >> of course, reaction to the massacre in november, the french president took up the fight against isis in syria and iraq. just explain for us what's being done to fight those sort of lone wolf attackers within france. >> reporter: well, the actions
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in syria against isis by the french army are not very controversial. over 90% of the french population supports the french action in syria. but that was the case right after the attacks. now almost two months later people start asking questions what, are the effects, what are the costs. is it really useful? there's also a change of politics. as you know, we're still under a state of emergency in france which will last theoretically until the end of february. but the government has introduced a bill earlier this week that will implement all the extreme measures the police has now into normal legislation. this is a very -- this is a very sensitive point to academics but also to judges who are saying now that democracy in france is under danger. it's something we've seen after 9/11 in the usa. but it's a debate that's just beginning and actually the biggest question of our time is how far do we have to go with
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security to guarantee liberties. that's something the french president has not answered yet and it will without a doubt be the topic of this year. >> certainly tough question as well. stefan devries, thanks for joining us today. we appreciate it. more than a million migrants made their way into europe last year, each one of course has a heart-wrenching story. ahead we'll meet a filmmaker who is documenting their fight. plus, we'll tell you why six sunni led countries are accusing iran of intervening in the world affairs of saudi arabia. skincal with roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1. proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. but grandmcause we uses we don't charmin ultra soft.clean. charmin ultra soft gets you clean without the wasteful wadding. it has comfort cushions you can see
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welcome back. the foreign ministers of more than 20 countries of the arab league council are meeting to discuss the attack in iran last weekend. at a summit the six countries of the gulf corporation council called that attack a terrorist act. seven countries have cod ld down diplomatic relations. during that attack on the saudi embassy, the protesters tried to set it on fire. that came after they execute thd cleric. manry infuriated over the execution of sheik nimr al nimr. cnn international diplomatic editor nic robertson has more on the long-time rivals. >> reporter: they met for three hours. saudi, armani, kuwaiti and
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others coming together. it's a week after the saudi embassy in tehran was torched. we've seen saudis sort of arab and gulf allies chime in helping ratchet up this past week if you will on the diplomatic tensions. some of the countries severing or downgrading ties with tehran. we're hearing from the gcc, this ratchets up and keeps the tensions at a high level. accusing tehran of terrorism although people on the streets of tehran torching the saudi embassy and tehran last week. this really shows that the tensions are staying high. the saudis, the gcc saying they'll take unspecified measures, so far unspecified measures to stop what they describe as iran's interference in the region. when they talk about terrorism here considering last weekend the she i cleric was executed. on the basis of inspiring
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terrorism sends a clear message to iran that any further interference as the gcc see it in their internal affairs could be met with similar punishment. the rhetoric, the tensions still right up there. nic robertson, cnn, riyadh, saudi arabia. the strife between them is one hotspot in the middle east. stories of human misery continue to emerge from across the region. one filmmaker documented some of that suffering. he traveled through europe producing a film about a young afghan refugee and his friends. >>. [ speaking foreign language ]
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[ speaking foreign language ] >> the filmmaker spoke with cnn's jonathan manm about the plight of the refugees and the difficulties he witnessed. >> that young boy, his story is repeated thousands of times. let's go back, though, to one
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photograph that you have that appears in the film and that is all of them crammed into the trunk. it looks almost like a children's prank. it looks like something you might do on a joyride. how long did they travel like that? >> it's hard to say. they were basically telling me about their journey and they spent many hours in the trunk of this car. they were in the back of pickups racing across the desert. they arrived in turkey, they traveled an hour across the choppy sea and i spent six hours with them on a train traveling across macedonia. >> we have another photograph from that train ride. let's look at it now. it gives you a sense of how young is that child? i presume someone is taking care of her. in that picture you get a sense of the isolation. these are very fragile people, and they're traveling basically with literally the goods in their bags. in this case, there's a human being. >> she's a 2-year-old girl from
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afghanistan. i was traveling with her uncle. he had gone up to have a cigarette. i was looking after her. what's interesting, they were traveling with everything in their bag and they were sharing it with me. here, have a snack, have water. i felt guilty taking it. but this train car, there was no heat. the windows were frozen over. on this car, there was no functioning bathroom. the conditions were tough winter had arrived. >> you get a sense of the vul nernlt. you get a sense, again, children, so many of your images are of children making this journey. >> what people have to remember is, about 45% of the people arriving on the shores of greece are women and children. these are three brothers from afghanistan. and throughout the car there are children, mothers. >> this picture once again speaks to the journey. there's another picture that jumped out at me. you have to explain the story. because this is what looks like a campfire. you can make out what seems to
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be smiles on these men's faces. this looks like a nice night out for a group of friends. it isn't that, though. >> it's not that. these guys are in no man's land. europe stopped accepting anyone from syria, iraq or afghanistan. these guys are from somewhere else. they were stuck between the border of greece and macedonia. it was a light moment here. but it was anything but light during the day. there were protests between the migrants and the police, the mass doanian police who erected a barbed wire fence. this happened to be a light moment. the days were grueling. i stood between the riot police and the migrants and it was not pretty. >> we have shots from that. our next photograph is, i guess -- you set this up for us. >> so, behind him are macedonian police. behind him it macedonia. they're stuck. when they arrived on the shores of greece, they thought they would be welcomed. but the policy changed. if you weren't from one of three
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countries you were stuck. this guy was stuck. >> let me just ask you, we can't avoid the headlines coming out of germany, the protests in cologne. those are people who made it into europe. you've been with people struggling and enduring and sacrificing. what goes through your mind as you see the reaction in germany. >> two thoughts. one, the german people have a right to be angry. i think if you're an asylum seeker and you commit aid violent crime, you need to be deported. the second point is, don't use this as an excuse to ignore the humanitarian crisis that will face hundreds of thousands of women and children as they flee war in situations like in syria seeking safety in europe. >> thomas nybo, you've been traveling with them for months. great work. >> thanks, jonathan. >> we'll be back with more after this. hair, strands always break off.
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been growing since november 7th. excitement started to build last weekend when it hit $400 million. so the next draw is wednesday. if anyone wins the big prize, lottery officials say that after tax, the cash value is worth $800 million. not bad if you can get it. there's been a windfall for a canadian maker of pet clothe after an internet debate over the proper way for dogs to wear pants. jeanne moos settles the matter once and for all. >> who wears the pants in your relationship, you or your dog? now you both can. this is the story of how a jokey doggie diagram that went viral led to a bonanza for muddy muts. >> business is a little ridiculous. >> first the ridiculous question. a 19-year-old student in belgium claims his girlfriend's dog got him thinking. if a dog wore pants, would he
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wear them like this, on four legs or like this on two hind legs. the internet wept nuts joking about the question. would pants on the behind legs be shorts or both wrong since pants are supposed to cover your put. then muddy mutts unmuddied the water. >> you think you've settled the argument wunts once and for all. >> it is settled. >> pants for dogs already exist. waterproof nylon waders sold by husband and wife company in canada for 50 bucks u.s. >> it looks really funny. when you get tired of cleaning a dog for 20 minutes after a walk, it's really practical. >> it was a neesh product until it went viral and tim skelly says sales jumped 2800%. >> i'd love to show you one. but i even sold the one on our model dog. >> now there's a waiting list as tim races to make more muddy mutts. >> does, like people, have to
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put their pants one leg at a time. >> the easiest way to put it on is start to the front leg. >> put on each leg and fasten the velcro cuffs. there are three straps. then your dog can look like a studly fireman. it original led to spoofs like how would a ferret wear a tube top and how would an earth worm wear clothes. even the owner of rocky, the dog that inspired the debate is considering buying a pair of muddy mutts, though we doubt rocky himself is panting for pants. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. well, that does it for this edition of "cnn newsroom." i'm lynda kinkade. for viewers in the u.s. -- for everyone else, the best of quest starts in a moment.
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