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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  March 20, 2016 11:00pm-1:01am PDT

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doesn't have to pick one or the other. other. maybe they can share. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is a historic visit, and it's a historic opportunity to engage directly with the cuban people. >> barack obama becomes the first sitting president to visit cuba in 80 years. an exclusive look at the largest joint military exercise between the u.s. and south korea and how seoul's northern neighbor is reacting many plus, as another campaign rally gets feisty, how does the rest of the world feel about the prospect of president donald trump? we'll bring you reports from israel and india. all that, plus a live report
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from amman, jordan on the u.s. resource on the fight against isis. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. "cnn newsroom" starts now. cuba and the united states are embarking on a new chapter in relations, stamped with president obama's historic visit to havana. he is the first u.s. president to visit cuba in 88 years. the trip caps a reengagement process that began in december 2014. >> now hours before mr. obama arrived, police arrested scores of cuban dissidents from the group "ladies in white." >> and president obama is scheduled to meet with dissidents later in the trip.
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we have more on the president's itinerary. >> reporter: change is in the air as president obama prepares to spend hess first full day here on the island. the president will begin his day laying a wreath at the memorial for jose marr tee. the president and his family took a walking tour and stopped at the old capital. that was before he addressed members of the u.s. embassy. >> it's been nearly 90 years since a u.s. president stepped foot in cuba. it is wonderful to be here. back in 1928, president coolidge came on a battleship. it took him three days to get here. it only took me three hours. [ laughter ] >> reporter: later on tomorrow, the president will be delivering a speech to the cuban people. he will be talking about
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expanding human rights, freedom of speech and freedom of the press. he will wind down his trip to cuba with a baseball game between the cuban national team and the tampa bay rays. jim acosta, cnn, havana. >> this underscores president obama's vow to extend a hand to traditional u.s. enemies. >> i know your work load is a lot heavier than it was. but i want you to know everything we've accomplished so far, more americans coming to cuba, more engagement with the cuban people, civil society, faith groups, entrepreneurs, students, young people, more opportunities for the cuban people to improve their lives, it's all happening because of you. every single day, you're bringing the cuban people and the american people closer together. >> now the trip has its u.s. critics who say it rewards an authoritarian regime that has made no substantive moves
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towards change. republican candidate and real estate mogul donald trump took issue with raul castro's failure to meet president obama on hess arrival. >> we are amateur hour, folks, amateur hour. and honestly, obama should have turned the plane around and left. no, he should have. he should have turned it around. should have said bye-bye. he's not here? and i'm not knocking castro. i mean, if they can get away with this stuff, it's great. they make it a great deal, because, you know, they're making a deal. it's fine to do it, but you got to make a better deal, like the clothes i told you about, but honestly, number one, it should never happen. but if it did happen, it's go bye-bye. we'll see you in a couple years or maybe a couple of decades. >> now donald trump has cast a businessman's eye toward cuba saying if he were president he'd
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strike a better deal. now a hotel has struck its own multi-million agreement which could mean managing as many as two hotels in the region. >> we are very proud to be in this pivotal moment. and in the hospitality industry. we are thrilled to be the first company to sign management contracts. >> reporter: how did you become the first company? >> i think it's a testament of the hard work of people who put up the workday after day. and starwood has been a pioneer in opening new markets. we've had a great presence in china, argentina, chile. >> this is about sheratons.
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>> we have one in myanmar. >> it has been a long process, a very thoughtful one. a lot of regulations involved. we obtain a license from the u.s. government last week. we apply, of course, many, many months ago. and locally, we have been working toward this moment. we are very proud to offer the travelers around the world a better way to experience. >> reporter: how is this going to work? you're effectively a partner with the cuban state, and that brings in itself a number of challenges. >> i mean, we are partners of the cuban companies that they manage hotels. and this sh no different from other parts of the world many we
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have a management account as we usually do, and we'll be able to operate under our standards. >> reporter: but still, you are going to be working within a pretty challenging environment with staff for example trying to source food and that sort of thing. the minuenusha of running a hot. >> what is a similar model? china? vietnam? >> china is one. we are the largest hotel operator in china. we have more hotels operating that all our competition combined. and we have a great presence there. >> what lessons do you large early on in china that you might apply -- >> in general, we don't go into any specifics. it's a highly-regulated economy, right? therefore you need to be very careful in complying with the laws.
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in this case, we have laws very careful to apply, the license we apply for, the u.s. and local law. >> a lot of lawyers involved. >> a lot of lawyers and a lot of expertise. >> are you going to be able to live up to the brand? is that going to be challenging? >> it's going to be a challenge. it's going to be exciting. and we are going to be able to do it. and coming up next hour, we will take a closer look at who is backing closer ties between cuba and the u.s. and why. all right, we have new images we want to show to you. and they show north korean leader kim jong un inspecting what we understand are military drills. >> state-run media broadcast the images of kim watching exercises on the coastline, including landing exercises by the korean people's army. the exact date of the drills is unknown. >> but all of this comes during a time of heightened tensions on
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the korean peninsula. u.s. officials say north korea fired two ballistic missiles this month, and cnn is getting exclusive access to a u.s. eric carrier involved in annual joint military exercises with south korea. our ivan watson takes us aboard the u.s. aircraft carrier, the john c. stennett. >> reporter: f-18 fighter jets catapult into the sky, launching off the deck of a u.s. aircraft carrier, the john c. stennett. this strike group is here as part of annual joint military exercises with south korea. this takes place every year, and it makes the north korean government furious. they argue that this could be a precursor to a military invasion of the north. nonsense says the admiral in
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charge here but he says the presence of the largest war machine in the u.s. military arsenal is designed to send a message to north korea. >> the provocations and things that you see from north korea, we hope that our actions here, as routine operations, hope to deter any actions many. >> reporter: north korea revi routinely shows off its military muscle. some experts argue you have to show strength when dealing with this regime. >> if you show weakness in a authoritarian system like north korea, you're eliminated. if you are weak, they will bully you and take advantage of you. they only respect power. >> reporter: the problem is, this annual show of force which includes amphibious assaults hasn't stopped north korea from testing nuclear bombs. in fact, pyongyang recently
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fired salvos of ballistic missiles twice in just eight days, in violation of multiple u.n. security council resolutions. just days ago, kim jong un gave orders for scientists to develop the technology to launch a nuclear warhead on the tip of a ballistic missile. even those who breach power concede pyongyang is committed to expanding its clear arsenal. >> they put so much effort, and they're very dedicated to having those capabilities. so if they're not reliable today, they're going to deep wo keep working. so they can use them next month, or next year. >> reporter: andsaber rattling continues. the u.s. and its allies are very likely training for other possible scenarios, such as how
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to take out north korea's growing arsenal of nuclear weapons if it looks like pyongyang is about to use them. ivan watson aboard the john c. stenne stennett. some fists were flying at a trump campaign rally in arizona. the latest on the republican frontrunner's campaign in the wild west. plus the first part of cnn's series on belgium's fight against homegrown terrorism. stay with us. verizon is the number one network in america. i know what you're thinking, ththey all claim stuff like tha. yeah, but some of them stretch the truth. one said they were the fastest. we checked, it was fastest in kansas city and a few other places. verizon is consistently fast across the country. you wouldn't want to hear from the bloke who packs your parachute, "it's good over kansas." do you know what i mean? so that's, you know... anywhere else, splat.
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an american marine killed by an isis rocket attack in iraq saturday was stationed at a newly operational fire base, according to a u.s. defense official. now the base is located in northern iraq, just south of mosul. >> a pentagon official tells cnn it planned to acknowledge the base's existence this week and that it's part of what will be a
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limited ground combat operation supporting iraqi troops. >> so let's bring in cnn's jomana karadsheh for the latest. she joins me from amman, jordan. what are we learning about these previously undisclosed bases in northern iraq? >> reporter: well, rosemary, as you mentioned, that u.s. marine who was killed in a rocket attack on saturday was at this fire base. now according to u.s. defense officials, in the last couple of weeks, a group of about 200 marines moved into this location and set up this fire base, now fire bases are usually set up in remote locations, and they are places where they provide artillery support for infantry troops in locations at about 10, 15 kilometers away from these bases. now, as you mentioned, the u.s. has not made it public information that these bases
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have been set up. there are a couple of other fire bases that are set up in larger, iraqi bases, in the country, but this is the first that we know of, a separate fire base that has been set up, as you mentioned, south of the city of mosul. now at this point in time, u.s. defense officials say that it is providing protection, providing artillery support for a nearby base where iraqi forces, about 5,000 forces, are being trained for that eventual operation to retake the city of mosul. and in the future, in the coming weeks and months, u.s. officials say that this fire base will be used with these couple hundred marines providing that artillery fire support for iraqi forces as they advance toward the city of mosul. now this attack, rosemary, according to defense officials, they believe this is the assumption right now, that in
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the past couple weeks, as the marines moved in that they may have been observed by isis forces chose by, moving in and in the last few days, there is also practice firing of their artillery guns, so that may have alerted isis to their presence in the area. and two rockets targeting that base on saturday, rosemary. and one of those rockets falling inside the base, killing that one marine and wounding several others. it's not clear how many others were wounded in this attack, really underscoring the real, how dangerous this mission is for u.s. forces also on the ground, providing that limited combat support, rosemary. >> yeah, and of course the end game here is to make mosul, ultimately. what, what efforts are in the works to do that? and how likely is it that that can be achieved in the short term?
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>> reporter: well, as we've heard, there's been talk about this operation for retaking mosul since last year, rosemary. iraqi forces are being trained, peshmerga forces, also kurdish forces are being trained and preparing for this mission. and we've seen kurdish forces in northern iraq moving in areas, trying to secure routes into mosul, and the same thing in, in the other parts of iraq where they're trying to secure areas, because to try and retake mosul is a very complicated operation as one can imagine. not only do they want to cut off the supply routes, do they want to secure the city. i remember the senior iraqi official rosemary last year telling us that they are not going to be able to move into mosul until they secure, at least secure areas of anbar province where they believe
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weapons and fighters can move north towards mosul. there's also that very complicated situations within the city. you're talking about a city of 2 million people. this is iraq's second-largest city. a high-density of civilians in that city. so it is going to be a very complicated one to try and retake the city and try to preserve civilian lives in there. >> all right. jomana karadsheh joining us with that live update. we will talk to you again next hour. thank you so much. we move our attention to turkey now. the country's interior minister says a turkish citizen with ties to isis carried out saturday's attack in istanbul. it killed four people and wounded dozens. five people have been detained in connection with that blast. the government canceled a soccer
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match citing security concerns. we turn to belgium where salah abdeslam was planning fresh attacks in brussels before he was caught on friday. the 26-year-old was captured after a gunfight with belgian authorities. investigators are now trying to uncover the terror network that supported abdeslam. and even with his arrest, belgium's fight against homegrown terrorism is far from over. one of the battles is combating extremist literature. >> one seeks out the textbooks at the core of isis's recruitment. >> reporter: a sunny day in the center of brussels. for years, authorities here have been combating an epidemic of extremist literature. we set out to find out how easy it still is to access these texts. using an undercover camera, we visited a number of bookshops,
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asking for books we knew espoused violent, jihadi ideology. this man stammers nervously before telling me he doesn't have them in but knows where to find them. a small district in the heart of brussels. we head there. another bookshop, another stammered answer. we're directed to the center of town. back to the first shop. it's starting to feel like we're being given the run around. she knows these bookshops all too well. ten years ago, she went undercover to expose the extremist literature for sale. after disclosing it, she found herself at the center of
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criticism and threats. >> the mayor, police, secret services, they all said it was too sensational, that i exaggerated. my conclusions were based on, well, just street talks. so they didn't take me serious, and they didn't take their people on the street serious. >> reporter: the buying and swapping of the books is itself part of the radicalization, seen as evidence of commitment, that the ideology is taking hold. armed with the titles and the publishing houses we don't have to search much further. through online bookshops in belgium, extremist literature is delivered right to your front door. we're not disclosing the names of these books, but these are amongst the extremist texts being found in the homes and hideouts of suspected militants there, essentially jihadi 101s.
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the language in here is horrifying. justifying the targeting of jews, the conscription of children and matter of fact statements that it's every muslim's responsibility to bear arms. these are key isis tenets. in many european countries, these books are banned. in belgium, at best, buying these books may attract unwanted attention from the authorities. but the books and their sale is completely legal. videos like this have grown infamous here. belgian jihadis exhorting those still at home to join them in iraq and syria. estimates vary, but belgian security forces calculate the average number of belgians who have successfully left to join isis are almost at two dozen. the dramatic capture of the so-called eighth paris attacker,
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salah abdeslam, just a street away from his childhood home after months on the run, a stark reminder of how hard it's been for belgian authorities to stay one step ahead of the extremist networks. and the tide of extremist literature bolstering the networks is proving even tougher to quell. if anything, it appears to be even easier to obtain, cnn, brussels. >> and there will be more exclusive reports all week as she gives us an inside look at the homegrown threat of terrorism, and of losing more children to the lure of isis. >> reporter: belgian security sources tell cnn, that an a average of five to six belgians left to join isis. for the families and the communities they return to, it only exacerbates the fear.
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>> translator: every sign, every case is different. when you look at them separately, they don't hook like signs of radicalization, but when you look at the whole picture, you realize that these are signs of radicalization, they're part of the recruitment process. >> join us at this time tomorrow for more of the investigation. "front line belgium", only here on cnn, and she speaks to us live next hour on the latest on the ongoing terror investigation. we'll take a break here on "cnn newsroom." but up next, an aide of donald trump is caught interacting with a protester at a rally, and it didn't seem very cordial. hillary clinton and donald trump prepare to address one of the largest pro-israeli groups in the u.s., more on that after this. question everything you know and what you don't know
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a warm welcome back to viewers watching right here in the u.s. and those of you tuned in from all around the world. this is "cnn newsroom," i'm errol barnett. >> and i'm rosemary church. it's time to check the main stories we're following this hour. u.s. president obama is set to meet with his cuban counterpart on monday. he is the first sitting president to visit the island nation in 88 years. critics say the u.s. reengagement with cuba rewards an authoritarian regime. a bus crashed in spain. 14 died and 33 others were injured. a bus hit a car. the students were enrolled at barcelona university and were returning from a festival in valencia. drum's campaign manager attempted to yank a collar of a man. he was confronting a man who had already been kicked out of the
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rally and had somehow returned. it wasn't the only confrontation at the rally. this protester got sucker punched by a trump supporter. >> i had a sign that sad bad for america, and it had trump with the confederate flag super imposed. the guy grabbed the sign out of my right hand and sucker punched my. then he got on top of me and hit me a couple more times. donald trump has insisted that his campaign events have not been particularly violent. and he's repeatedly said that violent behavior is not something he condones, but he himself has often taken a combative tone in speaking which his supporters appear to relish. >> the press is now calling this an oh, but there's such
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violence. no violence. you know how many people have been hurt at our rallies? i think like basically none. [ bleep ]. [ bleep ], [ bleep ]. [ yelling ] [ bleep ] >> you see somebody getting ready to throw a tomato, knock the crap out of them, would you? i promise you, i will pay for the legal fees. i promise. [ yelling ] >> i intend to -- he lies. he lies. i haven't seen anything like it. >> i can't breathe, man, i can't
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[ bleep ] breathe. [ screaming ] >> how many people have been injured at my rallies? zero. zero. [ crowd yelling ] >> there's no violence, there's none whatsoever. people say, well, is there violence? there's no violence. it's a love fest. these are love fests. >> you can decide for yourselves there. u.s. democratic presidential candidate hillary clinton is set to speak at the american israel public affairs committee gathering in washington in just a few hours. republican donald trump will speak there later monday. >> the pro-israel group
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potentially invites all candidates. and all the candidates except bernie sanders accepted. he said his campaign schedule prevents him from attending. >> all the candidates say they support israel. many israelis don't necessarily love donald trump. >> on israel, donald has said he wants to be neutral. >> there's nobody on this stage that's more pro-israel than i am. >> you'd be forgiven to think that the candidates were running for office in israel. the candidates trying to one up each other on who will keep israel safe and repair the strained relations between president obama and benjamin netanyahu. trump has gotten most of the headlines in israel. >> my name is donald trump, and i'm a big fan of israel. >> reporter: highlighting an ad he made for benjamin netanyahu. and yet his comments on registering muslims in the u.s.
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and the salute to trump at an orlando rally, some compared to a nazi salute frightens some israelis. >> they're looking astonished at this phenomenon called donald trump. >> reporter: before dropping out of the race, marco rubio attacked donald trump on israel. >> i don't know if he realizes, it's an anti-israeli policy. >> reporter: the latest poll from the israeli based institution say israelis favor clinton. a carryover for israel's fondness for bill clinton. >> we hear trump and cruz and now kasich arguing about who is the most pro-israel. and yet israelis prefer hillary clinton. why is that? >> i think it's a familiarity thing. she's a household name in this country. everyone remembers her husband bill clinton when he was president many. >> reporter: hillary clinton played up her support for israel
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on cnn's state of the union in february. >> i will defend and do everything i can to support israel. >> reporter: the irony of all this about israel is that israel is not the mane issue for american jewish voters. a 2015 survey from the american jewish congress found that israel fell behind the economy, health care and national security. only 7% of american jewish voters said israel was their deciding issue. oren lieberman, cnn, jerusalem. now as donald trump gets closer to securing the nomination, people in the world's biggest democracy are getting increasingly uncomfortable with the candidate and his views on muslims. we have that story from new delhi. >> reporter: on the cover of one of india's top publications, an angry and petulant donald trump, headlines, an american nightmare. >> the more incendiary he gets,
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that's when indians wake up. >> reporter: waking up and noticing that a person of indian origin holding a stop hate banner being ushered out of one of trump's rallies. the man apparently an sikh, >> he wasn't wearing one of those hats, was he? was he wearing one of those hats? and he never will. >> reporter: many here were outraged, including provocative talk show hosts. >> this is an insult to all indians. go and tell this man, this bigoted semi-literate idiot called donald trump. >> reporter: trump is hardly a household name here, but now the editor of outlook magazine says it's impossible to ignore him. >> after super tuesday, it became more and more clear that the united states was moving in the direction of making him the republican candidate. so having considered him for a period of time, we thought the moment had arrived.
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>> reporter: we, too, thought the moment was right to explore what indians actually think of a potential president trump. most don't know of him. >> no. >> reporter: no? no idea? >> no idea. >> reporter: no, never? >> never. >> reporter: those who did, didn't think much of him. >> i don't like him. >> reporter: no? >> not at all. >> reporter: you don't like him? why? >> he's very scary right now. >> reporter: the dominant concern, his comments on muslims. >> that is not the kind of leadership we look for. >> maybe one day he'll not like indians. we don't know. >> reporter: in a country with 170 million muslims, his style of politics is a sensitive issue. >> the brashness, insensitiveness. the zen phobic nature. not just what's happening in america but in india where there's a raging debate on nationalism, on immigrants.
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>> reporter: so while indians may relate to the trump phenomenon, many here say they expect better of america. sa mima udas, cnn, new delhi. >> and donald trump will be among the five candidates making their way to the office. five conversations, one night, monday, 8:00 eastern time, midnight in london, only here on cnn. >> still to come this hour. important import, i should say embargoes have kept cuba's famous cars trapped in time. next, a look at how people there have kept them running. plus, we'll take you to egypt's capital where hundreds of american football fans tackle with some of the best in the field. we're back in a moment. of work. to run this business.
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the x1 voice remote is here. x1 customers get your voice remote by visiting xfinty.com/voiceremote. just when you thought spring had sprung in the northern hemisphere, a late, mean storm, let's call it, is taking aim at the u.s. eastern seaboard. pedram javaheri joins us. it's a mean storm. >> just a couple weeks ago we were talking about shorts and t tee shirts. it was the warmest start ever. almost 80 degrees in central park. snowshowers in the area now. >> it's ridiculous. we complain down here. this is nothing. >> there's a nor'easter in the
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works. this is on march 10th, folks, breaking out the bicycles in central park, the tee shirts, enjoying the nice temperatures. people enjoying the sunshine. look at that. i can see errol doing something along those lines, coming down the stairs using your hands. you see the ladies, you try to get in on the action, do a little work out there. but the temperatures, 79 degrees, that was on march 10. the nosedive here. the temperatures have brought it back down to reality, the first day of spring, that was sunday across the northern hemisphere, coming in at 43 fahrenheit. in celsius, 26 celsius, dropping to 6 celsius, in a matter of just ten to 11 days. that is how rapidly things have changed across parts of the eastern u.s. but this is the pattern over the last couple of hours, and we do watch the storm system meander off the eastern seaboard. we get snowshowers out of this, but the cold temperatures in
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place on sunday morning and monday morning as whelm notice, generally speaking, light amounts, along long island, two to four inches, the heaviest amounts around boston toward lowell. that is late season ago you ts transition into spring. see where it sets up shop right there towards southern florida, eventually to cuba, a cold front ushering the winds of change. as we know, the president of the u.s. making his first visit of any u.s. president in 88 years. it is the driest time of the year in cuba, climatologically speaking, paris about an inch of rainfall. and temperatures pretty cool as well. >> unusual weather everywhere. >> absolutely.
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>> we don't like this. don't like it at all. >> as pedram sasys i would do that step thing? >> now rosemary wants me -- >> next hour we'll bring out a picture of a work out with rosemary. a group of american football players traveled to egypt to hold a training camp in kay rca. >> and as ian lee reports, some of the best in the field were in the field. >> don't do that! not this, not that. >> reporter: this is how you get into beast mode. >> don't dive like that. >> reporter: learning to hit from former nfl running bamarshn lynch. but this isn't a camp near you. american football is going abroad. bringing the hits, the pain and
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unique motivation. >> the more i get paid, the more i get paid. keep doing what you're doing. hey, that's not working. >> reporter: it's american football without barriers or afwb for shore. tennenful players held a camp in egypt. >> here's a sport that's different in their culture, but it's a fun sport, it's the definition of a team sport and builds friendships. this is something we want them to live with. >> reporter: football isn't completely unknown in the world f pharaohs. >> people say this is amazing. i want to hit somebody. >> actually, i prefer for one defense, because there's, i love it. i love being aggressive on
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something like that. >> get out of here, get out of here, let's go, let's go. >> reporter: 400 people signed up within hours to learn from the best, including two from egypt's all female teams. >> to prosper here. >> for y'all, you show great teamwork. that's very important in the sport of football. >> reporter: but there's more to football than the hitting, drills and pushups. >> we want to polish it up from the standpoint of you have to eat right. you have to be healthy when you play this sport. you have to make sure that you have the right equipment, because when you have these popup sports in other countries, they're not always doing it right. >> reporter: it's unlikely the gridiron will overtake the pitch at least anytime soon. soccer is still king in egypt, but who knows. football could make an interception and lead to a
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touchdown here. ian lee, cnn, cairo. well, cruising down havana's streets is like traveling back to the 1950s. we will show you how cubans are keeping these classic cars going, next. nexium 24hr is the new #1 selling frequent heartburn brand in america. i hope you like it spicy! get complete protection with the purple pill. the new leader in frequent heartburn. that's nexium level protection.
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welcome back, everyone. well, president obama's historic visit too cue pa includes a meeting with his cuban counterpart monday. >> mr. obama is the first u.s. president to visit cuba since this trip, i should say since 1928. this trip ends more than 50 years of estrangement between the two countries. president obama's fortified cadillac limo, nicknamed the beast made the trip with him. it's likely one of the most modern vehicles in the country right now. >> a ban has kept the vehicles in the '50s. we show you how they have kept their classic cars running. >> reporter: a lot of you have been asking, how do these cubans keep all the classic cars on the road. you can see what alberto's doing, he's replacing the engine of this 1954 chevy.
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since fidel castro took power, it is extraordinary difficult for ordinary cubans to import car the or car parts. you have vehicles on the road sometimes 60 or 70 years old, and the parts are just as old as well. so sometimes you'll have a car like this with an engine from russia, or parts from germany. they have a barttering system. they buy, sell, trade. cuba is home to some of the most creative mechanics in the world. they patch together these cars to keep them going long after they've been discarded in most other countries. as the restrictions start to lift, cubans might have more new cars, but at least in the meantime, this is how you see all of these vintage cars, really an icon of cuban culture. it gets down to the nitty-gritty, patching things together, doing the dirty work to keep them on the road. >> will ripley there. shows you how some of those cars
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are. >> there are some gorgeous vehicles, too. this concludes this hour. do remember you can always follow us on social media anytime. i'm rosemary church. >> i'm errol barnett. next hour we get a live report on the brussels terror investigation and news as it breaks. do stay with us. (music plays) hi i'm kristie and i'm jess. and we are the bug chicks. we are a nano-business. windows 10 really helps us get the word out
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history in havana. the u.s. president prepares for his first full day on cuban soil. blame it on the protesters. donald trump refuses to condemn violence at his campaign rallies. >> and front line belgium. cnn goes inside the country's fight against islamic extremism. welcome to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us as we begin our second hour of "cnn newsroom" together. now, more than half a century of estrangement is over with u.s. president obama's arrival in cuba. he is the first president to visit the country since 1928,
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and the trip underscores his promise to extend a hand to long-time foes. >> crowds gathered to watch the obama family walk through the streets of old havana. critics in the u.s. says it rewards a regime that has not really changed. before the president arrived, police arrested scores of dissidents. >> and mr. obama is set to visit with dissidents later in the trip. >> reporter: change is in the air here in cuba as president obama prepares to spend his first full day here on the island. the president will begin his day laying a wreath at the memorial remembering jose marti, and then the president will sit down for a bilateral meeting with president raul castro. the president and first family took a walking tour of old havana and stopped at the
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cathedral. that was after the president addressed the people. >> it's been nearly 90 years since a u.s. president stepped foot in cuba. it is wonderful to be here. back in 1928, president coolidge came on a battleship. it took him three days to get here. it only took me three hours. >> reporter: later on tomorrow, the president will be delivering a speech to the cuban people. he will be talking about expanding human rights for the cuban people, talking about freedom of speech and freedom of the press. after that, he will wiped down his trip to cuba with a baseball game between the cuban national team and the tampa bay rays. jim acosta, cnn, havana. >> we are joined from washington, president emeritus for policy, analysis and exchange on western members fear affairs. thank you for being with us.
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president obama has said himself that this is an opportunity to forge new agreements and deals. what will those look like exactly, and just how big an opportunity is this? >> well, i think it's less an opportunity to really put ink on deals. i think the deals have already been negotiated. i think what really happens here is that obama will want to connect with the cuban people. the enthusiasm for this change in u.s. policy is palpable in havana. i was there only a couple months ago, and it's clear that president obama's widely admired. and he's going to get tremendous crowds, tremendous applause, great enthusiasm, and i think he's raising the level of optimism about the future for most cubans, which means they're going to put more energy into
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really making this relationship work. >> and of course it has to be said not everyone's happy about this. a lot of critics suggest this is too premature and comes before any real reforms have been achieved in cuba, what do you say to that? >> well, number one, i think there's not a lot of criticism. in fact, this is one of the least controversial foreign policy initiatives of the obama administration. there has been some criticism. some of it is certainly true that the cubans have not made the kinds of concessions, the kinds of movement that movement on human rights, on opening their economy, of allowing people real access to internet. and but this is very consistent with the kind of foreign policy that obama talked about in his inauguration, and then at the nobel prize ceremony, with the
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idea is not to sort of negotiate everything but rather to hold out your hand to engage, to create an atmosphere and hope that other country will respond to that kind of warming and opening, rather than sort of trying to do it inch by inch. and i think that that's the idea of cuba, we'll have to see. 55 years of an old policy didn't work. let's give this a little more time. >> and just very quickly, how long do you think, though, it will be of about we see an open chi and improvements in the lives of people there in cuba? >> i think we have to have some patience for that. it's very hard for the united states to have a normal relationship with a country with an authoritarian leadership, with no elections, with human rights abuses. when that gets over with, then we'll have the normal
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relationship, and i'm afraid, i'm sorry to say, i think it will take some time. peter hakim, thank you. in just a few hours, hillary clinton will address the american israel public affairs committee at their annual conference in washington. later monday the republican candidates will speak in that gathering. >> they invite all presidential candidates to speak. this year only bernie sanders declined to come because of his campaign schedule. some apec members plan to stay away when donald trump speaks. they object to what they say is the divisive tone of his campaign. >> now the anti-defamation league, a group of devoted individuals fighting anti-semitism has announced
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plans to redirect the $56,000 trump has donated through the years. >> it will go to programs that address, as he put it, the type of stereotyping and scapegoating that have been injeked into this political season. >> now the united states is israel's closest ally, and israelis are watching the presidential election process very closely. you see there, cnn's oren lieberman who joins us from jerusalem with more on that. the relationship has been a topic during this election year. but how are israelis watching and seeing this all play out? well, israeli's watch the elections with a bit of curiosity and wonder. they won't be too heavily focussed on the speeches from the candidates, that is because there are two big names they know. it's hillary and trump the israelis are familiar with. then they watch the headlines
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waiting to see how it plays out for america and israel. >> on israel, donald has said he wants to be neutral. >> reporter: you'd be forgiven for thinking the candidates are running for office in israel. they're trying to one up each other on who can keep israel safe and who can repair the strained relations between president obama and benjamin netanyahu. trump has gotten most of the headlines in israel. >> my name is donald trump and i'm a big fan of israel. >> reporter: highlighting an ad he made for benjamin netanyahu in 2013. and yet his comments on registering muslims in the u.s. and the salute to trump in an orlando rally some compared to a nazi salute astonishes some. before dropping out of the race, marco rubio attacked trump on israel.
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>> the policy donald has outlined is an anti-israeli p policy. >> reporter: the latest poll from an israeli based institution show israelis favor clinton. a carryover for israel's fondness for bill clinton. >> we hear trump and cruz and before rubio and now kasich arguing about who is the most pro-israel, and yet israelis prefer hillary clinton. why is that? >> i think it's a recognition and a familiarity thing. she's a household name in this country, i think everyone remembers her husband bill clinton when he was president. >> reporter: hillary clinton played up her support for shooel on cnn's state of the union in february. >> i will defend and do everything i can to support israel. >> reporter: there is a bit of a role reversal that amuses israelis. normally it's the american elections that make headlines in israel. now it will be israel making headlines with the american
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elections. >> since you say that for american jewish voters, the relationship between the two countries hasn't been the most important issue. what is? >> reporter: a few studies, one last year and one during the last presidential election shows that israel is not the main issue. it's the economy, health care, all of those rank as more important for american screwije voters than israel. it's interesting that they come to tout their position with a group who generally vote on other issues. >> it makes sense all over the world. the economy is a tough issue people vote for. thanks, oren. now donald trump will be among the five presidential candidates making that case for the seat in the oval office later on monday here on cnn. be sure to tune in as both republicans and democrats sit
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down with wolf blitzer and anderson cooper. one night only, 8:00 eastern time, midnight in you're watching in london. >> and we will have much more on the race for the white house, including some particularly angry moments at the most recent trump rally in arizona. plus we go into the heart of belgium's fight against home grown terrorism as new details emerge in the capture of the only surviving suspect of the paris terror attacks.
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this just in to cnn. south korea is reporting that pyongyang fired several short-range projectiles off the korean peninsula around 3:00 local time. the projectiles were fired from eastern north korea and flew some 200 kilometers to the east. the south korean military says they are closely tracking the situation, and we will, of course, have more on this story coming up later in the hour. we are learning more about the only surviving suspect of the deadly terror attacks in paris. belgium's foreign minister says
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salah abdeslam was ready to restart something in brussels. the 26-year-old was captured after a gunfight with authorities on friday. >> cnn spoke with the minister and said even with the arrest the threat for paris is far from over. >> he is one of the most wanted foreign fighters that we looking for. but i'm very aware that the action's not done. the network is not clean. so we have to continue the action. >> for more on abdeslam's capture and the continuing investigation, let's bring in cnn's senior correspondent who joins us live from brussels. what is new on the investigation there this morning? >> reporter: well, we're learning belgian authorities believe abdeslam had managed to pull together a new network around him.
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so, in addition to the broughter network in the paris investigations that they're seeking currently, they're also trying to dismantle this new infrastructure that salah abdeslam had pulled together, with the intent, belgian authorities say, of launching another attack here in brussels. the terror level continues at three. they have said repeatedly that while of course there is a sense of jubilation that's definitely coming across here with the capture of salah abdeslam, this is not over. interpol is warning all european countries to remain very vigilant at their borders with a concern that perhaps foreign fighters might be trying to push back into europe. >> and it's just stunning and incredible to think the man at the center of what was a global investigation and search in these past few months has somehow been able to build up yet another terror network.
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what else are you learning about how and why extremist ideologies are able to fester there in brussels? >> reporter: well, there is a real sense that salah abdeslam's ability to not only build a new network around him but to have hidden in a house, just a street away from his childhood home, that this really comes back to the failures of belgian intelligence. the ideology has been able to succeed, and a lot of that comes down to the influence of those dlaunls and the extremist literature that we discovered is so easy to procure here in belgium. take a look at this, errol. a sunny day in the center of brussels many for years, authorities have been combating an epidemic of extremist literature. we set out to find how easy it
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still is to access these texts. use being an undercover camera, we visited a number of bookshops, asking for books we knew espoused violent jihadi ideology. this man stammers nervously before telling me he doesn't have them in but knows where to find them. a small district in the north of brussels, he says. we head there. another bookshop, another stammered answer. we're directed to the center of town, back to the first shop. it's starting to feel like we're being given the run around. >> so 11 years -- >> reporter: she knows she's bookshops all too well. >> several stores, bookstores in brussels. >> reporter: ten years ago, the researcher visited many of them undercover to expose the extremist literature openly for
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ste sale. after she published her findings, she found herself at the center of a whirlwind of criticism and threats. >> the police, secret services. they all said it was too sensational, that i exaggerated. my conclusions were based on, well, just street talks, so they didn't take me serious. and they didn't take the young people on the streets serious. >> reporter: the buying and swapping of the books is itself part of the radicalization, seen as evidence of commitment, that the ideology is taking hold. armed with the titles and the publishing housing, we don't have to search much further. through online bookshops, in belgium, extremist literature is delivered right to your front door. we're not disclosing the names of these books, but these are amongst the extremist texts being found in the homes and
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hideouts of suspected militants. they're essentially jihad ei 10. the language in here is horrifying, justifying the targeting of jews, the conscription of children and matter of fact statements that it's every muslim's responsibility to bear arms. these are key isis tenets. in many european countries, these books are banned. and belgium, at best, buying these books might warrant unwanted attention from the authorities, but the books and their sale is completely legal. videos like this have grown infamous here. belgian jihadis exhorting those still at home to join them in iraq and syria estimates vary, but belgian security forces estimate the number of belgians who have successfully left to join isis since the paris
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attacks are almost two does. salah abdeslam was captured just a street away from his home in brussels, after months on the run, a sign of how hard it's been for authorities to stay one step ahead of the extremist networks, and the tide of literature bolstering the networks is proving even tougher to quell. if anything, it appears to be even easier to obtain. belgium's interior minister says they are making some successes in this fight against recruitment, but he also acknowledges that the battle against extremist literature goes to the heart of belgium's attempt to maintain freedom of speech, the principles that make them who they are while trying to combat this ideology, and there are really no easy answers for them.
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>> your report speaks to the challenges, and just the fact that there is so much more work that needs to be done specifically there in belgium. thank you for your report at 8:22 in the morning. >> and this week she will be taking us through part two of her story of radicalized belgians who are now coming home. >> reporter: through 2015, an average of five to six belgians a month left to join isis. and it's a pipeline that flows both ways. for the communities and the families they return to, it only exacerbates the fear. >> every sign, every case is different. when you look at them separately, they don't look like signs of radicalization, but when you hook at the whole picture, you realize that these are signs of radicalization. they're part of a recruitment process. >> and watch more of the investigation tuesday on our series "front line belgium",
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right here only on cnn. turning our attention now to turkey where the interior minister says a turkish citizen with ties to isis carried out saturday's bombing in istanbul. the attack killed four people and wounded dozens. >> five people have been detained in connection to the blast. the government suspended a soccer match citing security concerns. 14 are dead and 33 others injured after a bus crash in northeastern spain. the bus was carrying a group of exchange students in a program at barcelona university. the bus hit a car. the students were returning from a fest val in valencia. now to the latest in the crash of a fly dubai jet in russia. the airport where the plane went down on saturday has just reopened. >> yeah, mourners left flowers there over the weekend. 62 people died when the boeing
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737 crashed while attempting to land. cnn's john jenson has more on the investigation. >> reporter: the investigation into the fly dubai crash may be more difficult than expected. both of the so-called black boxes recovered from the crash site are significantly damaged. that's what investigators at russia's interstate aviation committee said on sunday. and that could make the task of retrieving information about the final moments of flight 981 much harder. the task is being led by russia's air crash safety investigation agency, along with representatives from the u.s. and the united arab emirates. the main noek nfocus now seems the weather. we know there was decreased visibility and extremely heavy wind gusts near the airport in southern russia. in a press conference on sunday, fly dubai's ceo said it was too
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early to speculate on why the plane went down. >> we would ask that the investigating authorities are given the time, space they need to report definitely on the case of what happened in the accident. >> reporter: he also added that the airline would pay an initial $20,000 in financial assistance to the families of the victims. the russians have said it may take two months to determine just what happened to the flight. but with damage to the flight data recorders, it could take even longer. john jenson, dhabi. bold protests getting forceful reactions from donald trump supporters and staffers at their latest rally. because covering heals faster. for a bandage that moves with you and stays on all day, cover with a band-aid brand flexible fabric adhesive bandage.
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welcome back, to those of you watching in the united states and all around the world, it is your last half hour with us. it's a new chapter in u.s./cuba relations as president obama embarks on his first full day in havana. his first day includes a meeting with fidel castro. authorities found many heavy weapons after they arrested paris terror attack suspect salah abdeslam on friday. he added that the 26-year-old was ready to start something in brussels. investigators are trying to uncover the network that supported abdeslam. i want to go back now to a
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developing story this hour. south korean officials say north korea has fired four short-range projectiles off the eastern coast of the korean peninsula. so let's get our, get to cnn's paula hancocks in seoul for the very latest. what more are we learning about these short-range projectiles? >> reporter: well, rosemary, we've just had an update from the joint chiefs of staff. they now believe five short-range projectiles were fired into the safe japan, what koreans called east sea. and they had a range of 200 kilometers, so they are less of a concern. obviously, the medium and long-range concern them. but for japan and south korea, that is a concern that they are still testing these rprojectile against u.n. resolutions. certainly, if they turn out to be ballistic missiles, they are
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against u.n. resolutions. also a message from the joint chiefs of staff saying that since that satellite launch on february 7th which many thought was a thinly-veiled nuclear test, 15 projectiles have been fired. this is to be expected. we are in the middle of the u.s./south korean military drills, and every year, north korea carries out these exercises, they have their own military drills, of course, or these projectiles, missiles, rockets being fired off the kohl's of korea. back in 2014, they fired 90 of these missiles, these projectiles, so certainly, this is to be expected at this time of year. >> our paula hancocks bringing us up to date from seoul in south korea, we're learning five projectiles have been fired by north korea. we'll keep a close eye on that story. many thanks. >> just before this latest move by north korea, ivan watson got
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an exclusive look on board a prominent u.s. warship. >> the uss john c. stennett is taking part in military drills. here's our exclusive report. >> reporter: somewhere in the sea east of korea f-18 jets catapult into the sky, launching off the deck of a u.s. aircraft carrier, the john c. stennis. >> it is here for joint exercises with south korea. and it makes the north korean government furious. they argue that this could be a precursor to a military invasion of the north. nonsense, says the admiral in charge here. but he says the presence of the largest war machine in the u.s. military arsenal is designed to send a message to north korea.
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>> the provocations and things you see from north korea, we hope that our actions here, as routine operations help to deter any escalate ory actions. >> reporter: some argue you have to show strength when dealing with this regime. >> if you show weakness in the domestic political system, in an authoritarian state like north korea, you're eliminated. that's how it works in the exhibit national s international system. if you are weak they will bully you and they only expect power. >> reporter: the problem is, this annual show of force which includes simulated amphibious assaults hasn't stopped north korea from testing nuclear bombs. in fact, pyongyang recently fired salvos of ballistic missiles twice in eight days in
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violation of multiple u.n. security council resolutions. just days ago, kim jong un gave orderers for scientists to develop the technology to launch a nuclear warhead on the tip of a ballistic missile. even those who breach power concede pyongyang is committed to expanding its nuclear arsenal. >> they put so much effort, and they're very dedicated to having those capabilities. so if they're not reliable today they're going to keep working so they'll be reliable and they can use them if they needed to use them tomorrow or next month or next year. >> reporter: and so the establi rattling continues. the u.s. and its allies are likely training for other possible scenarios, such as how to take out north korea's growing arsenal of nuclear weapons if it looks like pyongyang is about to use them.
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ivan watson, cnn, aboard the u.s. aircraft carrier, john c. stennis. the trump campaign is defending a top staffer, who was caught on video yanking a protester. it happened saturday at a rally in arizona. >> look closely as corey lewandowski appears to yank the protester by the collar. the spokesperson says he was dealing with a protester who had already been thrown out and had found his way back in. >> trump says his actions were spirited and that he was trying to take down obscene signs around the protester. >> the front runner has repeatedly said he does not condone violence. but as far as sanchez reports, the crowds have never reacted
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kindly to protesters. >> reporter: despite assurances from the republican frontrunner. >> these are love fests. >> reporter: confrontations between protesters and supporters have become routine at donald trump's campaign events. >> knock the crap out of him, would you? seriously. i will pay for the legal fees, i promise. >> reporter: as crowds cheer on. >> i'd like to punch him in the face, i'll tell you. >> reporter: and seemingly echo the billionaire businessman's heated rhetoric. >> the next time we see him, we might have to kill him! >> [ bleep ]. >> reporter: tensions between trump's fans and most vocal detractors boiled over last week, forcing him to cancel an event at the university of illinois chicago. shortly after, fists were flying and skirmishes pouring into the streets. trump accused bernie sanders of playing a role in inciting the protests. >> i don't even call them protesters. i call them disrupters. a lot of them come from bernie
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sanders, whether he wants to say it or not. if he says no, he's lying. >> reporter: and he's down-played the confrontation. >> there's no violence, nobody's been hurt. >> reporter: the hectic atmosphere of trump's crowds have even found their way onto a stage in dayton, ohio. a 22-year-old protester tried to jump on stage and yank the microphone. the secret service has protected trump for months, private security now appears to be playing a bigger role in keeping him out of harm's way. on monday, the campaign had anyone attending a rally in ohio bussed in from about 7 miles away. >> i haven't noticed that much of a difference. we've always had the secret service around. and, you know, i feel very, i feel very secure. >> reporter: as the republican race moves closer to the cleveland convention in july, concerns are mounting. not only that protests may continue to follow trump, but that anything short of a trump
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nomination could lead to clashes on the floor of the convention itself. >> usa! >> reporter: boris sanchez, cnn, salt lake city utah. >> and we invite you to tune in as both democrats and republicans sit down with wolf blitzer and anderson cooper. five conversations, one night, midnight in london, 8:00 here on cnn. a deadly attack prompts officials to talk about a fire base that hadn't been publicly acknowledged yet. what they're telling cnn about its function. with mom and dad forever, do you?" "she says...bazang!" "ok, good one." "uh, how do i check my credit score?" "credit karma, it's free." "credit karma. give yourself some credit."
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a u.s. defense official tells cnn that a marine killed by an isis rocket attack in iraq saturday was stationed at a newly operational fire base. the base is located in northern iraq, just south of mosul, and we are told the pentagon planned to acknowledge the base's
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existence this week. cnn's jer mauna karachi joins me now from amman, jordan with the latest. what more are we learning about these previously undisclosed fire base? >> reporter: well, rosemary, here's what happened. on saturday, the u.s. marine was killed and several others were wounded in an attack by isis on a location in northern iraq, as you mentioned. it targeted a base near the town that is south of the city of mosul. and it was two rockets, one that fell inside the base, killing that one marine and wounding a number of others. we do not know how many other marines were wounded in this attack. but a u.s. defense official is telling cnn that the location that was targeted, as you mentioned is what is known as a fire base. these are usually remote bases that are set up to fire artillery from, to provide
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support for infantry troops, usually about ten or 15 kilometers away from that location. and according to this u.s. defense official in the past couple weeks, a group of about 200 marines moved into this location and set up that base. now their main mission right now, rosemary, is to provide protection for a nearby base where coalition troops are training about 5,000 iraqi troops for that eventual operation to retake mosul. but also this base will be used to provide artillery cover for advancing iraqi forces when they make their move in the coming weeks or months to advance on the city of mosul. as you mentioned, this location was not disclosed before, the presence and existence of these fire bases was not known. there are a couple of other fire bases that are set up within
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larger iraqi bases, but this is the first that we know of that u.s. officials say that was going to be announced by the pentagon this week where a group of a couple of hundred marines have set up this fire base as we mentioned. now it is assumed that isis observed these marines moving in and setting up this camp in the past few days before this base became operational. firing practice rounds, and that is possibly what gave isis, made isis aware of their presence there and led to their targeting. really underscoring the dangers that u.s. forces face even in that limited combat role right now in iraq. rosemary? >> all right, many thanks to jomana karadsheh joining us live there in amman, jordan. as president obama continues his historic visit to cuba, we
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. a tennis official is sparking a firestorm after making controversial comments about women in the sport. >> that's right.
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raymond moore told reporters that female tennis players were lucky and owed their careers to male stars. look. >> in my next life, when i come back, i want to be someone in the wta. they ride on the coattails of the men. they don't make any decision, and they're lucky. they're very, very lucky. if i was a lady player, i'd go out every night on my knees and thank god that roger federer and rafael nadal were born. because they have carried the sport. they really have. >> nevertheless, reaction came fast. serena williams called the comments out and said i don't think any woman should be down
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on their knees >> and he apologized to the players and wta as a whole. now cnn has been taking viewers inside cuba for more than three decades. from the mario boat lift. >> and we've covered a country that's been at odds with washington since 1959. ♪ >> reporter: let's face it. i mean, cuba is a beautiful country. beautiful beaches, sunsets. i mean, the safeness, and the people. the people make cuba a gorgeous country. ♪ >> during my trips there, it was decided we wanted a bureau, so i was made the point person for opening a cnn bureau in havana. it took about seven years to do.
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janet reno was the attorney general, and she kept saying the crisis is over, the crisis is over, and i was on the beach. and dozens of cubans were continuing to pour into the sea. and we would report that the crisis was not over. and our own people wouldn't believe us. so you had to take the camera and show them. here they are with their rafts jumping into the ocean. it made it important so people could see the whole picture of what was going on with the u.s. and cuba. >> i've heard everything from the miami cuban community. and it was my first time actually going into cuba to see what it was like, it was like the clock stopped in 1959. the cold war had been over for years, but yet everybody was still living like the cold war was going on. >> one day we went with ted turner, which was a while ago, when he was going to interview fidel castro, and we got incredible access to the cuban
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leader. we rode around havana all day one day in jeeps. the jeeps kept breaking down. and we had to jump out of one jeep and jump into another. after a while, we said boy, if they can't even drive their leader around, maybe this isn't a place we should be scared of. >> i always remember fidel's speeches. one of them, fidel facing to the united states, just 90 miles away, saying to president bush, hail caesar, we who are about to die salute you. >> the biggest story happened shortly after i got there. i was the producer for the cnn havana bureau. the correspondent was out of town. this was july 31, 2006. we not negot news there was goi be a big announcement on state
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tv. well, we turn the tv on, and fidel castro's person secretary came on and said that he was going into emergency surgery and handing power over. this was a huge bombshell. nobody had expected t it. he'd been in power for nearly 50 years. >> changes are happening rapidly, and i think it's going to explode as we go. >> with the changes that have happened since the opening of relations, the people always want to talk to you. they want to know, when are things going to change? when are things going to get better for me? >> at the end, i guess the main word was rewarding. it was a rewarding experience to be involved in that, to have a little part of doing something that maybe opened the doors a little bit, and maybe they're open a little bit more. >> and you know what? the winds of change in cuba are also being felt in the weather as a rare cold front moves
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through the region. and our meteorologist pedram javaheri joins us with more on this. and it is very cold in parts. >> it's a pleasant setup here for an area that expects to be in the 80s. the rain showers come down. you see some of the images at obama family gets off air force one. and the conditions are soggy. as you take a look at the climate logical norm, the temperatures rebound into the 80s where it belongs this time of year. so yes, it is below average. across the u.s., we have a nor'easter across parts of new england. the temperatures have been on an incredible ride, from 80 degrees, dropping down to 43 degrees, that is 26 celsius tocelsius, the man is walking
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down the steps with his hands. the temperatures were so warm a couple weeks ago. rosemary brought something up. she said i can do some of the fitness activity. we didn't have to go far. get on social media, rosemary's cnn, plenty of her, on the treadmill. how about skiing? across portions of the western u.s., and how about getting up towards the hiking and backpacking in her teen years. check out rosemary cnn. can you see that. >> pedram, i will never, ever challenge you again! >> good stuff. pedram does his -- pedram does his research. great story there. sent out on twitter a poll, who among us is likely to climb stairs with our hands, vote now. >> thanks store watfor watching rosemary church.
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"w"well you don't want to live with mom and dad forever, do you?" "then she says...bazang!" "ok, good one." (laughs) "bazang. remember?" "bazang...you get it?" "bazang?" "yeah!" "uh, how do i check my credit score?" "credit karma, don't worry bud it's free." "ohhhh." "credit karma. give yourself some credit."
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can donald trump win over the gop establishment? in just hours, the republican frontrunner meets with leaders followed by chaos on the campaign trail. president obama in cuba. the first u.s. president to visit the country in 88 years. and the captured paris terror suspect behind bars claiming more attacks were planned. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm miguel marquez. >> nice to see you. happy spring.

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