Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 2, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

1:00 am
♪ but acknowledges some serious challenges remain. plus, as the race for the democratic party nomination heats up in the state of wisconsin, bernie sanders and hillary clinton get a little more critical of each other. and painful memories amidnew beginnings as surviving students of the deadly attack at kenya's garisa university come together one year later. live at atlanta headquarters, we want to welcome our viewers from the simpraunit
1:01 am
states and around the world, i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts now. good day. we begin with the efforts of world leaders to ensure nuclear weapons and materials don't fall into the wrong hands. that was the focus of the nuclear summit that was held in washington, d.c. the u.s. president barack obama says an important treaty is now expected to go into effect. that treaty requires member states to do more to secure their radioactive materials. plus, china has pledged to work closer with the u.s. beijing plays a key role in enforcing sanctions against north korea, which is believed to have nuclear weapons. mr. obama also says he wants to reduce america's nuclear arsenal further, but he says the u.s. cannot act alone. >> one of the challenges that we're going to have here is that it is very difficult to see huge reductions in our nuclear
1:02 am
arsenal unless the united states and russia, as the two largest possessors of nuclear weapons, are prepared to lead the way. the other area where i think with we need to see progress is pakistan and india, that subcontinent, making sure that as they develop military doctrines, that they are not continually moving in the wrong direction. and we have to take a look at the korean peninsula because the bprk, north korea is in a whole different category. and poses the most immediate set of concerns for all of us. one that we are working internationally to focus on. >> as you heard there from the u.s. president, north korea is still a key obstacle for global nuclear peace. it was just thursday that pyongyang fired yet another short-range missile. this time it landed in the east
1:03 am
coast off the peninsula there. all this according to south korea. plus, north korea's country feels threatened by military exercises between the united states and the south. and now pyongyang says that all the talk in washington will not stop its nuclear program. >> if the united states continues, then we have to make the countermeasures also, as i told you. so, we have to develop and we have are to make more deterrence, nuclear deterrence. at this point how can you talk about endorsing right now? so we are busy to deal with this, you know, the state us of the cities on the peninsula now.
1:04 am
>> of all the world leaders who attended that summit in washington, one major power was missing -- russia. our brian todd explains why. >> reporter: with the brussels and paris attacks, a clear message from isis, they will hit western cities and kill as many civilians as they can. and it appears isis wants to create more devastation. after the paris attackers, investigators in a raid found surveillance footage of an belgium -- >> so, now we know that they actually are trying to take steps to try and acquire these materials, and so, therefore, we need specific action coming out of this nuclear security summit. >> reporter: but at the nuclear security summit in washington, one leader who could make a difference in securing nuclear material was a no-show.
1:05 am
vladimir putin has once again snubbed president obama. >> russia's lack of participation, obviously, in our view, is, frankly, counterproductive. >> reporter: russia has more than half the world's stockpile of the world's nuclear materials, and its safeguards haven't always been air-tight. >> there was an example several years ago where an insider employee at one of the russian facilities was slowly taking out small quantities of nuclear material from that site. >> historically, i've been to russia and to their nuclear facilities, in the years after 9/11, it was very am tutor way they were holding these radioactive materials. >> reporter: but experts say the russians have since gotten better at securing nuclear material. security analysts say if putin showed up at the summit, he could have shared intelligence on how to keep isis away from
1:06 am
radioactive material. radiological material for a dirty bomb, often stored in hospitals and industrial complexes, is far less secure. isis can access that. and isis supporters in the u.s. haven't been bashful about where they want to strike. >> this target is their aspiration, right? >> yes. radiological bomb f it went off here, many people dead in the immediate vicinity, but it would disperse radioactive material around several blocks and shut down the city for many years. >> reporter: responding to the criticism of putin for not showing up at the summit, a russian told us they're not sending a bad message and there's much more to nuclear security than this summit. and some have ticked off reasons for putin's absence. some countries say those with nuclear material, like iran, are not participating. they say most of the goals for
1:07 am
nuclear security have been reached and so no reason to show up. brian todd, cnn, washington. america's choice, 2016, the race for the white house and sharp words from the current u.s. president who says dlt trump hasn't shown he knows much about foreign policy or much about the world at large, for that matter. earlier this week the republican presidential candidate suggested that japan and south korea should develop nuclear weapons to defend against north korea. >> they tell us the person who made the statements doesn't know much about foreign policy or nuclear policy or the korean peninsula or the world generally. >> meanwhile, a 180 from donald trump. now back to saying that he could be open to the idea of a third
1:08 am
party run. he told fox news it all depends on how republican leaders treat him. >> are you ruling out running as an independent third-party candidate? are you ruling that out? >> i'm -- >> it's simple. >> no, it's not that simple. i'm by far the front-runner a republican. i want to run as a republican. i would beat hillary clinton. >> but if you don't get the nomination? >> we'll have to see how i was treated. we'll have to see how i was treated, very simple. >> back in september the republican candidates pledged to back the party's nominee, but they basically all abandoned that pledge on tuesday, and compounding a tough week for donald trump, some polls show that ted cruz now has a double-digit lead over him in wisconsin. the next crucial primary. cnn explains. >> do we love wisconsin, right? do we love it. >> reporter: donald trump is
1:09 am
facing a pivotal moment. >> wisconsin is very important. who is going to vote for trump on april 5th? >> reporter: tuesday's wisconsin primary now a big test as the gop front-runner tries to rebound from the toughest week of his campaign. >> it's a very serious problem. >> reporter: trump is trying to clean up his comments from earlier this week when asked if women shut be punished for having an abortion f it became illegal? >> the answer is, there has to be some form of punishment. >> reporter: now a rare admission from the billionaire. >> it could be that i misspoke, but this was a long, convoluted subject. >> reporter: trump is not backing down from another firestorm he sparked this week, standing by his refusal to rule out using nuclear weapons in europe. >> europe's a big place. the last person to use nuclear would be donald trump. i think it is a horrible thing. the thought of it is horrible. but i don't want to take
1:10 am
anything off the table. >> reporter: trump stumbles, providing an opening for the stop trump movement, kicking their efforts into overdrive in wisconsin. >> donald trump is coming into a state that i think has his number. >> reporter: lining up influential conservative talk radio hosts and activists to blunt trump before the race moves east into potentially friendlier territory for trump. >> i believe he poses an existential threat not just for the republican party, but to actually conservative principles and the image going forward. >> reporter: and trump's rivals are not letting up in their attacks. >> the problem for him with town halls, he actually has to answer questions in a specific way. >> reporter: that backlash comes as trump ames to mend fences with the republican party. sitting down thursday with officials at the rnc, including chairman previs. a source familiar with the meeting tells us previs told trump his disparaging comments
1:11 am
about the rnc from donors and activists, whose help he'll need. >> it's really a unity meeting. >> reporter: trump isn't backing down from the campaign fight, releasing a new instagram video targeting ted cruz. >> i think he's been just as wrong as obama, if not worse. >> reporter: while ted cruz is staying on the offensive against trump. >> nominating donald trump could be a train wreck. and that's not fair to the train wrecks. now to the democratic race and things are getting more personal. just days ahead of two crucial primaries in the states of wisconsin and new york, front-runner hillary clinton says bernie sanders' campaign is lying about her record and shoos sick of it. now sanders says clinton is the one who's lying. so, who's lying? jason carroll has the latest for us.
1:12 am
>> reporter: a growing intensity in the democratic primary fight as hillary clinton tries to shed rival bernie sanders. >> i just go crazy when i hear senator sanders and the tea party republicans railing against the export/import bank. >> reporter: clinton holds a significant lead in the delegate count, but on the heels of a string of western victories, sanders is vowing to carry on to the july convention. >> if we win here in new york, we are going to make it to the white house! >> reporter: sanders is challenging clinton in her adopted home state of new york, rallying more than 18,000 supporters in the bronx thursday night. here in wisconsin, polls show him with a narrow lead over clinton ahead of tuesday's primary. despite his delegate gap, sanders insists there is still a path for him to win the nomination. >> you get 60%, 70%, 08% of the vote in a state. you know what? i think super delegates should vote for us. >> reporter: sanders is likely to have the resources to push
1:13 am
forward. his campaign saying it raised $44 million in march, eclipsing its $43 million haul from february. the hard-fought race growing more intense by the day, with clinton being confronted by a climate activist after a new york event thursday night. >>. >> i am so sick of sanders' campaign lying about it. >> if people receive money from lobbists in the industry, i think you're receiving money from the industry. >> reporter: democratic rivals also sharing jabs over abortion. clinton accusing sanders of not denouncing trump. >> senator sanders agreed that donald trump's comments were shameful, but then he said, they
1:14 am
were a distraction from, and i quote, a serious discussion about the serious issues facing america. >> reporter: sanders is charging clinton with misrepresenting his word. >> what secretary clinton did is take things out of context. i am 100% pro-choice. >> that was cnn's jason carroll reporting for us. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead this hour, latest on a deadly overpass collapse in kolkata, india. who authorities in india are blaming. plus, kenya marks the somber anniversary of some students who survived the university attack, telling us what they remember from that day. you're watching "cnn newsroom."
1:15 am
1:16 am
1:17 am
1:18 am
i'm george howell. the latest on the deadly collapse of an overpass in india. authorities are now charging a construction company for that incident. at least 24 people were killed on thursday in kolkata. an executive of the company denied any fault, saying that
1:19 am
the disaster was an action of god. cnn's correspondent has been covering this for us, and she spoke with some of the victims' families. >> reporter: despair and mourning. they were on a hand-pulled rickshaw headed to a nearby hospital to visit an ailing relative when a meter-long chunk of concrete and metal came crashing down. in seconds their lives ended. while at home the world turned upside down for their two sons. their shaved heads a sign of grieving in hindu communities. he had to identify his parents. >> condition was very bad. they were not in position to see and recognize. it was very bad. full body was burnt. >> reporter: their father was the sole breadwinner.
1:20 am
he was their only son. we didn't hear from them for hours, we couldn't get in touch with them and then we heard the overpass collapse. i just went cold, she says. after frantic four hours of searching, calling, hoping and praying, she found out what happened. there's no limit to hardship and sorrow in life. sometimes it's happiness, other times it's all darkness. my heart bleeds with pain. he was my only son, she says. in the neighborhood, across the country, people want to know how it happened, who is accountable, but here there's no anger. who can we blame? we don't blame anyone. we blame our faith. they're still in a state of shock, aware of what's happened but unable to make sense of it. cnn, kolkata, india. in south africa, the
1:21 am
country's president jacob zuma is facing calls to resign. this after south africa's highest court determined zuma broke the law in using public funds to renovate his private home. the constitutional court ruled mr. zuma improperly used $15 million in state funds for home upgrades. you see his home here. while some opposition party members are urging mr. zuma's impeachment, the ruling afternoon national congress is rallying around him inspect a televised address, mr. zuma apologized to south africans. >> has caused a lot of frustration and confusion for which i apologize on my behalf and on behalf of government. i urge all parties to respect
1:22 am
the judgment and abide by it. let us use the judgment to build and further strengthen our democracy. >> president zuma has been ordered to repay state funds that were spent on any upgrades that are not related to security. in kenya, a somber anniversary this day. it has been one year now since the garissa university massacre. that massacre that killed 148 people, all gunned down by al shabab militants. they went door to door on the school's campus, targeting christians specifically. the attack has left a lasting scar on those who survived that day. many of those students are now attending a school in elduret and that's where our robin creel
1:23 am
is following this story. this is a day so many survivors are reliving a nightmare, simply thankful they are alive. this is a day they saw many of their classmates killed. >> reporter: a truly mixed bag of emotions, george. every now and then a student walks out in tears. there are 600 garissa college student here who came here to moore university after their college was attacked last year by shabab gunman. one thing juliette said to me yesterday, she's a survivor we spoke to, is that today could have just as easily been a memorial day for her had she not survived this attack. i think that's what's really resonating with students here, it could have easily been them and not just the garissa university students who survived. there is a thinking across kenya universities and indeed across the world that this kind of terror attack could have happened anywhere. here's what a few students we spoke to yesterday had to say about the one-year anniversary since the garissa attack.
1:24 am
>> reporter: like many university students, ben is on a journey. different than most. >> i crawled up to the door. that's when i was rescued. and as they were rescuing me, someone from shabab said they were coming in and he shot them. >> reporter: shot by terrorists on a attack on his university, ben remained silent. one year after suffering debilitating injuries, ben is moving again. >> i'm able to work. currently i am using a bicycle. i cannot walk for very long distance, but i can run, i can play, i can do very many things. >> the prayers in the whole and when they shoot us, i fall down.
1:25 am
>> reporter: evelyn can finally walk unassisted and is proud of it. this school houses almost all of the survivors of the garissa massacre. hundreds of miles from the state of the attack, it's much more secure. still students fear more attacks and remember the friends they lost. like judith, she was one of evelyn's roommates. of the six girls in their dorm room, only three survived. two of them still lived together. roommate juliette carries one reminder of her best friend. >> reminds me of judy. >> reporter: judith is not here anymore, but her friendship, an ever-lasting gift. ♪ >> reporter: that singing you hear behind me, george, is the students of garissa university
1:26 am
choir. they are singing a beautiful hymn and they will be heard throughout today. a memorial for those students who died but also a celebration of their lives. i want to talk about security, george. security here at moore university is fairly tight. there are a number of armed policemen around but there are still scares. some of these university students from garissa telling us a number of them still suffering from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. every now and then they hear of -- they say it has even caused stampedes and some injuries. there is still this feeling of unrest on this campus. we can also tell you about how al shabab, the gun man that attacked garissa university, has been handled by kenyan security services. there has not been another major attack since the garissa college attack. since then we've had a number of high-profile visits and we
1:27 am
understand the african forcing fighting shabab in somalia, including kenyan forces v been launching offensives as well as u.s. drone strikes again the terror group. george? >> it is beautiful music there to hear behind you on this day, a day that so many families -- those survivors are thankful and those families who lost loved ones are still deal with such pain. robyn, thank you for your reporting. 4:27 on the east coast of the u.s. still to come this hour, hundreds of migrants and refugees could soon face deportation from greece back to turkey. and some are saying they won't go. plus, inside the ancient city of palmyra after the destruction caused by isis. we're live in the u.s. and around the world this hour. you're watching "cnn newsroom."
1:28 am
1:29 am
1:30 am
1:31 am
here in the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom." it's good have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines this hour. u.s. president barack obama is slamming donald trump's suggestion that japan and south korea should arm themselves with nuclear weapons. at a nuclear summit on friday, mr. obama said the republican presidential candidate doesn't know much about foreign policy or the world, for that matter. meanwhile, donald trump says he is not ruling out a third-party bid for the white house. it's not the first time the billionaire has said he's leaving the door open for an independent run. the front-runner says he wants to run as a republican but it depends upon how he is treated by the party's leaders at convention.
1:32 am
a construction company faces numerous charges, including attempted murder in connection with the collapse of an overpass in kolkata, india. at least 24 people died when a section of that bridge, which was under construction, crashed on thursday. an executive at the company denies any fault. now to the migrant crisis in europe. police say that hundreds of migrants and refugees tore down part of a razor wire fence surrounding a building where they were being held on a greek island. they marched ten kilometers, that's about 6.2 miles, to a port to protest a deal between european union and turkey. under it, any migrant who arrived in greece after march 20th must remain in a holding center there, and will be sent back to turkey if their asylum requests are then rejected. >> i don't know how they are going to treat us.
1:33 am
if they support me, i don't know. we are not going back. we have families in europe who are happy. i'm not going back you know. and they promise you that they can make asylum, but police not accepting any. >> that migrant deal between the eu and turkey is supposed to go into effect monday through -- though the u.n. is arguing neither country is ready, yet. the plan is for ankara to take back refugees who left turkey for europe if their asylum request has been rejected. the eu will settle a asylum-seeker in turkey and will speed up payment of some $3.3 billion already promised to turkey to help pay for the
1:34 am
refugees. and the eu will wave visa requirements for turkish citizens by next june. both sides will negotiate possible membership into the eu. we move to syria and the ancient city of palmyra. we're getting a much closer look at the damage done by isis. they recaptured the city from isis with the help of air power but palmyra is a shell of what it once was. we go inside that city and what remains of its historic treasures. >> reporter: palmyra's arch may have been demolished by the islamic state but triumph is exactly what syrian soldiers field. the officers know the symbolism of stones. a people without a past, he says, is a people without a future. no one kne the propaganda value
1:35 am
of palmyra other than isis. they destroyed columns and temples supposedly in a campaign against idolatry. they left it in an attack because it made for a backdrop in their videos of horror. imagine just last year, people were to come here and watch as jihadis came on this ancient stage, with them 25 syrian soldiers, whom they murdered. it's just extraordinary to think of such barbarity, a sea of cruelty in the modern world. a group of russian officers arrived. they're -- this damage was caused by the months of motorers
1:36 am
and russian come barredment. they took to the sky that the syrian army could prevail over jihadists. >> translator: there were many explosives and mines. the heaviest battles were with the terrorists around the castle. they had all kinds of weapons. as soon as we appeared, they fired right at us. we killed many of them. we saw them dragging away the bodies of the wounded. >> reporter: before fleeing, isis militants rigged the streets of the modern town adjace adjacent, right up to the flagpole where last year they hanged the 81-year-old keeper of the palmyra museum. a brutal message to anyone who might want to stop the looting and destruction. the beauty of palmyra is stunning. syrian archaeologists say they can rehabilitate the site in
1:37 am
five years if they get the money. and if there can be peace. the current calm is more fragile than karveg on stones. signs of the i.s. presence, a jihadi must have slept here. the graffiti says, keep out, by order of the islamic state. the devastation at the temple is shocking. this is what the sacred sanctuary of the temple of bell used to look like. tens of thousands of tourists blocked here to see it. this is what it looks like now, just rubble, a ruin, completely destroyed. islamic state militants packed it with explosives and blew it up. it's almost impossible to imagine how it could be restored. the stones are shattered and some archaeologists think it would not only be futile but wrong to try and rebuild exactly as it was. >> the identity of palmyra can't
1:38 am
be the same anymore. it's true it is a world heritage site but now it has witnessed massacres. 400 people have been killed inside the roman theater. people will not look at this site again as it was before. now it's a place where there is blood. they have modern blood. it's not old blood. can we treat it the same way as if this never happened before? >> in syria the past isn't over. it's not even past. the battle for palmyra has not only changed the course of this modern war, but changed forever this precious, ancient site.
1:39 am
i'm only in my 60's. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement insurance plans, it could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] you'll be able to visit
1:40 am
any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and virtually no referrals needed. see why millions of people have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp. don't wait. call now.
1:41 am
america's choice 2016, the race for the white house and tensions are rising. just ahead of crucial democratic primaries in both wisconsin and new york. hillary clinton had a heated exchange with a climate change activist on thursday and said
1:42 am
that she is sick of bernie sanders' campaign, quote, lying about who donates to her campaign. sanders says his campaign has not lied and the former secretary of state owes him an apology, he says. >> according to an analysis on greenpeace, hillary clinton's campaign and her super pac have received more than $4.5 million from the fossil fuel industry. in fact, 57 coal, oil, gas lobbyists have directly cribbed to her campaign, with 43 of them contributing the maximum allowed for the primary. and these are not just workers in the fossil fuel industry. these are paid, registered lobbyists. secretary clinton, you owe our campaign an apology. we were telling the truth.
1:43 am
>> the gloves coming off between clinton and sanders. let's take a closer look now at hillary clinton. her resume is impressive. her experience is virtually unrivalled in the race for the president. so, why does she constantly struggle with being likeable? jonathan mann takes a look for zeus she doesn't seem warm. she doesn't seem genuine. >> she doesn't appear honest. people haven't liked her for years. >> i hate to say, it's a personality, which is not a fair thing to say because she's a woman and comes off as kind of serious. you hear a lot on the news about her yelling. >> reporter: they are impressions that barely scratch the surface of hillary clinton's decades in public life. but they are deep-seeded and for clinton, they are a problem. hillary clinton has been many things. a middle class girl from the north side of chicago. a yale scholar. the first lady of arkansas and then the first lady of the united states.
1:44 am
♪ don't stop thinking about tomorrow ♪ >> reporter: after a tumultuous eight years in the white house, she would go on to serve as senator for new york, the only first lady to ever hold the post. and then in 2007, she became a candidate for president herself. she has worn many hats and famously many pantsuits and she is judged for her clothes, her hair, her marriage, her integrity, and something much more basic, her likability. >> you're likeable enough, hillary. >> thank you. >> reporter: a cbs poll found 62 % of voters have an unfavorable view of her. donald trump, perhaps the most polarizing politician, is only disliked by slightly more, 57%. there have been questions, scandals, about a land development deal from her days in waarkansas known as watergat
1:45 am
about libya when she was secretary of state, about her decision to handle government communications on a private e-mail server. what do all the episodes have in common? no wrongdoing was ever found but she was never able to wash away the stain of scandal. >> the problem is the style. the problem is, is she the person you want to have a beer with. >> reporter: and, of course, there was monica lieu wewinsky. >> it's important to remember bill clinton is one of the most popular living american politicians but the downside is those scandals. to the extent that mentions of monica lewinsky dredges of memories people would not like to relive. >> reporter: maybe many americans are uncomfortable with a woman as successful and ambitious as hillary clinton. years ago she identified the problem. >> i suppose i could have stayed home and baked cookies. >> she has already competed in
1:46 am
the presidential primary eight years ago. she's been the secretary of state by the united states. by the way, the third female secretary of state in the united states. so, at ts point i don't think it's sexism. >> hillary! >> reporter: supporters insist clinton is still judged unfairly. >> this will be a big test for the country and whether or not we're able to look past all of these cultural, social and media biases and look at the person, the individual, their leadership traits and what they bring to the conversation, that's the big test. >> reporter: compare her to some of the most important men in her life today. clinton is not credited with bernie sanders' honesty, donald trump's candor or her husband's magnetism but she's doggedly working toward the presidential nomination. and as she approaches the general election, she will somehow ho-v to convince americans she can be the first female president of the united
1:47 am
states, whether they like her or not. jonathan mann, cnn. switching now to weather, some severe storms have battered parts of the southeastern united states and our meteorologist karen mcginnis is at the international weather center following those storms. >> yeah, it was a wild ride across the deep south the last several days with hundreds of reports of severe weather. most of those being high wind and hail, but we did have a number of tornadoes across the deep south. most of them producing some type of damage, mild to moderate, but no reports of any injuries. a sharp contrast to that, april is one of those months where you think, well, we're now officially into spring but it's not going to feel that way into southern ontario, quebec, into the great lakes and into the eastern great lakes and portions of new england. even in places like boston there could be between 7 and 17
1:48 am
centimeters of snowfall or 3 to 6 inches possible. look at these temperatures. they are going to be amazingly below normal from washington, d.c. and new york city, but even for atlanta, a chill in the air, where temperatures had been well into the 20s. now only in the teens. so, we see those temperatures drop from the 70s back into the 60s and in some cases into the 50s. across europe, one storm system after the other, our information drops out here, but we've seen quite a bit of vigorous weather move in across the united kingdom, also in glasgow, 30 to 35 millimeters of rainfall. we're looking at the middle east where we could see some severe storms from kabul and into -- more towards the north. showers and thunderstorms could produce some look-alike flooding which could produce some landslides in those areas. maybe a few isolated showers for the uae and baghdad and tehran could pick up an isolated
1:49 am
shower. across the indian subcontinent, the office there is saying over the next several months before the monsoon season begins, we're looking at temperatures well above normal for this time of year. george, back to you. >> karen, thank you so much. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, nissan is adding a new vehicle to its lineup. and it's unlike any car you've ever seen before. look at that. we'll show you the scoot on the streets of new york for the first time.
1:50 am
1:51 am
1:52 am
1:53 am
in egypt, the mystery behind queen nefertiti's final resting place is not over. archaeologists have been scanning what they believe are recently discovered chambers behind king tut's tomb respect results from that scan will be ready soon and could prove queen nefertiti's remains were placed there some 3,000 years ago. >> there's still the possibility to find something this remarkable here. and i think if you do find something that's remarkable, then the ingenuity of science
1:54 am
will find a way of revealing this. we're not there yet. year still testing the hi hypothesis. a new all-electric car, nissan has partnered with the firm to design what is called the scoot, which hopes to attract urban drivers. our maggie lake took a scoot for a spin on the streets of manhattan. ♪ >> reporter: if you're sick of driving around for hours looking for a parking spot or spending lots of money to fill up your car, nissan thinks it has the answer for you. rachel, what are these things? are they cars? golf carts? what with-r we looking at? >> it's a vehicle, i'm happy to introduce, for the first time on the streets of new york, our
1:55 am
nissan new mobility concept. >> reporter: it kind of looks like a toy, or like a go-kart. what can this do? >> it's a production vehicle. its top speed is at 25 miles per hour. and it's electric, no gas? >> 100% electric. part of the cool factors are the scissor doors. >> reporter: very nice. this is race car feeling, i think. >> it's pretty simple. get in and go. ♪ >> reporter: this feels good, i have to say. you definitely have a bumpy feel. where does this fall between bike and zipcar, though? >> zipcars are are for more just to get out of the city. >> reporter: this is more in city in and out, parking quickly. ♪ >> i would drive that little thing. >> you like it? >> i love it!
1:56 am
>> it looks interesting. i don't know about my 6-foot frame fitting in there. >> reporter: come on. let's see. how does it feel? >> it feels good. >> put the pedal to the metal. ♪ >> that is definitely the answer to parking in places like new york. there is no official word yet, though, on when the scoot will be available to the public. we thank you for watching this hour. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. this is cnn, the world's news leader.
1:57 am
1:58 am
1:59 am
2:00 am
the u.s. president says the world cannot be complacent on nuclear security and warns to keep radioactive materials out of the wrong hands. plus, donald trump tries to right his ship after a week of flip-flopping while the democratic candidates accuse each other of lying. and remembering garissa university. cnn speaks with survivors of that massacre in kenya one year after al shabab militants launched a devastating raid there. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "newsroom" starts right now. good day to you. we begin this hour with the
2:01 am
nuclear summit in washington, d.c. and the efforts to maintain security of nuclear stockpiles. the u.s. president barack obama says an important treaty is now expected to go into effect. that treaty requires member states to do more to store their radioactive materials. china pledged to work closer with the u.s. as well, playing a key role in enforcing sanctions against north korea, which has nuclear weapons. mr. obama also says he wants to reduce america's nuclear arsenal further, but he also wants to modernize the nuclear weapons the u.s. does keep. >> just the smallest amount of plutonium, about the size of an apple, could kill and injure hundreds of thousands of people. it would be a humanitarian, political and environmental catastrophe with global ramifications for decades. it would change our world. so, we cannot be complacent. we have to build on our progress.
2:02 am
>> world leaders at the summit also focused on keeping nuclear materials out of the hands of terrorists, but one major nuclear player decided not to show up. our brian todd reports on why russia skipped this major summit. >> reporter: with the brussels and paris attacks, a clear message from isis, they will hit western cities and kill as many civilians as they can. and it appears isis wants to create more devastation. after the paris attacks, investigators in a raid found surveillance footage of an employee at a nuclear facility. >> and that nuclear facility had highly enriched uranium and also produced these radiological sources so now we know they are actually trying to take steps to try and acquire these materials and so, therefore, we need specific action coming out of this nuclear security summit.
2:03 am
>> reporter: but at the nuclear security summit in washington, one leader who could make a difference in securing nuclear material was a no-show. vladimir putin has once again snubbed president obama. >> russia's lack of participation, obviously, in our view, is, frankly, counterproductive. >> reporter: russia has more than half the world's stockpile of nuclear materials and its safeguards haven't always been air-tight. >> there was an example several years ago where an insider employee at one of the russian facilities was slowly taking out small quantities of nuclear material from that site. >> historically, i've been to russia and to their nuclear facilities, in the years after 9/11, it was very amateur the way they were holding these radioactive materials. >> reporter: but experts say the russians have since gotten better at securing nuclear material. security analysts say if putin had shown up at summit, he could have shared intelligence on how
2:04 am
to keep isis away from nuclear and radioactive material. either way, the terror group would have a tough time getting its hands on a nuclear weapon. but radiological material for a dirty bomb, often stored in hospitals and industrial complexes, is far less secure. isis can access that. and isis supporters in the u.s. haven't been bashful about where they want to strike. this kind of target is really their aspiration? >> yes. mass target attack, clearly an aspiratio aspiration. radiological bomb f it went off here, many people dead in the immediate vicinity, but it would disperse radioactive material around several blocks and shut down the city for many years. >> reporter: responding to the criticism of putin for not showing up at the summit, a russian official told us, they're not sending a bad message and there's much more to nuclear security than this summit. the russians have also ticked off some reasons for putin's absence from the summit. they say some countries like nuclear material, like iran, are
2:05 am
not participating. they say most of the goals for nuclear security have already been reached and so no need to show up. and they say the u.s. is unfairly pushing its agenda on some groups, like the nuclear wash dog and enter poll. broo brian todd, cnn. america's choice 2016. the current u.s. president had some sharp words for donald trump. this after his recent comments that the united states should back out of its security role in asia. the republican front-runner suggested at a cnn town hall on tuesday that japan and south korea should develop their own nuclear arsenals. and at a news conference at the nuclear security summit, mr. obama said the remarks indicate that trump should not be in the oval office. >> the person who made the statements doesn't know much about foreign policy or nuclear policy or the korean peninsula
2:06 am
or the world generally. it came up on the sidelines. i've said before, you know, people pay attention to american elections. what we do is really important to the rest of the world. >> mr. obama's criticism of trump comes as the presidential race heats up in the state of wisconsin, with its primary just around the corner. voting is set for next tuesday there, april 5th. and it's expected to be a crucial contest for both parties. there are 42 delegates at stake for republicans and 86 pledged delegates for democrats. local officials say they could see the state's biggest voter turnout for the primary in 36 years. that primary isn't looking so good for donald trump. he is ten points behind ted cruz at this point. and that is just one part of trump's bad week. the past few days have been the most challenging of his campaign
2:07 am
so far. our chief political correspondent, dana bash, has this report for us. >> reporter: when all else fails for donald trump, he tries to change the subject, like he did today. ♪ >> ted cruz, i did not like him at all -- >> reporter: slamming ted cruz in a new instagram video after the front-runner's worst weeks since the campaign began, causing a bipartisan firestorm with these comments, when asked if women should be punished for having an abortion, if it became legal. >> the answer is that there has to be some form of punishment. >> for the woman? >> yeah, there has to be some form. >> reporter: that trump recanted within hours and later added this -- >> but this was a long, convoluted subject. >> reporter: but he has not taken back what he said at cnn's town hall, advocating for more nuclear weapons in asia. >> at some point we have to say, you know what, we're better off if japan protects itself against this maniac in north korea.
2:08 am
>> reporter: now trump is refusing to rule out using nuclear weapons in europe. >> europe's a big place. the last person to use nuclear would be donald trump. that's the way i feel. i think it is a horrible thing. the thought of it is horrible. but i don't want to take anything off the table. >> reporter: trump's rivals continue to blast him. >> nominating donald trump could be a train wreck. and that's not fair to the train wrecks. >> see, the problem for him with town halls, he actually has to answer questions in a specific way. >> reporter: kasich also went after donald trump for having a thin leadership record. >> his record is shutting down the government and making everybody he works with upset. >> reporter: as trump sees his unfavorable ratings rice and support among women fall, he's quick to point out he is still the front-runner by a longshot. even if he arrives at the gop convention in july without winning the nomination, if he is close, it should be him. >> i really think that whoever has that kind of an advantage
2:09 am
should get it. >> reporter: but the first-time politician is also learning that seizing the republican nomination takes more than just winning contests. it takes winning over delegates in some states, where rules vary. sources tell cnn that educating trump about the complicated delegate process was the subject of trump's meeting this week with republican party chair previs. >> it's really a unit meeting. >> reporter: cnn is told previs useded meeting for trump to ease up on trashing the rnc, as he did this week at cnn's town hall. >> i've been treated unfairly. i'll i'll give you an example -- >> treated unfairly by who? >> i think basically the rnc, the republican party. >> that was cnn's dana bash reporting for us. in yet another reversal on friday, donald trump told cbs news that federal laws are set
2:10 am
and should not be changed to outlaw abortion. later, his spokeswoman said donald trump was just giving an account of the current laws, which he would change as president. now to the democratic race, where things are getting much more personal now. front-runner hillary clinton says bernie sanders' campaign is, quote, lying about her record and she's sick of it, she says. now sanders says that clinton is the one lying. senior washington correspondent jeff zeleny has this report for us. >> reporter: hillary clinton just can't shake bernie sanders. >> this is really personal for me. >> reporter: their democratic fight isn't winding down, but ramping up and expanding to new fronts. >> secretary clinton -- >> reporter: sanders and his supporters keeping alive their criticism of clinton, receiving contributions from the oil and gas industry. this confrontation with a climate change activist going viral. >> i do not -- i have money from people who work for fossil fuel.
2:11 am
i am sick of sanders campaign lying about that. i'm sick of it. >> reporter: the clinton campaign accepts money from lobbyists who work for oil and gas companies, not the companies themselves. sanders calls it a distinction without a difference. >> if people receive money from lobbyists of the industry, i think you're receiving money from the industry. these are not just a little work men. these are lobbyists who represent the oil and gas industry. >> reporter: clinton struck back, saying sanders isn't pro-business. >> i just go crazy when i hear senator sanders and the tea party republicans railing against the export/import bank like it's some kind of evil, you know, presence. >> reporter: the democratic rivals are also tangling over abortion. clinton accusing sanders of not properly denouncing donald trump's assertion that women who have abortions should be punished. >> senator sanders agrees donald trump's comments were shameful, but then he said they were a distraction from, and i quote, a
2:12 am
serious discussion about the serious issues facing america. >> reporter: sanders cried foul. >> what secretary clinton did is take things out of context. my 100% pro-choice. >> reporter: the root of the tension is the length of the race. the clinton campaign once assuming the race would all be over by now. as campaign manager noted in this memo after clinton lost the new hampshire primary two months ago, writing, the nomination will likely be won in march, not february. sanders has an edge in wisconsin and is fighting hard on clinton's turf in new york. he drew 18,000 supporters to a rally in the bronx. >> my father came to this country at the age of 17 from poland without a nickel in his pocket. >> reporter: sanders is well behind in the delegate race, but money is keeping him in the game. his campaign says it raised $44 million in march, fortifying it for the final two months of the
2:13 am
long democratic primary. >> let's take this fight to the white house! thank you all! >> reporter: but for bernie sanders to take this to the white house, he needs to keep winning and winning big. his first target is wisconsin. he's camping out this all weekend long. now, a top clinton adviser told me today they believe wisconsin is basically out of reach. that's why they're focusing so much attention on new york. but judging by the size of last night's crowd in the bronx for sanders, that popular streak in new york is alive and well and the clinton campaign is taking new york very seriously. tey know a loss there would up-end this race like nothing else could. >> that was cnn's jeff zeleny reporting there for us. bernie sanders spoke out about clinton's finger-pointing at a rally in wisconsin on friday. the vermont senator says his campaign was not lying about clinton's donations from fossil fuels, from that industry, and the former secretary of state owes him an apology. >> according to an analysis done by greenpeace, hillary clinton's
2:14 am
campaign and her super pac have received more than $4.5 $million from the fossil fuel industry. in fact, 57 oil, gas and coal industry lobbyists have directly contributed to her campaign with 43 of them contributing the maximum allowed for the primary. and these are not just workers in the fossil fuel industry. these are paid, registered lobbyists. secretary clinton, you owe our campaign an apology. we were telling the truth. >> gloves coming off there. be sure to join cnn on tuesday for all the day's coverage of this critical wisconsin primary. it could be a game-changer for candidates on both sides only hear on cnn. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still to come this hour, the
2:15 am
deadly bridge collapse in kolkata, india. a look at who authorities are blaming there. plus, the garissa university massacre one year on. survivors reflect on what they saw that day and how they are moving forward. stay with us. living with chronic migraine feels like each day is a game of chance. i wanted to put the odds in my favor. so my doctor told me about botox®, an fda-approved treatment that significantly reduces headache days for adults with chronic migraine, 15 or more headache days a month, each lasting 4 hours or more. it's shown to prevent headaches and migraines before they start. and it's injected by my doctor once every 12 weeks. effects of botox® may spread hours to weeks after injection causing serious symptoms. alert your doctor right away, as difficulty swallowing, speaking, breathing, eye problems, or muscle weakness can be signs of a life-threatening condition. side effects may include allergic reactions, neck and injection site pain, fatigue and headache. don't take botox® if there's a skin infection.
2:16 am
tell your doctor your medical history, muscle or nerve conditions, and medications including botulinum toxins, as these may increase the risk of serious side effects. put the odds on your side. visit botoxchronicmigraine.com to learn how to save on your treatment. talk to a headache specialist today about botox®. oh. yes, hi. want to survive... ...a crazy busy day? start with a positive attitude... great. thanks. ...and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... ...with active naturals® soy. to help reduce the look of brown spots in just four weeks. i gotta go. and for gentle makeup removal... try our nourishing wipes to brighten skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results®. and to help you accelerate,ast. we've created a new company. ♪ one totally focused on what's next for your business.
2:17 am
a true partnership where people, technology and ideas push everyone forward. accelerating innovation. accelerating transformation. accelerating next. hewlett packard enterprise. welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell.
2:18 am
the death toll from the deadly bridge collapse in india has now risen to 27 people dead. authorities are charging a construction company with several crimes, including attempted murder. an executive at that company has denied any fault. cnn has more from kolkata on the disaster, including reaction from the victims' families. >> reporter: authorities are acting swiftly to get to the bottom of this tragedy, how it happened and all who's responsible. police have detained 12 employees of the construction company behind this highway overpass for questioning. they've also charged the company of culpable homicide. that's actually a very serious charge and could lead to life in prison if those employees are actually convicted. now, when you ask authorities as to how they came to these charges, they said they could not elaborate, but many people here say that they believe this
2:19 am
is a man-made disaster. they blame it on shoddy construction, faulty engineering and also corruption. we've been talking to families who lost their loved ones and as you can imagine, they are in a complete state of shock. >> reporter: despair and mourning. they were on a hand-pulled rickshaw headed to a nearby hospital to visit an ailing relative when roughly a 100-meter long chunk of concrete and metal came krashg down. in seconds their lives ended. while at home the world turned upside down for their two sons. their shaved heads a sign of grieving in hindu families. he had to identify his parents' bodies. >> condition was very bad. they were not in position to see and recognize. it was very bad. full body was burnt. >> reporter: their father was the sole breadwinner. running a timber trading business.
2:20 am
he was their only son. we didn't hear from them for hours, we couldn't get in touch with them and then we heard the overpass collapse. i just went cold, she says. after a frantic four hours of searching, calling, hoping and praying, she found out what happened. there's no limit to hardship and sorrow in life. sometimes it's happiness, other times it's all darkness. my heart bleeds with pain. he was my only son, she says. in the neighborhood, across the country, people want to know how it happened, who is accountable, but here there's no anger. who can we blame? we don't blame anyone. we blame our faith. they're still in a state of shock, aware of what's happened but unable to make sense of it. a tragic story playing across
2:21 am
various households in kolkata. now that the search and rescue operation is pretty much over, families of victims are requesting authorities to take action as soon as possible so tragedy like this does not happen again. now on to kenya, where the nation is remembering victims of the garissa university attack one year ago. that's when al shabab militants stormed the campus, murdering 148 people, most of them students. many of the students who survived that attack have since continued their education many miles away. robyn kriel paid a visit to that school and is there with a live visit. this is a day so many survivors are simply thankful to be alive, but remembering that nightmare, remembering seeing so many of their fellow classmates killed. >> reporter: well, yes, george. just behind me at the moment,
2:22 am
one student is describing how n her words, she watched her friends killed. it was incredibly traumatic day for around 600 students who are here at moore university, continuing their university education after it was disrupted one year ago today at garissa university college. we're also hearing today celebratory songs. 147 is not just a number. that is a theme that has been resonating through kenya for the past year, reminding people of the 147, 148, those numbers are still being confused at this point in kenya, but 147 not just a number, is a number -- is a phrase that's been trending. today we've heard people singing about it, trying to remember those 140-plus people who died on that day. we spoke to two students who narrowly escaped death. incredible stories of bravery. here are their stories.
2:23 am
like many university students, ben is on a journey. his is different than most. >> i tried to crawl. i crawled up to the door. that's when he was rescued. and as they were rescuing me, some al shabab said they were coming in and they killed that person who was rescuing us. >> reporter: shot by terrorists during an attack on his university, ben lay motionless for hours, playing dead. one year on after suffering debilitating injuries, ben is moving again. >> i am able to walk. currently i am using a bicycle. i cannot walk for very long distance, but i can run, i can play. i can do very many things. >> the prayers in the whole and when they shoot us, i fall down. >> reporter: evelyn can finally
2:24 am
walk unassisted and is proud of it. this school houses almost all of the students of the garissa massacre. several hundred miles away from the attack is much more secure and allows for diversion. still students fear more attacks and remember the friends they've lost. like judith, she was one of evelyn's roommates. of the six girls in their dorm room, only three survived. two of them still live together. roommate juliette carries one reminder of her best friend. >> i don't university to see that. >> reporter: judith's not here anymore, but her friendship, an ever-lasting gift. security presence here at moore university has been ramped up because of today's one-year
2:25 am
anniversary. security ramped up across the country, the airports, major transport hubs have all seen increased presence of kenyan security as we have seen for the past year. there has not been a major al shabab attack since the garissa university attack this time last year, george. >> i know that was a big question following that attack, just bolstering security in kenya and making sure that events like the one you're attending now, to make sure they are safe and secure. what about taking the fight to al shabab militants across the border, what's being done there? and is the united states playing a role? >> reporter: indeed, that is what we have seen and that's what we can confirm, george. u.s. air strikes in support of african union and african union somali offensive launched just in the recent past few days, really. we're hearing of a u.s. air strike, large u.s. air strike, possibly targeting hundreds of al shabab fighters just a few
2:26 am
days ago. of course, there was that huge air strike about two weeks ago that targeted al sa bab fighters. of course, al shabab has claimed many blood-thirsty victories lately, including kenyan forces who are fighting to keep al shabab from entering into kenya, to keep them on their toes, on the back foot, to try and annihilate as many as possible so they cannot launch terror attacks such as the one at garissa university college that so many of the students behind me are mourning the loss of their teachers, of their colleagues, of their friends, of their roommates. >> such a mix of emotions. one can only imagine for people who are in that hall behind you. robyn kriel live for us this hour. thank you. it is 5:26 on the u.s. east coast. still to come this hour, the aftermath of isis. what remains of the ancient city of palmyra after militants pushed out? plus, hundreds of migrants
2:27 am
and refugees break out of the holding center in greece as athens gets ready to send many of them back to turkey. the news continues live around the u.s. and throughout the world this hour. you're watching "cnn newsroom." [alarm beeps] ♪ ♪ the intelligent, all-new audi a4 is here. ♪ ♪ ain't got time to make no apologies...♪ couand i want to remind youel that no one's the same without the game... like @squirrelgirl52 who writes, "no football on sundays has left me with a lot of free time. "so i've constructed a small sanctuary for local squirrels. it's a safe haven where they can meet and fall in love and..."
2:28 am
ok, i'm going to stop reading right now. you might have some issues that go beyond football's help, but try watching the nfl draft. see if that helps. maybe watch with a friend... or doctor.
2:29 am
2:30 am
welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. this is "cnn newsroom." good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following this hour -- >> it's been one year since the deadly terrorist massacre at garissa university in kenya. al shabab militants killed 148 people on that day. many of them students.
2:31 am
it was the country's deadliest attack in nearly two decades. the death toll from the deadly bridge collapse in kolkata, india, has now risen to 27 people dead. the construction company faces numerous charges, including attempted murder. an executive at that company denies any fault. in los angeles, police say a knife found on the property once owned by o.j. simpson has no connection to the murders of his ex-wife and her friend. a worker found the knife and gave it to an officer who held onto it then for years. no murder weapon was ever recovered in that case and o.j. simpson was acquitted. u.s. president barack obama is praising a nuclear securities summit that ended on friday. mr. obama says an important treaty is now set to go into effect. it requires member states to do more to secure their radioactive materials. and world leaders at that summit also focused on how to prevent isis from getting nuclear materials or weapons. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr has this report.
2:32 am
>> reporter: new images of u.s. warplanes bombing mosul university. there have been more than a dozen strikes in recent weeks taking out isis installations across the campus. one critical target, isis's chemistry lab. getting rid of isis's chemical weapons capability, a top priority. >> isil has already used chemical weapons, including mustard gas in syria and iraq. there is no doubt that if these mad men ever got their hands on a nuclear bomb or nuclear material, they most certainly would use it to kill as many innocent people as possible. >> reporter: a senior iraqi explosives officer told cnn, some of the chemicals being worked on include those similar to what was used in the brussels attack. though u.s. officials could not confirm that. isis has brought in foreign fighters to teach them how to build bombs, fighters who could
2:33 am
possibly return to the west. >> what they needed help with was some top-end research and development, engineering. how do you compound chemicals so they aren't as detectable. >> reporter: all of that sharpening the u.s. focus on taking out isis's advanced weapons. >> something we're focused on every single day. particularly around mosul, where we know they've had a chemical weapons network, trying to produce chemical weapons. >> reporter: with the university long shut down, u.s. intelligence believes most of the chemical weapons work there centers around chlorine and sulfur mustard, chemicals that could be put into bombs earmarked for the west. as warplanes bomb from overhead, they have detained isis's chemical chief, gathering more intelligence. >> the more information we get, the more our special operators are out there, the more we learn about the networks, the more we're able to unravel them. >> reporter: barbara starr, cnn,
2:34 am
the pentagon. on to syria where the government forces have driven out isis out of the ancient city of palmyra, but the militants left behind many land mines, which syrian troops are now carefully detonating. isis also destroyed a number of palmyra's historic treasures, but as itn reports, some ancient sites remain largely untouched. >> reporter: palmyra's triumphal arch may have been demolished by the islamic state, but triumph is exactly what syrian soldiers feel. the offices know the symbolism of stones. a people without a past, he says, is a people without a future. no one knew the propaganda value of pal meyer ra better than i.s. they destroyed columns and temples, supposedly in a campaign against idolatry but really to shock the world. they left the roman amphitheater
2:35 am
intact because it made a dramatic backdrop for their videos of horror. imagine, just last year local men were forced to come and sit here and watch an extraordinary spectacle, as 25 teenage jihadists came onto this ancient stage, with them 25 syrian soldiers, who they murdered. it's just extraordinary to think of such barbarity, such a theater of cruelty in the modern world. a group of russian officers arrive, but they're camera-shy, even though it's their bombing that may have saved palmyra. this damage was caused by months of motorers and government and bombardment. but it was only in the last few weeks when russian aircraft tro took to the skies with iranian and fighters on the ground that the syrian army could prevail over the jihadists.
2:36 am
>> translator: there were many explosives and mines and the heaviest battles were with the terrorists around the castle. they had all kinds of weapons. as soon as we appeared, they fired everything at us. we killed many of them. we saw them dragging away the bodies of the wounded. >> reporter: before fleeing, i.s. militants rigged the streets of the modern town adjacent to the site with explosive devices and mines. right up to the flagpole where last year they hanged khaled al assad, the 81-year-old keeper of the palmyra museum. a brutal message to anyone who might want to stop the looting and destruction. the beauty of palmyra is stunning. syrian archaeologists say they can rehabilitate the site in five years, if they get the money. and if there can be peace. the current calm is more fragile than carving on stones. signs of the i.s. presence, a
2:37 am
jihadi must have slept here. the graffiti says, keep out by order of the islamic state. the devastation at the temple of bel is shocking. this is what the sacred sanctuary of the temple of bel used to look like. tens of thousands of tourists flocked here to see it. and this is what it looks like now. just rubble, a ruin, completely destroyed. islamic state militants packed it with explosives and blew it up. and it's almost impossible to imagine how it could be restored. the stones are shattered and some archaeologists think it would not only be futile, but wrong to try and rebuild exactly as it was. >> the identity of palmyra can't be the same anymore. it's a world heritage site but now it's a site that has witnessed massacres. 400 people have been killed inside the roman theater. people will not look at this site again as it was before. now it's a place before there's
2:38 am
blood. the ruins have blood on them and it's modern blood. it's not old blood. can we treat it the same way as if this never happened before? >> reporter: in syria, the past isn't over. it's not even past. the battle for palmyra has not only changed the course of this modern war, but changed forever this precious, ancient site. >> that was itn reporting for us. you can find out much more about the ant tantiquities isis ruine online at cnn.com. now we move on to the migrant crisis in europe. greece says it is ready to implement a deal between the eu and ankara to start sending migrants and refugees back to turkey. under that agreement, migrants who arrived in greece after march 20th will be sent back to turkey if their asylum requests are rejected.
2:39 am
hundreds of migrants and refugees broke out of a holding center on a greek island in protest and they marched to a nearby port. humanitarian organizations questioned the legality of the deal, but greece is standing firm. >> reporter: on the greek side, whatever is needed to be done has been done. both with the legal framework and the accommodation and logistics. we are at a satisfactory level of readiness so that the implementation of the agreement can begin on monday. i can't say that the other sides are also ready. primarily the european side on the level of the specialists that they were supposed to send. in any case, we on monday are ready to proceed with the transfer of people to turkey. >> but once they are returned to turkey, there are still concerns about what will happen to the migrants and refugees. amnesty international says the turkish government has been rounding up and forcing thousands of syrian refugees to return to syria. the director for the human rights group for europe and
2:40 am
central asia says the european union is ignoring what's happening. >> they're bussing people over, putting them in the hands of the local millish imilitia groups operating there and taking them to camps. camps whose conditions are awful and getting worse with a blatant disregard for the rights of those individuals, their welfare, their family ties. >> according to amnesty international, all are forced to return to syria. all are under illegal conditions in turkey. the european union and international law. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, it can be a silent killer. and it's a bigger threat to global health than ever before. we'll have details on the spreading epidemic next.
2:41 am
2:42 am
2:43 am
2:44 am
obesity, it's a bigger problem than world hunger and it is only getting worse. a new study published in the lancet medical journal says more people across the world are obese rather than overweight. cnn's kelly morgan has this report for us. >> reporter: as a population, we are growing. and not just in numbers. we are, according to a new study, fatter than ever. >> there had been for a long time in the world less obese people and in the past decade it's switched to be more obese people. >> reporter: the study is the biggest of the kind and looked at the mass body index over the
2:45 am
past 40 years, creating a unique global picture. it found that in 1975 there were 105 million obese men and women. that figure now stands at 641 million. broken down, almost 11% of men in the world are obese. that's a three-fold increase over four decades. and there are even more obese women. almost 15% of the female population. and the picture is expected to get a lot worse. the world health organization and united states set a target in 2011 to reverse the growing rate of obesity by the year 2025. this study says that's just not going to happen. that actually by then, one in five people in the world will be clinically obese. it's an epidemic brettish health campaign says could have been avoided. >> this is far beyond the crisis. the crisis was actually back in 2003-2004. we've just -- by failing to do anything positive, we have let
2:46 am
this crisis develop into what is a tragedy. >> reporter: it's the wider health and economic repercussions he's worried about. the links obesity has to illness such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, all potential killers, all an increase strain on the public purse. experts claim our faster, more urban lifestyles and the convenience of fast foods. some cities have introduced a tax on the sweeteners. >> it's a hard battle but it's a battle that is costing -- influencing people's health, and it's especially influencing the health of people who can least afford it. >> reporter: the w.h.o. hasn't given up on its 2025 goal, but it's call for all member states to be more aggressive in the fight. kelly morgan, cnn, london. switching now to weather and severe storms have battered parts of the south eastern
2:47 am
united states. meteorologist karen is at the international weather center. more on that. >> yeah, we've had several days where we've seen hundreds of reports of high wind and hail, even some tornadoes. most of those were fairly weak tornadoes. did produce some damage. don't have reports of any injuries. this one particular tornado report comes out of the south central region of georgia. as you take a look at this video, i want you to listen to what you hear as well. [ sirens ] >> you hear the wind blowing, the sound of the tornado sirens in the area. this is out of robins air force base to the south of macon, georgia. there was some damage reported. this is a fairly small town. the damage was trees were knocked down, some damage to homes. we also had reports are of a
2:48 am
wind gust around 78 miles per hour. so, that's hurricane-force winds that raked across the region. that's one sign of spring. another sign thaw don't typically think about is the snowfall. this comes along with a clipper system that will sweep across the great lakes region, southern ontario, quebec, and for the northeastern united states, bringing with it not just the snowfall, but high winds and high wind watches have already been issued for some sections of new england. take a look at the sharply colder temperatures that we're expecting from washington, d.c., new york and into boston. temperatures that are a good 10 to 20 degrees below where they should be for this time of year. also in atlanta, georgia, where temperatures have been quite comfortable. but as we take a look in the next several days, sharply colder. across the united kingdom, back-to-back storm systems have ushered in some rainfall in glasgow also into sky, we've seen between 30 and 35 millimeters of rainfall.
2:49 am
and then we take a look across the indian subcontinent and there is a heat warning out for some of those north central states where temperatures are expected to be in the low 30s to the low 40s, with very little chances for precipitation until the monsoon season begins. george? >> karen, you mentioned atlanta, here where we are. anything we can do about that pollen? >> i wish we could. it's going to be around until something washes it out of the atmosphere. >> thanks much. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, a hair-raising situation 35,000 feet in the air. coming up, how one man shamed this passenger for her ponytail fail. feels likewith chronic migraine each day is a game of chance. i wanted to put the odds in my favor. so my doctor told me about botox®, an fda-approved treatment that significantly reduces headache days for adults with chronic migraine, 15 or more headache days a month, each lasting 4 hours or more.
2:50 am
it's shown to prevent headaches and migraines before they start. and it's injected by my doctor once every 12 weeks. effects of botox® may spread hours to weeks after injection causing serious symptoms. alert your doctor right away, as difficulty swallowing, speaking, breathing, eye problems, or muscle weakness can be signs of a life-threatening condition. side effects may include allergic reactions, neck and injection site pain, fatigue and headache. don't take botox® if there's a skin infection. tell your doctor your medical history, muscle or nerve conditions, and medications including botulinum toxins, as these may increase the risk of serious side effects. put the odds on your side. visit botoxchronicmigraine.com to learn how to save on your treatment. talk to a headache specialist today about botox®.
2:51 am
2:52 am
"so your score went up, what are you going to do know? get a loan and finally finish culinary school...?" "learn how to make the perfect macaron... come back and open your own authentic french bakery?" "i think i need credit karma too." "check out credit karma today."
2:53 am
welcome back. the golden state warriors are chasing history this year. they are on the brink of setting a new record for wins in a season. a record that's been around since michael jordan's 1995 bulls. they suffered a big setback, though, on friday night and they dropped their first regular season home game since january 27th of last year.
2:54 am
they had won 54 in a row in oracle arena before dropping this one to the boston celtics. as the league record in its own right, they remain focused now on the big one. the warriors now need to win 5 of their last 6 games in order to make history. now to a tale of a ponytail fail. a woman on board an airplane has caused an uproar with her seat invasion of a fellow passenger. now that passenger is getting revenge. jeanne moos has more on the wayward ponytail that went viral. >> reporter: it doesn't quite qualify as an in-flight emergency, but -- >> all of a sudden, this ponytail drops down in front of us. >> reporter: this ponytail, dante ramos and his partner exchanged, can you believe this looks, and then dante snaps the
2:55 am
photograph, congrat it is to ponytailed young woman in seat 22b, you've invented a whole new way to be awful at 35,000 feet. >> we waited to see if the ponytail owner would notice. she didn't appear to. >> reporter: the photo went massively viral, landing on the infamous passenger shaming facebook page where joined bare feet in midair, feet on tray tables, q-tips left in seat pockets, litter, travelers half undressed. former flight attendant shawn kathleen created passenger shaming. yikes! >> it's so yikes. it's so beyond yikes. there was a gentleman treating his warts with compound-w. >> reporter: there are other hair plane photos on the passenger shaming page, but this one struck a chord. what were people suggesting you should have done? >> we should have put gum in her hair. >> reporter: hey, rapunzel, commented someone, have you five seconds to move your hair before i cut it off suggested another.
2:56 am
just grab it, caress it, sniff it, give it just enough of a tug. but dante's partner opted to simply stand up. >> hovered over her in a way that she noticed. >> reporter: without exchanging a word, she brought up her seat, her hair disappeared. dante is a boston globe columnist, so he wrote a piece entitled "the day i went viral," bemoaning how much attention his hair tweet got compared to syria's stuff, while still admiring clever puns like -- >> we've been hijacked as if it was a hair weave that had somehow taken over the plane. >> reporter: unless your locks threat ton overflow your seat, lock 'em down. jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> weave been hijacked. okay. i'll say you'll never have that problem if i'm sitting in front of you on a plane. thanks for being with us. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. the news continues on tn right after the break.
2:57 am
♪ ♪ [engine revving] the all-new audi a4 is here. and i want to remind you that no one's the same without the game. take @youwishcommish8 for instance. he writes, "as commissioner of my fantasy league, i'm thinking about moving the draft up... to next week. too early?" commish, the season is a ways out. months in fact. no rosters are set, the draft hasn't even happened yet, and not a single free agent has been signed. so, it is too early? ...yes it is. dial it back, commish... way back.
2:58 am
. oh remotes, you've had it tough.
2:59 am
watching tvs get sharper, bigger, smugger. and you? rubbery buttons. enter the x1 voice remote. now when someone says... show me funny movies. watch discovery. record this. voila. remotes you are back. the x1 voice remote is here.
3:00 am
x1 customers get your voice remote by visiting xfinty.com/voiceremote. good morning. 6:00 on a saturday morning. we're so grateful. i'm christi paul. >> i'm victor blackwell. new republican front-runner said abortion laws should remain unchanged. this report comes days after that firestorm of criticism for saying that women who get abortion should face some form of punishment. listen to his latest comments. >> you told bloomberg in january you should abandon it. >> first of all i would like to see

70 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on