Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 3, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

1:00 am
yourself as a unique individual. what could be more important than that? mikes stage a protest demanding more attention paid to their plight as terror continues. two weeks after the deadly terror attacks in brussels. he was always bear the title convicted felon. >> i shot and killed a man. >> the story of a convict-turned-advocate who got a second chance at life and now working with powerful allies to
1:01 am
help reform the u.s. prison system. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome. to our viewers in the united states and around the world, i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. good day. we begin with the controversial plan to relocate thousands of migrants. starting on monday, migrants who arrived in greece from turkey after march 20th win sent back. and in exchange, e.u. nations will accept an equal number of vetted syrian refugees from turkey. migrants now in greece are protesting that plan. human rights groups say turkey is not safe enough for these refugees. among those to be affected by the deal, the thousands of migrants who are now stranded in greece. on saturday, migrants blocked the highway demanding the macedonian border be reopened. for months now, migrants have
1:02 am
been living in poor conditions at camps in the city. some residents have not been able to work their lands due to the camp. they're demanding the government speed up the relocation of migrants to shelters and other camps. refugees are begging not to be forgotten. >> translator: we are asking what is going to happen to us. i'm asking all the countries, what is our fate. no one understands what we are going through except us. we who ran from our country, not because we were hungry. we didn't leave because we were hungry. we left because there is a war. is it our fate to i ddie here a? no one is paying attention to us, absolutely no one. >> we're joined by a journalist live in athens via skype with us. elena, it's good to have you. this deal that is set to take effect monday, it's callsing a great deal of panic among the so many people, the families who risked their thrives get to
1:03 am
europe. >> reporter: absolutely. panic is the right world for how people are reacting now. they're trying to see if they can leave the camps. they're saying that they do not wanted to go to turkey. as a result, there's a lot of tension in the existing camps. there have been fights between different groups, specifically between migrants and refugees. [ inaudible ] those who can qualify and those who do not qualify to be able to be readmitted, people have been leaving camps. they've been in one particular island, one of the main entry points into europe for thousands of these migrants and refugees. people left the camp, went there for two days now, just protesting saying that they will not get on the boats. the agreement itself is quite controversial. those who do not qualify for asylum will be turned back. but at the moment, greece itself
1:04 am
is saying it does not have the facility, is not able to process these asylum applications. we hear that on the other side, turkey is not really ready to receive them. and we're looking at something that's about to start in less than 24 hours from now, george. >> the protests that are playing out, when it comes to migrants who are there, trying to make their way forward, they finding ways around the barriers, finding ways to possibly get around the new rules set to take effect? >> reporter: i mean, this is just the thing. we hear that some new routes are about to open. people will try what they can in order to get to their final destination. we seem to have part of that flow being diverted to italy as much as possible, and what is certain is that people who have traveled such a long way, who are so determined to have a new life will do what they can. and this means that they're an
1:05 am
easy prey in the hands of smugglers. we understand that the prices for the journey so now that the route is more difficult, it's harder for them to get anywhere. the prices are going up, as demand goes up. and what we expect to see in the days ahead is that this phenomenonesq esqucalates as mo desperate people try to make it to europe. >> reporting live from athens, ele elena, thank you very much for your reporting. we're joined by leonard doyle, spokesman for the international organization for migration. and joining us live via skype from geneva. it's good to have you to talk about this, as well. let's start by the criticisms out about the deal. several human rights organizations have expressed concerns. >> indeed, there are many concerns mostly which have to do with the vary nature or lack of such and arbitrary decisions. i think a lot of -- the scrutiny
1:06 am
that the magistrates going there are going to make sure they give proper hearings to the migrants. there's a lot of global scrutiny at least from cnn, as we're seeing now. there will be a lot of interest on the part of the europeans and making sure it's done appropriately, i think. >> when it comes to turkey, is turkey safe for migrants who are returning there? there are concerns that it's not. >> it kind of depends on how you're looking at it. if you want to look from a legalistic perspective, indeed there have been challenges, concerns. amnesty international put out a report over the weekend. on the other hand, it has to be recognized that in reality, turkey is an extraordinary welcoming and generous country. it's hosting almost 2.7 million refugees already from the war in syria. we do not hear daily reports of problems.
1:07 am
in fact, the turks have opened their hearts to these people. the church has been a lot more welcoming than europeans have been -- the turks have been a lot more welcoming that europeans have been to refugees. >> another important part whe it comes to turkey and discussions with the e.u., how critical is that for this deal? will. >> extremely so. turkey wants to join the -- the market and to have -- it wants to have free movement for its people throughout europe. something that's been promised for so many years and been denied by narrow self-interests of certain european countries. it's part of the bargaining happening now. perhaps that's the big win for them. i've seen reports, for example, from some of the islands where the migrants are going, that they're looking forward to the -- soon to the arrival of turkish tourists. there will be a lot to win from having free movement of turks
1:08 am
across europe, particular in the greek economy, extraordinary benefits. and so we'll see. it is certainly part of the discussion. >> i want to ask you this question, and it just goes to the heart of what people will think about this when it comes to a family there. a family that's in greece that does not want to go back. a family that risked their lives to get to where they are right now. what recourse do they have? what can they do to make sure they continue to move forward despite the new rule that is set to take them back? >> sadly, they don't really have a lot to fall back on. i think the reality is that everybody knows that the majority of these people are coming from refugee-producing countries, be that afghanistan, iraq, or syria. and the europeans to some extent, some europeans, los angeles merkel in particular, has -- angela merkel in particular, has been generous and opened the gates of her
1:09 am
country. so many have come in the hope of safety. in the meantime, there's been a political backlash across europe. we've seen this in recent elections. the reality is that that position has been unsustainable, the position of keeping europe's borders open to these large flows of migrants who are in grave danger. and what's happening now is that the europeans are trying to contain that and control it. and that unfortunately means that for a lot of those already en route there will be no destination in europe, and they will be sent home. >> while you're talking, we're looking at images of the families, children, just -- you can only imagine the plight of these families after what they've gone through. the rule set to take effect on monday. leonard doyle, thank you very much for your insights. we'll stay in touch with you, as well. to find out how to help syrian refugees, head to cnn.com/impact. and there you will find a list of nonprofits, vetsed nonprofits by cnn -- vetted nonprofits by cnn and other resources to help you get involved.
1:10 am
turning to brussels and what is being called a sign of hope in the belgian capital. the city's main airport is partially reopening to passengers for the first time since the suicide bombers struck that location and a metro station just last month. just brief flights will be departing sunday. security is high. cars arriving at the airport are being checked. travelers are being screened before they can even enter the airport facility. tensions remain high there on the streets, though. there are protests and arrests in the belgian capital. let's go live to cnn's alexandra field following this from the brussels airport. it's good to have you. so what is the mood there as this airport reopens after what happened there? >> reporter: well, it's been 12 days since the airport was rocked by those bombings. and in just about an hour or so, passengers will begin to arrive. there's the checkpoint that's
1:11 am
back behind me, being closely guarded by police officers. they'll have to show officers that they are, in fact, flying on those three flights going out today. other than that, access is still being limited to this airport. these are the necessary first steps in order to get the airport back up and running. they want a much smaller crowd. they've dpotd to be able to en-- got to be able to ensure the safety and security of people flying today. you will have a smaller group, stricter security measures in place. we're told that passengers will be received at new temporary check-in structures. there will also be screening in a different area before they proceed to their flights. it's going to be a different experience to fly in and out of the airport. but authorities thought it was essential to get the airport back up and running, to give people this sense of security, and also this is an airport needed in this community. this is a place that used to greet 60,000 passengers every day. we're talking about much smaller numbers than that to start. in fact, the airport says that they are hoping really to get up to full capacity again, probably
1:12 am
not until june or even possibly july, george. it is a small start, but it is a step forward. >> a small start but, yes, an important start, alexandra. i'd like to talk about what's happening in the streets in brussels with the protests and arrests. >> reporter: right, george. all weekend we saw police doing crowd control. frankly, sometimes in riot gear, and with crowd control vehicles in place. there had been a ban on public demonstrations ordered by city officials last week. they were hoping to avoid any conflict in the streets over the weekend. they were hoping to avoid tensions and any clashing while they continued to devote security resources to the ongoing investigation into these terror attacks and trying to find anyone connected to the attacks. that's why they told people not to gather. there was also a planned right wing march, a group that said
1:13 am
they were going to do into an anti-islam demonstration in the heart of the community. that's demonstrations that police said don't gather, don't demonstrate. people did not heed the instructions. in two locations, we saw large crowds. that's when police stepped in, enforcing the ban on demonstrations, pushing people out, making them disperse. those who refused were taken into detention. we're told they were given administrative charge and will have to pay a fine. it was some 140 people. >> a moment of hope there at the airport, but tensions still my brussels. alexandra field live for us. we appreciate your reporting, as always. the united states air force is deploying 12 f-15 fighters and several hundred personnel to iceland and the netherlands. their mission is to support nato surveillance and conduct flight training. the flight rotation was initiated amid heightened tensions between nato countries and russia after moscow's annexation of crime extra. the planes are scheduled --
1:14 am
crimea. the planes are scheduled this hour. presidential candidates ratcheting up attacks on each other. ahead, why hillary clinton and bernie sanders are debating about debating. plus, donald trump has an out-of-character moment you could say, making what some might call an apology. stay with us. rough night?
1:15 am
1:16 am
1:17 am
i wish we had looked for a bigger place before he was born. oh, when we wanted another place, first thing we did was check out credit karma - made things a lot easier. that sounds exhausting. actually, it's really easy. and it's free.
1:18 am
that was easy! "check out credit karma today. credit karma. give yourself some credit." (shush, shush, shush) america's choice 2016. the race for the white house and democratic presidential candidates are devoting all of their time and energy now to swaying voters in the state of wisconsin ahead of the primary that is set for tuesday. 86 democratic delegates are up for grabs, and on saturday, hillary clinton responded to criticisms from bernie sanders that she has supported trade deals that have taken jobs away from the united states. >> we need a president who doesn't just rail against trade or who doesn't enforce trade, but a president who knows how to compete against the rest of the world and win for america and
1:19 am
for american workers. >> in return, bernie sanders said he is the only candidate who could prevents a republican -- who could prevent a republican from winning the white house. listen. >> there has been some concern upon the part of my opponent and others as to whether or not bernie sanders could win a general election. >> we love you, bernie! [ applause ] >> let me tell you, let me tell you that the last cnn poll had us 20 points ahead of donald trump. >> bernie sanders there. clinton and sanders head to an even bigger primary in a little more than two weeks from now, the state of new york. the two democrats have been stepping up their attacks on each other. now they're debate being debating. >> reporter: bernie sanders and hillary clinton campaigning hard
1:20 am
in wisconsin in the northern city of eau claire today. before either candidate hit the ground, they were throwing mud at each other. the clinton campaign accusing the bernie sanders campaign of rejecting three dates to debate in new york in april, saying this -- "the sanders campaign needs to stop using the new york primary as a playground for political games and negative attacks against hillary clinton." the spokesman for the sanders campaign firing back saying, "unfortunately the dates and venues she has proposed didn't make a lot of sense. the idea that they want to debate in new york on a night of the ncaa finals with syracuse in the tournament no less is ludicrous. we have proposed other dates which they have rejected. we hope we can reach agreement in the near future." it's important to remember how this all started. after bernie sanders had a big weekend sweeping wins in washington, alaska, and hawaii,
1:21 am
he challenged hillary clinton to a debate in her adopted home state of new york. for about a week, hillary clinton was rather noncommittal. yesterday, her campaign saying they're trying to work out the dates with the sanders campaign. today, the clinton campaign going after the sanders campaign saying that they're playing games with these dates. the sanders campaign denying it. and the reason why this new york primary is so important. many people expect that bernie sanders will be able to win in wisconsin. to be able to close the gap in delegates that he has, he's lagging clinton by 240 delega s delegates. he needs to upset her in new york. there's a huge cache of delegates available in new york state, 250. second only to california. if bernie sanders can pull a win there and upset hillary clinton in her adopted home state, he comes close to helping close the gap against hillary clinton. sanders and clinton hashing out when they'll have the debate is very important. when and where could have a big
1:22 am
impact on that april 19th primary. we'll continue to watch that here in wisconsin. cnn, eau claire, wisconsin. and now as to republicans, they are also fighting it out in wisconsin. the front-runner, donald trump, is not favored to win that state. instead, he is trailing rival ted cruz there. with john kasich a close third. it is not clear how much that has to do with the rough week that donald trump had. he appeared to change his stance on abortion several times, and his rivals have pounced on that. cruz in particular insists that donald trump is not one of the republicans to represent their party. >> donald trump is not the best candidate to go head to head with hillary clinton. if we nominate donald trump, it elects hillary clinton. she wins by double digits. if hillary clinton is the next president, it's a catastrophe for this country. >> trump maintains a healthy lead in the delegate count. but reaching that magic number of 1,237 will be a tall order.
1:23 am
if he gets close, an open convention has the potential to radically change the entire picture. john kasich told our reporter that a contested convention is indeed going to happen. and that he likes his odds once they get there. >> i can't win enough to get to the convention with enough delegates, and neither can cruz. he'd have to win 90% of the remaining delegates. and donald trump would have to win, you know, probably better than 60%. as you know, his -- he's never gotten close to that. we're going to go a convention. when we go, there's going to be two things that will be asked -- one, who can win in the fall. i'm the only candidate that consistently beats hillary clinton in the fall. secondly, michael, delegates take this seriously. they gun feel the weight of big -- they begin to feel the weight of big decisions and will ask who has the record, who has the accomplishments, and who can be president. >> even with donald trump's recent troubles, he isn't backing down from what's gotten
1:24 am
him this far. as he explains it, the controversy surrounding his comments wasn't really his fault at all as our jason carroll reports. >> reporter: as donald trump addressed the crowd in racine, wisconsin, at his town hall, he touched on a number of issues that's plagued his campaign throughout the week. two issues namely. that was abortion, the other, foreign policy. first to the issue of abortion. he told the crowd it's a complicated subject saying no matter what he does, how he answers, he says, the press is always going to twist his words. he says when he does get his words out, no matter what he says, it's an answer no one will be satisfied with. >> the truth is you can't, no matter what you do, what you say, because they can take something you say and turn it around, like i'll be on cbs "face the nation." what i said was perfect. what i said was -- in fact, otherwise, honestly, i'm going to be on tomorrow, and i taped it yesterday. what i said was so good.
1:25 am
it was so perfect. and then they looked, oh, maybe he should have added a word -- actually, the beltway came out, they took words out that i said. >> reporter: trump talking foreign policy, responding to the president's criticisms about trump and his knowledge of foreign policy. as you know, during the nuclear summit, the president was asked about trump's suggestion that u.s. allies, south korea and japan, arm themselves with nuclear weapons against north korea. to that, trump had to say this -- >> i mentioned this deal and i mentioned the fact that it's -- the fact that america can't afford it. the united states can't afford to do it, and they'll will have to pay more. i didn't say anything about letting japan nuke, but i did say perhaps if we can't do the right deal, we'll have to let them take care of themselves. if that means they'll have to someday get nuclear weapons, in all fairness, folks, i know the way life works, eventually they'll probably want to do it
1:26 am
anyway. anyway. i don't say that's aed if thing or bad thing -- that's a good thing or bad thing. we can't lose the money we're losing. >> reporter: trump reminding those who came to see him in racine that he is self-funded, not taking money from special interests. and he's not beholden to anyone kpels except -- except those trying to get him into office. the latest polls showing cruz up by 10%. jason carroll, racine, wisconsin. >> thank you. of course, remember to joins us here on cnn all day tuesday for complete coverage of the critical wisconsin primary only here on cnn. 4:26 on the u.s. east coast. still ahead this hour, calcutta, india, looks to rebuild after a disastrous highway bridge collapse. cnn spoke to witnesses who are struggling to even sleep after seeing what you see there happened. plus, a teenage murderer
1:27 am
goes from the streets of the u.s. to the halls of power. now pushing for prison reform. live this hour in the united states and around the world, you are watching "cnn newsroom."
1:28 am
1:29 am
1:30 am
kolkata. welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. are you watching "cnn newsroom." good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines -- message from migrants in greece, no one is paying attention to us. many blocked the highway there on saturday demanding the macedonian border be reopened. it is presently closed ahead of a controversial e.u. plan set to
1:31 am
take effect monday. migrants who arrived in greece from turkey will be sent back. in brussels, a sign of hope this day. the city's main airport is partially reopening to passengers. this for the first time since the deadly terror attacks nearly two weeks ago. the airport's ceo says just three flights are taking off sunday bound for portugal, italy and greece. there will be no arriving flights. in syria, government forces discovered a mass dprgrave with least 40 bodies in palmyra. many of the victims were women and children, many showed signs of beheading and torture. indian police have arrested four top construction executives connected with this week's deadly overpass collapse in kolkata. all charged with attempted murder and mischief. rescuers pulled three more bodies from the debris on saturday. now bringing the death toll to 27 people dead.
1:32 am
in kolkata, the streets are getting back to normal. those who witnessed the bridge collapse told cnn the very memory of what they saw will haunt them for years to come. >> reporter: from the ground, it feels like any other day. life is back. people, cars, chaos. >> amazing to think just 48 hours ago, this entire area was full of rubble, concrete and cement, some of it several floors high. from above, lives will never be the same again. "it was like a movie. it just felt like this. the whole slab at once. below there wereto cars, taxis,y the time i blinked, the overpass had collapsed," she says. in just a few seconds, a 100-meter-long chunk of concrete and steel came crashing down.
1:33 am
"i pray to god i never have to see such a thing again. i can't sleep. i can't eat. people were shouting, "help me, help me." there was blood pouring out. i could see feet sticking out, hands dangling. there was blood everywhere," she says. from a room with a view, the their family has watched the city grow. this was one of the busiest parts of kolkata. tailors, traders, the homeless jostled for space, opening makeshift busy undiness under t overpass. "so many people died. so many. i can't bear the pain. imagine the people who lost their loved ones," she says. her daughter-in-law shows me the window from where she saw the overpass crack. "they had just poured concrete that morning around 11:30 a.m. then an hour later, it broke," she tells me. the 2.2-kilometers-long overpass
1:34 am
built to relieve the congestion below has always been controversial. spanning almost the entire width of the street, the people say no one liked in the overpass because this, they say is, no way to live. cnn, kolkata, india. a recent terror attack in pakistan is highlighting the danger of being a christian there. the suicide bombing at a park killed more than 70 people on easter sunday. it wounded hundreds more. a taliban splinter group has claimed responsibility. that group saying that it was targeting christians. this of the latest in a string of attacks that saw cities bombed and homes burned, families living in fear. cnn takes you inside this small community to see how it is coping. it is an exclusive report. you'll see it monday only here on cnn. the former president of
1:35 am
brazil joined about 100 protesters at a pro-government rally on saturday chanting "there will not be a coup." the demonstration came a day after anti-government protesters rallied in sao paolo calling for the impeachment of president rouseff. da silva is under investigation for corruption. he was recently sworn in as chief of staff. thousands of colombians say their president is a traitor and are calling on him to resign. they staged demonstrations in more than 20 cities across the country saturday. they are opposed to president juan manuel santos, saying he's failed to deliver on policies like education and employment. the colombian civil war has lasted more than 50 years. a convicted murderer has picked up some unlikely
1:36 am
political allies. ahead, the man who went from solitary confinement to the halls of power to push for prison reforms in america. stay with us.
1:37 am
you won't see these folks they have businesses to run. they have passions to pursue. how do they avoid trips to the post office? stamps.com mail letters, ship packages, all the services of the post office right on your computer. get a 4 week trial, plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com/tv and never go to the post office again.
1:38 am
1:39 am
welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. as a teenager, shacka sengor committed murder, but behind bars he found purpose. now he's a leading voice for prison reform in the united states and the author of this book, "righting my wrongs: life, death, and redemption in an american prison." cnn's poppy harlow saw down and talked about his life, his mention, and his unlikely political allies. >> reporter: shaka senghor will always bear the name "convicted felon."
1:40 am
>> at the age of 18, i shot and killed a man. >> reporter: he didn't start out that way. you were an honor roll student. what happened? >> once i started going through things at home, i stopped taking interest in school. it's one of those things that now when i look back especially working with young people, i think about how we sometimes fail as adults to pay attention to what's happening to children. i literally went from honor roll student to like barely showing up in class. >> you say no one ever stopped to say what's wrong. >> yeah. >> why are your grades falling off. not one person? >> not one person. originally, it felt kind of like the ideal middle-class family. a lot of siblings, fun times, but also a lot of hurtful and painful times dealing with the abuse of any mother, dealing with the dissolution of my parents' marriage. >> reporter: he served 19 years, seven in solitary confinement. you knowingly chose the street
1:41 am
life. no one pushed you there. nothing forced you there. why did you choose it? >> i was looking for love and acceptance. and i ran away when i was 14 years old. and you know, i was naive like most 14-year-olds and thought that somebody's parent would take me in and shelter me from abuse. that didn't happen. so when i got introduced to the drug trade, it came under the guise of love and acceptance. when you're a young vulnerable teenager who's been hurt and damaged, you're looking for that emotional connection to anybody that's saying, hey, i love you, i have your back. so i chose that lifestyle. >> reporter: you felt accepted there? >> i felt accepted, definitely. >> reporter: he told crack by age 14, was shot himself at 17, and murdered a man by 19 in a drug deal gone awry. >> i realized that not only had i tragically caused somebody's death, but that i devastated
1:42 am
somebody's family. and that i couldn't take that back. i got a letter from my son while i was on that 4.5-year stint in solitary. he said, dear dad, i know you're in prison for murder. please, dad, don't kill again. jesus watches what you do. as a father, i realized that i had not only faileddmy son, but that i was failing a generation of young men who were growing up in the neighborhood. i realized that i needed to do something different in my life. first thing was taking full responsibility for the decisions i made that landed me in prison. but also to figure out a way how i can utilize the experience to help other young men and women avoid the path that i had taken. >> reporter: the aunt of the man that senghor murdered wrote him a letter of forgiveness while he was serving time. she told me she loved him because god loved him. i think viewers watching will ask, you are a former felon, a murderer. you took a man's life. why should people listen to you
1:43 am
no now? >> because i think in order to solve a problem you have to be in closest proximity to it as possible. and the reality is that gun violence is a large part of what's happening in american society. and who better to understand how to solve it than somebody going through it. >> reporter: in "righting my wrong," he asks the question, how do you emerge in a society that is so unforgiving? there is a lot of discussion now in washington about prison reform. are you hopeful? >> i'm very hopeful. i think that we're at a space now where the american public is a lot more aware because i feel like, you know, if you're footing the bill for this and to not get the return on investment that's been promised to us, i think it's unfair. and our prison system operate as a big warehouse. >> reporter: a warehouse? >> a wealthier house of misery to be -- a warehouse of misery
1:44 am
to be specific. you can help or further hurt them. then you can wake up and say, okay, i'm not surprised if that they get out and come back. >> reporter: a 2014 study from the bureau of justice statistics followed inmates from 30 states for five years. it found nearly 70% of former prisoners returned to prison within three years of being released. >> american society, we have a choice what kind of men and women we want to return. either you want healthy men and women ready to re-enter as contributing members of society, or you want broken men and women who's going to come out and wreak havoc on society. >> reporter: today he works with the cut 50 initiative. a bipartisan effort to reduce the u.s. prison population by half by 2025. who's your biggest ally in this fight? >> we have multiple allies. newt gingrich has been a great ally. people from the republican party, different politicians.
1:45 am
i think it's a time in the country where everybody is realizing that we've done this thing wrong for a long time. i think if you think about what the cornerstone is of faith is forgiveness and redemption, i think that when we look at our country, that's the foundation of the country is built on faith. different faiths. no matter what faith you come from, background you come from, that's a deep part of that. sadly, it hasn't been extended to those who are incarcerated. >> reporter: are you an anomaly? >> i don't think so. we're throwing away a lot of greatness. we're basically dismissing people's humanity. i think we failed particularly inner city kids. we're quick to throw them away, quick to judge them more harshly than other kids are judged.
1:46 am
it's a reality of the racial dynamics and class dynamnix america. we're not always honest about that. >> the path of a prison reformer. poppy harlow there for us. switching to weather. the calendar may say that it's spring, but in the northeastern united states, hey, it feels a little bit like winter again. karen? yes, a one-two punch. if you are viewing us from new york city or washington, d.c., yes, there is some snowfall to report. also in boston, some of the latest computer models suggesting maybe as much as eight inches of snowfall. that's going to be blown around by winds gusting to 60 or 65 mile-per-hour or 1 you don't know this 115 kilometers -- 115 kilometers an hour. we'll see bottmbogenesis meanin low pressure will deepen as it gets off shore. that will enhance the moisture
1:47 am
and create winter conditions up and down new england. you can kind of see the path from the great lakes into the eastern great lakes and then toward new england, kind of that center line stretching along the border between pennsylvania and new york, extending on over toward massachusetts and into connecticut. we're looking at perhaps some of the heaviest snowfall bands that we will see over the next 48 hours. drive carefully. road conditions are going to be especially treacherous. don't be surprised if there are delays at the major airport. they should be brief, but nothing less with the poor visibility and blowing snow, that could be problematic. we see a moderating trend by midweek. we'll see the double digits again at least celsius in new york city. perhaps temperatures in the low 50s, running well below where they should be for this time of
1:48 am
year. in china, one of the central provinces had poor visibility thanks to rainfall. take a look. you see this multivehicle pileup that actually claimed two lives and sent 29 people to the hospital. there you see it was because of the slick roads, the poor visibility due to some of the fog and mist in the air, and traveling too fast on those roadways, as well. a very dangerous and scary situation. and then we're watching the tropics, yes, the tropics, in the southern hemisphere. a low probability, but around fiji, it looks like the cluster of thunderstorms could possibly turn to something a little more sinister as we look into the next several days. we'll continue to monitor the tropics there. kind of a crazy weather scenario right now, george. back to you. >> karen maginnis, thank you very much. still ahead on "cnn newsroom," a lion attacks a man
1:49 am
on the outskirts of nairobi. ahead, the attack, the aftermath, and the growing fears as african cities expand into wildlife habitats. stay with us.
1:50 am
1:51 am
1:52 am
1:53 am
a lion attack outside of kenya's capital is raising concerns about wild animals living near big cities in africa. lions have, in fact, wandered off from nairobi's national park three times this passed month alone. ian lee reports the animals are terrifying citizens and alarming wildlife officials. >> reporter: a group of men surround an escaped lion from nairobi national park, taking pictures and throwing rocks. the famous feline known as mohawk lashes out, injuring one person. wildlife rangers arrive on scene, but without tranquilizers, they shoot and kill the big cat. the action taken as a last resort out of concern for public safety, say officials. kenyans were outraged, many criticizing the wildlife service and using the hash tag
1:54 am
#justiceformohawk. this is the fourth time a lion has escaped nairobi national park in a month. the 117 square-kilometer park butts up to the city of over three million, home to an array of animals including zebras, giraf giraffes, and antelopantelope. despite the escapes, you're hard pressed to find line in the park. will will only 35 roam the fields, but when they escape, they can be dangerous. >> oh, god, why all this? >> reporter: a lion attacked michael adore while he was on his way to work. >> i saw it sticking out its teeth, coming to maul my face. >> reporter: the feline fled, but not before crushing his shoulder. the claws ripping his flesh. activists fear encounters like this could grow more common. as the city of nairobi continues to expand and develop around the
1:55 am
park, it's encroaching on the habitat of not only the lions, but the lions' prey. conservationist say this will increase the likelihood of lions leaving the park and encountering humans. the city has expanded tenfold since the 1940s. the land surrounding the park is privately owned and prime real estate. a recent road cutting through the park has also reduced habitat. some lions leave the park searching for food, mainly livestock, putting them in direct conflict with humans. then, there are the migratory routes. >> lions migrate to the particular areas, and the areas are settled. when they come out, they get closer to people. >> reporter: if a plan isn't developed, officials might be forced to fence off the park, turning the nairobi national park into the national zoo. ian lee, cnn, nairobi. and as we close this hour,
1:56 am
we would be remiss not to tell you about this internationally recognized day. it is a day when anyone can be a kid. all you have to do is grab your pillow. so people around the world, they battled it out doing this -- the seventh annual international pillow fight day saturday. dressed in pajamas, participants in berlin, germany, also blew off steam, having fun with this. look at that. and in hong kong, the feathers are flying, too, as well. people of all ages took part in the festivities. some even wore superhero costumes, even batman and spider-man were spotted in the crowd there. good to grab a pillow at this point. thank you very much for being with us this hour. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with more news from around the world. thanks for watching cnn, the world's news leader.
1:57 am
1:58 am
1:59 am
2:00 am
reopened but not fully. the brussels airport plans to partially resume flights less than two weeks after the blast that ripped through the main terminal. stuck in limbo. a deal to send migrants back to turkey is set to go into effect amid protests and concerns over poor preparation. and this -- >> either they pay up including for past deficiencies, or they get up. >> donald trump ramping up criticism against america's nato allies with an important primary vote hanging in the balance. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome.
2:01 am
to our viewers in the united states and around the world, i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. good day. we begin in the belgium capital. people checking in at the airport under tightened security. that airport resuming passenger flights on a limited basis for the first time since suicide bombers struck the location and a brussels metro station 12 days ago. cars are being checked as they arrive to the airport, and passengers are being screened before they can even go inside the building. the airport's ceo says sunday's reopening brings hope to belgium. >> a restart of the operations even only partially as quick as this is a sign of hope that shows our shared will and strength to resurface and not to
2:02 am
let people down. i want to thank every member of the airport community and all the partners involved. they've all made this possible. in getting back to normal, our main concern will remain the safety of our passengers, staff, and the police. we have always been working in order to guarantee an optimum safety level while providing passenger comforts, as well. >> cnn is live in brussels. alexandra fields joins us from the airport there. what is the mood given that this airport is about to reopen, but at this time, the security is much, much tighter? >> reporter: sure, if you think about the fact that two weeks ago, george, they were doing 600 flights a day in and out of the airport, and are you down to three, it's owbviously an alterd and changed experience. very few people going into and out of the airport. they just started letting cars through. people were met by police as they drove into the airport earlier. they're seeing security before they even check in.
2:03 am
they'll be screened again. so there is really a heavy presence. we were able to get back there and see the security presence that was in place outside of the airport. i think that people might feel calm to see that there is this added layer of protection and security. but certainly this will likely be emotional for many of the passengers who are going to take these first three symbolic flights, as they are being called. we know it is still going to be some time before the airport is operating at full capacity. we're told it would be perhaps two months. they're hoping to get up and fully running by the end of june or possibly early july. in the meantime, it was important to get the place open. so they do have some temporary check-in facilities. that's where passengers will go today. and in the coming days, they hope to add more flights to the schedule. they hope to get more people through the doors. it is important to keep that number small at least to start, they say, because they want to ensure that this extra security is certainly sufficient. that people feel calmed and comforted by it. and they're able to handle the capacity that they are taking
2:04 am
on, george. >> let's also talk about what's happening in brussels itself with these protests and the orders for people not to protest. there were arrests in the past few days. >> reporter: that's right, george. this started when a right wing conservative french youth group said they planned to hold a march in molenbeek, a community mostly inhabited by immigrants. officials from the city were concerned that this would create chaos, that it could cause an eruption of tensions. they told people not to demonstrate. but throughout the city yesterday, we did see large crowds gather. and police responded swiftly, trying to break up those crowds. at one point, going to mall week in -- molenbeek in riot gear to disperse clouds to protest or counterprotest. they came in with crowd control vehicles. we saw the same thing at the
2:05 am
area where the victims have been memorialized for nearly two weeks now. about 140 people were taken into detention for refusing to disperse despite the police orders. we're told this is an administrative charge. it meant several hours of detention and a fine of up to 250 euros. it underscores the point officials were trying to make earlier in the week when they said they do not want the demonstrations now. they do not want the tension or chaos. they need to provide security and support services for the ongoing investigations that are happening related to the attacks that took place in the city. george? >> alexandra field live in brussels. thank you so much for your reporting. we'll stay in touch with you. now we move to the controversial plan to relocate thousands of migrants. starting monday, migrants who arrived in greece from turkey after march 20th will be sent back. in exchange, e.u. nations will accept vetted syrian refugees from turkey.
2:06 am
advocacy groups fear that turkey will not protect the human rights of asylum seekers. among those to be affected by this deal, thousands of migrants who are stranded there in greece. and on saturday, many of them blocked a highway demanding that the macedonian border be reopened. for months now, migrants have been living in poor conditions at makeshift camps, refugees are begging not to be forgotten. >> translator: we've reached this point and are asking, what is going to happen to us? i'm asking all the countries, what is our fate? no one understands what we are going through except us. we who ran from our country, not because we were hungry. we didn't leave because we were hungry. we left because there is a war. is it our fate to die here also? no one is paying attention to us. absolutely no one. >> many people in turkey are also against the new e.u. deal. hundreds of demonstrators rallied in the coastal city.
2:07 am
preparations are underway there to register asylum-seekers when they're returned from greece. some in the community say they don't want the rejected refugees housed in their town. >> translator: first of all, the city is not ready for this. if you gather a large number of refugees, it is almost like a punishment. this would trigger a change in this town that is a tourist spot where people live in comfort. the people do not want this. >> for more, we're joined from our journalist live via skype from athens. good to have you again this hour. this deal that is set to take effect on monday, it's already causing a great deal of panic among people. families who risk their lives to get to europe your risk being sent back. -- now risk being sent back. >> reporter: precisely. they thought they had made it to europe. they thought that they're safe, that they're able to start a new
2:08 am
life. away, in many cases, from war. now there's a sense of fear and confusion about what will be sent back and when. some migrants and refugees have tried to leave camps, particularly on the island that's one of the first enry and exit points from europe to turkey. people have broken the fence. they have been asking to get on ships through athens to get to the northern border. they're hoping from there they'll continue their journey to europe. the border has been closed for several weeks, but people are not believing this. they think that as long as they get to the greek boreder that they'll make it to europe. the authorities on the greek side, they have enforced riot police on some of the islands. they're saying they understand that the migrants are in
2:09 am
distress and understand why this is happening. at the same time, they're trying to pacify the greek citizens, the islanders also complaining that this with -- this cannot go on. the main question for everyone here is, is this actually going to work. greece has about 50,000 people stranded. the number of boats, people that have been arriving from turkey, from the turkish coast to the greek islands has gone down since this agreement came into effect. if this doesn't work and tomorrow really is the first dy that we'll see if the agreement can be implemented, the question is what is going to happen if more people are trying to still cross into greece and europe. >> the politics aside, as nations try to figure out policies, you know, to reach some sort of solution -- use
2:10 am
look at the images, think about the people, the families, the children in the middle here, many human rights groups are concerned about what happens to people when they are returned to turkey. many of them believe that they would not be safe in turkey. what are you hearing? >> reporter: this is exactly what we've been hearing, as well. a number of countries have a hard time recognizing turkey as a safe country. and amnesty international published a report saying some of the refugees are being sent back from turkey to syria. so this is obviously an issue of concern. what we don't know at this point is that, yes, these people will be returned to turkey, but what next. the e.u. has not gone into details of explaining will these people stay in turkey, will they be sent back to their respective countries? this is a point that remains unclear, george.
2:11 am
>> reporting live via skype in athens, thank you very much for your reporting and perspective on this. you can find out how to help syrian refugees. head to cnn.com/impact. there you will find a list of nonprofits that are vetted by cnn and the many other resources to help you get involved. to syria now where government forces have uncovered a mass grave in palmyra. this yearly a week after recapturing the ancient city from isis. syrian media reported at least 40 bodies were discovered, many women and children. many of them showed signs of beheading and torture. the victims are believed to be among hundreds killed by isis after it seized palmyra in may. a decades' old dispute over territory between armenia and azerbaijan has flared up. both countries claim the
2:12 am
nagorno-karabakh region, a landlocked area surrounded by azerbaijan, but mainly occupied by forces backed by armenia. at least 30 people from both country were killed in clashes between armed forces on saturday, should say, in 1994, the cease-fire ended in armed conflict that had lasted for six years. the u.s. and russia are urging diplomatic solutions. >> it was a violation of the cease-fire between the international law, international humanitarian law and the nations because of what the official has done in the zone of the azerbaijan-nagorno-karabakh conflict. the conspicuous intervention in tourists and policy. >> at the same time, azerbaijan blame the armenians for starting saturday's clashes.
2:13 am
to a possible new clue in the mystery of the mystery malaysia flight mh370. a piece of debris was found an island nation and may explain what happened to the plane. hotel workers found the piece of wreckage on a beach on thursday. you'll remember 239 people were on board when the flight disappeared in 2014. cnn's aviation correspondent, richard quest, has more. >> reporter: from the pictures that we've seen, this one seems pretty clearcut. it is obviously part of an internal panel. it's believed to be from the business class section. the pattern of the wall is distinctive. it's got a type of flower pattern. and if you compare this piece to pieces that have been known about already and look at what's on the planes, you see it is actually similar -- in fact, it's identical. so this would suggest that the piece did come from mh370.
2:14 am
and it would also tell investigators that the plane did indeed break up either in the air or when it hit the water and didn't manage to land or do a gentle ditching in the ocean. how much more it will tell investigators, of course, is somewhat suspect. it's unlikely to tell them exactly where the plane went down, and it's not going to give any secrets away about what happened on board the aircraft. but the more pieces of debris they find, the greater the picture they will get of how the aircraft came out of the sky. by looking at compression, fractures, rips and tears, they'll be able to determine the forces that the plane went through as it went into the water. they're still a long way from that, but this is one more piece of a very complicated puzzle. richard quest, cnn, new york. you are watching "cnn newsroom." and still to come this hour,
2:15 am
witnesses to the deadly bridge collapse in kolkata, india, say they are still haunted by what they saw. >> translator: i pray to god i never have to see such a thing again. i can't sleep, i can't eat. >> you'll hear from people when watched it happen firsthand. plus, when to debate, where to debate? the u.s. democratic presidential candidates, they can't decide. and get this -- they're blaming each other for the confusion. you're watching "cnn newsroom." get ready... to show your roots. with root touch up from nice'n easy it blends with leading shades, even salon shades. in just 10 minutes. so pick your shade. and show the world your roots... ...with root touch-up. duracell quantum lasts longer so kevin jorgeson can power through the night.
2:16 am
sfx: duracell slamtones and i want to remind you that no one's the same without the game. like @flagdad28, who tweets, "in a recent flag football game with my family, i ran up the score, pick-sixed my daughter 3 times, and blocked 8 punts. did i cross a line? flag, i get it. you simply wanted to recreate the thrill of the nfl... all over your family. don't fret: training camp opens soon. but, it might be a good time to spring for a puppy.
2:17 am
[alarm beeps] ♪ ♪ the intelligent, all-new audi a4 is here. ♪ ♪ ain't got time to make no apologies...♪ no problem. that's a lot of dishes& i'll use a lot of detergent. dish issues? get cascade platinum. one pac cleans tough food better than 6 pacs of the bargain brand combined. cascade. "w"well you don't want to live with mom and dad forever, do you?" "she says...bazang!" "ok, good one." "uh, how do i check my credit score?" "credit karma, it's free."
2:18 am
"credit karma. give yourself some credit." ♪ a somber moment in pakistan where people are holding a memorial for the more than 70 that were killed in a bombing in lahore that happened last week. dozens of people were wounded, as well. schoolchildren held up signs condemning terrorism and sang hymns for peace. that attack is highlighting the danger of simply being christian in pakistan. the suicide bombing happened at a park on easter sunday. a taliban splinter group claimed responsibility saying that it was targeting christians. that was the latest in a string of attacks that has seen church
2:19 am
bombs, homes as well, and people living in fear. an exclusive report monday on cnn. now kolkata, india, the site of a deadly bridge collapse that's killed at least 27 people. many people saw this bridge fall firsthand. and some told us those memories will never leave them. >> reporter: from the ground, it feels like any other day. life is back. people, cars, chaos. >> amazing to think just 48 hours ago, this entire area was full of rubble, concrete and cement, some of it several floors high. from above, lives will never be the same again. "it was like a movie. it ju-- it just fell like this.
2:20 am
the whole slab at once. below there were cars, taxis, by the time i blinked, the overpass had collapsed," she says. in just a few seconds, a 100-meter-long chunk of concrete and steel came crashing down. "i pray to god i never have to see such a thing again. i can't sleep. i can't eat. people were shouting, "help me, help me." there was blood pouring out. i could see feet sticking out, hands dangling. there was blood everywhere," she says. from a room with a view, the their family has watched the city grow. this was one of the busiest parts of kolkata. tailors, traders, the homeless jostled for space, opening makeshift business under the overpass. "so many people died. so many. i can't bear the pain. imagine the people who lost their loved ones," she says.
2:21 am
her daughter-in-law shows me the window from where she saw the overpass crack. "they had just poured concrete that morning around 11:30 a.m. then an hour later, it broke," she tells me. the 2.2-kilometers-long overpass built to relieve the congestion below has always been controversial. spanning almost the entire width of the street, the people say no one liked in the overpass because this, they say is, no way to live. cnn, kolkata, india. america's choice, 2016, and the democrats running for president are focussed in on two important primaries coming up in the states of wisconsin and new york. the attacks between hillary clinton and bernie sanders, they heating up, as well. we report the two candidates are debate being debating.
2:22 am
>> reporter: bernie sanders and hillary clinton campaigning hard in wisconsin in the northern city of eau claire today. before either candidate hit the ground, they were throwing mud at each other. the clinton campaign accusing the bernie sanders campaign of rejecting three dates to debate in new york in april, saying this -- "the sanders campaign needs to stop using the new york primary as a playground for political games and negative attacks against hillary clinton." the spokesman for the sanders campaign firing back saying, "unfortunately the dates and venues she has proposed didn't make a lot of sense. the idea that they want to debate in new york on a night of the ncaa finals with syracuse in the tournament no less is ludicrous. we have proposed other dates which they have rejected. we hope we can reach agreement
2:23 am
in the near future." it's important to remember how this all started. after bernie sanders had a big weekend sweeping wins in washington, alaska, and hawaii, he challenged hillary clinton to a debate in her adopted home state of new york. for about a week, hillary clinton was rather noncommittal. yesterday, her campaign saying they're trying to work out the dates with the sanders campaign. today, the clinton campaign going after the sanders campaign saying that they're playing games with these dates. the sanders campaign denying it. and the reason why this new york primary is so important. many people expect that bernie sanders will be able to win in wisconsin. to be able to close the gap in delegates that he has, he's lagging clinton by 240 delegates. he needs to upset her in new york. there's a huge cache of delegates available in new york state, 250. second only to california. if bernie sanders can pull a win there and upset hillary clinton in her adopted home state, he comes close to helping close the gap against hillary clinton. sanders and clinton hashing out when they'll have the debate is very important.
2:24 am
when and where could have a big impact on that april 19th primary. we'll continue to watch that here in wisconsin. cnn, eau claire, wisconsin. the republicans are also campaigning in wisconsin. but front-runner, donald trump, finds himself in an unfamiliar position in second place. he is also taking heat from every direction lately, including president obama lambasting his foreign policy acumen. trump, however is, sticking to his guns, including his controversial take on nato. listen -- >> many countries are not paying their fair share. that means we are protecting them, and they are getting all sorts of military protection and other things. and they're ripping off the united states and ripping you off. i don't want to do that. either they pay up including for past deficiencies or get out. if it breaks up nato, it breaks up nato. >> donald trump there. and the republican candidates
2:25 am
are also focusing in on swaying delegates in the state of north dakota this weekend. though the state only offers a small number of delegates, they are crucial in what is a tightening rice -- tightening race. the state does not hold a presidential primary or caucus, meaning there is no public vote. instead, party officials select the total of 25 delegates plus three party leaders to attend the national convention that is set for july. the key here is that the delegates do not have to commit to any candidate before that convention. they are effectively free agents and could make a major difference if no candidate secures enough delegates to clinch the nomination on the ballot. trump's lead is fairly secure. the possibility of an open convention could make anything under that magic number of 1,237 a moot point. cruz and kasich are focused on denying trump that figure and not figuring it to reach themselves. cruz picked up another six in
2:26 am
colorado today as part of their complex delegate selection process. a brokered convention isn't totally without precedents, but it is certainly a departure from any election we've seen the past few decades. our tom foreman delves into what it would mean for the candidates' chances to win the white house. >> there's a reason they call it a floor fight if no candidate can get the magic number of delegates necessary to clinch the nomination before the convention begins. let's look at the delegate count now. donald trump is the close. but if he doesn't get the number before the convention starts or, say you actually get to the convention and have a floor full of people here who have trump signs but on the first vote he does not get enough to get the nomination squirrelled away, then we have a real problem because a floor fight is underway at that point. why? because after the first vote, many of these delegates become
2:27 am
unbound. that means they can voted for whomever they wish, not necessarily the person chosen by the people back in their state. people who are holding trump signs may suddenly be holding cruz signs. or maybe kasich signs. maybe signs for somebody else altooth. every state has its own rules. the convention will have its own rules when it starts. it's not clear which rules override other rules. you can bet all three campaigns will be doing all they can to twist arms, to bend the rules, and to push the referees to try to get an advantage. it could get bitter and very nasty. there is a reason the party does not want that to happen. overwhelming reason. look at this from the pew research center. these are the numbers. in the republican party if the nominee is chosen on the ballot, 64% of the time the nominee will go on to win the white house. second ballot or later, only 50% of the time. these numbers are even worse for the democratic party.
2:28 am
there's a real cost to be paid by a party that goes into its convention undecided. >> thank you. and of course, remember to join us here on cnn all day tuesday for complete coverage of the critical wisconsin primary only on cnn. it is 1:28 p.m. in dubai. 5:28 a.m. on the east coast. still to come this hour -- medical marijuana being used to treat children. coming up, why one israeli family says the controversial drug is the only thing that's left to help their toddler. the news continues live across the u.s. and around the world this hour. you're watching "cnn newsroom." m
2:29 am
2:30 am
2:31 am
2:32 am
map. welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom," and it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following this hour -- the main airport in brussels partially reopening to passengers this day for the first time since the deadly terrorist attacks nearly two weeks ago. the airport company's ceo says there will just be three flight taking off sunday bound for portugal, italy, and greece. passengers are being screened before they ender it the terminal. syrian -- enter the terminal. syrian forces have discovered a mass grave with at least 40 bodies in palmyra. this follows the recapture of the ancient city from isis last week. many of the victims were women and children. many showed signs of beheading and torture. the president of niger was sworn in saturday for another five-year term. he was elected in a runoff vote last month that was marred by
2:33 am
low turnout. the opposition boycotted that election due to their candidate being hospitalized days before ballots were cast. no one is paying attention to us. that's just one of the messages from migrants who blocked a highway in greece on saturday. they are demanding the macedonian border be reopened. it is closed ahead of a controversial e.u. plan set to take effect monday. migrants who arrived to greece from turkey will be sent back. last hour, i spoke with a spokesman for the international organization for migration about the new deal and how safe turkey will be for migrants who return. indeed there have been challenges, some concerns, amnesty international, for example, put out a statement over the weekend. in reality, turkey is an extraordinarily welcoming and generous country. it's hosting almost 2.7 million refugees already from the war in
2:34 am
syria. we do not hear daily reports of problems. in fact, the turks have opened their hearts to these migrants. so i think one has to look at it in context. the turks have been a lot more welcoming than the europeans have been toward the migrants and refugees. >> and then another very important part when it comes to turkey and its discussions with the e.u. how strict that for this deal -- how critical is that for this deal? will. >> extremely so. turkey wants to join the market and to have free movement to its people throughout europe. something it's been promised for years and being denied by narrow self-interests of certain european countries, let's put it that way. that's finally part of the bargaining if you like that's happening now. perhaps that's the big win for them. i've seen reports, for example, from the islands that the migrants are going that they're
2:35 am
looking forward to the arrival soon of turkish tourists. there will be a lot to win from having free movement in europe and particularly the economy. it warrants discussion. >> i want to ask you this question, and it just goes to the heart of what people will think about this when it comes to a family there. a family that's in greece that doesn't want to go back. a family that risked their lives to get to where they are now. what recourse do they have? what can they do to make sure that they can continue to move forward despite this new rule that is set to take them back? >> sadly, they don't have a lot to fall back on. the real sit that everybody knows that the majority -- reality is that everybody knows that the majority are coming from refugee-producing countries, be that afghanistan, iraq, or syria. and the europeans to some extent, some europeans, angela merkel in particular, has been
2:36 am
extraordinary generous and has opened the gates of her country. so many have come in the hopes of safety. in the meantime, there's been political backlash across europe. we've seen this in recent elections. the reality is the position is unsustainable. the position of keeping europe's borders open to the large flows of migrant who's are in grave danger -- migrants who are in grave danger. the europeans are trying to contain and control it. and that unfortunately means that for a lot of those already en route, there will be no destination in europe. and they will be sent home. >> that was leonard doyle, spokesman for the international organization for migration. the former brazilian president joined 100 protesters at a government rally saturday chanting, "there will not be a coup." the demonstrations came a day after anti-government protesters rallied in sao paolo calling for
2:37 am
the impeachment of the president. he is being investigated for corruption and was recently sworn in as chief of staff. thousands of colombians say their president a traitor and are calling on him to resign. they staged demonstrations in more than 20 cities across that country on saturday. that are opposing the president's efforts for peace after decades of guerrilla conflict. protesters believe there santos has caved to much to rebel commands. the former president led one of the demonstrations and says he wants to bring awareness to the country's corruption. >> translator: we want this march to create consciousness regarding the damage created by the impunity for narcoterrorism. impunity is being given to a particular group and another comes forward. colombia will not escape the violence. >> the colombian civil war has
2:38 am
lasted more than 50 years. this is "cnn newsroom." ahead, a controversial drug is being used to help treat children. coming up, why one family says marijuana is the only medical remedy that works for their toddler. stay with us. ayla reminds me of like a master chef and emiana reminds me of like a monster chef. uh oh. i don't see cake, i just see mess. it's like awful. it feels like i am not actually cleaning it up what's that make mommy do? (doorbell) what's that? swiffer wetjet. so much stuff coming up. this is amazing woah. wow. now i feel more like making a mess is part of growing up. stop cleaning. start swiffering.
2:39 am
you're all set to book a flight using your airline credit card miles. and surprise! those seats sometimes cost a ridiculous number of miles, making it really hard to book the flight you want. luckily, there's a better way... with the capital one venture card. with venture, you'll earn unlimited double miles on every purchase, every day. and when you're ready to travel, just book the flight you want, on any airline, then use your miles to cover the cost. now you're getting somewhere. what's in your wallet? bounty is two times more absorbent. more "sit" per roll.
2:40 am
so one roll of bounty can last longer than those bargain brands. so you get more "life" per roll. bounty. the long-lasting quicker picker upper. ♪ no, you're not ♪ yogonna watch it! ♪tch it! ♪ ♪ we can't let you download on the goooooo! ♪
2:41 am
♪ you'll just have to miss it! ♪ yeah, you'll just have to miss it! ♪ ♪ we can't let you download... uh, no thanks. i have x1 from xfinity so... don't fall for directv. xfinity lets you download your shows from anywhere. i used to like that song. welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. in the u.s., lawmakers in several southern states have recently debated bills that address the rights of gays, lesbians, and transgendered people. one bill in the state of north carolina has now become law. nick valencia looks at the measure's impact so far. ♪
2:42 am
>> reporter: it's saturday in raleigh, north carolina. this is a midday drag show. a fundraiser for lgbt awareness. candace cox is the woman of the hour. >> the most important thing for me personally is that every time i close mize and say a prayer, and i ask my god as a person of faith how he feels, he doesn't seem to have a problem with it, and my parents have no problem with it, and their opinion matters to me. >> reporter: cox is transgender. >> black congresswoman in north carolina, i'm used to being stabbed, in the back, not in my eye. >> reporter: one of thousands in north carolina affected by the private securities privacy act and stimulate that requires trans people to use the public restroom related to the gender on their birth certificate, not how they identify. >> this law affects us because it puts us in danger and is open discrimination. it's no different than the jim
2:43 am
crowe laws in the south. you look -- mwah. >> reporter: at home, she and her husband, adam daniels, say that now that she's required to use the men's room, they worry she'll be physically assaulted or worse. >> i would say most of the attention is because people do not understand what the bill actually does. >> reporter: state house republican pro tempore paul stamm is one of the sponsors. he says the law is not limiting the protections of the lgbt community but rather not giving them special rights. >> we have lots of accommodations in the bill for those in special circumstances. we're trying to protect the reasonable expectations of privacy of 99.9% of our citizens who think when they're going into a restroom or changing room that they will be private. >> reporter: 19 surgeries, two
2:44 am
trips to thailand, and more than $100,000 later, cox is post-op transgender, though her birth certificate says she's a man. she's what the trans community would call passable as a woman. she says that doesn't make it any easier. >> we're literally the same and are fighting for the same thing. we want to be accepted and to know that we're not going to be discriminated against. >> thank you! >> reporter: nick valencia, cnn, raleigh, north carolina. we move on to israel and the issue of medical marijuana. a family is using the controversial drug to treat their son's chronic health conditions, and it's their last hope after other treatments failed to bring the toddler any relief. cnn's orrin lieberman has this report for us. >> reporter: for 2.5-year-old levity, moments of joy are all too brief. diagnosed with severe epilepsy andsational palsy from birth leaving him with brain damage, he suffered seizures, dozens a
2:45 am
day. now they're nearly gone, w just a few drop a day of medical marijuana, cannabis oil, mixed into his food. >> we saw a difference immediately. after a few weeks, we didn't see any seizures at all. >> reporter: other medicines didn't work, his father says, or worse, caused severe side effects. levity h-- levity has been on te cannabis for a year and a half. it's high in the pharmacological ingredient in cannabis and flow thc, the psychoactive ingredient, the drug that makes you high. there's little research on the effects of medical cannabis on babies, but this father has all the results he needs. his son hasn't had a seizure in months. he takes the cbd oil daily and a second oil of thc only when levit is having a bad day. when you give him the drop of thc, that's the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, it makes him high. >> in the beginning, we were
2:46 am
pretty anxious about it, i guess. then we thought, well, what are we seeing? we're seeing this kid that was before in distress, and now he isn't. >> reporter: at home, they play with their son and daughter. the difference is stunning, she is ten months old, one-third of her brother's age. she can hold toys and play with her parents and much. th this, one father worries, will be too much for his son. instead, he hopes one day to hear his son say "dad." we turn to weather around the world. in portions of the united states, it is a lot colder than it should be for april. our meteorologist, karen maginnis, is at the world weather center. what's happening? >> reporter: it is colder. and it's snowier and blustery-er, if you can have a word like. that we've got snowfall stretching from the great lakes into the eastern great lakes and
2:47 am
finally across new england. we've got back-to-back storm systems, both are very fast moving. so it's high impact, short duration. cold comfort, no pun intended. winds around 60 or 65 miles per hour, around 100 to 110 kilometers per hour. and we'll start to see the next wave of this move in toward monday. the snowfall is going to be fast and furious. there you see in some of the coastal areas of massachusetts and into rhode island and connecticut, we're mostly seeing it as wet weather. western massachusetts, the snowfall has already begun. also washd. dulles reported snow flurries an hour or so ago. there was the first wave. we've got another behind it, a clipper system that actually develops and deepens as we go into the next 48 hours.
2:48 am
the temperatures will reflect the cold air that's going to be in place. take a look at new york city. not until midweek will we expect temperatures to start to cream back up again. it will be the wind, it will be the blustery conditions. we are looking at snowfall totals maybe in boston four eight inches certainly possible. take a look at this video coming out of china. it's a combination of speed, poor visible, as well as slippery roads. there were 56 vehicles involved in this deadly crash that claimed the the lives of two people and sent 30 to the hospital. it goes to show on the slick roads you never can be too caref careful. this happened in the past 24 hours, two fay salts associated with that -- fatalities associated with that. and i mention for two reasons because of this broad area that we'll watch for tropical
2:49 am
development, but also in the past hour, there was a report of an earthquake, 6.9 magnitude, 20 miles deep. george, no tsunami warnings have been issued. that is no tsunami warnings issued for the basin. >> that is important to make a point of. thank you very much. we'll stay in touch with you to continue following that, as well. next on "cnn newsroom," hear what donald trump thought about running for president more than ten years ago. that's right, more than ten years ago. stay with us. living with chronic migraine feels like each day is a game of chance. i wanted to put the odds in my favor. so my doctor told me about botox®, an fda-approved treatment that significantly reduces headache days for adults with chronic migraine, 15 or more headache days a month, each lasting 4 hours or more. it's shown to prevent headaches and migraines before they start. and it's injected by my doctor once every 12 weeks. effects of botox® may spread hours to weeks after injection causing serious symptoms.
2:50 am
alert your doctor right away, as difficulty swallowing, speaking, breathing, eye problems, or muscle weakness can be signs of a life-threatening condition. side effects may include allergic reactions, neck and injection site pain, fatigue and headache. don't take botox® if there's a skin infection. tell your doctor your medical history, muscle or nerve conditions, and medications including botulinum toxins, as these may increase the risk of serious side effects. put the odds on your side. visit botoxchronicmigraine.com to learn how to save on your treatment. talk to a headache specialist today about botox®. one...is all it takes...... ...to turn the tables. crest 3d white toothpaste... ...removes 5 times more stains... ...than the red box. for a smile like that, crest 3d white... is the way to whiten. ♪ [engine revs] ♪
2:51 am
♪ [engine revving] the all-new audi a4 is here.
2:52 am
duracell quantum lasts longer so kevin jorgeson can power through the night. sfx: duracell slamtones but so we don't have tormin wad to get clean. charmin ultra soft gets you clean without the wasteful wadding. it has comfort cushions you can see that are softer... ...and more absorbent, and you can use up to 4 times less. enjoy the go with charmin.
2:53 am
welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. there's no doubt about the fact donald trump is a big proponent of success through self-confidence. cnn scoured thousands of pages of books, of speeches and television interview transcripts from the past 30 years to put together a portrait of the u.s. republican presidential front-runner in his own words. here's a telling sample of what donald trump has said. >> i love the creative process, and i love winning. ♪
2:54 am
you do have to be born a certain way. having parents that are into the world. the gene spool somewhat important. it's a horrible thing to say. when people pay me to teach people to be successful, i hate to say that. i was spanked lovingly -- not by my father who would ever do it, but by my mother. really i like to say anything i need to to succeed. i'm the bigger developer in new york pby far. work is good, and accumulation is positive, not negative. the fact is that i was generous at a bad time in my life. around 1990 and '91, the real estate markets were down, it was crashing. >> you had debt of $900 million. how did you do that? >> i actually had millions of -- billions in debt. i rant and rave. >> would you like to be
2:55 am
president of the united states? >> what a question. i guess a lot of people that are ambitious and all of the things, i don't think i would want to give up what i have right now i'm friendly with everybody. the people i do best with are the people who drive the taxis. wealthy people don't like me because i'm competing against them all the time. i know so many people that i've been dealing with for years, i would bring them together, i have no doubt about that. >> reporter: why are you involved in politics at all? >> i enjoy it. i enjoy the system. i doubt i'll be involved beyond what i am right now. i think i'm too honest to be a politician. >> you think you're too honest to run for office? >> i'm too forthright. i think i'm too honest. but i do believe i'm too forthright to be a politician. >> politics there. let's close on a different note. we'd be remiss not to tell you about this internationally recognized day where anyone can be a kid including you if you're asleep in the u.s. or just waking up. grab your pillow right now
2:56 am
because people around the world are battling it out during the seventh annual international pillow fight day saturday. dressed in their pajamas, you see them participating here in berlin, blowing off steam there, having fun. feathers flying also in hong kong. people of all ages took part in the festivities. some even wearing superhero costumes. batman and spider-man were even spotted in the crowd. that looks like fun. thank you for watching this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. and for other viewers around the world, "the best of quest" starts in a moment. thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader. courtyard, the official hotel of the nfl,
2:57 am
and i got together to remind you that no one's the same without the game... like @sirloinking who writes, "just came home with $85 worth of groceries with names like, goats beard, pawpaw and that vile weed kale. what happened?" well, a lack of football is what happened. breathe. soon, you'll be enjoying a big 'ol brat at a tailgate and kale smoothies will be but a memory. next time you order kale, try using a silent "k". tastes so much better.
2:58 am
2:59 am
3:00 am
good morning. welcome to sunday. so grateful to have your company. i'm christi paul. >> i'm victor blackwell. >> all eyes on wisconsin. twob days until the badger state heads to the polls. >> proving to be a real battle for republican and democratic front runners. today no events in wisconsin for hillary clinton. senator sanders holding a town hall at 2:30 eastern and a rally lgt tonight. >> trump a rally tonight after a busy

67 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on