Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom With Carol Costello  CNN  April 6, 2016 6:00am-8:01am PDT

6:00 am
homeless. here is what they do. they come in and arrange to have housing. that is their job. but this is not their job. on duty officer playing hopscotch with the child. his partner instinctively got out to play hopscotch to connect to let her know it is all okay. and he says he wants people to feel comfortable in tough situations. life is hard. you don't have to make it more hard. and it is not just protect and serve. it is part of being a human being. >> fantastic. --. >> stitched in there double. cost me an extra 15 hundred. >> "newsroom" starts now. good morning. i'm carol costello. front runners go down and
6:01 am
chances of a contested convention way up. ted cruz tops donald trump as democrats in wisconsin feel the bern. both candidates celebrating today after wisconsin's critical primary. on the democrat side sanders grabs his sixth consecutive win beating hillary by more than a dozen points. and a big day for the anti-trump movement. >> tonight is a turning point. it is a rallying cry. let me just say, hillary, get ready. here we come. >> cruz stomps on trump and picks up more than 30 delegates. trump us a path to the nomination now in jeopardy as the republican party moves one step closer towards a contested convention. trump would now have to win 60% of the remaining delegates to clinch the nomination. sta even possible? we're following all of this with our team of political kor spots and experts.
6:02 am
let's begin with christine romans. >> wisconsin was a must win for ted cruz and bernie sanders and they both did just that. let's look at these numbers here. cruz's decisive victory in wisconsin really shaking up the republican race. he won more than 48% of the vote. 42 delegates up for grabs. cruz will take 36 of those. and donald trump gets three delegates. he's still on top but into the home stretch is math isn't adding up to clinch the nomination before the convention. this sets the stage for a delegate fight at an open convention with 16 primaries and caucuses to go. trump will need to win 60%, carol. of the remaining delegates to reach 1237. ted cruz has to win 88%. john kasich has to win more delegates than there are. not impossible for donald trump, but unlikely. for the democrats, bernie sanders nabs more than 56% of the vote. bringing his number of delegates to 1066. a little more than 200 behind
6:03 am
hillary clinton's total. but clinton leads with the super delegates. assuming all of the super delegates stay committed to their candidate, clinton only needs 36% of the remaining pledge delegates. 36% to clinch the nomination. but super delegates don't count until they actually vote on the campaign floor. what's ahead? new york. california? a big map still to go. sanders campaign hoping his momentum will cause super delegates to jump ship. but you can see a long way go. he has to win 77% of all the remaining delegates. republicans face the real possibility of not having a nominee before the start of their convention. sanders supporters dream of the same situation for their party. >> thanks for breaking down the numbers christine. i appreciate it. cruz's big win now potentially resetting the republican race as they set
6:04 am
sights on new york state. phil mattingly is here. hi. >> hey carol. well ted cruz's campaign attacked wisconsin. in the last couple weeks they deployed major ground operations, unparalleled compared to any other candidate or campaign. they had targeted ads. not only set to boost cruz but also to take down john kasich, the third candidate in the race who's threatening cruz in some congressional districts. all in all it was an effort that not only worked but may have reset the race. >> hillary, get ready. here we come. >> ted cruz pulling off a big win in wisconsin's republican primary. the victory for cruz narrowing donald trump's path to the nomination and moving the party ever closer to a contested convention. >> tonight is a turning point. a rallying cry. >> cruz's win the most substantial since his defeat of trump in iowa. >> three weeks ago the media
6:05 am
said wisconsin was a perfect state. for donald trump. but the hard working men and women of wisconsin stood and campaigned tirelessly to make sure tonight was a victory for every american. >> trump facing a nearly impossible mathematical challenge to amazz the delegates needed for the nomination. a rough week of political blunders, attack ads and questions about his ability to be presidential loosening if front runners grip as presumptive nominee. lindsay graham tweeting well done ted cruz. hopefully tonight is the turning point to deny donald trump 1237 delegates. in the hours before polls closed trump hit the trail hard. it wasn't enough. >> we could have a big surprise
6:06 am
tonight folks. >> trump's campaign mostly silent after the loss, only releasing a biting statement against the cruz campaign. saying in part, lying ted cruz had the governor of wisconsin. many conservative talk radio show hosts and the entire party apparatus behind him going on to say ted cruz is worse than a puppet. he's a trojan horse being used by the party bosses, attempting to steal the nomination from donald trump. cruz meanwhile celebrating his big win. >> my wife heidi. >> ensuring he shares the spotlight after trump tweeted an unflattering photo of her which he later acknowledged was a mistake. >> i may be biased. but isn't she going to make app amazing first lady? >> and carol, all eyes now turn east. the new york primary next on the map. april 19th. 95 delegates at stake and an
6:07 am
area where donald trump feels he's on solid ground. and the map continues to look better for trump going forward. east coast primaries. places trump's advisors think cruz is going to have major problems. still for anybody who thinks the contested convention is the most exciting story or the place they want to end up in cleveland, last noiight was good for them. >> thank you fill. with me now to talk about all of this is bob bar. also joined by cnn senior political analyst and editor of the atlantic ron brown stein and republican strategist boris epi --. last night was a big blow for trump. he needs 60% of the remaining delegates to get the nomination. is it time to change strategy? >> it is not. stick to the original strategy that's gotten him here. he's up by over 200 delegates
6:08 am
and he does have a clear path. the only path that is feasible to the nomination out of all the other candidates. so what he needs to do is go back on message. talk about making america great again. talk about immigration, national security, the economy and by doing that he's going to continue his strong move to the nomination. again, new york, the naes states. delaware, rhode island. pennsylvania. and i predict he will get tot the 1237. and he doesn't then plenty of time to recruit delegates to get you over the line. >> bob let's talk about ted cruz. because he faces tough odds too when it comes to the nomination. he needs 88% of the remaining delegates. so is it possible? >> well it is certainly possible. but unlikely boris's candidate who refuses to follow the advice
6:09 am
that boris gave him which would be very good advice and that is stick to a positive substantive message. mr. trump is a candidate who constantly reverts back to his inner self and that is insulting and belittling opponenting and anybody else who seems to differ with him. senator cruz are continue to do what he's doing, which paid very high dividends last night in wisconsin. and that is to focus on a very, very well organized ground game. and also to stick to issues that poll after poll after poll indicates is what american voters want to hear. that is not insults. but rather solutions for the economic and foreign policy crises that are facing the country. >> so we have rosie views from the candidate's supporters. so ron, let's talk about reality. is a contested convention a sure thing now? >> not a sure thing because of the point boris made. that even if mr. trump falls
6:10 am
short, he has the potential to pull enough delegates together at the end if he's very close. it looks more likely. the big question is whether there is a lasting reset of the race. because we saw new patterns. up until wisconsin ted cruz had not won even a plurality of voters who are not evangelical christians in any state with an exit poll. including his home state of texas. he won them big last night and that is important. as you move to the coast, historically you would say this is tough terrain for ted cruz because there are fewer evangelical christians. it is more secular, white collar, moderate suburban vote. the question is whether ted cruz's vote is essentially the never trump vote and kind of transcended the views about him personally. if has the pattern he'll have lots of opportunities in the remaining map. but we have to wait and see. >> let's talk about that never trump vote. because when you look at the exit polls in wisconsin, 4 in 10
6:11 am
said they voted for cruz because they are scared of trump becoming the nominee. so bob, did you want your candidate to win because of that? >> a win is a win. and senator cruz's critics, particularly mr. trump will find all sorts of ridiculous explanations for it. but the fact of the matter is that as we get closer and closer to the convention, to the eventual selection of a nominee at the republican convention, people are taking a much harder look than they did earlier in these campaigns at the actual differences between mr. trump and senator cruz. and what they are finding is that the lack of any real expertise or substantive ideas coming out of mr. trump or his campaign. and the continual reversion to personal attacks and insults really is not what they want to see in a nominee. and i think that will continue to mount as a problem for mr. trump. >> so we'll see about that. so boris.
6:12 am
but 4 in 10 are afraid of a trump presidency. doesn't that bother you? that is disturbing isn't it. >> what i like is 6 and 10 are not. and hopefully we can enlarge on that number. donald trump still has a long time to show the country what he's all about. there are several months left until the general. the republican party would do much better to coalesce behind him. he's the leader and most likely nominee. and to focus then on defeating hillary clinton. and because of the ongoing investigation. let's not pretend ted cruz is somebody with a lot of experience. he's a freshman senator who hasn't been supported by anybody in the senate for a long time. now some are doing it while holding their nose. that is freshman senator who generally just throws bombs in the senate and doesn't have any real ideas and the idea he does have change on immigration and national security. donald trump is not a
6:13 am
politician. he's a successful businessman. someone who can really grow the country and --. >> let's talk reality now. you have 4 in 10 afraid of a trump presidency. you have ted cruz, like a lot of people who are never trump are voted for in the state of wisconsin i would assume. and olson ted cruz has high unfavorability ratings. are either candidate particularly strong in a general? >> they both face challenges when you look at the numbers today. but i think trump faces even greater challenges based on today's polling and that is a real problem for him in accumulating enough delegates from ton bound if he falls short. if you look today, donald trump is facing the highest unfavorable ratings we've seen in polling for a front runner at this point in the race. particularly among the groups at the core of the modern
6:14 am
coalition. -- slow down -- and what that means carol is that if you are an elected official there is not a lot oaf incentive to go to donald trump unless you have. not a lot of unpledged delegates are looking at him and saying this is the guy who can lead us to victory in november. cruz's numbers aren't much better but they are better and that is a big head wind for trump. to some extent he's got to solve his general election problem to help solve his problem in the primary. >> thanks to all of you. still to come in the "newsroom," sanders wins big in wisconsin. but the bern better watch his back. hillary clinton unleashes her new plan to take down who are democratic rival s beautiful mo. with flonase allergy relief, they wont. most allergy pills only control one inflammatory substance. flonase controls six. and six is greater than one. flonase changes everything.
6:15 am
they sato make a sunscreenle... you can apply to wet skin. a wrinkle cream that works in one week. and a shampoo that washes away the residue hair care products can leave behind. but we did it. no wonder dermatologists recommend neutrogena® 2 times more than any other brand. we're always re-thinking what's possible in skincare. that's just how we roll. neutrogena®. see what's possible. how fast is it?
6:16 am
plenty fast. but it's not how fast you mow, it's how well you mow fast. it's not how fast you mow, it's how well you mow fast. it's not how fast you mow, it's how well you mow fast. ...it's how well you mow fast! ...it's how well you mow fast. even if it doesn't catch on, doesn't mean it's not true. the john deere ztrak z535m with our reengineered deck to mow faster better. to find out more about the accel deep mower deck, go to johndeere.com/mowwellfast and to connect us with thes twonderment of nature. with the tiger image, the saliva coming off and you got this turning. that's why i need this kind of resolution and computing power. being able to use a pen like this on the screen directly with the image, it just gives me a different relationship to it and i can't do that on my mac. this is brilliant for me.
6:17 am
6:18 am
bernie sanders, tops in wisconsin, beating out clinton in 6 of the last 7 contests. the delegate math though is
6:19 am
still in clinton's favor and in he really wants to make a dent he needs a blow out win in new york. polls show the frun we are a sizable lead and that's not the only obstacle facing sanders. clinton is facing a new campaign strategy on her opponent. >> that 14 point victory for bernie sanders such a big moment for him. but the reality here is going forward in this campaign, as i go to the new york primary it is a new ball game and the clinton campaign is waiting for bernaie sanders more than ever before. they have been first ignoring bernie sanders then dismissing him. a new strategy is taking shape now. it is to disqualify him and defeat him. in that order. you are going to see, you know, this new strategy rolling out. in fact you already are this morning. hillary clinton doing a round of interviews saying she's not
6:20 am
qualified to be president. she also is taking aim at whether he is actually a democrat. if he's truly a member of the democratic party. take a listen to this. >> when he puts his head on a pillow at night do you think he goes to sleep a democrat. >> i can't answer that glen because he's a relative i new democrat. and i'm not even sure he is one. he's running as one. i'll leave that to him. >> we know how voters are characterizing him and that is a winner in some respects. that is the beginning of this line of attack. is he really a democrat and it is happening as closed primaries are coming up. that means only democrats have vote in the primaries here. bernie sanders talking about the super delegates who he is hoping will rally to his side. >> i think that a lot of these super delegates are going to be
6:21 am
looking around them and they are going to be saying, which candidate has the momentum? which candidate is bringing out huge numbers of people and creating huge -- [ cheers and applause ] which candidate can bring out large numbers of people. >> it is bernie sanders favorite word on the campaign trail -- huge. well he needs to get some huge wins going forward. new york would be a good place to start. that is why the next two weeks so fascinating. hillary clinton never thought she would be fighting for the new york primary but she's fighting. >> going to be quite nasty. will show go one step farther since she's not sure bernie sanders is a democrat? will she say he's a socialist? >> that's implied but she may
6:22 am
have to lead the voter to that conclusion. look for her surrogate osteostart doing that. and the voters out there are excited about his candidacy. that is one thing they are going to try to figure out how to do, how to extinguish that excitement. >> next hour i'll be talking with a spokesperson for the hillary clinton campaign. than at 11:15 a.m. eastern hillary clinton will appear on cnn during at this hour with berman and baldwin. attention it is a an all time high between clinton and sanders. the question for the clinton camp is will its new line of attack stop sanders momentum heading into the new york primary? so let's talk more about that with the director of the university of virginia center for politics larry sab toe. take a look at this tweet from former obama advisor dan pfeifer. things that don't matter.
6:23 am
narrative, momentum and expectations. things that do matter. math, delegates and organization. end quote. is that really true? >> it is partly true. he's talking about winning the nomination. and so the factors he sites are much more important. but it is also true that at the end of this process hillary clinton who will be the nominee because the math pretty much projects that. she has to reunify this party. and she's going to have to find ways s ts to accommodate this contingent of sanders delegates who will be at the convention. will she have to concede on policy issues? will she have to include planks in the platform she doesn't like? will she have to find a vice presidential candidate who's completely acceptable to the sanders crowd? these are all important questions. >> sanders may have the momentum. but he has more to worry about than just clinton's attacks on
6:24 am
him. the new york daily news, and new york tabloid, it comes down hard on sanders two weeks before the new york primary. you see the headline. bernie's sandy hook shame. inside there is a problematic interview where sanders is unable to articulate a plan to dismantle big banks. and i'm going to read part of that for you. the daily news interviewer asks sanders how you go about breaking up big banks. and sanders replies how you go about doing it is having legislation passed or giving the authority to the secretary of the treasury to determine. under dodd-frank these banks are a danger to the economy over the problem of o too big to fail. the daily news followed up by asking but do you think the fed now has that authority to break up those big banks? >> sanders replies well, i don't know if the fed has that power. and this is what clinton had to say about that just a few minutes ago on msnbc. >> i think the interview raised
6:25 am
a lot of really serious questions. and i look at it this way. the core of his campaign has been break up the banks. and it didn't seem in reading his answers that he understood exactly how that would work under dodd-frank. exactly who would be responsible. what the criteria were. and, you know, that means you can't really help people if you don't know how to do what you are campaigning on saying you want to do. >> so is she right? does this raise questions about sanders? >> well sanders is starting to get something that he didn't get a lot of for much of this campaign. it is called vetting. and the reason he wasn't vetted very thoroughly is because he was seen as a sure loser. almost as a gadfly in the beginning. but the price of winning so many primaries and caucuses is people are actually asking could he be president? and if president what are his
6:26 am
real policies beyond the slogans? i think the clinton campaign is smart to focus on that. and notice, carol, as jeff was just telling you in his reporting, most of the key primaries coming up are closed. they are going to be only democrats participating. and hillary clinton does very well in primaries where only democrats and no independents participate. >> interesting larry sabado. thanks for your insight as always. next thursday night in brooklyn right here on cnn. 9:00 p.m. eastern. still to come the final results of the wisconsin primary only tell part of the story. exit polls reveal how fear played a key role among many republican voters.
6:27 am
6:28 am
6:29 am
6:30 am
let me talk to you about retirement. a 401(k) is the most sound way to go. let's talk asset allocation. sure. you seem knowledgeable, professional. would you trust me as your financial advisor? i would. i would indeed. well, let's be clear here. i'm actually a dj. [ dance music plays ] [laughs] no way! i have no financial experience at all. that really is you? if they're not a cfp pro, you just don't know. find a certified financial planner professional who's thoroughly vetted at letsmakeaplan.org. cfp -- work with the highest standard.
6:31 am
and good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. ted cruz's strong showing in wisconsin may have less to do with him and more to do with donald trump. exit polls reveal some interesting things about why republicans voted the way they did. nearly 4 in 10 say they voted for ted cruz because they were scared of trump becoming president. that might not serve cruz well if he gets the nomination. christine romans has more of the numbers for you this morning. >> good morning carol, the exit polling very revealing. showing wisconsin republicans are afraid of their front runner. we asked votes how they would feel if trump is elected president. 48% scared, 20% concerned.
6:32 am
those sentiments definitely a factor in the win there. fear prevails this primary season as, you know. when it comes to the economy 94% of gop voters are worried. just 6% said they are not. of those feefrl of the economy voters broke decisively for cruz. another storyline, more than half of all republican voters say international trade kills american jobs. trump won those voters. he has in most states but look at this. trump's victory over cruz very small. 43-42. trump usually dominates that group. democrats of 37% rank the economy and jobs at the top followed by --. of those vote who are said economy and jobs, 54% voted for senator sanders. clinton points behind. hillary clinton has done very well with women throughout the
6:33 am
primary states but in wisconsin bernie sanders edged her out by 1 percentage point. she still did very well with minorities and older voters. >> thanks for sharing the numbers with us. with me now wisconsin lieutenant governor rebecca kleefisch. welcome. >> thank you so much carol. >> thanks for being here. you heard what christine just said. -- republicans in your state feared a trump presidency. but is that a good reason to vote for someone else? namely ted cruz? >> well i think the survey probably chose some t of the most vitriolic moods they could have picked. but wisconsin voters are smart and independent. but last night also pragmatic. i think one of the things that we have seen country wide is the great unsung song of the fact
6:34 am
that donald trump actually has fewer primary and caucus voters than the rest of the candidates. i think we hear a lot about delegate numbers. but when you look at the idea of consolidating all of the votes that did not go for trump, well there is the vast majority right there and what wisconsin voters did yesterday was they saw this as a two man race. and they self consolidated this race and they voted for ted cruz. >> so you yourself, you made your mind up late. you voted for ted cruz. you tweeted as a matter of fact, i voted for jobs, freedom and security. see you at the victory party. my question is why did it take you so long to embrace ted cruz? >> well it didn't take me so long to embrace cruz. it took me so long to tweet that vote. ted cruz has always had the best
6:35 am
tax plan. i like what he does on dynamic scoring. i like the earned income tax credit but ultimately i do believe the same thing wisconsin voters said yesterday. that ted cruz can be a uniter of this party. especially because wisconsin is a great example of how the republican party has united in the past. we took our libertarian leaning folks and our tea party folks, our establishment folks and your gop-leaning moderates and independents and formed an unbeatable coalition in 2010. and the governor's recall and my recall in 2012. and then again in 2014. ted cruz put it back together in a unique way last night. i think that is going lend him momentum. >> needless to say donald trump has a very big problem with your state. your government in particular. his campaign sent out this
6:36 am
statement. >> well you can't pick on wisconsin. >> let me read you what the trump campaign sent out about the state of wisconsin "donald trump witt stood the onslaught of establishment yet again. lying ted cruz --. ted cruz is worse than a puppet. he's a trojan horse being used by the party bosses, attempting to steal the nomination for mr. trump. and i'll add one thing. anti- -- forces. as of the end of march they spent between 20 and $30 million just to defeat donald trump. not to support any other candidate. >> well this is a primary election. right now we are win knowing the field in order to determine who represents the gop when we two into the national election this fall. so it is unsurprising to me that
6:37 am
you had primary candidate versus primary candidate. >> historically, when can you remember another race where so much money was spent simply to defeat one candidate? and it didn't really matter who anyone else voted $30 million in one month. >> well carol, let me tell you about two other things i think made the difference yesterday. i think first of all wisconsin voters were independent and pragmatic yesterday. but two other things that made the difference i think for ted cruz were talk radio. we have a really unique situation in wisconsin, where local and regional talk radio -- i'm not talking at rush limbaugh. loik cycle regional talk radio are huge electoral motivators, especially where the vast majority of primary votes come from in the highly populous, the dense areas of our state. they went all in for ted cruz about six weeks ago.
6:38 am
and so that was a big motivator, having a steady drum beat of these influential talkers day after day. and the second part of that is donald trump took a very different study guide in wisconsin than ted cruz and ultimately john kasich too. donald trump chose to come in negative on wisconsin. and he kind of stuck to his guns. something that he had done very early on while the golf was still a candidate for the president of the united states. using numbers that were put out by democrats that have been disproven time and time again. and i don't know if it was poor preparation or if he felt that it was working for him early on in iowa. but he brought back a set of numbers that were just downright false. and it really felt like he was just ripping on wisconsin and he didn't know about our success story. the other thing was, you know, he ripped on governor scott walker. governor scott walker is a pretty popular guy.
6:39 am
if you remember act ten, what brought all of those protesters to madison a few years back and let to the governor's recall and my recall election, that's now saved wisconsin taxpayers, $5.24 billion. we've had a lot of success here. and donald trump basically didn't acknowledge that. and didn't acknowledge scott walker as the architect of it. there are a lot of wisconsin voters who, you know, took offense to that. and i think they took it out on donald trump at the ballot box. >> fascinating. lieutenant governor rebecca kleefisch thank you so much for being with me this morning. still to come the democrats prepare for a new york brawl. but when the gloves come off, who really gets hurt? media giant i have asthma...
6:40 am
...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled,
6:41 am
your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
6:42 am
6:43 am
6:44 am
13 days until new york. the democrats, namely hillary clinton are about to take the gloves off. but whether nasty will make a difference is another story. clinton suffers from an enthusiasm gap which will be difficult to overcome if negativity becomes the name of her game. with me now to talk about that and more, founder of women and the world t daily beast tina brown. >> hi carol. we got the summit starting tonight. >> so exciting. because among your guest, meryl streep, megyn kelly -- i suspect the election will come up. >> i suspect it might. and a lot to discuss. actually on the topic of misogyny. >> have you seen misogyny in the race so far? >> i certainly have.
6:45 am
the way women have been talked about you will until now has just been really stunning. >> who's been the worst offender? >> we'll clearly trump has been the worst offender in that he's overt. what he's done is let the ugly trolls of misogyny out of bag and get his supporters to say, you know, i kind of like the way he talks about women. he tells it like it is. really? that is very scary. >> he does have a certain amount of support from women which, some women say they don't quite get. what do they see in donald trump do you think? >> well the women who support him i think see -- they are on saysed with, you know, he can fix things. because women are practical. so the women who support trump have brought into his narrative, which is i know how to get things done. i'm not a good who lets red tape stop me. i can bowl through and get stuff down. unfortunately he's also a
6:46 am
fantasyist. >> it is not a good siep for donald trump. the interesting thing is how he almost willfully blew himself up. part of me wonders psychologically if he doesn't really want to be president and it actually scares him. otherwise why not reign it back just a bit. keep his enthusiasts but also not give himself these boomerang sound bites. >> let's talk hillary clinton. she does suffer from this enthusiasm gap. why? especially among young people aren't more voters enthusiastic about a hillary clinton candidacy. >> unfortunately we live in an era in which experience and having been there a long time is not considered anything exciting and is actually considered instead a new word, which is baggage. you don't have experience
6:47 am
anymore. you have baggage. actually sometimes it is pretty great to have some baggage. when you are in the middle of a crisis where everything is coming at you. where, you know, foreign policy issues of enormous complexity. that quote, baggage is handy because you actually know something. people who come in clean slate. that is great in the new ideas department. but these problems actually arequire some knowledge. >> i think part of hillary clinton's baggage though is her lack of trustworthiness. only 16% of voters in wisconsin find her trustworthy. why is that? >> that narratorive of hillary has been pounded by republicans for many decades and it has stuck i think. frankly i find it pretty untrustworthy to be promising the electorate crazy stuff, like the fact that you can block the
6:48 am
banks and give everybody free college tuition and give everybody free healthcare that. sounds about as trustworthy as the kind of -- trump university. i think hillary has been unwilling to say stuff she can't deliver. >> she's going to fight back against bernard on that very thing. she's going to say to his young supporters, he's selling you a bill of goods. she says these things and doesn't know how to accomplish them. i can. but i'm going to worry about that later. and i'm going attack the candidate that you revere as a revolutionary. will that work? >> i think it may eventually. it hasn't up to now. a lot of what bernie sanders said is wildly appealing. i agree with most of what he wants. it is just that we also know how difficult it is to get done. like somebody walking into a meeting and saying i have an idea. let's totally reinvent this company and let's -- okay. well now tell me how and what's
6:49 am
the plan? and i think what we're seeing right now is the beginning of that moment where voters are saying okay we've heard it all but how is he going to do it? he saw the revelation in that interview with sanders yesterday, whichs pretty much of a shocker where he was asked questions how he would break up the banks and so on and he flailed and blathered. he had no clue. and i actually think that new york, for instance, is a tough-minded state. and i think it is not going to be enough to just go in singing the song of the beautiful revolution. i just don't thinks going to be enough. >> and a lost question about hillary clinton's appeal. especially to young women. young women like this 70-year-old guy. >> i know it's great. >> they are not attracted to a woman who could make history. why do you think that is? what is it -- >> i don't think it's so much that it turns her off. but i think that when you are young you want to change
6:50 am
that there will be no more big banks being greedy, that there will be health care for everybody, all colleges will be free. you haven't yet had the experience or should i say the baggage to know, these things are very hard to achieve. so it's not really appealing to be looking at someone who says, look, i've been there, i know this is really difficult. i can offer you this. it may not be exactly your dream but i think i can improve your life by x percent. that's an exciting message if you're young. i think it's a young thing and i do understand it. i really do. the question is, how it's going to play out when it really comes down to the numbers that come out. >> tina brown, thanks for stopping by. i appreciate it. i'll be right back. hold-onto-your-tiara, kind-of-day. live 24/7 with 24/7 digestive support. try align, the undisputed #1 ge recommended probiotic.
6:51 am
6:52 am
we've been together since 2012. dinner is absolutely our favorite time together. i do notice that sometimes i eat better than her. i get my healthy bowl of beneful, and she eats a cheese stick and a cracker. that's what she ate last night. cheese stick and a cracker. can you believe what some people put in their bodies? (vo) beneful originals is a healthy blend... ...your dog will love. with whole grains, real beef and accents of vegetables. beneful. healthy with a side of happy.
6:53 am
6:54 am
president obama's supreme court nominee merrick garland meets with a trio of democrats.
6:55 am
he's meeting with dick durbin and then dianne feinstein and sheldon whitehouse. cnn's political reporter manu raju has more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. there will be meetings with vulnerable republican senators including kelly ayotte and they do not support moving forward with confirmation proceedings that are happening, just to have the courtesy visits. you're seeing an intense suggesting that there should be confirmation hearings and criticized substantially from the left. he backtracked and may face a primary challenge by making those comments. mike pompeii is considering a run against him. this is an intense pressure campaign from the right which is a big reason why it may be hard
6:56 am
to see merrick garland confirmed this year. carol? >> manu raju, thank you. the next hour of "cnn newsroom" is up after a break. e saliva cof and you got this turning. that's why i need this kind of resolution and computing power. being able to use a pen like this on the screen directly with the image, it just gives me a different relationship to it and i can't do that on my mac. this is brilliant for me. headache? motrin helps you be an unstoppable, let's-rock-this-concert- like-it's-1999 kind of mom. back pain? motrin helps you be the side-planking, keeping-up-with- your-girlfriend- even-though-you'll-feel-it- later kind of woman you are. body pain? motrin helps you be an unstoppable, i-can-totally-do-this- all-in-one-trip kind of woman. when pain tries to stop you, there's motrin.
6:57 am
motrin works fast to stop pain where it starts. make it happen with motrin liquid gels. here's the plan. you want a family and a career, but most of the time you feel like you're trying to wrangle a hurricane. the rest of the time, they're asleep. then one day, hr schedules a meeting with you out of the blue. and it's the worst 19 minutes of your career. but you don't sweat it because you and your advisor have prepared for this. and when the best offer means you're moving to the middle of nowhere, the boys say they hate the idea. but you pretend it's not so bad. and years later at thanksgiving, when one of them says what he's thankful for most, is this house,
6:58 am
you realize you didn't plan for any of this you wouldn't have done it any other way. with the right financial partner, progress is possible. this... i can do easily. i try hard to get a great shape. benefiber healthy shape helps curb cravings. it's a clear, taste-free daily supplement.... ...that's clinically proven to help keep me fuller longer. benefiber healthy shape. this, i can do. find us in the fiber aisle.
6:59 am
i'm a customer relationship i'm roy gmanager.ith pg&e. anderson valley brewing company is definitely a leader in the adoption of energy efficiency. pg&e is a strong supporter of solar energy. we focus on helping our customers understand it and be able to apply it in the best way possible. not only is it good for the environment, it's good for the businesses' bottom line. these are our neighbors. these are the people that we work with. that matters to me. i have three children that are going to grow up here and i want them to be able to enjoy all the things that i was able to enjoy. together, we're building a better california. show show me more like this. s.
7:00 am
show me "previously watched." what's recommended for me. x1 makes it easy to find what blows you away. call or go online and switch to x1. only with xfinity. and good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. front-runners go down and chances of a contested convention are way up. ted cruz tops donald trump and both candidates celebrating after wisconsin's critical primary. on the democratic side, sandsers wraps his sixth consecutive win beating hillary clinton by more than a dozen points.
7:01 am
and a big day for the anti-trump movement. >> tonight is a turning point. it is a rallying cry. let me just say, hillary, get ready, here we come. >> cruz stomps on trump and picks up more than 30 delegates. trump's gop nomination now in jeopardy as the republican party moves one step closer towards a contested convention. trump would now have to win 60% of all the remaining delegates to clinch the nomination. is that even possible? christine romans here is following the numbers for us. good morning. >> good morning, carol. an interesting night. wisconsin was a must-win for bernie sanders and ted cruz. they both did that. cruz's decisive victory shaking up the republican race. he won more than 48% of the vote. 42 delegates up for grabs. cruz will take 36.
7:02 am
donald trump will get 3 which means he's still on top of the delegate race. as we get into the home stretch, the math isn't hadding up for him. this sets the stage for a delegate fight at an open convention with 16 primaries and caucuses left to go, trump will need to win 60% of the remaining pledged delegates to reach his magic number of 1237. ted cruz will need 88% and john kasich would need an impossible 125%. not impossible for trump to do it but unlikely. bernie sanders nabs more than 66% of the vote. that brings his pledged candidates to 1066, a little behind clinton's pledged total. assuming all of them stay committed, clinton only needs 36% of the pledged delegates to clinch her nomination. but superdelegates don't count
7:03 am
until you are at the convention floor. new york and pennsylvania and california, she's spent a great deal of time there. the sanders campaign hoping that causes superdelegates to jump ship. a long way to go for bernie sanders. he has to win 77% of all of the remaining delegates. republicans face the real possibility of not having their nominee before the start of their convention. sanders supporters dream of the same for them. >> remember back in the day when conventions were boring. >> performa. >> and we didn't want to have them anymore? not this time around. >> nope. >> christine romans, thanks so much. ted cruz's win over donald trump potentially resets the republican race as the candidates set their sights on new york. let's bring in cnn's phil mattingly for that part of the story. hi, phil. >> hi, carol. last night is what people trying
7:04 am
to stop trump had been waiting for. grassroots conservatives, talk radio all behind one candidate for a major, major win. ted cruz himself pointing out that this might change the tide of this entire race. >> tonight is a turning point. it's a rallying cry as the people of wisconsin defy the media and pundits, i'm more and more convinced that our campaign is going to earn the 1237 delegates needed to win the republican nomination. >> now, carol, one person we did not hear from, at least in public last night, was donald trump. a bit of a turn from what we usually see on primary nights. his big press conferences adorned with gold at his resorts, things of that nature. that didn't happen. he did have a biting statement directed at ted cruz. starting with, "of course, lying ted cruz had the governor of
7:05 am
wisconsin and conservative radio show hosts and the entire party behind him. he's worse than a puppet." while he's talked about moving into a more presidential tone, not pursing that last night. the race is moving into trump's territory. new york is the next primary up april 19th, 95 delegates at stake. both ted cruz and donald trump will be on the ground here today. for trump's team, this is extraordinarily important. they believe they can pull as many as 90 delegates out of this state and ride this into a series of states right now that look very good for donald trump on the map. but carol, for the cruz campaign, wisconsin, obviously a big night. as they hope, a turning point. not just to necessarily block donald trump but to get them to a convention and in a position to win if not on the first ballot then in that open convention. carol? >> phil mattingly, thank you. even though ted cruz won in
7:06 am
wisconsin, it's not all rainbows and butterflies from here on out and here is why. part of why trump lost was because of the fear factor. four in ten voters said they were scared of a trump presidency. according to a recent cnn orc poll, 56% of voters have an unfavorable view of ted cruz which means cruz could face trouble if he's indeed the party nominee. let's speak about this with s.e. cupp and john avalon. welcome to both of you. >> hi. >> s.e., donald trump called ted cruz a trojan horse. is he right? >> well, i don't think he intended this, but in the beginning of that statement, donald trump really gave ted cruz a compliment. he said that he coalesced establishment republicans, talk radio, the party behind him and
7:07 am
that's what ted cruz has been really good at doing. getting those behind his campaign in recent weeks. some of that might be an anti trump enthusiasm for ted cruz but it doesn't really matter. that kind of organization is what is propelling ted cruz's campaign through to the convention. and it's what will help him on those second ballot votes. and where donald trump is really lacking. now, i think donald trump is going to probably go to the convention, maybe with the delegates already clinched, certainly a plurality of the delegates when he gets to the convention. but if it gets to a second ballot, that lack of organization, that lack of outreach to delegates in the months beforehand could be a big problem for him. >> so what if it gets to a third ballot, john? isn't that possible and doesn't that mean a third-party
7:08 am
candidate, some candidate we haven't heard of, maybe the nominee for the republicans? >> not necessarily. not to rain on the unicorn and rainbow there. but with the existing rules in place require the majority of delegates in eight states. that puts a damper on any fantasies about paul ryan coming to save the republican party for himself. but the question you asked, which i think is interesting, is ted cruz, who is very effectively organizing the anti-trump forces -- and this was a big win last night, but not as positive as you point out because trump has strong potential states coming for him right up. it is ted cruz a more competitive general election candidate than donald trump? the one thing you can say, he will probably do better with hispanics. the reality is, ted cruz's entire political argument has been about ideological and playing to the debates and it's not a message that generally
7:09 am
works if you're trying to win swing voters in the general election. that's the reality check for those rallying around ted cruz right now. >> well, it's interesting. because if you put ted cruz up against a democratic candidate in a general election, he's very socially conservative. he's against gay marriage and he's also against abortion in all cases with no exceptions, you know, for rape or incest. so how will those things play, s.e., in a general election? yeah. i think it would be fair to say that before this election started, he was a fringe candidate. he's become more normalized things to donald trump and more palatable conservative candidate. but no question in a general election, some of his views will put him outside of the mainstream of even moderate republicans and independents. to that end, he's been recruiting senators like mike lee and lindsey graham to speak on his behalf and really court
7:10 am
that establishment wing of the party and convince then, look, you might not have liked him in the senate. you might have thought he was a divisive guy. now is the time to get behind him and donald trump's views and rhetoric are much worse and less palatable to a general electorate than ted cruz is. >> it's so tepid for lindsey graham, does it even matter? >> he said it would be like choosing between getting poisoned or getting shot. now he's out supporting getting poisoned. that speaks to the fundamental problem that the party is facing right now, which is a problem of its own making. you have senate leaders rallying around ted cruz as an alternative to donald trump. by comparison, he looks like the
7:11 am
better deal. at least he understands conservative catachism. let's not fool ourselves about what kind of a candidate he will be. john kasich, it's mathematically impossible for him to win outright, he's been polling ahead of hillary clinton consistently. and the fact that the party can't seem to elevate its most general election candidate speaks to the deeper problems that the party has to confront, whether it's a nominee as ted cruz or donald trump. >> last question on the subject of john kasich, s.e. is it time for him to get out? >> oh, i think it was time a long time ago. he's trying to go to the convention and make the argument that marco rubio was trying to make, it matters if you can win in a general election and john kasich is right, he's the most electable but can't seem to get
7:12 am
any more support except for his friends in ohio. unfortunately, he's not running for president of the ohio. he's running for president of the united states. but the republican electorate does not prioritize beating hillary clinton in this election. >> i have to leave it there. thanks for your insight. appreciate it. bernie sanders has now beat hillary clinton in six of the last seven states but the delegate math is still in clinton's favor. and if sanders really was to make a department, he knows a blowout win but the bern better be on his toes. clinton is unleashing a new campaign against her opponent and it's nasty. >> you just have to look at the morning tabloids to show that bernie sanders is in a different
7:13 am
environment here. the clinton campaign has tried ignoring him, brushing him aside and now they are employing a new strategy. they are trying to disqualify him and defeat him and they will try to unify the party later here. bernie sanders has so much support coming here and in new york as well. one problem for bernie sanders, though, we're now entering a period of closed primaries. that means only registered democrats can vote, only if you've already been registered for a few weeks here in new york. that is a different moment for him than in the wisconsin primary and other open primaries. bernie sanders has been focusing on not only hillary clinton but also on donald trump. let's take a listen. >> when we stand together and don't allow the trumps of the world to divide us, whether we were born in america or born abroad, whether we were muslim,
7:14 am
jewish or christian. when we stand together, whether we are gay or straight or male or female, yes, we can create a government that represents all of us. >> carol, i asked the bernie sanders top official, what's the thing that he needs to do here to pull it off and that's to convince democrats that he can actually win in the end. that's why he talks about donald trump so much, to show that he could beat him, too. so we'll see if that works. >> going back to hillary clinton becoming more nasty in her campaign tactics against bernie sanders, she gave an interview where she said -- she's not even sure if bernie sanders is a real democrat. >> well else could he be? an independent socialist? of course, that's what he's been.
7:15 am
the democratic party rules allowed him in. he's running as a democrat. i'm not sure that's going to hold much weight but she's trying to send a message, i'm the party person here. he's not been with us all that long. >> jeff, thank you so much. still to come, the gop sets its sights on july and the republican national convention. could the rules be donald trump's biggest obstacle? then, i decided to have my dna tested through ancestry dna. it turns out i'm scottish. so, i traded in my lederhosen for a kilt. >>psst. hey... where you going? we've got that thing! you know...diarrhea? abdominal pain? but we said we'd be there... woap, who makes the decisions around here? it's me. don't think i'll make it. stomach again...send! if you're living with frequent, unpredictable diarrhea and abdominal pain, you may have irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea or ibs-d - a condition that can be really frustrating.
7:16 am
talk to your doctor about new viberzi. a different way to treat ibs-d. viberzi is a prescription medication you take every day that helps proactively manage both diarrhea and abdominal pain at the same time. so you stay ahead of your symptoms. viberzi can cause new or worsening abdominal pain. do not take viberzi if you have or may have had pancreas or severe liver problems, problems with alcohol abuse, long-lasting or severe constipation, or a blockage of your bowel or gallbladder. if you are taking viberzi, you should not take medicines that cause constipation. the most common side effects of viberzi include constipation, nausea, and abdominal pain. stay ahead of ibs-d... with new viberzi. but pantene is making my hair hairpractically unbreakable.ff. the new pro-v formula makes every inch stronger. so i can love my hair longer. strong is beautiful. pantene. what if 30,000 people download the new app? we're good. okay... what if a million people download the new app?
7:17 am
we're good. five million? good. we scale on demand. hybrid infrastructure, boom. ok. what if 30 million people download the app? we're not good. we're total heroes. scale on demand with the number one company in cloud infrastructure. i think we should've taken a tarzan know where tarzan go! tarzan does not know where tarzan go. hey, excuse me, do you know where the waterfall is? waterfall? no, me tarzan, king of jungle. why don't you want to just ask somebody? if you're a couple, you fight over directions. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. oh ohhhhh it's what you do. ohhhhhh! do you have to do that right in my ear? ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment.
7:18 am
once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
7:19 am
as republicans deal with the fallout from last night's wisconsin's primary, ted cruz's victory, meaning the gop, could be moving closer to a contested convention. for some, that's bringing back memories from 1976 and the nomination fight between gerald ford and ronald reagan, a fight ford would go on to win and it was quite the raucous event.
7:20 am
welcome. >> hi, carol. how are you? >> you were there. what was it like? >> well, first of all, 40 years ago. not 50 years ago. i feel old enough already. it was a very intense convention. you know, when it's a contested convention and you don't know the ultimate outcome, there's just much more excitement and much more tension on the floor. also, the role of the delegate is very, very different. in an uncontested convention, they are basically studio participants. they are supposed to applaud at the right time. in a contested convention, they may actually be called upon to make decisions, possibly their ultimate choice as far as who the presidential nominee should be. >> so as raucous as it was back then, what do you think it will
7:21 am
be like on june 19th? >> back then you didn't have all of the media surrounding the convention like you have now. and president ford and ronald reagan were, you know, i would say, pretty traditional republicans. now you have some outsized personalities that are going to be part of the convention. so it would be a very, very exciting thing and would have to see what would happen. >> yes, we will. hopefully it will only be an exciting thing, right? so in a statement, donald trump's campaign called ted cruz a, quote, trojan horse. in other words, he's being used to steal the nomination. do you think that's true? >> well, let's understand something. from the time of the republican party, which does predate donald trump, you get the nomination by having a majority of the delegates. he doesn't have a majority of the delegates. no one has a majority of the delegates. so everyone, all the candidates
7:22 am
have a right to go to cleveland and try to get that number of delegates. trump will probably have a plurality but that does not give him a majority. what the trailing candidate wants to do in a contested convention is try to force procedural and ideological votes so that there is not a predisposition to vote for the front-runner. i think in trump's case, he's so at variance with what most republicans believe on a wide variety of votes, he's probably vulnerable to a platform fight, for example. so if cruz or somebody else forces the number of votes on the platform that trump were to contest and lose, it might make his nomination less likely. and so delegates may have the opportunity to vote their conscience if we go to multiple ballots. >> so, you know, the process is so complicated and so difficult to understand and it is
7:23 am
difficult to understand that a lot of voters think that it's not necessarily a democratic process. especially, i would say, trump supporters who would think that the rnc is trying to steal the election for their chosen candidate. >> the rnc doesn't have a chosen candidate. i don't know who that would be. we had nine candidates when we started. the process, carol, is always as it has been. it takes a majority of delegates at the republican national convention to win the nomination. now, how those delegates are selected has changed dramatically over time. if you go back 30, 40 years ago, a good deal of the delegates were selected by party leaders. over the years, that has changed. they are not all selected in primaries and bound to one candidate or the other. so it's a mixed process.
7:24 am
i don't think it's fair to say, well, i won the first half of the super bowl so the second half doesn't count. we're in the second half now and if trump feels like he should be the nominee, he's got to continue to compete and try to get a majority of the delegates. as of now, it looks like we're going to go to cleveland and no one will have a majority. >> the last question about contested conventions in general. so when a candidate finally emerges, a nominee finally emerges, is it likely that nominee goes on to win in a general election? that didn't happen in 1976. >> no, it didn't. you know, it depends. recently, the feeling has been that if you have a divided convention, that hurts you in the general election. it's up to the candidate to put forward a positive message that a lot of people will understand
7:25 am
and buy into. i personally believe that after eight years of this administration with the worst economic record of any president since world war ii, that a republican candidate talks about an inclusive uplifting message that talks about making america getting moving again and getting our economy moving again, whether he's the product of a divided candidate or not would be a very strong candidate against a very weak democrat, most likely hillary clinton in the general election. >> frank donatelli, thank you for stopping by. >> you're welcome. the countdown is on for the cnn debate. plus, a campaign spokesman. next. with flonase allergy relief, they wont. most allergy pills only control one inflammatory substance. flonase controls six. and six is greater than one. flonase changes everything.
7:26 am
it's everything you've always wanted. and you work hard to keep it that way. ♪ sometimes, maybe too hard. get claimrateguard® from allstate. it helps keep your homeowners' rate from going up just because of a claim. call an allstate agent first. 888-429-5722. accident forgiveness from allstate will keep his rates from going up. but not his blood pressure. michael james! middle name. not good. get accident forgiveness from allstate and keep your rates from going up just because of an accident. and it starts the day you sign up. so whether it's your car or home, let allstate help protect your rates. talk to a local allstate agent and discover how much more their personal service can do for you. call 888-429-5722 now.
7:27 am
once i left the hospital after a dvt blood clot. what about my wife... ...what we're building together... ...and could this happen again? i was given warfarin in the hospital, but wondered, was this the best treatment for me? i spoke to my doctor and she told me about eliquis. eliquis treats dvt and pe blood clots and reduces the risk of them happening again. not only does eliquis treat dvt and pe blood clots. but eliquis also had significantly less major bleeding than the standard treatment. knowing eliquis had both... ...turned around my thinking. don't stop eliquis unless you doctor tells you to. eliquis can cause serious, and in rare cases, fatal bleeding. don't take eliquis if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. if you had a spinal injection while on eliquis call your doctor right away if you have tingling, numbness, or muscle weakness. while taking eliquis, you may bruise more easily... and it may take longer than usual for bleeding to stop. seek immediate medical care for sudden signs of bleeding, like unusual bruising. eliquis may increase your bleeding risk
7:28 am
if you take certain medicines. tell your doctor about all planned medical or dental procedures. eliquis treats dvt & pe blood clots. plus had less major bleeding. both made switching to eliquis right for me. ask your doctor if it's right for you. in new york state, we believe tomorrow starts today. all across the state, the economy is growing, with creative new business incentives, the lowest taxes in decades, and new infrastructure for a new generation attracting the talent and companies of tomorrow. like in rochester, with world-class botox. and in buffalo, where medicine meets the future. let us help grow your company's tomorrow - today - at business.ny.gov
7:29 am
man 1:man 2: i am. woman: ex-military? man 2: four tours. woman: you worked with computers? man 2: that's classified, ma'am. man 1: but you're job was network security? man 2: that's classified, sir. woman: let's cut to the chase, here... man 1: what's you're assessment of our security? man 2: [ gasps ] porous. woman: porous? man 2: the old solutions aren't working. man 2: the world has changed. man 1: meaning? man 2: it's not just security. it's defense. it's not just security. it's defense. bae systems.
7:30 am
and good morning, i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. terrorism and immigration were two of the hot button issues that drew republican voters to the polls in wisconsin. exit polls show exactly how that played out between ted cruz and donald trump. our chief business correspondent christine romans has more on the exit polls. good morning. >> good morning again, carol. for 30% of republican voters, terrorism was their biggest concern. of those national security voters, they preferred ted cruz by 14 percentage points. we asked voters whether they support the signature trump temporary ban on muslims entering the united states. nearly seven in ten want to ban muslim voters. a twist here, ted cruz won this
7:31 am
group by six points. remember, this is one of donald trump's signature policy proposals. it's a question we wouldn't be asking if trump hadn't brought it up. we also asked whether illegal immigrants should be deported. a third support deportation. donald trump carried this crowd 49% to cruz's 45%. on the democratic side, a big win for bernie sanders. the sanders camp says he's gaining momentum with seven wins in the past eight contests against hillary clinton. but voters in wisconsin think hillary clinton is the best candidate to take on donald trump. she beats bernie sanders by 11 percentage points, carol. >> christine romans, thanks for sharing. we appreciate it. tensions are rising between the two democratic candidates. hillary clinton unleashing a new campaign against her opponent saying he doesn't know what he's talking about when he criticizes wall street. >> well, i think the interview raises a lot of questions and i look at it this way.
7:32 am
the core of his campaign has been break up the banks and it didn't seem in reading his answers that he understood exactly how that would work under dodd/frank and exactly who would be responsible, what the criteria were and, you know, that means you can't really help people if you don't know how to do what you are campaigning on saying you want to do. >> all right. so that aside, should this also concern the front-runner? younger voters turned out for sanders. he got 82% of 18 to 29-year-old voters and half of all women voters. clinton was right behind him, though, with 49%. joining us to talk about this and more, brian fallon, press secretary for hillary for america. welcome, brian. >> thank you for having me. >> thanks for being here. a former obama adviser dan pfeiffer tweeted this out. "things that don't matter. narrative, momentum and
7:33 am
expectations. things that do matter, math, delegates and organization." really, momentum doesn't matter? >> there was a point in the spring where i think president obama lost six out of nine contests to hillary clinton and yet she was never able to catch up from the delegate standpoint because of the way that they apportioned delegates in these contests. you have to win not just nominally. you have to have a big size victory if you're running from behind, as sanders is right now. the results yesterday in wisconsin told that story. he had a victory yesterday in wisconsin for which we congratulate him. if you look at what it means from a delegate standpoint, it looks like he's going to net about ten delegates out of it. we entered yesterday with a lead of 230 or so delegates. there's been no question that it's been a positive stretch for senator sanders. but the states ahead will be the states that matter because the four largest most delegate-rich
7:34 am
states like new york on the 19th are ones that he's going to have to win going away, collecting between 58 and 59% in a state like new york. there's no evidence of him being able to win a state like that in new york. >> in a general election, should hillary clinton get the nomination, she kind of needs white, male voters and she needs young people and some enthusiasm about her campaign, doesn't she? >> well, look, i think that wisconsin was a state that was very favorable to senator sanders. i don't think we should draw too many conclusions. gallup had a poll last week that hillary clinton has more enthusiasm compared to bernie sanders. we know that we have some inroads to make with certain demographics but we have a broad base coalition if you look at the states that have voted so far. we would like to perform more strongly with young voters and we're working on that. i do think that over time --
7:35 am
>> i have read that hillary clinton will turn her attacks on bernie sanders and tell young people, he's promising you these things and he can't accomplish them because he doesn't know how to do it, right? >> uh-huh. >> i think young people would find that patronizing. >> no, i don't think so. she has a bold plan when it comes to some of the issues that young people care about, too. we have an aggressive plan for allowing college to be more affordable, allowing people to opt in to debt-free tuition options at public schools and universities. we want to talk about that more. we think that young people will gravitate towards those proposals. we do think it does matter when it comes to senator sanders outlining his vision that he'll be able to back it up and deliver on his goals. the reason why that interview was so damning for him, he has really crystallized his campaign around a single issue of wall street reform, economic
7:36 am
inequality. if you're going to put those issues at the centerpieces of your campaign, you need to be able to defend your proposals and he wasn't able to answer elementary questions about how he would go about breaking up the banks. >> when cnn debate rolls around, will we see a feistier bernie sanders? >> i love jeff zeleny but i don't know where he's getting that. we're going to continue to do what we do. point out appropriate comments that he made to the daily news about gun safety suggesting that he still is not in favor of letting victims of gun violence sue manufacturers when they engage in reckless conduct. that was a troubling statement that he reiterated again to "the daily news." you've seen governor malloy really hammer him over that because you have an active lawsuit with some of the parents of the children that were lost in newtown. they are suing.
7:37 am
they are testing that legal theory. senator sanders is saying they shouldn't get their day in court. in a contest with the new york primary, it's an issue. we're going to point that out. it's a legitimate policy difference. >> brian fallon, thanks for stopping by. appreciate it, as always. in about half an hour, hillary clinton will talk with cnn about the state of the democratic race. tune in "at this hour with berman and bolduan." it's an interview you won't want to miss. bernie sanders facing sharp criticism. will that be an issue moving forward? i think it might be. we'll be right back. ound way to. let's talk asset allocation. sure. you seem knowledgeable, professional. would you trust me as your financial advisor? i would. i would indeed. well, let's be clear here. i'm actually a dj. [ dance music plays ] [laughs] no way! i have no financial experience at all. that really is you?
7:38 am
if they're not a cfp pro, you just don't know. find a certified financial planner professional who's thoroughly vetted at letsmakeaplan.org. cfp -- work with the highest standard. headache? motrin helps you be an unstoppable, let's-rock-this-concert- like-it's-1999 kind of mom. back pain? motrin helps you be the side-planking, keeping-up-with- your-girlfriend- even-though-you'll-feel-it- later kind of woman you are. body pain? motrin helps you be an unstoppable, i-can-totally-do-this- all-in-one-trip kind of woman. when pain tries to stop you, there's motrin. motrin works fast to stop pain where it starts. make it happen with motrin liquid gels. but i've managed.e crohn's disease is tough, except that managing my symptoms was all i was doing. and when i finally told my doctor, he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira
7:39 am
saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, remission is possible.
7:40 am
this clean was like pow! can a toothpaste do everything well? it added this other level of clean to it. it just kinda like...wiped everything clean. 6x cleaning my teeth are glowing. they are so white. 6x whitening i actually really like the 2 steps. step 1, cleans step 2, whitens. every time i use this together, it felt like...
7:41 am
...leaving the dentist office. crest hd. 6x cleaning, 6x whitening i would switch to crest hd over what i was using before. whyto learn, right?e? so you can get a good job and you're not working for peanuts. well what if i told you that peanuts can work for you? while you guys are busy napping, peanuts are delivering 7 grams of protein and 6 essential nutrients right to your mouth. you ever see a peanut take a day off? no. peanuts don't even get casual khaki fridays. because peanuts take their job seriously. so unless you want a life of skimming wifi off the neighbors, you'll harness the hardworking power of the peanut. (cheering)
7:42 am
disqualify and beat bernie sanders now. that's the new mantra as hillary clinton drops the hammer on her democratic rival. bernie sanders marked his sixth straight contest win in a row. with me now is nomeki. good morning. >> good morning. >> sanders may have the momentum but i'm talking about "the daily news" article, a new york tabloid. it came down hard on sanders and this is two weeks before the new york primary. you can see the headline there "bernie's sandy hook shame" and that's not all. he upset gun control advocates saying that gun manufacturers are not liable for gun deaths. he said he hadn't thought about where to detain terrorists if they closed guantanamo bay. and i want to read an exact
7:43 am
quote. they asked sanders, how do you go about breaking up the big banks. mr. sanderses "how you go about doing it is having legislation passed or giving the authority to the secretary of treasury to determine under dodd/frank that these banks are a danger to the economy over the problem of too big to fail? and then daily news said, but do you think that the fed, now, has that authority? he said, "well, i don't know if the fed has it." shouldn't he know this? >> i think they hold him higher than the new york post or daily post. they said that he was right on this. the entire transcript is very long and takes about 45 minutes to read. he went into detail about how the determination about how to
7:44 am
break up the big banks lays with the president or congress. the problem is, we take as we do in the media, take little bits out of context and don't show the full picture. and to be clear, to be even more fair, bernie sanders is the only senator -- >> i read the exact -- >> it's a much larger quote. he went into other details in the transcripts but also is the only member of congress who has brought this up as legislation just last year. "the daily news" didn't talk about that but "the new york times" did. it will go into detail about not just his record but what he was trying to say there, unlike a lot of politicians who go in and lie. >> well, i will say that there's something about offering a simpler explanation, like just give me your plan of how you're going to do it and leave it there. don't tell me what can't be done
7:45 am
and what laws have to be passed and blah, blah, blah. voters want answers now. they just wanted to know how bernie sanders would go about breaking up the big banks. >> it's not an easy process. that's what "the new york times" was trying to explain. that as much as we want it to be an easy process, it does have to go through the fed and has to be passed through congress and these are an arcane and very complex set of laws. every economist says so. as much as we want to simplify it, economics is very tough and bernie sanders acknowledges it. guess what, hillary clinton is not talking about that. she continues to go and accept money from high-dollar donors, do fund-raisers like she did last night at $30,000 a plate. she's not talking about breaking up the big banks because that's what voters want. they want to make sure that they can survive. she's out there campaigning with governor cuomo trying to take credit for the $15 an hour
7:46 am
minimum wage while she's for the $12 an hour minimum wage. she's not for democratic values. she doesn't want universal health care. that's what democrats want. she also insulted him and said he's not a democrat. >> let's talk about that. she's gone on the attack. she says she doesn't really know what bernie sanders is. she says he may not be a real democrat. so, in your mind, is bernie sanders a real democrat or is he a socialist or democratic socialist? is he an independent socialist? what is he? >> well, he's been very open about being a democratic socialist and when you poll democrats, they don't care if he's a democratic socialist or a democrat. he's a very valuable member of the senate and democrats wouldn't win a lot of votes if it weren't for bernie sanders, so much so that senator chuck schumer of new york has campaigned for bernie sanders, so much so that bernie sanders has gone out and campaigned for
7:47 am
democrats. when you look at the issues that democrats care about, the rhetoric matches his record. hillary clinton's rhetoric is not matching her record. democrats want universal health care and quality and cheap, affordable college. they don't want democrats to instin tifi instinctively go to war. abortion issues she has exceptions to which leaves the states open to interpretation, which is where republicans are winning. she -- her rhetoric is not matching her record. it's a cheap shot. >> i have to leave it there. i will say that cnn debate will be interesting, right? nomiki konst, thank you. the democratic candidates are debating at 9:00 p.m. next thursday night. anderson cooper is moderating.
7:48 am
a cover for legal discrimination some are saying the religious freedom law. what if 30,000 people download the new app? we're good. okay... what if a million people download the new app? we're good. five million? good. we scale on demand. hybrid infrastructure, boom. ok. what if 30 million people download the app? we're not good. we're total heroes. scale on demand with the number one company in cloud infrastructure.
7:49 am
i've heard it all. eat more fiber. flax seeds. yogurt. get moving. keep moving. i know! try laxatives. been there, done that. my chronic constipation keeps coming back. i know. tell me something i don't know. vo: linzess works differently from laxatives. linzess treats adults with ibs with constipation or chronic constipation. it can help relieve your belly pain, and lets you have more frequent and complete bowel movements that are easier to pass. do not give linzess to children under six and it should not be given to children six to seventeen. it may harm them. don't take linzess if you have a bowel blockage. get immediate help if you develop unusual or severe stomach pain, especially with bloody or black stools. the most common side effect is diarrhea sometimes severe. if it's severe stop taking linzess and call your doctor right away. other side effects include gas, stomach-area pain and swelling. talk to your doctor about managing your symptoms proactively with linzess.
7:50 am
where world-class chefs meet top-notch nutritionists. prime cuts of meat... 25 grams of protein... bold flavorful sauces... and savory mouth watering sides. it's the perfect balance of delicious and nutritious. making it just the right fit for you. stouffer's fit kitchen meals. this is fit.
7:51 am
in the state of mississippi,
7:52 am
a backlash is growing against a law critics say is legal discrimination. the state being the latest to allow businesses and government agencies to deny services to the lgbt community based on religious objections. governor phil bryant signed the bill into law on tuesday even though protesters urged him not to do so. and now the #shameonphil is trending. cnn's sara ganim is joining us with more. >> yes. some people calling this a hate bill, others saying it is sending mississippi back into its dark past. this is the latest in the wave of discrimination laws across the south since the supreme court legalized same-sex marriage. this stands out in mississippi because it's so detailed and such a strong language. this law, which was signed into law last night by the governor there, allows businesses to deny services based on their beliefs
7:53 am
against same-sex marriage, against premarital sex and a recognition of someone's gender only at birth. so that, carol, means that people can be denied adoption services. >> wait. premarital sex? >> yes. for everybody. not just same-sex couples but a belief against premarital sex can deny you adoption services, certain medical treatments. even the chance to buy or rent property. that's how strong this language is and that's what has people so upset. governor phil bryant defending this decision. >> if a baker or photographer says my religious view is that i cannot participate in a religious event like a we had, the state cannot fine you. >> people have heard throughout the years at a church or a school or even in their home,
7:54 am
unfortunately, that they are not of value and that they are second class and here's our state leader saying exactly that same thing. >> so there are other states that have floated similar laws. north carolina had backlash over a bill that regulates who can go into which bathroom. virginia and georgia both had governors that vetoed similar bills. tennessee is considering a bill that has to do with therapists and whether they have to give their counseling to certain people. we're seeing the pushback mostly in the pocketbook. businesses saying that they are not okay with this, they are not going to do business in states that have these kinds of laws on the books. >> have any of them followed through with their promise to leave? >> pay pal, for one, has decided not to go forward with a huge expansion in north carolina. this was just signed into law last night and mississippi is already seeing reaction from businesses, like microsoft and ibm. so large corporations, this could have a financial impact. >> sara ganim, thanks so much.
7:55 am
coming up next in the "newsroom," it's a great time to live in san francisco. i'll tell you why, next.
7:56 am
wrely on the us postal service? because when they ship with us, their business becomes our business. that's why we make more e-commerce deliveries to homes than anyone else in the country. here, there, everywhere. united states postal service priority: you don't let dust and allergies get and life's beautiful moments. with flonase allergy relief, they wont. most allergy pills only control one inflammatory substance. flonase controls six. and six is greater than one. flonase changes everything. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check.
7:57 am
silence. are you in good hands?
7:58 am
silence. they found out who's been who? cking into our network. guess. i don't know, some kids in a basement? you watch too many movies. who? a small business in china. a business? they work nine to five. they take lunch hours. like a job? like a job. we tracked them. how did we do that? we have some new guys defending our network. new guys? well, they're not that new. they've been defending things for a long time. [ digital typewriting ] it's not just security. it's defense. bae systems.
7:59 am
president obama's supreme court nominee judge merrick garland is making the rounds on capitol hill again. he's meeting with democratic senator dick durbin, the first of several face-to-face talks with top democrats today. republicans are refusing to have a vote on his nomination. san francisco now the first u.s. city to mandate six weeks of paid leave for new parents. the city's board of supervisors un nan no unanimously approved the measure requiring companies with 20 or more employees to pay full salaries during parental leave. the new law takes effect january 1st. thank you so much for joining me today. i'm carol costello.
8:00 am
at this hour with better mhour m -- at this hour with bettrman d bolduan starts now. >> bernie sanders name would be on that list, at least for now. >> we've got an excellent chance to win new york and a lot of delegates in that state. >> i believe the values of new york are the values of america. in well, hello, friends. i'm kate bolduan. >> and i'm john berman. you'll hear from hillary clinton here on cnn just hours after her tough loss to bernie sanders giving him six wins in the last seven states giving h

71 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on