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tv   Early Start With John Berman and Christine Romans  CNN  April 20, 2016 1:00am-2:01am PDT

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thank you, new york. we love new york. >> you proved once again there's no place like home. >> breaking news this morning, donald trump and hillary clinton win big in new york. blowout victories reshaping the race for president. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm christine roman. >> i'm john berman. it's 4:00 a.m. in the east. the breaking news this morning, huge wins for donald trump and hillary clinton in new york. significant wins. race-shaping wins.
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both front runners, they won their home state. look at what donald trump did. he had 60% of the vote. he beat john kasich, his closest rival, and ted cruz a distant third. ted cruz didn't pick up a single delegate. donald trump may walk away with almost all of them. we have him at 89 right now. john kasich with three. a few more to be allocated. trump will probably reach 90 or 91. this significantly improves his chances of getting the 1237 delegates he needs to clinch the nomination in the first ballot. on the democratic side, hillary clinton, she won a big victory. look at that. beating bernie sanders by 15 points in a state where bernie sanders just yesterday said he thought he had a good chance of winning. she now leads bernie sanders by about 260 pledge delegates. add in the super delegates, her
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lead is almost 700. >> we don't have much of a race anymore based on what i'm seeing on television. senator cruz is just about mathematically eliminated. as you know, we have won millions of more votes than senator cruz, millions and millions of more votes than governor kasich. we've won and now especially after tonight close to 300 delegates more than senator cruz. we're really, really rocking. >> in this campaign, we've won in pefr region of the country. [ cheers and applause ] from the north to the south to the east to the west, but this one's personal. the race for the democratic nomination is in the home stretch, and victory is in sight. >> all right. let's break down the front
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runners are' new york victories this morning. eric in washington, both front runners really needed those victories last night and they got them. >> they absolutely did. for donald trump, this is an opportunity now to sort of drop the lying ted bit. you heard him talk about senator cruz and governor kasich. instead of being against them, he was talking last night about being for the democratic process. he was making his case that the only way he can lose at this point is if the system is rigged against him. for hillary clinton, it was a big win not just because it was her home state and a bunch of delegates, but because for bernie sanders, new york really represented a chance to fundamentally alter the dynamics, change the psychology of the race by going into clinton's backyard and winning. not only did he not do that, but
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she kind of blew him out. for hillary clinton now, if bernie sanders isn't in the rearview mirror, he's a lot closer to it than he was at this point yesterday. >> yeah, he's in the blind spot or moving past that blind spot in the passing lane. hillary clinton's in the passing lane trying to move forward. dylan, eric brought up donald trump right there. in the shift we saw from donald trump last night as he was giving his victory speech, he literally did not call ted cruz lying ted. he called him senator cruz. we also heard donald trump talk about something he hasn't talked about much in this campaign, how hard he will work going forward to try to win votes. this represents maybe a pivot with these new staffers coming in. let's listen to what donald trump said about the road ahead. >> i'm flying tomorrow morning to indiana. i'm going to pennsylvania. i will be all over. so we're going to celebrate for about two hours, then early in
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the morning i get up and we begin working again. >> you know, after his last few big victories, donald trump took days off of the campaign trail. all but disappeared. this time it's different. how significant do you think this shift in strategy has been for the trump team? >> the shift is extremely significant, actually. what you're seeing play out there on stage in terms of this new tone and this new sort of work ethic is really the result of what's been playing out behind the scenes is. it's a result of trump bring in paul manafort to lead the delegate corralling effort leading into the convention. it's never to get more serious about this presidential campa n campaign. for the first nine months of donald trump's campaign, he was running what was effectively a communications based campaign. it was based on going out there, holding rallies wililierallilie controversial things, and
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getting free media attention. the crazier things he said, the more media attention he would get. that proved very effective for him until he got bogged down in a nasty sniping fight with ted cruz. for a guy that's trying to pivot towards a general election and come off as his party's presumptive nominee, getting in these bottom of the barrel bickering matches with your competitor punching down, that's not effective. so donald trump, these two weeks he sort of hit the reset button, brought in guys it like paul manafort, got rid of other people on the campaign, and now we're seeing trump 2.0. it's much more serious, playing by the old rules of presidential campaigning. it's one he believes can take him over the edge. >> we heard hillary clinton in her victory speech in new york basically appealing to sanders'
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supporters. and also pivoting toward the general election. let's listen to what she said reaching out to sanders' supporters. >> and to all the people who supported senator sanders, i believe there is much more that unites us than divides us. >> much more that unites us than divides us. is she going to be able, with him potentially in her rearview mirror here, is she going to be able to appeal to those independents, to those very progressive democrats who have been drawn to bernie sanders? are they going to buy her message now? go ahead, dylan. >> i was going to say, it's absolutely going to take some work. just because hillary clinton won and won with quite a decisive victory in new york by no means -- that doesn't mean she solved her problem in terms of millennials, in terms of the 18 to 29 set. she still has a lot of work to
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do in that regard. i think it's becoming more and more clear to voters that hillary clinton is getting closer to the nomination, and it's very hard to see bernie sanders' path. he loves talking about momentum. he picked up so many small states, but if you really want to be your party's nominee, you've got to win the big states. those are the states that hillary clinton has won. so now as she once again for the umpteenth time pivots towards the general election, she's thinking about how she can bring in that bernie sanders coalition, how she can set the stage to make an appeal to them at the convention where the sanders movement, if you will, will be a powerful voice. >> i want to be clear. on the democratic side, talking to staffers on both campaigns, it's a bigger margin than the clinton team thought they would win by, and it's a bigger margin than the sanders team thought they would lose by. 15 points is at the very, very high end of where they thought this race was. likewise, on the republican side, i heard republicans say, you know, donald trump would be around 80 delegates when all was
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said and done. he got to 60% and probably around 90 delegates in new york. when you look at the overall delegate board, what he's managed to do is go from the largest margin of lead over ted cruz in recent weeks to now what is the biggest margin of lead he's had in this campaign today. nearly 300 delegates. a significant edge right now in the delegate race. >> that's right. new york is actually one big contest and then 27 other little ones, 27 congressional districts. it's really, really big for the trump campaign that he not only won statewide, but he was able to top the 50% mark in almost all of those congressional districts, which means he gets all of the delegates, all three delegates from each of them. that's a good sign headed into five more east coast states next week, all of which have similar rules where if he's able to win
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not just rural and urban but suburban congressional districts one by one, the delegates really start to add up. the core of the stop trump effort is to win those sorts of little fights, those delegate-by-delegate battles that trump has been frankly sort of bad at so far. but with margins like this on the east coast, it's going to give him a much better chance of getting to that magic number of 1237. so yeah, ted cruz's campaign was -- >> i'm going to stop. eric, we're going to talk about ted cruz. we're going to take a quick break and talk much more about ted cruz, john kasich, and bernie sanders and the race ahead for the people who did not win here in new york. so stay with us.
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has nothing to do with a politician winning his home state tonight. >> we lost tonight. there are five primaries next week. we think we're going to do well. >> senators ted cruz and bernie sanders clearly determined to fight on despite crucial wins overnight by the front runners, donald trump and hillary clinton. what exactly are the paths forward for cruz and sanders, and have these long primary fights fractured their parties? we'll dig into the exit polling and talk about what's next and put these questions to our panel. gentlemen, nice to see you again. eric, let's answer that question about what happens for ted cruz in particular. we were talking about that just before the break. what's the next step for ted cruz? >> ted cruz is going to have to compete in states like pennsylvania and maryland where he's not likely to win statewide. he's just hoping to pick off some rural congressional districts. then the big fight ahead for him is the week after next in
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indiana. that's where he will look to defeat donald trump and regain some of the momentum he's lost at this point. for cruz, last night was rough. it turns out that bashing new york values is not the way to make friends and influence people in the new york republican electorate. so he had spent time in new york. he had really been hoping to make some inroads and make it tough for donald trump there. the fact he wasn't able to do that at all doesn't bode well for five more east coast contests next week. so indiana is the one that he's really got to circle on the map. >> ted cruz campaigned in new york. he's run a very smart campaign. he finished a distant third, well behind john kasich, and john kasich is the one who emerges with delegates. ted cruz gets zero.
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dylan, let me read you a tweet from the kasich campaign. going forward, polls show john kasich is consistently the best candidate to take on trump. so john kasich, who still trails marco rubio in the delegate count more than a month after rubio dropped out of the race, is using the results last night to cling to hope going forward. >> yeah, and look, john kasich has been saying this for a long time. he says you look at the polls, i'm the best positioned to beat not only donald trump, he also says he's the best positioned to beat the democratic nominee. the problem is at the end of the day, presidential primaries are not a game of polls. they're a game of results. if you look at the results, he doesn't have them. he's won his home state, and that's it. if anyone was going to come to listen and sympathize with kasich's plea, it needed to be the republican establishment.
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the republican establishment needed to coalesce behind him, really give him a lot of money and sort of make him the savior of the republican party. there's a reason they didn't do that. it's because they didn't believe that he could beat trump or cruz. it's hard to see how he can pull that off going forward, despite what is a very good spin on the fate of his campaign. >> so that's the republican side. let's look at the democrats and bernie sanders, where he is this morning. back home in vermont recharging his batteries. he made some comments yesterday that i thought were pretty interesting. he talked about independents. we talked about how notoriously closed the new york primary process is. listen to what he said about how his supporters were robbed of their voice last night. >> almost 30% of the eligible voters, some 3 million new yorkers, were unable to vote today because they had registered as independents, not democrats or republicans, and
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that makes no sense to me at all. people should have the right to participate in a primary and vote for their candidate for president of the united states. >> eric, that wasn't a surprise, though, that people who were not registered -- that was not a surprise, should not have been a surprise to this campaign. it was a surprise, in your view, how wide the margin was for hillary clinton's victory over bernie sanders last night in new york? >> it was a bit of a surprise. the fact that not only did she get into double digits but won by more than 15 was a bit of a surprise. but sanders is right in pointing out that closed primaries where only registered democrats can participate do tend to work well for hillary clinton. they shut him out from bringing mass quantities of independents into the process. but the rules are the same going forward. in four of the five states that vote next week. so this is something that bernie
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sanders has known about the entire time and something he's going to have to confront. people who are loyal democrats tend to support clinton. we've seen that in exit polls out of state after state after state. >> it will be interesting to see if establishment democrats tone down their criticisms of hillary clinton and that campaign going forward. we'll discuss that in our next half hour. guys, thanks so much. just hours from now, president obama in saudi arabia and how to fight isis, but this is a strained relationship with new troefcontroversies. could that stand in the way? next. . so there will be things to keep us up at night. will they find happiness? reach their potential. stay safe. fall in love. but tonight johnson's can help with a bedtime routine clinically proven to help them fall asleep faster. and stay asleep longer. there will be things to keep us up.
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but tonight, we sleep.
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in just over two hours, president obama arrives in saudi against isis. the visit comes at a time when relations between the u.s. and saudis are pretty badly frayed. king solomon not happy about the nuclear deal with iran or a bill currently before congress that would allow families of 9/11 victims to sue the saudis for damages. want to bring in cnn's nick robertson live in riyadh this morning. these are important meetings that come at a very precarious time. >> reporter: absolutely. and certainly president obama is going to walk into that meeting with king solomon today and there's going to be a very frigid atmosphere. the tensions between the two countries have been growing, particularly with the bill that's before congress right now, these 28 pages. what do they contain? should it be made public? that's certainly going to cloud the atmosphere. what president obama hopes to achieve here is to get saudi support and regional support on tackling isis. he wants stability in the
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region, security in the region. the gulf allies here want a ballistic missile shield against what they consider potential aggression by iran in the future. the saudis rely heavily on u.s. military systems. they're investigating hugely in their defense and security infrastructure here. so what president obama can promise and talk about speeding and expediting the delivery of that ballistic missile system, that's going to iron out some of the wrinkles in the relationship. but really, it's in a very bad place right now, john. >> we'll hear from the president in just a few hours. nic robertson in riyadh, thanks so much. dow futures are lower thr morning. oil is behind that drop. it's back down around $40 a barrel. european stock market slipping. asia finishing mixed overnight. the dow is now up five of the past six days. even more impressive, from its bottom in february, it's up more than 16%. 2,500 points the dow has
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rallied. for the year, the dow is up 3.6%. the nasdaq still down a little. the s&p 500 up 2.7%. one stock we're watching today, intel. shares are down 2% in premarket trading. it's laying off a stunning 12,000 workers around the world. most of the cuts will take place over the next two months. the stock is one of the worst performers on the dow this year. intel is the largest chip maker in the world that's been struggling to break into mobile devices as pc sales slide. all right. huge victories, very big, significant victories for donald trump and hillary clinton in new york. we'll tell you what it means. that's next. ey'll always be our. so there will be things to keep us up at night. will they find happiness? reach their potential. stay safe. fall in love. but tonight johnson's can help with a bedtime routine clinically proven to help them fall asleep faster.
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and stay asleep longer. there will be things to keep us up. but tonight, we sleep.
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>> home. breaking news this morning. big victories for donald trump and hillary clinton in their home state of new york, changing the trajectory of this race, shaking things up once again. welcome back to "early start," everyone. >> nice to see you all this morning. 32 minutes past the hour. the breaking news this morning, huge wins for donald trump and hillary clinton in the new york primary. both front runners take their home state. for trump, a landslide victory, beating john kasich by 35 points, ted cruz by 45 points. in the end, trump may walk away with almost all of new york's 95 delegates, which significantly improves his chance of reaching the 1,237 delegates he needs to clinch the republican nomination before the convention. on the democratic side, clinton wins a decisive victory over bernie sanders, beating him by 15 points. she now leads sanders by about
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256 pledge delegates. when you add in the super delegates, clinton's total lead skyrockets to more than 700. last night, clinton and trump both held huge rallies celebrating their wins. >> we don't have much of a race anymore. based on what i'm seeing on television, senator cruz is just about mathematically eliminated. as you know, we have won millions of more votes than senator cruz, millions and millions of more votes than governor kasich. we've won, and especially after tonight, close to 300 delegates more than senator cruz. we're really, really rocking. >> in this campaign, we've won in every region of the country. [ cheers and applause ] from the north to the south to the east to the west, but this one's personal.
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the race for the democratic nomination is in the home stretch and victory is in sight. >> victory is in sight. hillary clinton right there clearly indicating she hopes she thinks this race might be close to over. joining us now, cnn politics reporter eric bradner and dylan byers. let's start on the republican side. donald trump hitting 60%. yes, it's his home state, but that's a lot anywhere in this primary campaign so far. he won the lion's share of delegates, 89 right now, maybe 90 or 91 by the time it's all over. that is a big, big margin at a big moment in this campaign. >> yeah, it's a really big margin. it's a significant margin for him. as much as senator ted cruz would like to dismiss this as, you know, donald trump just winning his home state, obviously ted cruz didn't see it that way when he won texas, this is a very big win. and the 60% number, i think, is
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significant. the reason for that is we've always talked about donald trump as having this sort of ceiling. he was always able to breakthrough that ceiling and establish a higher ceiling. there's this feeling that donald trump could never quite win a majority of voters. he always won a plurality in many of these states but never a majority. 60% is extremely decisive. it sets up a scenario where he might not just get to the convention with, you know, more delegates than anyone else, he might get to the convention with the 1237 delegates he actually needs to win this thing. at least that's the story he can tell going forward. as we've seen him sort of reorganize his campaign and really focus on winning those delegates, that's the case he's going to be trying to make to voters all the way from here through the final day of voting in california and elsewhere. >> we've been saying for some time, he needs to win 62% of the delegates in the primaries ahead
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to make sure he could clinch that nomination, the 1237, before the convention. he talked last night in his victory speech about the work he has to do ahead, about the states ahead. let's listen to what he said. >> i'm flying tomorrow morning to indiana. i'm going to pennsylvania. i will be all over. so we're going to celebrate for about two hours. then early in the morning i get up and we begin working again. >> so how does he maintain this momentum in these other states going forward? new york is his home state. he has spent an awful lot of time here. >> yeah, he seemed to be sort of reflecting, a candidate who has come to grips with the realities of this contest, that he is going to have to pay attention to the little details like the delegate selection process. often trump has taken a day off after an election. he's going straight to indiana today. that's interesting. that shows him competing hard in a state that ted cruz could
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possibly win, where ted cruz could slow some momentum that strump hoping to build on the east coast. not just yesterday but next week. so this is trump sort of embracing the details of the campaign, sort of buckling down, getting more serious in a way that we haven't seen up until this stage. he was making the argument last night, instead of talking about lying ted and that sort of thing, he was talking about the democratic process and making the argument the only way he can be denied at this point is if the system is rigged against him. and he's starting to put in the work that it'll take to sort of get at least really close to 1237 if he doesn't get all the way over that hurdle. >> dylan, the democratic race, 15-point edge for hillary clinton here in new york, which was really beyond the ceiling most clinton supporters and strategists had set for hillary.
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actually, a worse night for bernie sanders than the low expectations. in some ways, a 15-point margin a surprising margin right here. you heard hillary clinton say victory is within our sights. she didn't want to taunt sanders' supporters and say it's over, but she clearly wants to send the message it's heading that way. >> yeah, and so much of this campaign what we've been seen is we've been oscillating between two different polls. we have hillary clinton, like donald trump, on the republican side winning these big states. clearly establishing themselves as the front runners of their respective campaigns. we see the ted cruz's and bernie sanders come in and win a number of small states and claim that they've got the momentum. we always come back to this. we always come back to the big states, and hillary clinton wins those decisively. when she does, she takes bernie sanders down yet another peg and really does establish herself as a front runner.
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you talk about new york specifically. what happened to bernie sanders in new york? it was a long process. it was a two-week process in which the candidates were in the national spotlight, in the heart of the new york city media market. time and time again, bernie sanders sort of got tripped up. there was a new york daily news interview where he couldn't answer specific questions about his record. there was -- you know, he was on the cover of the new york daily news being hit hard for his stance on guns. guns was a big issue for them. he had a speaker at one of his rallies who referred to corporate whores. he ran into controversy and problems and wasn't able to do -- to focus on doing the work that it would have taken to at least narrow the margin with hillary clinton. that gives her, of course, all of the momentum. >> when you look at some of those exit polls, you can see this core long-term support for hillary clinton served her well in new york and may translate
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with some of the other states ahead. women voters, she did well with women voters. 61%. black voters, 75%. look at the margin of victory for her with african-americans, latino voters. this was a core that has helped her in some other states, that really helped her in new york. eric, does she take that with her to those contests next week? >> there's no reason to believe she doesn't. for bernie sanders to have any chance at this stage, he has to alter the fundamentals of this race. he has to start winning or doing a lot better with minority voters. he has to start winning loyal democrats. he has to chip into her margin with women. until we see those things happening, there's no reason to believe he can catch her in pledged delegates. these advantages are not unique to new york. it started in nevada, in the south, and now clearly helped her win yet another big state.
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>> and christine, if i may, i would also point out that hillary clinton made inroads. it's not just that bernie sanders has work to do in terms of making gains, he also has to shore up the base of support he's had so far. >> interesting. dylan and eric, thanks so much we'll talk to you again in a minute. those big wins for clinton and trump, but their primary opponents are not giving up. we'll talk what's next in this race for president right after the break.
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i'm so excited to share with you what america has learned
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over the past few months. and it has nothing to do with a politician winning his home state tonight. >> we lost tonight. there are five primaries next week. we think we're going to do well. >> senators ted cruz and bernie sanders, they are fighting on despite big losses in the new york primary last night to donald trump and hillary clinton. so what do ted cruz and bernie sanders have to do now? let's put those questions to eric bradner and dylan byers. they join us once again. ted cruz netted exactly zero delegates in the state of new york. that's despite having campaigned here, having put his think tank panel to finding de ining deleg steal or pluck in new york. he didn't get any. now he goes to other northeast and mid-atlantic states. it could be just as tough. >> yeah, it's a big fat goose egg for him. he should teach a course in how
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to spin a third place finish as a relative victory because he's done it time and time again. i'm sort of impressed, if anything, with his ability to sort of spin this as a victory in the long term. the truth is that new york was a major loss for him. he did make -- look, he was never doing to do wonderfully in new york, but he did make an effort to try and pick up some delegates. that effort failed. like you said, we're staying in the northeast. that's not necessarily friendly territory for ted cruz. you look at the map going forward, the next big thing he has is indiana. if i'm the cruz campaign, i'm thinking about focusing big there. the game you're playing now is not a game of winning this contest. it's a game of keeping donald trump from going to the convention with those 1237 delegates. again, cruz campaign probably thinking really seriously about indiana. they also have to think really seriously about where they can win in the state of california
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because obviously places like san francisco, los angeles, those big markets aren't necessarily going to be friendly to the senator. they can probably do better in rural areas, but again, there's going to be a lot of support for trump there as well. >> the hometown newspapers, "the new york post" this morning calling him king don. it's interesting, john kasich with a tweet last night. he came in second and did much better than ted cruz. he said going forward, polls show john kasich is consistently the best candidate to take on trump. second in connecticut, maryland, and new jersey, and second tonight in new york. eric, john kasich saying, you know, second is where he wants to be right now. >> right. so now that ted cruz can't really get to 1237, kasich is making the argument that cruz was making earlier in the campaign. if he doesn't have a shot at clinching the nomination before
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the convention, there's no real reason for cruz to be the leading trump alternative at this point. but kasich, we've seen this time and time again. states where he should theoretically do well, states with big suburban, highly educated, moderate populations. he does inch up into the 20%, 25%, 30% range, but he can't seem to get over the hurdle. next week will be key. we'll see if he can change things in pennsylvania or maryland or connecticut or delaware or rhode island. at this stage, kasich needs to just get a little bit over the hurdle and start winning some congressional districts. that's how he can start to rack up delegates, even if he doesn't win any of these states. the map is good for him. he's looking at the northeast next week followed by indiana, which is a neighbor state with a
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former governor in mitch daniels who sort of likes kasich. he should be able to compete there, but he does need to start turning this into more than the three delegates we saw in new york so far. >> all right. dylan byers, bernie sanders right now off the campaign trail, back in burlington, vermont, recharging his batteries. the question he's going to face today from many establishment democrats and party insiders is you need to stop going after hillary clinton, right. they're going to be saying this. you're beginning to hurt her in ways that could last into the general election. we're not saying drop out of the race, we're just saying tone it down. that criticism already starting to come. how do you think the sanders campaign will respond? >> well, look, i don't think the sanders campaign is going to respond to what the democratic establishment tells them to do. in their view, they've galvanized an incredible
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movement. that is the mission that he's at the head of. he's very -- there's a lot of bad blood that's developed between both sanders and clinton and between the two campaigns. i don't see him heeding the advice of the democratic establishment at all. i do wonder if he'll heed the advice of his own campaign if his campaign tries to tell him the same thing. it never looks really good to be too dismissive of your rival, especially at a time when the democratic party is trying to tell a story that they have a more civil primary race that they're running. i don't know if it necessarily behooves senator sanders to go so negative on hillary clinton. it certainly didn't work in new york. i'm not sure why that would work in other parts of the northeast or across the remaining states. >> very good point. stick with us. the top issue in almost every primary state so far, the
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economy and jobs. new york no different. 36% of republican voters say the economy and jobs are the top issue followed by government spending, terrorism, and immigration. of that group, 54% voted for donald trump. here's a stunning figure from the exit polls. 92% of republican voters worried about the u.s. economy. only 8% are not. of those voters worried, donald trump scores an overwhelming win at 60%. turning to the democrats' top issue. for 38% of voters, the economy and jobs. broken record. income inequality is second. that was the only issue of these four that bernie sanders won, income inequality. health care then terrorism. of the voters who said the economy is their top issue, hillary clinton with 61% of the vote. these primary season voters don't feel it, don't believe it. they say they're worried about
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thundershower kids a their kids and the future. in just hours, president obama will arrive in saudi arabia for intense and what could be uncomfortable meetings. that's ahead. they'll always be our babies. so there will be things to keep us up at night. will they find happiness? reach their potential. stay safe. fall in love. but tonight johnson's can help with a bedtime routine clinically proven to help them fall asleep faster. and stay asleep longer. there will be things to keep us up. but tonight, we sleep.
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this morning, president obama arrives in saudi arabia, trying to step up the fight against isis. the visit comes at a time when relations between the u.s. and saudis is badly frayed. king salman unhappy about the iran nuclear deal and a bill in congress that would allow 9/11 victims to sue saudi arabia for damages. nic robertson joining us live from saudi arabia. characterize for me how frayed this relationship is. >> reporter: it's been getting worse during president obama's presidency. really, one of the turning points began even before then
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when he gave a speech in chicago, calling saudi arabia a so-called ally. when he came to office, the saudis were very well disposed to him. then you have the arab spring. the saudis feel they let down their allies in the region. then the nuclear deal with iran. they don't trust iran. they see it as being a sponsor of terrorism and trouble in the region. what the saudis and their gulf allies here want is a ballistic missile shield to defend against any aggression in the region by iran. both sides wanting something. but add on top of that those 28 pages, the 9/11 commission report, the bill before congress, add in that, no surprise perhaps the saudis' response has been visceral. in that kind of tense relationship when president obama meets with king salman this afternoon, it's hard to see
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the pair of them really looking at each other and getting beyond this tension that has been building now for the past number of years. but i think we can expect them to come out and at the end of this visit to have at least something positive to say. but behind the scenes, we do know it's going to be tense. those 28 pages making it more so. >> tense indeed. nic robertson this morning for us in riyadh. breaking news. the first criminal charges expected today in the flint water crisis. local officials have been pointing fingers at each other. a court victory for sandy hook families. a superior court judge allowing their lawsuit against gun maker remington to move forward. they can now begin depositions and get access to remington's internal records. remington manufactured the ar-15 used by the sandy hook gunman.
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back to the breaking news. morning. big wins for donald trump and hillary clinton. really reshaping the race for president again. thank you, new york. we love new york. >> once again, there's no place like home. >> the breaking news this morning, donald trump and hillary clinton, they win big at home. new york state is home to both of them. they both picked up blowout victories, changing the race yet again for the white house. good morning, earn. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> great to see you. i'm christine romans. it is 5:00 a.m. in the east. the breaking news this morning, huge wins for donald trump and hillary clinton in the new york primary. both the front runners take their home state. for trump, a landslide victory, beating john kasich, his closest rival, by

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