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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 24, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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the south korean military is on high alert after yet another korean missile launch from north korea. in super thousands protest the proposed trade deal between the united states and e.u. ahead of president barack obama's arrival to germany. and family and friends hold a private memorial service for prince as hundreds continue to honor his memory outside his estate in minnesota. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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a very good day to you. we begin this hour with the weapons test that north korea is calling, quote, a great success. that nation's leader kim jong-un was reportedly there to oversee the launch of a ballistic missile from a submarine. that missile fired off the eastern coast of the korean peninsula. in response, the u.s. quickly condemned that test, urging the north korean government not to destabilize the region. france also weighing in, calling on the e.u. to initiate their own sanctions against north korea. this latest missile test has south korean officials keeping a close eye on activities to the north of its border. paula hancock is calling it all in seoul, south korea. paula, good to have you. north korea calling this latest test a success, but what are we hearing from south korea about it? >> reporter: well, george, it's interesting that we have heard from the joint chiefs of staff on saturday night when this
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happened, and they did say that this missile flew about 30 kilometers, and they say for it to be considered a success traditionally for this type of launch it has to fly about 300 kilometers. now, clearly it was far short of the mark. but officials are not calling this a failure. that's significant in itself. the very fact that they don't know what intended target was or the range was for north korea, of course, any individual test they do no matter what the outcome pyongyang is learning a fair bit from that. we heard from state-run media saying as well they were trying to confirm the stability of the underwater ballistic launching system in the maximum depth of waters. and they say that they believe this has enhanced the capability of their navy. so as far as north ekorea was concerned, it was a great success. we is have the photos that have been published, kim jong-un
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looks completely pleased in those photos. >> paulpaula, i want to read th statement from the dprk ambassador. it says, as long as the u.s. does not cancel its nuclear war exercise with assumisouth korea its hostile power against us, we will continue without arresting days. obviously we don't see the united states stopping with its responsibilities with south korea when it comes to military connections. what could be done, then, from the united states' perspective, from international perspective or with china that north korea has long listened to and paid attention to? >> well, north korea has called for the drills to be finished and to be stopped on a number of occasions. they've dangled the carrot of, we will stop the nuclear tests. that's nothing new.
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certainly the u.s. and south korea up to this point have not paid any attention to that. they've just carried on with their joint military drill chz are nearing the end at this point. t they end april 30th. we do know that beijing certainly its relationship with north korea has changed quite significantly. it was a very close ally. now we have seen it is clear that beijing is losing patience with north korea. it's not warned about these kind of tests ahead of time. pyongyang and kim jong-un is ignoring beijing's call for restraint, not to make the situation even worse. and of course beijing did support those very strong u.n. sanctions which were passed back in march. of course it falls largely to china to make sure they are imlemted. certainly i think from washington's point of view and from seoul's point of view they feel they have china on side. they feel that beijing has been embarrassed really by pyongyang in the past by continuing to carry out these nuclear tests,
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satellite launches, claims of mill tarizing a nuclear weapon and now a ballistic missile from a submarine and not heeding beijing's desire for them to stop. george? >> our correspondent paula hancocks live in seoul, thank you for your reporting today. this test is raising concerns about north korea's military progre progress. a former u.s. ambassador to south korea explain that's one major partnership is what it might take to slow down north korea. listen. >> i think china and the united states are really in this boat together. so rather than talk about what more china could do or the u.s. could do, i think the real question is what could they do together? frankly speaking i think the u.s. and china could do a lot to dissuade north korea from doing this, starting with the sanctions but also stepping up measures perhaps even direct countermeasures to slow down these programs. >> keep in mind china is already tasked with enforcing foreign
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trade sanctions against north korea. the german chancellor eveniange merkel surveyed the growing migrant crisis from the front lines saturday along with other e.u. leaders. this trip, though, comes amid criticism of the e.u.'s deal with turkey that is meant to stem the flow of migrants into europe. nick paton walsh has the latest for us. >> reporter: a lot of this is about symbolism for angela merkel, to be seen, to be concerned about the living rights of syrian refugees on the syrian/turkish border area because of course she is the key broker of the deal between the european union and turkey that will see thousands, many more refugees, sent back from across the european union to turkey in exchange for 6 billion euros of aid and assistance to turkey in dealing with their broad and enduring refugee crisis here. now, she saw as part of her tour
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here a temporary shelter, frankly one of the better shelters provided for refugees here. a snapshot of how long-term the problem is here, hundreds of people living in that one shelter were in fact born there. that's one in ten have never seen life outside of a refugee camp like that. but the real concern is for the many others, 2.7 million, syrian refugees in turkey who don't have living conditions like this. turkey has faced a problem way in excess of a near million refugees the european union has had to deal with since the summer. angela merkel here with the prime minister of turkey to show their since of cooperation, to perhaps in some way endorse the kind of condition that's turkey can provide here and also remind yourself as well, too, that the european union has as part of this deal agreed to accept nearly 70,000 potentially syrian refugees resettlement across the european union as well. but a lot of this about
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symbolism, about angela merkel facing deep criticism at home for perhaps pushing human rights in terms of freedom of speech in turkey to one side to foster good relations with the administration, and being sure to be seen being concerned about the syrian refugees who will be sent back here as part of the deal she was the key brocker on. still the problem here is across the border terrifying and the potential threat of future refugees in the months down the line. >> as merkel visited the refugee camp there in turkey, there are migrants along the greek/mass donnian border who say they are disappointed in the german chance letter. they accuse her of ignoring what their they're going through. more than 10,000 people have been zranded at that border since february and some migrants say they've been forgotten and that no one cares. >> translator: the meeting between merkel and order juan
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isn't held for our benefits, but for their problems so turkey can be in the european union. no one cares about us. all we want is to pass. i swear. we don't want anything else. we didn't come here to cause problems or to become terrorists. we are just here to find safety and to look for a better life. >> the german chancellor certainly in the news this day, also meeting with the u.s. president barack obama who is headed to germany in the coming hours for trade talks. ahead of mr. obama's visit, thousands of people rallied against what some consider to be a very controversial plan for trade between the e.u. and the united states. it would create the world's largest free trade area. supporters say that would result in more than a million jobs, but critics still worry that that would give big u.s. corporations too much power. with more on president obama's visit to germany, our senior international correspondent atika schubert is southwest of
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hanover at this hour. atika, good to have you. as the protests go, what is the sense there on the ground? are officials expecting more protests when the president arrives? >> reporter: well, we saw tens of thousands of people come out yesterday by police estimate somewhere around 30,000 to protest against what's called the ttip, the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. huge crowds. but we don't expect to see any of that today. security is very tight in hanover. it's beginning of the world's largest industrial trade fair which obama will be here to open. so we won't be seeing any more of those protests. but clearly those against the agreement have made their voices heard. and the biggest concern for them is the synchronization of regulations between the e.u. and u.s. market. here in the e.u. regulations on environmental safety, food safety, other legislation, labor regulations, for example, are much tougher. there's a lot of concern here
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that if regulations are brought to a u.s. level it's going to hurt the labor markets and other economies here. so that's why you see those large protests. despite all that, however, president obama does remain a popur figure here in germany and throughout europe. so it will be interesting to see what his reception is when he gets here. >> when it comes to the relationship between these two leaders, they have definitely had their ups and downs. a low point for sure was when it was revealed that the u.s. government had been tapping the chancellor's phone. but then the two maintained close ties as europe deals with a more aggressive russia. how is this final trip for the u.s. president in germany, how is it being viewed by germans? >> reporter: you know, it's interesting. merkel and obama's relationship has really evolved. when he first became president, merkel was reportedly a little skeptical of the new president. but in that time, it's clearly grown quite a bit.
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in part because of the many challenges they have faced dealing with president putin in russia, for example, the syria crisis, the refugee crisis as well. so we've seen president obama speaking to a german newspaper here saying that he's learned a lot from merkel and that she is the leader that he has worked with the longest so he admires many of her values, her integrity. that's sort of a warm relationship, has really grown between the two. in terms of his reception here by the german public, he remains a very popular figure. in 2013, he had that massive speech at brandenburg gate in berlin where tens of thousands of people came out to hear him speak. so even with the protests against the trade agreement, even with the ups and downs of angela merkel with her own voting public here, obama remains popular. we'll have to see what he says at his speech at the hanover trade fair, but it will be about that german/u.s. partnership.
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>> atika schubert live in germany for us this hour. ati atika, thank you. during the president's visit to the uk, he sat down for an interview with the bbc in a wide-ranging interview he gave his thoughts on what it will take to solve syria's conflict. listen. >> it is my view that it would be a mistake for the united states or great britain or a combination of western states to send in ground troops and overthrow the assad regime. but i do believe that we can apply international pressure to all the parties, including russia and iran, who essentially are propping up assad as well as those moderate oppositions that exist and maybe fighting inside of syria to sit down at the table and try to broker a
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transition. >> while in the united kingdom, mr. obama also held a town hall to connect with everyday brits. he took questions on various topics, from gay rights to his legacy and rejecting iz laaphob. he also told the group of young leaders who were gathered to keep up the good fight for change in the world. >> my primary message today is going to be to reject pessimism and cynicism, know that progress is possible, that our problem s can be solved. progress requires the harder path of breaking down barriers and building bridges and standing up for the values of tolerance and diversity that our nations have worked and sacrificed to secure and defend. progress is not inevitable and it requires struggle and perseverance and discipline and faith. but that's the story of how we won voting rights and women's
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rights and workers' rights and civil rights and immigration rights and gay rights. because of those who came before us often risked their lives to give us the chance to know something better. >> meanwhile, back here in the united states, michelle obama was addressing racism on saturday. ms. obama gave one of her final commencement speeches as first lady at a historically black university in mississippi. during her address there, she urged students to use peaceful mean whz it comes to dealing with discrimination. >> are you going to throw up your hands and say that progress will never come? are you going to get angry and lash out? are you going to turn inward and just give in to despair and frustration? or are you going to take a deep breath, straighten your shoulders, lift up your head and do what barack obama has always done, as he says, when they go
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low, i go high. that's the choice barack and i have made. that's what has kept us sane over the years. >> when they go low, i go high. wow, that's impressive. ms. obama will deliver two more commencement speeches in 2016, one in new mexico and the other in the state of new york. you are watching "cnn newsroom." still to come this hour, music legend prince was celebrated at a private memorial. some fans even received a special gift from his family and friends. plus, hillary clinton is coming out swinging, but her punches are not aimed at bernie sanders. stay with us. "ok, good one." "uh, how do i check my credit score?" "credit karma, it's free." "credit karma. give yourself some credit."
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♪ the remains of music legend prince have been cremated. family, friends and fan members held a private memorial service. his publicist says his final resting place won't be revealed. since prince died on thursday at his minnesota home, families and
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friends, many people, have been gathering outside. and on saturday, family and friends of the musician gave admirers about a dozen purple boxes with special items inside. what was in your box? >> so i had -- it looks like it came from his home, i'm just going to keep to that. it's just a booklet and then for some reason to me, this fits my personality so well. >> open it up for us so we can see it. what did you get in your box? >> it's just amazing because you can tell that i have a tank top, and i pursue body building and weightlifting. it's like a personal gift it seems like. for him to give me a tank top, it's amazing. >> the cause of prince's death is still under investigation, remains unknown.
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america's choice 2016, the race for the white house. five states are going to the polls on tuesday for primary elections. republican and democratic candidates face big contests in the states of maryland and pennsylvania. 38 delegates at stake for republicans in maryland and 95 plus 23 superdelegates for the democrats. pennsylvania is another big prize, though, with 71 delegates for the republicans and 189 delegates plus 21 superdelegates for the democrats. all of the voting on tuesday is happening in the northeast, and that is where republican donald trump and ted cruz are campaigning very hard this weekend. trump wants to keep the momentum up from his huge victory in new york, and he's facing criticism now after a top adviser was caught on tape saying trump's private persona is different from the, quote, part he plays publicly. rival ted cruz has seized on
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that saying that the man who dubbed him lyin' ted is a phony. cruise is also coming off a win saturday picking up 19 of maine's delegates. and on the democratic side of things, front-runner hillary clinton has started avoiding criticism of her rival bernie sanders and instead she is going fiercely against donald trump. ha hasn't stopping bernie sanders from going after the former secretary of state. chris freitas has more for us. >> reporter: bernie sanders is back to criticizing hillary clinton on the campaign trail hitting her during several stops on saturday in maryland and delaware. >> her last reporter period her super pac reported 25 million in special interests, $15 million from wall street alone. and on top of that, she has given numerous speeches to wall street for $225,000 a speech. >> clinton meanwhile campaigned on a smaller scale saturday, holding a conversation with workers in connecticut, later a
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rally in rhode island. in recent days she's largely avoided hitting sanders and focused her fire instead on donald trump. >> loose cannons tend to misfire, and what we have with him is the loosest of all cannons. >> she released a video surging voters to remember his controversial positions as they pivot toward a general election. that follows a shot she took about muslims entering the conversation. sanders is lagging clinton by almost 30 points in pennsylvania. sanders hold events today in rhode island and connecticut where clinton also campaigns this afternoon. >> that was chris freights reporting for us. it's 4:24 on the u.s. east coast. still ahead this hour, revisiting the nepal. how is that nation recovering from the earthquake? an update ahead. plus, eight family members shot dead in a small u.s. town.
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the killer or killers still on the run. an update on the manhunt. live from atlanta and around the world this hour, you're watching "cnn newsroom."
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom" t. is good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the u.s. president is due to arrive in germany in the coming hours, and ahead of his visit thousands protested in hanover against his proposed transatlantic trade deal. the plan would create the world's largest free trade area. critics say though it would give too much power to big u.s.
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corporations and lead to privatization in europe. german chancellor angela merkel got a firsthand look at a refugee camp on the turkish/syria border. she visited the camp saturday along with turkish prime minister and our e other officials. new information now in the killing of a professor in bangladesh on saturday. isis is now claiming responsibility for his death. the 58-year-old english professor was stabbed at a bus stop near his home. officials say two or even three people attacked him from behind. north korea claims leader kim jong-un oversaw the test firing of a ballistic missile from a submarine calling the launch, quote, successful. but south korea says the missile only flew about 30 kilometers, about 18 miles.
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a u.s. official called it, quote, provocative but not a threat. when it comes to north korea much of the world is certainly concerned about the recent military tests and it's forcing many questions. many countries are asking whether pyongyang is a legitimate danger to them. but one question that hasn't gotten much attention is, why is all of this happening now? will ripley looks at what may be driving north korea's latest efforts. >> reporter: it's important to keep in mind the timing and context of what's happening inside north korea. we're just a couple of weeks away from one of the country's most important political gatherings in 35 years, the worker's party congress, the first since 1980, first time they held a congress, kim -- this time around, kim jong-un is expected to reshuffle party leadership and perhaps consolidate his power, making him even more powerful in that country. so all of this military activity
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we've seen in recent months may be attempts by the leadership, by the supreme leader, to project strength, to show force ahead of this political gathering. that's a message for his domestic audience and also for the international community as well. and we've seen a lot happening this year. there was that h-bomb test reported test in january, then one month later a satellite launch. i was just in north korea last week for that attempted missile launch from a mobile launching device on the nation's most important holiday, the day of the sun. but that launch attempt according to the u.s. and south dree area failed. now we see this apparent submarine launch, and there is even speculation among many including the south korean government that north korea could be preparing another nuclear test, again, ahead of this worker's party congress, a very important political gathering and an opportunity for the supreme leader kim jong-un to show his strength to the people in his country and the rest of the world, sending a very ominous message at an
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important time. will ripley, cnn, tokyo. now on to ecuador where the death toll is rising. more than a week after a powerful earthquake rocked that country, officials say at least 654 people have now died from the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck on april 16th. more than 12,000 people are injured and 58 are still missing. ecuador's president has raised taxes to boost reconstruction efforts there. this weekend, we are remembering yet another deadly earthquake that killed more than 8,000 people in nepal last april. it destroyed nepal's capital city and it left thousands injured and homeless. so how are people dealing with it now? how are they faring? k we went back to kathmandu for this update. >> reporter: sadly, the earth's
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rumblings seem so fresh. in parts of kathmandu and in towns and villages around the nepalese capital, the rubble of buildings still lay strewn on the street, piles of debris stacked high. i was driving back one day from the outskirts of the city when suddenly my eyes fell on this large field filled with tents. i was told later that it had become sort of an official tent city with an office there. there were 500 tents, 2,000 people still living there. there's no electricity. there's no running water. and people there are just eking out an existence. one man i spoke to in one of the larger tent cities told me he was going with a delegation to speak with the nepalese prime
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minister. i asked him, what will you say to the prime minister? and he looked at me and said, help us. in the square, there are many old temples and palaces. this is where everyone who visits kathmandu, this is one ever the first places people go to. and it was shocking last year when many of them came crashing down. there's been very, very little recovery work done there, reconstruction work done there. and the first thing i thought of when i went back to the square this time and saw all the damaged buildings and the debris and the piles of bricks, i thought of them as national festering wounds for all of the world to see. i had covered the earthquake in haiti in 2010 and went back a year later. i was reminded of haiti when i went to some of the tent cities be, the makeshift camps. you know, in haiti, thousands and thousands of people made
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those tents -- they became permanent homes for people. they lived there for years and years. i can only hope that the nepalese people fare better than the haitians did and that their recovery doesn't take as long. but, you know, a lot of people i spoke with say that they don't think their country will ever be the same again. >> now to a developing story that we are following here on cnn. a solar-powered plane is now one step closer to circling the globe. the solar impulse 2 landed in california just a short time ago after 2 1/2 days flying across the pacific. a long flight there. it was piloted by swiss explorer bertrand piccard. i joins us on the line from mountain view, california. bertrand, good to have you with us. >> it's a pleasure to be hear in silicon valley, which is the center of innovation, and to
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arrive here with the first airplane that can fly forever with absolutely no fuel. >> it's amazing. bertrand, we're looking at an image right now of your plane flying right alongside the golden gate bridge. what a moment that had to be. >> that was incredible. you know, for several hundred years it was boats coming from the west that were arriving and would see the golden gate, the symbol of freedom in america. and today it was the solar airplane that flies with no fuel, and it's a new era. it's not science fiction. it's today. it exists. and clean technologies can do the impossible. >> it is a moment of marvel. certainly this moment quite a success and hopefully much more successes. but there have also been setbacks. just talk to us about what has been your journey with this new technology. >> the journey started 17 years
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ago after my flight around the world nonstop in the balloon. i was afraid of being short of fuel during this 20-day flight nonstop. and i made the promise that i would fly with no fuel around the world in a solar airplane. so of course in the beginning people tell you it's impossible, people laugh at you, it's difficult to find partners, difficult to find a team. so it's true that the 16 last years were more difficult than the flight itself. the flight for me was the accomplishment of this vision, this dream i had, and for the entire team. it's a moment of pure elation because we can prove the credibility and reliability of this clean technology and renewable energy. >> i want to show this. we're looking here right now at the world. we're looking at your trek so far. you started in abu dhabi. that is where you're expected to end. talk to us about the plan to get
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back to abu dhabi. >> yes. the first half of the flight around the world that was from abu dhabi to india to myanmar to china to japan to hawaii and now to north america. and we will now cross the united states in the next weeks to arrive in new york. we take turns with my partner. and after that there will be the atlantic. i dream, of course, of flying new york to paris with solar impress. then we cross the mediterranean, making a stop in egypt and stop hopefully next june or july in abu dhabi. that will be the first solar flight around the world with no fuel at all. >> new york to paris, man, that's one of my favorite legs to make. i'll have to watch your journey as you do that for sure. but i want to point this out.
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it is amazing technology, but one challenge is that you need almost perfect weather to fly in it. what were the conditions in china? talk to us about the challenges you experienced there and how do you overcome that obstacle? >> we have a very big team of weather specialists, people who simulate on the computer all the flight depending on the turbulence, the weather, the sunshine and so on. and this is why sometimes we stay stuck for a certain time. in china, we were stuck for three weeks before we could continue because of bad weather. but don't forget one thing. when the wright brothers were flying in 1903, they had the same problem. the wright brothers, they could fly alone with good weather very slow, a little bit like solar impulse today. but we have to open the way, show that it's possible to move ahead and to do much more with these clean technologies.
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i hope that solar impulse is like a signal to the world that clean technologies can do the impossible and if they carry an airplane, day and night with no fuel, of course they can be used everywhere for electric mobility, insulation of houses, l.e.d. lamps, light structure for everything that moves to save energy, and this is really the living proof that it's possible. and i hope enough people will understand it and will really go into this clean tech revolution. >> the pilot of solar impulse 2, bertrand piccard, on the phone with us. bertrand, we wish you continued safety, and we leave you with that image there of the plane flying by the golden gate bridge. what an impressive journey. you're watching "cnn newsroom." stay with us.
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welcome back to "newsroom."
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i'm george howell. friday's adoption of the paris agreement tackles climate change and rising temperatures, but new studies reveal how urgent that matter really is. to talk more about it, meteorologist derek van dam is here. >> you know, the paris agreement is trying to get the countries to come together, to hold that increase in global temperature below two degrees. but they're also striving to pursue those efforts to limit it to 1 1/2 degrees. there's new research that's come out talking about the difference between a 1 1/2 degree world and 2 grdegree warming world. it's astounding to see what this means for parts of the world. west africa, south america into southeast asia, this will impact you. let me explain why. we have a difference here between that 1 1/2 to 2 degree warming world to see heat related extremes beyond some of the higher end of the extremes that we would anticipate from
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the climate change and global warming going forward. we could see heat waves last longer and become more frequent, for instance, and dry spells meaning drought conditions, comparing from 1.5 to 2 degree warming world, that would cover a significantly larger area. this is going to impact crops, for instance, corn, wheat, rice, some of the staple ingredients for our meals. and a lot of that originates into southeast asia, west africa and parts of south america. just take a look at this, for example. this is in india. you can see the extreme drought conditions that they are dealing with at this very moment in time. temperatures are running ten degrees celsius above where they should be this time of year. look at this over eastern and central india, 48 degree temperature on saturday. that's 118 degrees fairn might. it's no wonder the india meteorological department has put in place india heat wave
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warnings for that particular location. the heat will continue. you factor in the humidity, and it feels like the middle 40s as you step outside. now, it's not only the subcontinent of india feeling the effects of drought and heat wave. we bring you into the philippines where just entire crops decimated by the lack of rainfall and the extreme temperatures they've experienced. from northward into luzon, we have dry spells and drought condition as cross the area. it really began several months ago and really intensified into march and into april where we continue to see below-average rainfall for this region. i'll leave you with a satellite loop across the nation's capital of the philippines, manila. it is high and dry. we expect these conditions to continue, especially going forward. we are coming off of a very strong el nino, george, and this impacts the world's weather conditions in the world, philippines and india. now to a story we are following in the u.s. state of
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ohio, a horrific crime. eight family members killed in multiple locations, each shot in the head. cnn's nick valencia looks into the search for the killer or killers who are still on the run. >> yes, i need help. >> reporter: it is difficult to hear. >> i think my brother-in-law is dead. >> reporter: the sound of agony as a relative discovers members of her family have been murdered in cold blood. >> ma'am, you've got to tell me what's going on. >> there's blood all over the house. >> okay. >> my brother-in-law is in the bedroom and it looks like somebody beat the hell out of him. >> reporter: the ruthless killings apparently calculated attacks in four separate homes. police tell cnn they believe the suspect or suspects were familiar with the victims. the seven adults and one 16-year-old apparent targets. but why? police have not released a motive or named a suspect.
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for this tiny town of about 2,000 people in southern ohio, the senseless nature of the slayings is simply too much to understand. >> it's just inbelievable, really. this has taken place. >> reporter: phil fulton was pastor to some of the victims. >> i think maybe the most disturbing detail in all of this is the fact that one of the victims was killed next to her 4-day-old baby. >> i cannot believe how anyone could kill a mother with her 4-day-old baby in her arms. it's -- that's out of my realm of thinking that anyone could do that. how heartless. >> reporter: with no official leads, late saturday an ohio businessman offered $25,000 of his own money to help catch the killer or killers. jeff ruby has no connection to the family but says that he wanted to get the word out to find the person or people
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responsible for this. >> okay, just stay out of the house. don't let anybody go in there, okay? >> yeah. >> all right, we've got deputies on the way, okay? >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> reporter: nick valencia, cnn, pike county, ohio.
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an adviser for donald trump is walking back controversial comments he made about the republican front-runner. paul manafort told a meeting of the republican national committee on thursday that trump had a different public and private persona. he said that trump would shift his image to appeal to different groups of voters. he earlier tried to clarify those comments to cnn. listen. >> mr. trump would be speaking not different messages and not different beliefs but would be speaking in different settings. nowhere was i talking about there being a different donald trump. what i was talking about is there being a different environment where different parts of the message would be presented in a way that was different from a campaign rally.
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>> paul manafort there. now to the democrats, the delegate-rich state of pennsylvania is just one of five states with nominating contests on tuesday. and the democratic front runner hillary clinton is playing to her ties there. cnn's rachel crane has the story. ♪ new york >> reporter: after winning big in new york, hillary clinton is now focused on pennsylvania. >> hillary! >> reporter: touting her ties to the keystone state. >> i was in scranton. i was baptized in scranton. we spent christmases. we spent summers. >> reporter: reminding voters of her roots here. >> this is our girl. this is our girl doing well. >> reporter: no one remembers better than hazel price, the 91-year-old has been on the scene since hillary's birth, even longer. >> her mother and i shopped for maternity clothes together. i was at her christening. i held her on her christening
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day. >> reporter: the rodham family lived in this house next door to the prices. and though hazel hasn't seen clinton in the past few years, she still remembers summers when hillary's father would bring his family home to scranton. >> this is a picture of hillary and my children at a birthday party in my backyard. she was vivacious and gracious and a little stubborn. but really loveable. she really was. >> reporter: hazel says this coal mining town is where clinton's values come from. >> it's given her the background that most of us have and that her father had before her and that's to be a strong person, to not take a back seat, to answer truth lfully and to be right up front. not to be afraid. >> reporter: echoed by the current mayor of scranton. >> when you talk to her, it's just as if i was talking to a neighbor, you know. just like another xran tonian to me. >> reporter: despite polls showing clinton has a double-digit lead over senator
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bernie sanders, hazel says support here for clinton is not as strong as it was in 2008, though she'll be voting for scranton's girl on tuesday and has words for her critics. >> put up or shut up. put up that she did this or shut up and walk away. so far, they've said a lot of things and haven't proven anything. >> reporter: rachel crane, cnn, scranton, pennsylvania. >> that wraps this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. stay with us.
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north korea fires a missile from a submarine, raising concerns over just how advanced that nation's launch capability is becoming. u.s. president barack obama set to arrive in germany in the coming hours, but a controversial trade deal between the u.s. and the eu are sparking protests there. and the nation of nepal one year after a devastating earthquake there. why some people feel their country will never completely recover. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, watch to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell "cnn newsroom" starts right now. a very good day to you. we begin this hour on the korean peninsula, north korea boasting of a great success after its
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launch of a ballistic missile from a submarine. that nation's leader, kim jong un, was reportedly there to guide the operation personally. the u.s. and south korea were both quick to condemn the test. france joined in as well. they called on the eu to pile on its own sanctions against north korea. cnn's paula hancocks is following all of this live in seoul, south korea for us. it's good to have you this hour. so north korea is calling this test successful, but what are we hearing from south korean officials about it? >> well, george, we've just heard a statement from the south korean ministry. they've condemned this launch. they also said in the past that if north korea carries out another so-called provocation, then they would go back to the united nations security council and strengthen those sanctions that were passed against them back in march. already those sanctions have been described as ground breaking, and they say that they will go back and try and
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strengthen them even further. now, we've also heard on saturday night when this launch took place from the joint chiefs of staff that it flew around 30 kilometers. they also say that for it to be considered a success for this type of launch, it has to fly 300 kilometers. so it was short of that mark. significantly so. but they didn't call it a failure. knowing only too well that any outcome of this kind of test will teach north korea something. and also, of course, washington has reacted. one u.s. official telling us, "north korea's sub launch capability has gone from a joke to something very serious. the u.s. is watching this very closely." so that really sums up just how much of a concern this is. >> i'd like to read this statement for you from the former north korean ambassador, the former dkrb ambassador. he says "as long as the u.s. does not cancel its nuclear war exercise with north korea and its hostile policy against us,
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we will continue powerfully advancing with our nuclear activity without a resting day." obviously, those drills between south korea and the united states have continued. there has been no halt in that. so what else could be done with the united states, with china, a country that north korea has long paid attention to, watched closely? >> well, we've had this foreign ministry statement from seoul, and they also have criticized the north koreans for equating the two. they say that they should not be carrying out further nuclear tests, and then blaming the joint military drills between the u.s. and south korea. the south korean officials have said they think that number five could be on the way. the fifth nuclear test for north korea, even that it could come before this key worker's party congress that north korea is holding in early may, the exact date not known at this point. but certainly from china's point of view, the expectation is
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certainly in washington and seoul, that beijing is quite fed up with what north korea is doing. they are not heeding beijing's calls for restraint. they are not warning them ahead of time of these tests, and so certainly, beijing was, we hear, well behind these u.n. sanctions and says that they will fully implement them. of course, implementation does follow largely to china. george? >> paula hancocks live in seoul for us. thank you very much for your reporting today. the latest missile test from north korea is creating some anxiety about that country's missile capabilities and military abilities. a former u.s. ambassador to south korea says the answer could be two world powers working together. >> what is i think significant about this whole raft of tests is that it's very clear that kim jong un has no interest and really just doesn't care what the chinese think. so that is quite a difference
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from my watch when kim jong il, for all his hideous faults, seemed to care a little about what china thought. so i think china and the united states are really in this boat together. so rather than talk about what more china could do or what more the u.s. should do, i think the real question is what could they do together, and frankly speaking, i think china and the u.s. together could do a lot to dissuade north korea from doing this, starting with the sanctions, but also stepping up measures, perhaps even direct countermeasures to slow down these programs. >> keep in mind, though, china is already tasked with enforcing foreign trade sanctions against north korea. the german chancellor angela merkel and other eu leaders ath all got a chance to see a first-hand refugee camp on the turkish-syrian border. that visit comes just one month after officials finalized the controversial eu plan to cope with the growing migrant crisis.
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in a news conference with turkey's prime minister, ms. merkel spoke about the syrian cease-fire, saying that germany wants to create "safe zones" within syria to shelter refugees. listen. >> translator: i was always pleaded in favor of creating so-called safe zones. zones in which we can provide assurance and security guarantees and that has to be of the utmost immediate importance. also in our negotiations for a cease-fire, such areas or zones can be easily identified along the turkish-syrian border. we have worked to see that happen, and we have worked with great energy in that direction. the safer the people feel, the less urgent the need for them to leave their country. >> this concept of safe zones is one that turkey has been supporting despite warnings from the united nations about them. within the hour, the u.s. president barack obama will land in germany to meet with angela merkel. he is also expected to push his support of a proposed trade
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plan, which is drawing support and widespread protest as well. the transatlantic deal would create the world's largest free trade area between the u.s. and eu. supporters say it would result in more than a million jobs, but critics are not so convinced about that. with more on the president's visit to germany, our senior international correspondent atika shubert is southwest of hanover this hour. it's good to have you. so as we understand, these protests are happening. what's the sense on the ground with the president set to arrive soon? are more protests expected? >> reporter: well, we saw tremendous protests yesterday. an estimated 30,000 people coming out to show their anger with what's called here the ttip, the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. and this is really a partnership that's about synchronizing all the regulations, opening up those markets across the atlantic and the eu and the u.s.
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the problem is there's a lot of fear here, that by doing that, they'll be lowering a lot of the eu standards to match the u.s. equivalent. and of course, eu has much tougher environmental regulations, food safety laws, and also labor regulations. so there's a lot of resistance here. having said all that, the protest happened yesterday. we don't expect to see any protests today. and that's because there is a very strong security presence in hanover. thousands of police out in the streets. and even members of the public aren't really walking around in the streets there. the residents there are being told stay inside their homes or try not to go out and about, because with the president coming, security is at its highest. so we don't expect to see a lot of protests today, george. >> when it comes to the relationship between these two leaders, they have had their ups and downs, fair to say. a low point when it was revealed the u.s. government had been tapping the chancellor's phone. but then the two maintained close ties as europe deals with a more aggressive russia now.
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so what is this final meeting looking like, this final trip for the u.s. president in germany? how is he viewed by germans? >> reporter: you're right, it has been an up and down relationship, especially as you point out that nsa controversy where it was revealed that the u.s. had been spying on angela merkel's mobile phone. that was certainly the low point in their u.s.-german relationship in the obama administration. but since then, it really has evolved. and as president obama pointed out in an interview with the local newspaper "bild," angela merkel is the world leader that he has worked with the longest and he's come here in part ostensibly to on the hanover trade fair, the largest and industrial trade fair this the world, but also to give her a political boost. he maintains his popularity here. and he came here in this interview praising her, saying that she's a courageous leader, and one that he admires.
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so that relationship between them has really grown. in terms of the public, obama, again, remains popular here. remember, in 2013, he had that tremendous speech in berlin where tens of thousands came out to hear him. and with the prospect of another election and the other candidates currently in the news, i think a lot of people here in germany still find president obama to be in many ways the president they admire most from the united states. >> atika shubert live for us just southwest of hanover. thank you so much for your reporting today. during his trip to the uk, mr. obama sat down for an interview with the bbc. this came after a news conference where he laid out what could happen if britain left the eu saying that it would be, "at the back of the queue when it comes to future trade deals with the u.s.." listen. >> it was simply a response to i think the argument that i've heard from others who are proposing to leave the eu.
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that somehow america would be able to do things more quickly with the uk than if they were in the european union. i was simply indicating that that wouldn't be the case in this narrow issue of trade. the uk would not be able to negotiate something with the united states faster than the eu. we wouldn't abandon our efforts to negotiate a trade deal with our largest trading partner, the european market. >> the u.s. president also urging a group of young people to keep up the good fight for change in the world. he held a town hall in london on saturday to connect with everyday brits. >> my primary message today is going to be to reject pessimism and cynicism, know that progress is possible, that our problems can be solved. progress requires the hard e!
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pa -- the harder path of breaking down barriers and standing up for tolerance and diversity that our nations have worked and sacrificed to secure and defend. progress is not inevitable and it requires discipline and perseverance and faith. but that's the story of how we won voting rights and women's rights and civil rights and immigration rights and gay rights. because of those who came before us often risked their lives to give us the chance to know something better. >> the president also spoke about gay rights, islam phobia, and race issues. michelle obama was addressing racism on saturday. she gave one of her final commencement speeches as first lady at a historically black college in mississippi. she urged students to use peaceful means when dealing with
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the issue of discrimination. >> are you going to throw up your hands and say that progress will never come? are you going to get angry and lash out? or are you going to turn inward and just give in to despair and frustration? or are you going to take a deep breath, straighten your shoulders, lift up your head, and do what barack obama has always done? as he says, when they go low, i go high. that's the choice barack and i have made. that's what kept us sane over the years. >> mrs. obama will deliver two more commencement speeches in 2016. one speech in new mexico and the other in new york. music legend prince has been cremated. coming up, we'll show you the gifts that his family and friends gave to fans outside his
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home. plus, donald trump is defending his shifting personas after criticism from rival ted cruz. we will have details on that as "cnn newsroom" continues. ♪ ♪ you live life your way. we can help you retire your way, too. financial guidance while you're mastering life. from chase. so you can. i missed a payment.nce while you're mastering life. aw, shoot. shoot! this is bad. no! we're good! this is your first time missing a payment. and you've got the discover it card, so we won't hike up your apr for paying late. that's great! it is great! (both simultaneously) thank you. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card with late payment forgiveness.
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world's most celebrated artists has been cremated. prince's final resting place will not be revealed. fans are honoring the purple one outside his home and studio in minnesota. cnn's ryan young was there, as his admirers received the very special gift. >> reporter: just in the last 30 minutes or so, some friends and family members of prince have come out and started delivering these purple boxes out to people who have come from all over, and inside the box, if you don't mind opening it up, this is what they've been giving fans who have been standing outside. what was in your box? >> so i had -- it looks like it came from his home. it's just a booklet, and for some reason, to me, this fits my personality so well. >> it's beautiful. >> yes, it is. >> reporter: open that for us so we can see it. what did you get in your box? >> it's amazing.
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you can tell that i have a tank top. and i pursue bodybuilding and weight lifting. it's like a personal gift it seems like. for him to give me a tank top, it's amazing. >> on your birthday. >> reporter: you guys traveled here from milwaukee. why is it so important for you guys to travel here? >> it's significant. the inspiration that prince has given us over the years, since we've been 7, 8 years old, it's unbelievable. he's motivated us to pursue our dreams. i'm from milwaukee, wisconsin, but i just moved from phoenix to pursue dreams, and listening to prince, he encourages you to do that. >> reporter: musically, i know people have been standing out here playing music. can you talk about being in the crowd? everybody obviously is sharing the love about prince. >> it's just beautiful to be in the crowd. to be among just everybody who is experiencing the same -- you know, the consciousness of prince. it just seems like he is just living and breathing. >> he's all around us. >> reporter: one of the things i wrote was from one of his songs. >> all the flowers that you
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planted, mama, in the backyard continue to live when you went away. they didn't die, because they're continuing to live. and this is just beautiful. it's just life. >> were you shocked when a family member walks outside during a time like this and starts handing out boxes? >> and to be handed in your hand, it was like, really? >> it was personal. it seems like something prince would do. prince would give back to us. he would want us to have these type of gifts coming from his home. it's just a blessing to be here and to be able to be around others that feel the same way. >> reporter: thank you, guys. i appreciate you for sharing that box with us. >> thank you. >> reporter: i would say more than a dozen of those boxes were handed out to the crowd and they went pretty quickly. >> that was ryan young reporting for us. the cause of prince's death is still under investigation and remains unknown. we are following another story, a story of a shooting at a high school prom. it happened in the u.s. state of wisconsin. three people injured there. one person in critical condition. county officials say they evacuated students from the
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campus, but the circumstances of the shooting are still largely unclear. we will, of course, continue to follow this story and bring you details as they emerge here on cnn. america's choice 2016 and the race for the white house. ted cruz is hoping his win in maine this weekend will boost his chances against republican frontrunner donald trump. cruz won 19 of maine's 20 delegates that were up for grabs during the state's republican convention on saturday. he still needs more delegates than are available if he hopes to beat trump. but the republican presidential nominee could be decided in a contested convention. on the convention floor, if trump ends up not winning enough delegates. five states vote in nominating contests this tuesday. and an adviser for donald trump is walking back some controversial comments that he made about the republican
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frontrunner. paul manafort said on thursday that donald trump has a different public persona than his private persona. he said that trump would shift his image to appeal to different groups of voters. he earlier tried to clarify those comments here on cnn. >> mr. trump would be speaking -- not different messages and not different beliefs, but he'd be speaking in different settings. nowhere was i talking about there being a different donald trump. what i was talking about was being a different environment where different parts of the message would be presented in a way that was different from a campaign rally. >> paul manafort there. frontrunner hillary clinton has started avoiding criticism of her rival bernie sanders and instead now she's going after donald trump. but that hasn't stopped sanders from going after the former secretary of state. it's a back and forth.
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cnn >> reporter: bernie sanders is back to criticizing hillary clinton on the campaign trail, hitting her during several stops on saturday in maryland and delaware. >> her last reporting period, her super pac reported 25 million in special interests. $15 million from wall street alone. and on top of that, she has given numerous speeches to wall street for $225,000 a speech. >> reporter: clinton, meanwhile, campaigned on a smaller scale. later, she held a rally in rhode island. >> loose cannons tend to misfire. what we have with him is the loosest of all cannons. >> reporter: she released a video urging voters to remember his controversial positions as he starts to pivot toward the general election. that followed a shot she took at trump in pennsylvania, where she criticizes proposals to temporarily ban muslims from entering the country. sanders is lagging clinton in
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pennsylvania by almost 30 points, according to a new poll there. sanders holds events today in rhode island and connecticut where clinton also campaigns this afternoon. >> that was chris frates reporting for us. a revere weather outbreak is possible across the central part of the united states in the coming hours and our meteorologist is here to talk to us. this is being looked at as a multi-day event. >> yeah, it will start today. kind of taper off into monday. but really fire up on tuesday. that's the day that we're really concerned about. but first and foremost, let's get to the specifics of what's happening today for our u.s. viewers tuning in this morning. first of all, thanks for tuning in so early in the morning. but across the central u.s., this is where the firing zone is, at least in terms of thunderstorms later this afternoon. anywhere from kansas into parts of nebraska and central oklahoma. this is the setup. we have a very slow-moving area of low pressure that's now just starting to basically eject itself out of the rockies and
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strengthen as it does so. we'll pull in gulf moisture as well. on the flip side, the eastern half of the u.s. really gets to enjoy some nice spring-like weather. that's the positive side. now, as we go forward, you'll start to see some of these thunderstorms fire up across the kansas city region, perhaps into oklahoma city. but this is the area that the storm prediction center has highlighted as our greatest risk of severe weather. we have the potential of large hail, damaging straight line winds, and we can't rule out an isolated tornado later this afternoon. so look out, wichita. look out, kansas city. if you're tuning in from omaha, have your emergency preparations in advance just so you know that this is a potential later today. but now let's start to focus in on tuesday. so this is setting up as a multi-day event. we said monday we should start to basically kind of wind things down for a brief period of time. maybe a stronger thunderstorm in and around the chicago area. but by tuesday afternoon, this is the day that we're particularly focused on. especially across the plains states. isolated strong to severe
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thunderstorms possible. and some of these could contain tornados as well that could potentially be dangerous, if not lethal. we have a lot of upper level energy that's moving in with a system that's starting to pass across the western half of the united states. that's going to set up the jet or the upper level driving winds for the severe thunderstorms that develop. so the potential for a spin in the atmosphere is there. along with that deep moisture from the gulf of mexico. so we'll look out for the severe thunderstorms to fire up late on tuesday. this is the area. kansas city, wichita, oklahoma city, stretching as far south as dallas, and even perhaps into austin. so central texas still the potential of isolated tornados. again, this is for the day on tuesday. so we want to give a heads up on this multi-day severe weather threat. really quickly. london marathon taking place right now. i have several fans and family event. part in this particular wonderful event. it is a cloudy day in london for
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the marathon. but george, as a runner myself, and you are as well a runner, i know that that is the perfect running conditions. >> you're the better runner than me, though. >> you know what? that doesn't matter here. the idea is that they have great weather for the london marathon today. >> good stuff. thank you so much. it is 5:26 on the u.s. east coast. still ahead this hour, f-16 fighter jets are no strangers for the skies of iraq, but these new aircraft are iraqi owned and operated. coming up, find out why they are so crucial in the fight against isis. nepal one year after the worst earthquake to ever hit that country. people are observing three days of mourning. we will show you the ongoing effort to rebuild and recover. live across the united states and around the world this hour, you're watching "cnn newsroom." for a limited time, you can get a great deal on this passat. wow, it looks really good... volkswagen believes safety is very important... so all eleven models come standard
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welcome back to our viewers if the united states and around the world. these live pictures just outside of london, where you see the u.s. president barack obama as he is set to leave germany, about to board air force one. he is headed to germany for a free trade meeting to talk with the german chancellor angela merkel. mr. obama is expected to promote his transatlantic trade deal, which thousands of people have been protesting. also following other headlines around the world this hour, german chancellor angela merkel got a firsthand look at a refugee camp on the turkish-syrian border. she visited the camp on saturday along with turkey's prime minister and european union officials. her trip comes amid criticism of the eu's deal with turkey that
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is aimed at stemming the flow of migrants into europe. > music legend prince was celebrated in a private ceremony on saturday. fans continue to gather outside his home in minneapolis. his publicist says prince's remains were cremated and his final resting place, it will not be revealed to the public. the cause of death is still under investigation and is unknown. after north korea's latest military test, france is now joining the conversation on what to do in response. the french foreign ministry calling on the eu to put its own independent sanctions on the country. this comes after north korea launched another ballistic missile, this one from a submarine. and when it comes to north korea, much of the world is worried about this recent military test. it's forcing many countries to wonder whether pyongyang is a legitimate danger to them. but one question that has not gotten a lot of attention is why is all of this happening now? cnn's will ripley looks at what may be driving north korea's
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latest efforts. >> it's important to keep in mind the timing here and the context of what's happening inside north korea. we are just a couple of weeks away from one of the country's most important political gatherings in 45 years. it's the worker's party congress. the first since 1980. the last time they held a worker's party congress, the north korean president and founder kim il sun apointed kim jong il as his successor. this time kim jong un is expected to reshuffle party leadership and perhaps consolidate his power, making him even more powerful in that country. so all of this military activity we've seen in recent months may be attempts by the leadership, by the supreme leader to project strength, to show force ahead of this political gathering. that's a message for his domestic audience and also for the international community as well. and we've seen a lot happening this year. there was that h-bomb test, that reported h-bomb test in january. and then one month later, a
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satellite launch. i was just in north korea last week for that attempted missile launch from a mobile launching device on the nation's most important holiday, the day of the sun, but that launch attempt, according to the u.s. and south korea, failed. now we see this apparent submarine launch, and there is even speculation among many, including the south korean government, that north korea could be preparing another nuclear test. again, ahead of this worker's party congress, a very important political gathering and an opportunity for the supreme leader kim jong un to show his strength to the people in his country and the rest of the world, sending a very ominous message at an important time. will ripley, cnn, tokyo. japan's first stealth aircraft has passed its first test flight. the x-2 plane's fuselage and wings are designed to avoid radar detection. its designers say they also have implemented this technology to
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improve its maneuverability. work on this aircraft began in 2009 and it cost about $360 million. the u.s. already has stealth fighters. and now china and russia are also developing that technology. some new information to share with you in the killing of a professor in bangladesh on saturday. we now know that isis is claiming responsibility. a man was stabbed at a bus stop near his home. authorities say several people attacked the 58-year-old professor from behind. this weekend, students held a protest calling for justice in this killing. now on to syria, where fresh regime bombardments threaten an 8-week-old cease-fire. several sources say at least 27 civilians were kill eed in stris on rebel-held areas. this footage purports to show one of those attacks. cnn cannot independently confirm the images. a major syrian opposition
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leader is defending his decision to leave ongoing peace talks with the syrian government in geneva. during a visit to a refugee camp in turkey, we understand that he also criticized u.n. envoy for the violence, the rise of violence in syria. listen. >> translator: he describes putting the high negotiations committee on hold as political or diplomatic showoff. or whatever he named it. for us, we put our participation in the negotiations on hold to respect the syrian blood that is shed under strike with the regime and its allies and to respect the syrians who died of hunger following the siege and to respect syrians who were killed as a result of torture. >> now, despite the exit of the main syrian opposition delegation, the peace talks are set to continue until wednesday. but it appears an eight-week
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syrian cease-fire may be unraveling. f-16 fighter jets have proven to be a crucial weapon in the fight against isis, and now iraq has a batch of their own to use. iraqi pilots had to undergo years of training in order to fly these newly-purchased aircraft. cnn's arwa damon spoke to one of those pilots who carried out the first f-16 iraqi air raids. >> reporter: the menacing roar of the american f-16 fighter jet. a nimble, highly effective killing machine traveling at supersonic speeds. not unfamiliar in iraq's skies. but these f-16s are iraqi-owned and piloted by iraqis who went through a five-year training course in arizona. major hama carried out the first ever f-16 iraqi air raids back in september. >> i was nervous. i was happy. i was excited. and i was confident that i can go do it because of the training
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that i got. and i went up with a smile and came back with a smile. seeing my results were actually really, really good. so i was happy. >> and what was that first target? >> the first target was more bbid, weapons cash and isis fighters. >> a bet down. in other words, a safe house. this is video of those first strikes. dozens of isis fighters were killed in those raids alone. after years of waiting due to pilot training, complications, and security concerns, the first batch of six f-16s arrived over the summer with more expected later this year. in all, iraq ordered 36 f-16s worth billions of dollars. >> we're making a change here. we're fighting for everybody on behalf of the world. it's an honor to fly for my country and fight. >> the iraqi air force has other fighter planes. but none that match the
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effectiveness or speed of the f-16. in march, isis shot down a cessna. killing all onboard. >> never in the nation's history has it had this kind of air power at its disposal. crucial, of course, to the fight against isis. but also central to iraq's future and whether or not it will reposition itself as a regional military super power. that may take time. but the air force commander says by mid 2017, assuming all the f-16s arrive, iraq will be that much closer to reestablishing control of its skies. arwa damon, cnn, iraq. it has been one year since a devastating earthquake killed more than 8,000 people in the country of nepal. this is drone video of the aftermath. you see it here. look at all of that damage there. the quake hit katmandu on april
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25th of last year. this weekend, nepal's prime minister paid tribute to the victims and observed a minute of silence. cnn's moni bassu also traveled to nepal, where the struggle to recover also continues. >> reporter: sadly, the earth's rumbling seems so fresh. and parts of katmandu and in towns and villages around the nepalese capital, the rubble of buildings still lay strewn on the streets. piles of debris were stacked high. i w i was driving back one day from the outskirts of the city when suddenly my eyes fell on this large field filled with tents. i was told later that it had become sort of an official tent city with an office there. there were 500 tents, 2,000 people still living there.
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there's no electricity. there's no running water. and people there are just eking out an existence. one man i spoke with actually in one of the larger tent cities told me that he was going with a delegation to speak to the nepalese prime minister. and i asked him, what will you say to the prime minister? and he looked at me and he said, help us. there are many old temples and palaces. this is where everyone who visits katmandu, this is one of the first places people go to. and it was shocking last year when many of them came crashing down. there's been very, very little recovery work done there. reconstruction work done there. and the first thing i thought of when i went back this time and saw all those damaged buildings and the debris and the piles of bricks, i thought of them as
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national festering wounds for all the world to see. i had covered the earthquake in haiti in 2010, and went back a year later. i was reminded of haiti when i went to some of the tent cities, the makeshift camps. and, you know, in haiti, thousands and thousands of people made those tents their home. they became permanent homes for people. they lived there for years and years. i can only hope that the nepalese people fare better than the haitians did and that their recovery doesn't take as long. but, you know, a lot of people i spoke with say that they don't think their country will ever be the same again. call just came is about to arrive. and with her, a flood of potential patients. a deluge of digital records. x-rays, mris. all on account...of penelope. but with the help of at&t, and a network that scales up and down
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welcome back. i'm george howell. saturday marked the 400th anniversary of the death of william shakespeare, and fans around the world are celebrating the works of the british playwright, but not much is known about his perm life, so cnn's nick glass takes us on a tour of some of his rare personal memorabilia and his final resting place. >> reporter: much ado about william shakespeare. a big street parade every april, but this year, they added to the revelry by handing out thousands of facemasks. of course, they had a royal visitor. ben johnson, his friend and fellow play right, shakespeare was not of an age, but for all
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time. gentle shakespeare he wrote. sweet swan of avon. this is a weekend of what you might call bardolatry. multiple performances, including contributions from ian mckellen, ralph fiennes, and judi dench. in london with its own riverside shakespearean theatre, the weekend is being developed to "hamlet." president obama dropped by, got to briefly tread the boards, and hear a speech from the dane. >> a special providence in the fall of a sparrow. >> on the other side of the thames, some of the great shakespearean documents have begun on display, the ones we only ever get to see once in a lifetime. this is will's will. last seen by the public in 1964. each of the three pages are signed. we only have six examples of shakespeare's signature. here are three of them in one
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document. all a bit different. the final signature reads, "by me, william shakespeare." the man himself remains elusive. >> what his politics are. what religion he professed. who he slept with. what kind of father and brother and husband he was. those are not questions i think we'll ever have answers to. >> reporter: holy trinity church by the river in stratford is where shakespeare was baptized in 1564 and buried 52 years later in 1616. this, the same splendid oak door he used when he worshipped in the church. his bust and his grave are just by the high altar. after a recent radar scan, researchers claim to have made a startling discovery. the skeleton rests on soil just three feet under the stone slab. and it seems the skull may well have been tampered with, even stolen several hundred years
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ago. whatever the truth of it, shakespeare is still fought over. >> my sense of it is that shakespeare was born in stratford, couldn't wait to get out, spent his entire life in london, and only went back to stratford to die. >> when he went to london, he was simply capitalizing on the start that he had here in stratford. so, you know, there's a little bit to be said for london. but i wouldn't want to say too much. >> reporter: this is, in fact, shakespeare's school room, and it's just been opened to the public for the first time. this is where he studied latin and greek from the ages of 7 to 14. in stratford, the revelry continues all weekend. london will vie for more attention on monday. there's beginning to be an announcement about excavating one of shakespeare's original theatres. nick glass, cnn in stratford
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upon avon. >> love all, trust a few, do wrong to none, shakespeare. to keep the fun going, we have created a shakespeare insult meter on cnn.com. you go there to generate some of the author's greatest slapdowns. different from what i just shared with you. simply decide the level of your insult. they range from jesting monkey to cursed shrew. you can choose the gender of your unsuspecting victim and hit the generate button there. there's even an option to help break it down into modern day english. and if you want to test your knowledge of all things shakespearean, you can take our shakespeare quiz at cnn.com. take a look at this spectacular sight near the solar impulse 2, flying alongside the golden gate bridge after crossing the pacific. coming up, the latest on this historic flight around the world. stay with us. question, are my teeth yellow?
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mountainview, california. after finishing its pacific leg of the journey to circle the globe. the plane took off from hawaii on thursday after being stalled there for almost ten months. last hour, i spoke with the pilot of that plane after he landed. bertrand picard said he is excited. he sounded exuberant despite a long two and a half-day flight across the pacific. >> for several hundred years, it was boats arriving. and today it was a solar airplane that flies with no fuel. it's a new era. it's not science fiction. it's today. it exists. and clean tech followings do the impossible. >> it is amazing technology. but one challenge is that you need almost perfect weather to fly in it. what were the conditions in china? talk to us about the challenges that you experienced there, and
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how do you overcome that obstacle? >> we have a very big team of weather specialists. people who simulate on the computer, depending on the turbulence, the weather, the sunshine, and so on. and this is why sometimes we stay stuck for a certain time. in china, we were stuck for three weeks before we could continue because of bad weather. but don't forget one thing. when the wright brothers were flying in 1903, they had the same problem. the wright brother, they could fly with good weather very slow. but we have to open the way. show that it's possible to move ahead. and to do much more with clean technologies. and i hope that solar impulse is like a signal to the world that clean technologies can do the impossible, and if they carry an airplane day and night with no
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fuel, of course they can be used everywhere for electric mobility, led lamps, smart grid, night structure for everything that moves, to save energy. and this is really the living proof that it's possible, and i hope enough people will understand it, and will really go into this clean tech revolution. >> the plane flies about the same speed of a car, and it does not use a drop of fuel. and we leave you with that this hour. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. for other viewers around the world, "the best of quest" starts in a moment. thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader. for a limited time, you can get a great deal on this passat. wow, it looks really good... volkswagen believes safety is very important...
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6:00 on a sunday morning, and we are so grateful for your company. thanks for being here. >> good to have you. we're starting this morning with two breaking news stories happening overnight. two shootings. one at a high school prom in wisconsin, and an arrest at a motel. >> starting with the northern wisconsin situation, where police say two students were injured at their high school prom after a suspect showed up with a rifle and started shooting. this happened outside the building. >> joining us on the phone, wsaw reporter rebecca

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