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tv   Early Start with Christine Romans and Dave Briggs  CNN  June 22, 2017 1:00am-2:01am PDT

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senate republicans just hours away from revealing their health care plan. negotiated in secret. how does it affect you, and how can it win enough support to pass a vote next week? look, i'll tell you about the democrats. i am making it a little bit hard to get their support, but who cares? >> okay. president trump doesn't seem to mind the democrats opposing him at every turn. the president taking a victory lap in iowa after the republicans win in the georgia special election. that loss in georgia has some democrats revolting. nancy pelosi is hearing growing
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calls for change of leadership in the house. good morning, everyone, welcome to "early start." i'm dave briggs. >> good morning. i'm alison kosik in for christine romans, probably getting much-needed r&r. >> she is. last day of school for the kids, i believe. >> absolutely. it is june 22nd. up first, senate republicans coming out of the shadows revealing their plan to reform obamacare. until then, details had been a closely guarded secret with a handful of senators working behind closed doors. >> here's what we know about the plan. we'll see it later this morning -- 9:30 a.m., he tells the senate about this. it slows down the time frame and the house measure for rolling back the medicaid expansion. it also improves tax credits for low-income and older americans from the house version. it offers states more flexibility on waivers to opt out of obamacare regulations including essential health benefits. >> it also takes away money for
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blood f-- for planned parenthoo for a year. and that move could violate senate rules, passing with only 51 votes. several characteristritical iss in the air such as the fund to fight opioid abuse, money to stable iethe insurance market, timing of obamacare tax repeal, and the fate of coverage for pre-existing conditions. >> that is big. politically, senate gop leaders face a possible repeat of the fight over in the house, trying to find a balance that will satisfy both the conservatives and the moderates, earning enough votes to pass. we get more now from cnn's ryan nobles on capitol hill. >> reporter: good morning. finally we're going to get a chance to see exactly what the senate has planned in terms of reforming health care in the united states. the senators will meet first thing in the morning today to get a briefing on exactly what is in this bill.
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later in the day, it will be posted on line for everyone to see. for many senators, this will be the first time that they're seeing any of the text of this bill. this despite the fact that senate majority leader mitch mcconnell hopes to vote and pass this bill by the fourth of july recess. now we expect there to be some of those key obamacare provisions that were taken out of the house bill reinserted into the senate bill. there will be a change to medicaid expansion. it will be rolled back but in a much more gradual way than is expected in the house bill. they cut it off in 2020. the senate won't even begin the process until 2021. white house staffers were briefed on the bill last night here on capitol hill, and i spoke to mark short, white house legislative director, as he was leaving that meeting. he stopped short of saying that the president is ready to endorse this bill but said in h mind we are all one step closer to end the nightmare that is obamacare. it will be a busy day on capitol hill. >> yeah. >> okay. thank you very much. as we mentioned, the senate
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gop health care bill will delay the rollback of medicaid expansion to at least 2023, but millions of americans may lose coverage even sooner that that. and that's because many states won't have the money to keep running the program. it has to do with the federal match rate. the expansion covers 11 million low-income adults in 31 states, and the government covers 90% of the cost. that's a higher rate than for traditional participants. medicaid has a huge turn rate. if adults drop out, they have to re-enroll at the lower traditional rate. that's where states run into problems. at least eight have rules that end the expansion early if the match rate drops below 90%. other states will have to freeze the program if federal support decreases. it is the source of federal funding for many states. cutting the expansion helps reduce medicaid spending by at least $200 million the next ten years. of course, that leaves the question open, are senators even
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going to go for phasing out the expanded medicaid. >> we have no idea. >> no idea. >> there are a couple different camps. there's not just the moderates and the conservatives. there's also some in the middle, really concerned about medicaid. >> yeah. >> planned parenthood, you worry about murkowski and collins. medicaid, you worry about portman and shelly moore caputo. this is going to be a tough needle to thread. good luck you to, mitch. president trump touting the republican health care plan as he got back on the road. the big campaign-style rally in iowa. the president exulting after the win in the georgia special election. he said publicly for the first time he wants solar panels on that southern border wall, assuming it gets built. senior white house correspondent jeff zeleny traveling with the president has more from cedar rapids, iowa. >> reporter: president trump taking somewhat of a victory lap wednesday night at a rally in cedar rapids, iowa. his first visit west of the mississippi since taking office.
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iowa, of course, one of those blue states he turned red last november, winning by 10%. he was not talking about that victory. he was talking about the victory in the georgia special congressional race. that's what he started out talking about. he also ran the gamut, speaking more than an hour, about twice as long as the white house initially said he would, clearly reveling in the support from iowa republicans here. he started talking about health care and the bill moving through the senate. >> so we have a slim 52-48. that means we basically can't lose anybody. and i think and i hope, okay, can't guarantee anything, but i hope we're going to surprise you with a really good plan. you know, i've been talking about a plan with heart. i said, add some money to it. a plan with heart. obamacare is dead. >> reporter: of course much of his speech here in cedar rapids needed a bit of fact checking and a reality check. he's not the most successful president of record, he's not
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passed the most bills. that's what he left supporters believing here. in reality the president almost wistfully at the end of his remarks talked about how he wished democrats would come on board. how democrats would help with tax reform, health care reform bill, infrastructure. it will be fascinating to see in the coming months if he reaches out to democrats to get support because democrats know they also need to have more of a record, and they also need to not obstruct if they hope to win in 2018. the president flying back to washington after a visit here. of course, much on his plate remains in washington today. >> thanks for that. a growing number of democrats are looking for a leadership shakeup after that devastating loss in georgia's sixth district. some are even suggesting it's time for house minority leader nancy pelosi to go. listen to tim ryan and tim moulton, both democrats, calling for a new generation of leadership to move the party forward.
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>> you think nancy pelosi is more toxic than donald trump? >> you know what, the honest answer is, in some areas of the country, yes, she is. as unfair as it is, there have been a lot of people that have spent a lot of money running negative ads against her. and i think that in certain areas like in some of these special election districts, it doesn't benefit our candidates to be tied to her. and it's not fair, but it is true. and there's a reason why the republicans are still using it. >> it's clear that i think across the board in the democratic party we need new leadership. it's time for a new generation of leadership in the party. >> reporter: democrats have lost all four special elections since president trump took office including georgia where jon ossoff was defeated despite a campaign that raised over $23 million. >> three democrats in the senate now joining their house colleagues pushing the white house to review jared kushner's security clearance.
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senators richard blumenthal, al franken, and hawaii's mazy hirano, echoing concerns expressed by house democrats about the first son-in-law and senior trump adviser. >> among those concerns, the meeting with the head of a russian state bank and his reported attempts to set up a back channel to communicate with the russians during the transition. a similar letter from 18 house democrats points to an executive order that requires suspension of the security clearance of any employee who's under investigation as a national security risk. the white house declined comment on the democrats' request. the fbi is investigating the stabbing of a michigan airport police officer as terrorism. a 50-year-old canadian man is in custody, charged with violence at an national airport. more charges could be added. the fbi says he attacked lieutenant jeff neville with a foot-long knife after lingering at the airport for about 40
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minutes. >> he was carrying baggage. he went into a restroom. he spent a little tight in the restroom, dropped both bags and came out, pulled out a knife, yelled "allah akbar," and stabbed lieutenant neville in the neck. >> he fought back as the attacker was subdued. he is expected to be okay. neville appeared illegally last week. he's said to be a lone wolf. the suspect remains in custody until a hearing next wednesday. >> glad that officer's going to be okay. >> indeed. president trump weighs in after high-level talks between the u.s. and china. was there any movement on how to deal with the growing threat from north korea? we're live in shanghai.
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the trump administration says the u.s. and china share a
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common concern about the threat posed by north korea's nuclear missile program. jim mattis and secretary of state rex tillerson hosting their chinese counterparts to discuss the growing crisis. for months the white house has been lobbying china to exert more influence over the kim jong-un regime. >> last night in iowa, president trump praised china's president but also sent a message that he expects more from beijing. >> we've had a very good relationship with china in all fairness. and i do like president xi. i wish we would have more help on north korea from china. that doesn't seem to be working out, but i do like the president a lot. >> the meeting with top chinese officials comes days after the death of otto warmbier. the american college student spent 17 months hard -- before he was sent -- hard labor before he was sent home in a coma. we have more on the high-level
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meetings and where the two countries go from here. good morning. it's a question of what the chinese are willing to do, what they're willing to do to push the north koreans. do you get any sense of where they'll go here? >> reporter: well, this is a question that successive administrations have been asking starting with the clinton administration going on down the line to the trump administration. they all want china to do more when it comes to north korea, and secretaries of defense and state yesterday telling their chinese counterparts they expect china to do the same thing. china always says when they respond is, we are doing enough. look at in 2016 we helped draft two different u.n. security council sanctions against the regime, and we are enforcing those to the fullest. critics will say, though, that what china says and does are two very different things, that they regularly exploit loopholes in those sanctions and continue to trade with the north koreans. essentially giving an economic lifeline to the regime. the reasons for that are many.
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not the least of which that north korea acts as a buffer to the tens of thousands of u.s. troops that are currently stationed in south korea. and so the big question now moving forward for the trump administration and, frankly, a question we don't have an answer to yet, is if the trump administration feels that china isn't doing enough to push the north koreans to stop developing these weapons, what is the trump administration going to do next? we don't know the answer to that. and the broader impact, how will this affect the u.s./china relationship in other areas like the south china sea, like joint trade between the world's largest economies, that's another outstanding question that really has broad implications. >> matt, trade between north korea and china, is it still up since the trump administration took over? >> reporter: in fact, it's risen. in the first quarter of 2016 compared to 2017, total trade volume with north korea rose nearly 40%. yes, while china is doing things like banning coal imports from
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north korea, it is still trading with the north koreans in a major way, and it is absolutely providing an economic lifeline to the kim jong-un regime. >> all right. good stuff. matt rivers live in shanghai, thanks. >> it's questionable whether or not china's going to use the economic influence to make headway. >> it does not appear so. >> not at this time. the u.s. is denying claims by isis that american forces destroyed a mosque of critical significance to the islamic state. we are live in the mideast with why this matters next. it's our little differences, that can make a world of difference. expedia, everything in one place, so you can travel the world better.
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dialing classmates this morning about who's -- dualing
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claims this morning about who's responsible for blowing up a mosque. isis blames the u.s. coalition, a claim u.s. officials say is 1,000% false. iraq's military putting the blame back on isis. cnn has more live from amman, jordan, on the latest. can you clear this up, why the back-and-forth blame game about who blew up this very symbolic mosque? >> reporter: throughout this long and bloody fight to recapture mosul, if there was one moment that iraqi forces were looking to as a moment where they would be able to announce a victory over isis, even at least symbolically, it would be the recapture of anouri mosque. that is where the leader of the group made his first and only appearance in 2014, declaring the caliphate. if there was a time when the iraqi forces would be able to say that they have destroyed this caliphate, it would be by
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taking that mosque. and that is something they have been doing for months, trying to get closer and closer to the mosque in the heart of the old city of mosul. in recent days, they did start this new push, and they were aiming to recapture anou ri mosq-- anouri mosque by the end of ramadan. we heard from iraqi commanders saying that isis blew up the mosque and that iconic leaning mosque. shortly after that, we started seeing these claims by isis-linked accounts and their so-called news agency on social media saying that it was the u.s.-led coalition with an air strike that destroyed the mosque, of course, the u.s. coalition completely denying that. saying that they have monitoring the area around the mosque recently, and they did see the movement of fighters and explosives and the iraqis also pointing the blame at isis here.
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and you can definitely add the anouri mosque now to a long list of historical ereligioreligious archaeological sites that have been destroyed by the terror group in iraq and syria the past three years. >> and certainly the human toll that this war has had, as well. thank you very much. a touching moment at a congressional women's softball game. [ applause ] [ cheers ] that's capitol police special agent crystal griner throwing out the first pitch. let's make it two pitches. she was not happy with her first throw. griner was shot in the ankle last week after a gunman opened fire at the republican baseball practice in alexandria, virginia. the attack left congressman steve scalise critically injured. he's been upgraded to fair condition. and crystal griner, a former softball player and basketball
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player. she wanted another shot at that. she's entitled, indeed. >> she certainly is. senate republicans ready to release their health plan, and the president isn't counting on much bipartisan support. >> we would not get one democrat vote because they're obstructionists. they're obstructionists. we wouldn't get one democrat. >> it's the question we're all asking -- what the heck is in this health plan? what's not in it, and can it pass?
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him at every turn. the president taking a victory lap in iowa after republicans win in a georgia special election. >> and that georgia election has some democrats revolting. nancy pelosi is hearing growing calls for a change of leadership in the house. welcome back to "early start." i'm alison kosik. >> i'm dave briggs. 31 minutes past the hour. senate republicans coming out of the shadows to unveil their plan for overhauling obamacare. until now, details of the gop health care bill have been a closely guarded secret, to say the least, with a handful of senators working behind closed doors. >> here's what we know about the plan. we'll see it later this morning, around 9:30 or so. it slows down the time frame in the house measure for rolling back the medicaid expansion. it also improves tax credits for low-income and older americans from the house version. and it offers states more flexibility on waivers to opt out of obamacare regulations
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including essential health benefits. >> it also defunds planned parenthood for a year. that could violate senate budget rules the gop is using to pass the bill with only 51 votes. several critical issues remain up in the air. those include a fund to fight opioid abuse. efforts to stabilize the market during the transition away from obamacare, and the timing of the repeal of obamacare taxes, also still unclear here. the fate of coverage for pre-existing conditions. >> then there's the politics of all this. senate gop leaders face a possible repeat of the fight in the house, trying to find a balance that's going to satisfy both conservatives and moderates, earning enough votes to pass. let's get more now from cnn's ryan nobles on capitol hill. >> reporter: good morning. and finally we're going to get a chance to see exactly what the senate has planned in terms of reforming health care in the united states. the senators will meet first thing in the morning today to get a briefing on exactly what is in this bill.
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and later in the day, it will be posted on line for everyone to see. for many senators, this will be the first time that they're seeing any of the text of this bill. this despite the fact that senate majority leader mitch mcconnell hopes to vote and pass this bill by the fourth of july recess. we expect there to be some of those key obamacare provisions that were taken out of the house bill, reinserted into the senate bill. and there will be a change to medicaid expansion. it will be rolled back, but in a much more gradual way than is expected in the house bill. they cut it off in 2020. the senate won't even begin the process until 2021. white house staffers were briefed on the bill last night on capitol hill, and i spoke to mark short, the white house legislative director, as he was leaving that meeting. he stopped short of saying that the president is ready to endorse this bill, but he did say in his mind we are all one step closer to ending the nightmare that is obamacare. it will certainly be a busy day here on capitol hill. >> thank you very much. as we mentioned, the senate
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gop health care bill will delay the rollback of medicaid expansion to at least 2023. but millions of americans may lose coverage sooner than that. many states won't have the money to keep the program running. it has to do with the federal match rate. the expansion covers 11 million low-income adults in 31 states. the government covers 90% of the cost. a higher rate than for traditional participants. here's the thing, medicaid has a huge churn rate. if adults drop out, they have to re-enroll at the lower traditional rate. that's where states run into problems. at least eight have rules that end the expansion early if the match rate drops below 90%. many other states will have to freeze the program if federal support decreases. medicaid is the biggest source of federal funding for many states, and cutting the expansion helps reduce medicaid spending by at least $800 billion over the next ten years. president trump touting the republican health care plan as he got back on the road at a
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campaign-style rally in iowa. the president exulting after the win in the georgia election. he said publicly for the first time he wants a solar panel wall on the southern border, and yes, mexico will still pay for it. jeff zeleny traveling with the president has more from cedar rapids. > reporter: president trump taking somewhat of a victory lap wednesday night at a rally in cedar rapids, iowa. his first visit west of the mississippi since taking office. iowa, of course, one of those blue states he turned red last november, winning by 10%. he was not talking about that victory. he was talking about the victory in the georgia special congressional race. that's what he started out talking about. he also ran the gamut, speaking more than an hour, about twice as long as the white house initially said he would, clearly reveling in the support from iowa republicans here. he started talking about health care and the bill moving through the senate.
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>> so we have a slim 52-48. that means we basically can't lose anybody. and i think and i hope, okay, can't guarantee anything, but i hope we're going to surprise you with a really good plan. you know, i've been talking about a plan with heart. i said, add some money to it. a plan with heart. obamacare is dead. >> reporter: of course much of his speech here in cedar rapids needed a bit of fact checking and a reality check. he's not the most successful president of record, he's not passed the most bills. that's what he left supporters believing here. in reality, the president almost wistfully at the end of his remarks talked about how he wished democrats would come on board. how democrats would help with tax reform, health care reform bill, infrastructure. it will be fascinating to see in the coming months if he reaches out to democrats to get support because democrats know they also need to have more of a record, and they also need to not obstruct if they hope to win in 2018.
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the president flying back to washington after a visit here. of course, much on his plate remains in washington today. >> thanks for that. a growing number of democrats are looking for a leadership shakeup after that devastating loss in georgia's sixth district. so several house members are directing frustration at minority leader nancy pelosi. among them, tim ryan who ran an unsuccessful bid to succeed her as house leader. >> you think that nancy pelosi is more rocks toic than donald trump -- more toxic than donald trump? >> you know, the honest answer is, in some areas of the country, yes, she is. as unfair as it is, there have been a lot of people that have spent a lot of money running negative ads against her. and i think that in certain areas like in some of these special election districts, it doesn't benefit our candidates to be tied to her. and it's not fair, but it is true. and there's a reason why the republicans are still using it.
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>> it's clear that i think across the board in the democratic party we need new leadership. it's time for a new generation of leadership in the party. and democrats have had a tough time of it. they've lost all four special elections since president trump took office including georgia where jon ossoff was defeated despite a campaign that raised over $23 million. the president has blasted dodd-frank, blaming the regulations for preventing banks from lending money to businesses. u.s. banks actually have more cash than ever. banks raked in record profits last year pulling in $102 billion in townsends. just shy of -- in dividends. just shy of an all-time high. it's how you make your money as a shareholder. bank dividends crumbled during the financial crisis. they've grown since then even after congress passed dodd-frank in 2010.
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the payments haare a sign of go financial health. they boost stock prices. the prices at all-time highs. that's why banks are being accused of withholding money for lending to return to shareholders. despite the rhetoric on both sides, the truth is banks are lending. commercial loans hit an all-time high last november. the fbi is investigating the stabbing of a michigan airport police officer as terrorism. a 50-year-old canadian man, amor ftouhi, is in custody charged with violence at an national airport. more charges could be added. the fbi says he attacked lieutenant jeff neville with a foot-long knife after lingering at flint's international airport for 40 minutes. >> he was carrying badge -- car baggage, spent time in the restroom. dropped both bags and came out, pulled out a knife, yelled "allahu akbar," and stabbed
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lieutenant neville in the neck. >> police say neville fought back as another officer subdued the attacker. neville is expected to be okay. according to the fbi, the attacker entered the u.s. legally last week. officials say it appears he was a lone wolf and that no onels was involved. the suspect does remain in custody until a detention hearing that happens next wednesday. >> all right. so much for the reset with russia. ahead, moscow channeling -- canceling planned talks with the u.s. over a series of recent conflicts. we're live in moscow when we come back. can you actually love wearing powerful sunscreen? yes! neutrogena® ultra sheer. no other sunscreen works better or feels so good. clinically proven helioplex® provides unbeatable uva/uvb protection to help prevent early skin aging and skin cancer all with a clean light feel. for unbeatable protection. it's the one. the best for your skin.
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the trump administration says the u.s. and china share a common concern about the threat posed by north korea's nuclear missile program. defense secretary jim mattis and secretary of state rex tillerson hosting their chinese counterparts to discuss the
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growing crisis. for months the white house has been lobbying china to exert more influence over the kim jong-un regime. >> at his rally last night in iowa, president trump praised china's president but also sent a message that he expects more from beijing. >> we've had a very good relationship with china in all fairness. and i do like president xi. i wish we would have a little more help with respect to north korea from china. [ applause ] but that doesn't seem to be working out. but i do like the president a lot. >> the meeting with top chinese officials comes just days after the death of otto warmbier, the american college student who spent 17 months in hard labor in korea after he was sent home in a coma. warmbier's funeral is today. matt rivers with more on the high-level meetings and where the two countries go from here. good morning.
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>> reporter: this is the first series of dialogue after president trump and xi met at mar-a-lago earlier this year. at the meeting, the secretaries of state and defense doubled down on the government's position that china should be doing more, using its economic link over north korea to get the kim jong-un regime to stop going forward with its nuclear weapons program. that said, the chinese always respond in the exact same way when people use that line of argument against them. in fact, here's what the ministry of foreign affairs spokesman had to say on wednesday -- >> translator: china has made unremitting efforts to resolve the korean peninsula issue and has been playing an important and constructive role. in a word, contributions are there for all to see, and china's role is indispensable. >> reporter: china, though, criticali critical -- critics of china say they use loopholes in existing sanctions against the north
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korean regime to continue to trade and prop with the regime for the economic life. the big question is is the administration, if they decide that the chinese aren't doing enough, how does it affect the broader relationship between the u.s. and china in matters like trade and security. >> that is the question. matt rivers. thank you very much. moscow apparently having second thoughts, frustrated with the white house. the kremlin scrapping plans for talks with the trump administration aimed at improving u.s./russian relations. cnn's diana magnay live with more on the fallout. good morning to you. >> reporter: hi, dave. i think any chance for that hope of reset of relations between the u.s. and russia is pretty much dead in the water. the meeting between the deputy under secretary for political affairs and his russian counterpart in st. petersburg canceled because of this extension of sanctions, and russia has come out with rhetoric. they've taken aim at what they
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call inveterabe nulliphobes, trying to nullify any agreement with the countries. the foreign ministry spokeswoman saying we may talk at some point, but there is no point in trying to isolate us and talking to us at the same time. stop this spiral of sanctions, don't try and force us to obey. and this, of course, at a time when there's this new sanctions bill going through the house, clearly a message from the kremlin to think carefully before that sanctions bill is passed. i think the period when the kremlin was prepared to give the new trump administration the benefit of the doubt is well and truly over. i don't think there's any point in holding out much hope that much will come out of the meeting between presidents trump and putin in hamburg in two weeks time if they do meet at all. dave? >> right. still now announcement from the
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white house on if that will happen. thank you. going on any road trips this summer? >> yeah. doing a few road trips. >> all right. >> going to boston this weekend. that counts. >> driving, okay. gas is getting cheaper. the cheapest in more than a decade. and they're still falling. we'll tell you why on "money stream" next. the future isn't silver suites and houses on mars.
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u.s.-led coalition, or are they trying to take away the moment that iraqis have been waiting for? throughout this long and bloody battle, if there was a moment where iraqis were hoping to declare a victory, at least a symbolic victory in their battle to recapture mosul, it would have been reclaiming the mosque where the leader of that group, baghdadi, made his one and only appearance in 2014 where he declared this caliphate. since then, the flag of isis has been fluttering over this historic mosque and its iconic leaning minerette. they've been closing in on the city trying to recapture the mosque. in recent days, they did start a new push to anouri mosque. there were reports that they were planning on storming the mosque thursday. on wednesday evening, the iraqi military announced that as their forces were about 160 feet away
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from the mosque, isis detonated these explosives, blowing up the mosque and that iconic minurette. we heard from isis claims that it was an u.s. coalition air strike that destroyed the mosque. that is something that is being denied by the u.s. military, as you mentioned, saying 1,000% false according to one u.s. official. we heard from the iraqi prime minister saying that this is a sign of isis' defeat. and you can definitely now tragically add the mosque to the long list of o large colo, historicarchaeological and other sites. >> has become one of their methods. thank you for reporting live from jordan. a touching moment at a congressional women's softball game. [ cheers
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[ cheers ] that's capitol police special agent crystal griner throwing out the first pitch or first two pitches. she was not happy with the first throw. she's entitled to another. she was shot in the ankle last week after a gunman opened fire at the republican baseball practice in alexandria, virginia. the attack left congressman steve scalise critically injured. he's been upgraded to fair condition. tropical storm cindy is threatening serious flooding as it moves inland this morning. oh, yeah, the rain's coming in. with more let's go to meteorologist derek van dam with the latest. good thursday morning. we continue to track the progress of tropical storm cindy making landfall between texas and louisiana. this system is drawing in a significant amount of moisture from the gulf of mexico. depending on this exact track over the next few days, we have the potential for localized flooding across this region. anywhere from louisiana to eastern texas. the florida panhandle, into
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alabama, parts of mississippi, even georgia, as well. heaters a look at the latest -- here's a look at the latest flood watches and warnings from the national weather service. new orleans and baton rouge included. what is the fate of tropical storm cindy as it moves inland? it will start to dissipate. still a considerable amount of moisture associated with the system as a cold front sweeps it to the east. that is what's going to bring our flood threat along with it. here's our chance of severe weather today. for this afternoon, 80 for the big apple. 93 for washington. 92 for chicago. atlanta, a warm and muggy 81. back to you. >> okay. thank you very much. let's get a check on cnn's "money stream" this morning. global markets are down this morning after wall street closed mostly lower. the s&p 500 fell after energy stocks dropped 1.6%. that's because oil continues to decline. crude prices fell another 2% to the lowest level in ten months.
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that's still bear market territory or a 20% drop for oil. investors are worried over a supply glut. that drop in oil prices good news for drivers. gas is the cheapest in 112 years. prices have fallen every day since june 2nd. the average is now down ten cents to $2.28 a gallon. gas prices usually spike during the summer. but low demand is driving prices down. and experts think they'll just keep falling. they predict this weekend we'll have the cheapest prices so far in time to drive. home sales increased in may. that's a rebound from april. sales have seesawed from month to month this year. the problem is high demand and low inventory. low supply. the number of houses for sale is close to a 20-year low. that winds up boosting prices. so the median sales price hitting a new record in may. it's up 6% from last year. did you know that george
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clooney doesn't just look good? he sells tequila, too? he doesn't anymore. the actor is selling his tequila company for a cool $1 billion. the buyer is the owner of brands that you heard of -- joey walker and smirnoff. he launched the company go -- company with two partners in 2013. he plans to remain involved in the promotion of the company even after the sale. after the announcement, he said, "i plan to stay involved beginning with a shot." >> is that wrong? everything goes right for george clooney. i guess $700 million cash, $3 million more if they hit targets. he does have parters. randy gerber included. he doesn't get the whole billion dollars. >> i think he'll have extra money for his two new babies. >> twins. fantastic tequila if you're wondering. 4:59 eastern time. "early start" begins right now.
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senate republicans hours away from revealing their health care plan negotiated in secret. how does it affect you, and can you win over enough support -- can they win over enough support to pass a bill next week? >> look, i'll tell you about the democrats -- i am making it a little bit hard for them, but who cares? >> president trump doesn't seem to mind the democrats opposing him at every turn. the president taking a victory lap in iowa after the republicans win in that georgia special election. and that loss in georgia has some democrats revolting. nancy pelosi is hearing growing calls for a change of leadership in the house. good morning and welcome to "early start." i'm alison kosik sitting in for christine romans, who is enjoying r&r. >> couple of days off. it is thursday, june 22nd. 5:00 a.m. in the east. we're about 4.5 hours away from getting a glimpse at that health care bill. a first. republicans coming out of the shadows to unveil their plan for

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