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tv   New Day With Alisyn Camerota and John Berman  CNN  February 1, 2019 5:00am-6:01am PST

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where we see the faces of our leaders on television and feel pride, not shame. it is not a matter of can we. it's a matter of do we have the collective will, the american will? i believe we do. together, we will channel our common pain back into our common purpose. together, america, we will rise. i'm cory booker and i'm running for president of the united states of america. >> as you mentioned this is an incredibly crowded, competitive democratic field that cory booker is entering into today. the question is how will he compete, differentiate himself from the rest of the candidates. one thing he mentioned in the video is that he's the only senator who lives in an inner city. newark, just down the street from us here. this is where he cut his teeth
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politically as mayor. that's executive experience no other democratic has. he's going to iowa and south carolina next week. these are two of the states that will be key for him. south carolina, of course, with a majority of african-americans comprising the democratic electorate in the primary process. he'll do an interview later today on "the view" showing how important women voters will be for cory booker, especially when you have so many women candidates running in this field. so his work cut out for him. on day one, cory booker starting with a strong message. >> rebecca buck, stay with us. we'll make you stand out in the cold and be part of the conversation as we bring in nia malika henderson, van jones, host of "the van jones show" and david axelrod, host of "the ax
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files." ax, you're elected a president already. i want to ask you. cory booker's entrance into the race official now. what does it do to the field? >> first of all, thanks for giving me the entire credit for electing the president. i appreciate that. listen, cory booker is a dynamic guy. he has a really interesting story. the newark story is very compelling. you know, one of his problems is that we saw earlier in the week kamala harris enter the race with a message that was not dissimilar. they are in the same lane with the same theory of the case that if you do well in early primaries you turn the corner into diverse states where the african-american vote is meaningful. but it's unlikely that both of them can execute on that strategy. that's one of his issues. the other is that booker is a very inspirational guy. sometimes he can get carried
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away. we saw it with his spartacus moment on the judiciary committee during the kavanaugh hearings. he can move from being an inspirational figure to kind of a motivational speaker. sometimes it comes off a little tinny. that's a discipline he'll have to deal with. clearly a formidable guy and not to be dismissed in this race. >> that's an important point about what we saw in the hearings. nia-malika, cory booker getting a lot of attention which he wanted in that moment. not all of it was the positive attention he was going for. >> i think that's right. part of the issue was there are so many people running. a lot of folks looking for a viral moment. we had seen kamala harris having viral moments doing questioning. he couldn't in some ways figure out how to break through. so that's been a problem. axelrod brings the point.
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who he is vis-a-vis someone like kamala harris. she walked out of one of the hearings. he couldn't decide if he wanted to stay or go. i think that's an issue. in some ways he had this area to himself. being viral on social media. attracting the attention of young folks. attracting the attention of african-americans, too. now it's a more crowded field. a gift he has kamala harris doesn't have is he connects with people on the stump in a one on one way. people want to be around him and he wants to be around people. folks who decide who to vote for will see them not necessarily in their living rooms but on television. he has a magnetism and energy that cuts through the screen in a way a lot of the candidates can't quite do. >> van, you told us you have been aware of cory booker since
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you were both at law school at yale in the '90s. there are issues with which he's been closely identified for decades. criminal justice reform is one of them. how will that in his role there impact the race? >> absolutely. first, as i said, i have known this guy for 25 years. i'm so glad i graduated from yale three months before he got there. in the history of the yale law school, bill clinton and cory booker had the biggest impact on the school. cory booker's law school in a lot of people's eyes. criminal justice reform is something all african-americans, especially african-american folks from our age group -- in the 1990s, three strikes and you're out. you had a huge expansion of the prison population, mostly with our peers. that left a big mark on all of us. for cory booker i think that's a big part of the reason he's running. when he says nobody should be
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left behind, thrown away. he's talking about the experience of the 1990s and 2000s where a generation was moved to prison. there will be a heavyweight battle for the black vote between kamala harris and cory booker. they have strengths. kamala harris being a strong woman will have a big appeal. cory booker being better on the issue of criminal justice reform than kamala harris. she's gotten criticism for her role in that. carol mosely brown and al sharpton were in the same primary one time. neither of those figures have the heavyweight star power that you have with kamala and cory. >> if we look at booker's roll-out they are well calculated.
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he's starting with tom joiner. also speaking to the latin american audience today. he'll talk with the ladies on "the view" which touches boxing thats -- republicans as well -- have been accused of taking for granted. >> you have to cobble together a coalition from wherever you can get the votes. one other thing i noticed about the announcement video is it seemed young, hip, vibrant in a way that may appeal to millennials. the african-american imagery was obvious. this is something that shows me he's looking at millennial voters, young voters as part of the coalition to bring together. latino voters. he's going on univision radio for an interview this morning. this is an area where he'll have stiff competition from kamala harris who is from california and worked on immigration issues.
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potentially beto o'rourke if he decides to run. he's trying to show he can compete with these other candidates for voters. his campaign is laser focused this morning. >> i will steal an idea erica mentioned coming into the segment. >> we're a team, john. >> david axelrod, in the announcement video and as far as i could tell as part of cory booker's plan, i didn't hear him mention president trump. kamala harris didn't mention trump once. how intentional is it for the democratic candidates and how important is it for the democratic candidates to run independent of the spectrum of the trump presidency? >> the aura of trump can be assumed. it's obvious that's a big overhang on this election. the challenge for these candidates is to explain how
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they would lead beyond trump. they are all implicitly criticizing trump. he talks about leaders who we can look at with pride and not shame. i think that's the phrase he used. that was an unmistakable inference. people will be careful not to suggest that their only virtue is they are not donald trump. >> i just want to listen to a little bit -- >> one thing -- >> go ahead, van. >> i wanted to add of all the people running and we have 947 people running, i think. of the people running, cory booker is a walking repudiation of donald trump. he's literally the antidote or the opposite in that he's almost relentlessly optimistic, up it is -- upbeat and embracing everybody. he is the anti-trump just by nature. >> you and i were both looking to go to this bit of the
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interview we have with tom joiner. >> or maybe not. >> let's listen first to what he told tom. >> i'm running really not to beat anybody. i'm running to unite people. i know that when we stand together, when we work together, we can rise together. let me tell you this. we are not going to win the race by showing the worst of who we are, but by the best. i only know one way. as we were all taught by some of our best ancestors that you can't drive out darkness with darkness. you have to bring the light. you can't drive out hate with hate. you've got to bring the love. it's time for a more radical empathy for each other in this country. >> van, to your point about optimism and talking about, i'm not running to beat anybody. also not mentioning president trump's name which kamala harris didn't do either sets up a different tone.
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>> i think that's right. it is setting up a very different tone. i think one of the issues cory booker will have is do people find this tone and talking about love, which is great, do they find it sort of corny and cloying? season is it too much of an echo of president obama? the idea that we have to appeal to the better angels. there is no red or blue america, there is the united states of america. to the extent he's walking in the shadow of obama he's got to figure out a way to differentiate himself from obama. in truth, a lot of -- particularly african-americans feel like obama didn't go far enough in many ways. wasn't tough enough on some of these issues. he's got to figure that out. it sounds great. it's optimistic. it's what folks heard in 2008 and 2012 and bought it from
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obama and have love and respect for obama but might be looking for something different now, a little tougher. in that way maybe somebody like kamala harris who talks about fighting. maybe that's something they want to hear that they haven't necessarily heard from the candidates. >> you know, that may be true. i think people will be looking for a counterpoint to trump, someone who can heal the country. there is a lot of weariness in this country over the kind of continuous discord and acrimony and nastiness. it may be true. i think people will be looking for a counterpoint to trump. someone to heal the country. there is a lot of weariness in this country over the kind of continue was discord and acrimony and nastiness. it may absolutely be true. i think people will be looking for a counterpoint to trump.
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someone who can heal the country. there is a lot of weariness in this country over the kind of continuous discord and acrimony and nastiness. it may be true. i think people will be looking for a counterpoint to trump. someone -- >> something's wrong. david axelrod, we heard most of what he said. we lost his shot. do we have everyone else up here? one of the points i wanted to make is that van brought up the fact that cory booker is the walking antithesis of donald trump. they have one thing in common which is that two people who worked very hard to get both of them elected, jared kushner and ivanka trump. rebecca buck, they were big backers. were they bundlers for cory booker? >> they were. >> it is interesting. >> they hosted a fundraiser for him.
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they were very close to him as far as donors go. as cory booker has pointed out, he's been asked about this in the past few months. he pointed out they were democrats at that time. that's how he explains the relationship. charles kushner, jared kushner's father is a huge democratic donor in new jersey. the kushners are from new jersey. it is not unusual or out of the ordinary that they would have supported booker being democrats. booker says now jared and ivanka are working with president trump, he would not accept money from them today and they haven't talked since they have taken on this new role. it is a very interesting relationship indeed. >> what a soap opera. rebecca buck, thank you for standing in the cold. david axelrod, van jones, nia-malika henderson. tough analysis of the challenges cory booker faces. president trump claims his intelligence chiefs were misquoted when they contradicted
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informed him of the meeting giving him advanced knowledge that the russians were offering dirt on hillary clinton. joining us now, a member of the senate judiciary committee, maisey honona. the russians promised dirt on trump and the calls were not to his father. does that answer questions to you? >> no. >> why not? >> there is a lot that needs to be investigated. this is why the democrats focus so much on the need to make sure the mueller investigation goes forward unfettered and unrestrained. there is a lot going on that we probably still don't know. we need to have the dots connected. >> it is a question that house democrats were asking which is did donald trump, jr., call his father and tell him not then, not those phone calls, that is
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new information, correct? >> that may be new information. i don't know. surrounding this is the other actions taken by trump and his people with regard to their relationship and the discussions, what have you, with the russians. that can be one instance. there is probably a lot more we need to disclose. >> president trump did an interview with maggie haberman and peter baker of the "new york times" yesterday. i think we have sound from this. he tells them that he's been informed by the deputy toeattor general he's not a target of the investigation. >> well, he told the attorneys that i'm not a subject -- i'm not a target of, oh, yeah. >> did he say that in the sdny investigation? >> i don't know about that. >> there's two. mueller and cohen. >> i don't know about that. >> is this surprising that the
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president's legal team was informed he's not a target of the investigation? >> i don't know if it's a fact that his legal team was informed that the president is not a target. i don't think the fbi or the justice department goes around telling people whether or not they are or are not targets. even if one is not a target one could still be a subject of interest. everything that comes out of the president's mouth is, in my view, subject to question. >> again, if he's not under oath when talking to maggie haberman -- >> by the way, he still calls the investigation a witch hunt even as so many of his own people have been indicted, pled guilty. >> he actually did call the investigation a witch hunt last night even as he was releasing and praising this new information that donald trump, jr., didn't call in prior to the meeting. the chairman of your committee, senator lindsey graham, wants more information about how the fbi conducted the arrest of roger stone last week in
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florida. let me read the statement from senator graham. the american public has had enough of the media circus. the manner of this arrest appears to have only added to the spectacle. i write to seek justification for the tactics used and the timing of the arrest of mr. stone. >> do you have questions about the arrest? >> there are concerns about destruction of evidence, et cetera. my understanding is that this is the way the fbi conducts itself. certainly the chairman of the judiciary committee has its prerogative. perhaps he should call the fbi director and have a chat with him. we all care about the destruction of evidence. at the same time, i know that the president was concerned about what happened to his pal. i wish he would express the same concerns with regard to other kinds of law enforcement activities including police departments that had consent decrees at the justice department which, under the previous -- not the current
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acting attorney general -- were brought into question. so police misconduct. i wish that the president and everybody else cared more about the systemic police misconduct, especially as it targets african-americans and other minorities. >> senator, about an hour ago your senate colleague cory booker announced he's running for president. i think he's either the fourth or fifth one of your colleagues who's announced officially they are running, exploring or doing something to indicate they may get into the race. have you decided if you will support one of your colleagues in the pursuit for president? >> frankly, i like them all. i respect them all. let's face it, the democrats have a big tent. we can have a variety, a number of people to represent the diversity of our country. it's terrific. there are things that yunite us such as health care is a right, not a privilege even though this administration tries to cut back on the coverage for people with
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pre-existing conditions. while the democrats have a large tent, i think schultz should run as a democrat if his ideas are that great. he should articulate them as a democrat. it's great that we have this diverse group of people running. as i say, there are certain things that unite us. >> it sounds like you are giving me, i love my children equally answer there when i know for a fact we love all of our children differently. what i want to know from you is, is there somewhere you are leaning? do you think it is an important year for democrats to nominate a woman to be president? >> i would be delighted if we nominated a woman. i would be very delight eed if that person can win. of course i would be delighted. i would be very happy. it's time for our country to have a woman at the helm. the senate democrats who are running, the women, i have worked with all of them on so many important issues.
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i think they're all terrific. they all have different ideas to bring forth. it's all about acknowledging that we have income disparity in our country. we don't have equal rights, truly. there are so many ways we can bring forth the kinds of programs we support that distinguishes us from donald trump who, by the way, continues to focus on having a wall. really, we are at the point of ridiculousness. >> what about that? he told maggie and peter last night he doesn't expect that the congressional conferees will come up with something he supports and he's hinted that next is some kind of emergency declaration. >> an emergency of his own creation. when he says things so cavalierly, 35 days of harm not just to 800,000 federal employees but the contractor and the whole country. is this a game to him? 35 days of a government shutdown
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and he says, oh, i just set the stage for an emergency declaration which he created himself. there will be a lawsuit if he does that. i hope the judiciary which is supposed to be an independent branch of government will not allow him to have this kind of unfettered power to not only create the emergency, declare an emergency, then divert funds that are supposed to go for other purposes so his wall can be built. we are way past a president who is talking no sense. this is why i say with this president, how can you talk sense to somebody who makes no sense? what my expectation is that by february 15 we better have a bill we'll pass in the house and the senate that will keep government running until the end of the fiscal year. send it to the president. he can either sign it or not. >> senator mazie hirono of hawaii. thanks for being with us. >> thank you. we are moments away from
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secretary of state mike pompeo announcing the u.s. will pull out of a nuclear arms treaty with russia. could that lead to a new arms race? that's next. junior achievement reaches young people all over the world to prepare them for the future of work. we go into classrooms and we teach entrepreneurial skills and leadership skills. when you actually create a business when you're in your teens, it raises your self-confidence. junior achievement is really unique because they inspire young people to think creatively. the citi foundation's pathways to progress initiative helped us reach kids in over 50 countries. citi has also loaned us their executives and their employees to help us deliver our programs. our youth are three times more likely to become entrepreneurs and they're more likely to create jobs for others. they are going to bring an entrepreneurial spirit to making our world a better place.
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secretary of state mike pompeo is about to announce the united states will with draw from a nuclear arms treaty with russia. it is raising concerns about the possibility of a new arms race. joining us now, john kirby, a state department spokesperson under president obama and now a cnn military and diplomatic analyst. thank you very much for being with us. let's talk about what's happening here. intermediate range forces treaty has to do with missiles that reach up to 3,000 miles, i think. >> right. >> the administration claim is that the russians have been basically breaking the terms of the treaty for years. there is plenty of evidence of that. >> right. >> in terms of the russians because there are a lot of aspects here. what's the significance this morning of saying, you know, we're done with this? >> it's a move to try to pressure them back into
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compliance. remember, even if pompeo says we are suspending today which we expect him to say, there is a six-month withdrawal process. you still buy yourself a few months for the russians to do the right thing, destroy missiles and remove capabilities. i don't think that's likely. the russians said publicly as recently as a few months ago they don't believe the inf treaty is in their best national security interest. getting a change of behavior out of them isn't likely. the administration is trying to lay it on the table and pressure them to come into compliance. >> how much of this is about russia and how much is about china? >> great question. i think actually it's both. it is certainly about russia. we knew at the end of the obama administration we were pressuring russia to get into compliance. they now have four battalions of the missile systems of intermediate range and violating the treaty. it's also a recognition that china which is not a party of
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the inf treaty has been developing missiles of similar range and capability on their own. the argument that the administration is making is, look, the treaty binds us. it's not binding russia. they're violating it. it keeps our hands tied in meeting the threat from china. it's about both. >> one of the questions you could ask and this gets to china, the idea that china is doing this in a way that the united states can't stop it is what is the use of a bilateral treaty, a bipolar treaty and a multilateral world? >> it's a great question, john. you have to remember the time and space in which the inf treaty was signed. 1987, ronald reagan, height of the cold war. there was only one other nation state on earth that we needed to protect against these kind of missiles. that was the soviet union, now russia. china didn't have the capabilities, the economic and military power that would have allowed them to develop it back
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then. it was in time and space. you raise a good point. the value of multilateral treaties. this is one thing that bothers me about the decision the administration is making. it's in keeping with their disdain for multilateral agreements and multilateral commitments. i think what i would like to see them do in the time they have now to work forward in the next few months is try to get not only russia into compliance but try to develop a treaty framework to bring china in. how likely it is, i don't know. it's important in this multi polar world we need multilateral agreements to keep everybody in compliance. >> and allies are on edge. >> absolutely. the ones that russians have are a threat to the european continent, not to north america at all because of the range. no more than 3,000 miles. we should listen to pompeo, i guess. >> the security of the american people must be our greatest consideration. the agreements to which we enter
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must serve american interests. countries must be held accountable when they break the rules. for years russia has violated the terms of the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty without remorse. >> there you go. secretary of state mike pompeo telling us he thinks russia violated the terms of the treaty announcing the united states will suspend it. it gets to the question. the question everyone wants to know is does this mean a new arms race? the inf treaty in 1987 is seen as one of the pillars of the end of the cold war. does this mean we are going to enter willy nilly into massive nuclear build-ups? >> we all need to face the reality we are already in an arms race. china is already developing the capabilities as well as strategic nuclear capabilities. you have the north koreans and the russians have not only been
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developing the intermediate range missiles but more strategic nuclear capable missiles as well. we are in a little bit of an arms race now. when the pentagon announced the missile defense review a couple of weeks ago the acting defense secretary shanahan said it well. because the united states military is so capable. because we are so far flung, so forward deployed with great conventional nuclear capability that other adversaries, less capable like russia, china and north korea, have been left to develop missile technology as a way to deter and defeat or deny american military forces access to their spheres of influence, what are spheres they might be. they are developing missile technology, sometimes at a faster clip and more advanced than we are developing on our own. to a degree, we have to come to grips with the reality that missile technology and the missile threat isn't going anywhere any time soon. the missile review the pentagon did was well timed, overdue and
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comprehensive enough. i am worried about a withdrawal from the inf treaty for that reason. it's better to try to negotiate nations into compliance with the requirements than to bully them into pursuing them more aggressively which is what might happen. putin doesn't think the treaty is in his national interest. we pull out, it gives him a freer hand. >> do you have a sense of if it means new nuclear deployment from the u.s. and where exactly? >> i don't know if it -- i don't know that. i don't know if the pentagon knows it. what i think though and your question raises a great point is if we pull out of this and we then have to start to develop the intermediate range nuclear-capable missiles, a system of systems that we don't have now, we also are going to then have to find a way and the money and resources to deploy them. you can have all of them you want in the united states. it is not going to protect you from the threat to your european allies that the missiles pose from russia, certainly not going
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to protect your asia-pacific allies from the threat that chinese missiles pose. you have to not only develop a system but develop the deployment of them. you need resources and also bases overseas to do that. >> admiral kirby, thank you very much. appreciate you helping us understand what's going on here. it is a significant step in the arms development. >> it is very much. >> we have breaking news. the labor department released the january jobs report. a boffo jobs report is the technical term. christine romans has the numbers. >> starting this year with a lot of hiring across the board. we have 304,000 net new jobs in january. just shrugging off the government shutdown and private industry hiring. this is 100 months in a row now of job creation. that's remarkable. the unemployment rate ticked up a little bit. this is a generational low. for years now you have seen strong job creation. it shows no sign of letting down
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here. wages, by the way, up 3.2%. we have seen three months in a row of strong wage growth. that's been missing in so much of the recovery. watch to see if it continues. love to see it there. again, across the sectors. warehouses, transportation companies, offices. leisure and hospitality. huge gains in construction jobs and health care. 42,000 net new jobs there. this is a strong labor market report. we have seen 2.6 million new jobs. that pace is continuing at the beginning of the year. >> a string of big downward revision for december. 100,000 jobs. how much does the shutdown figure in to this? do we have to look at the numbers and say, they may be adjusted next report? >> you will see in the private contractors, that's where you see it. they counted workers who worked for the government but weren't employed. they weren't counted as unemployed.
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yesterday we saw a jobless claims number near a 49-year low. that's people filing for first time unemployment benefits. it's almost unheard of. that's a low number. we are seeing a strong job market here. private companies, public companies are hiring. the economy remains strong, a good market for workers, especially with wage numbers. we'll look to see if there is some sort of reverb in the numbers next month. >> last question. the fed gave us a weird signal where they may take a pause in interest rates. doesn't this data indicate maybe the pause shouldn't be so long? >> there is a big conversation about did wall street, the stock market bully the fed into being too cautious? these numbers suggest it's still a roaring economy. that's something that's concerned policymakers in the past. >> christine romans with the latest. happy belated birthday. >> happy birthday, romans. >> stay with us. we'll be right back.
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the opioid crisis kills 131 americans every day.
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according to a new lawsuit purdue pharma has profited off the country's addiction problem for decades, all while downplaying the public health crisis. miguel marquez joins us this morning with more. >> the attorney general of massachusetts saying it is an audacious plan by the company to sell the drug and the cure. nearly 300-page complaint against purdue pharma and the family outlines how they pursued a plan dubbed project tango to be an end to end pain provider. the company allegedly examined selling overdo dosdose antidote narcan to the same doctors it sold opioids to including oxycontin. citing internal documents the lawsuit shows the company referred to drug dependent people as, attractive markets that could earn the company billions. the massachusetts attorney
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general whose office filed the suit also accused the family of deceiving doctors and patients about oxycontin's risks and profiting off the sale of the drug while blaming the terrible consequences on the people who became addicted to them. the complaint cites an e-mail from former purdue chairman and president richard sack ler who wrote we have to hammer on the abusers. they are the culprits and the problem. they are the reckless criminals. the lawsuit includes a chart that shows the family paid themselves more than $4 billion in opioid profits between 2008 and 2016. purdue lost a legal battle to get the contents of the complaint kept private telling cnn the massachusetts attorney general's decision to release the complaint is, quote, part of a continuing effort to blame it for the entire opioid crisis and try the case in the court of public opinion rather than the justice system adding massachusetts seeks to publicly
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villify purdue, its executives, employees and directors while unfairly undermining the important work we have taken to address the opioid addiction crisis. eight members of the sackler family as well as current and former executives are named in the suit. >> you can see why it was of interest of them to be kept private. >> you can see what was redacted and what's now out there, it is very obvious anding sho i shock >> miguel, thank you for being with us. appreciate it. you might have heard. this sunday there is a football game. the patriots are playing -- a team. if you're not into football it is team ruff versus team fluff. >> yes! >> the puppy bowl. this is good news for everybody. earth loves this. the puppy bowl here next. moderator: this is the chevy equinox. various: beautiful. wow. ooh, this is fancy.
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"green book" is now nominated for five academy awards. ok, here's the deal. including...
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(911 operator, muffled) 911, what's your emergency? (overlapping radio calls) the first responders, they are the reason why i'm here. just um, just makes me thankful, for everything that i have. ♪ kickoff in atlanta brought to you by verizon. a small army of security will be protecting the one million visitors who made their way to atlanta for super bowl liii, a helicopter, bomb sniffing dogs and thousands of cameras out for sunday's big game. cnn's dave briggs is live in
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atlanta with a preview of the big game. good morning, my friend. >> reporter: good morning. nice jerseys, very good. the patriots and rams had just two weeks to prepare for the super bowl. for 65 local, state and federal agencies the security game plan is two years in the making. officials expect more than one million people to visit the super bowl festivities in downtown atlanta. to protect that quarter mile barrier has been established all around mercedes benz stadium behind me where 13 of the 15 events are within this border. it's marked by more than seven miles of fencing. the blackhawk helicopter above and numerous police drones will enforce a 30-mile no-fly zone around the stadium all weekend long. every arriving truck gets an x-ray inspection by u.s. customs and border protection officers. everywhere you look there are bomb-sniffing dogs, even at my
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hotel this morning. homeland security secretary s r kirstjen nielsen said there are no known threats to the super bowl. the fans here can feel safe and many of them will be rooting for the rams, john. i'm sorry about that. there are two groups -- the group from new england and the group that hates the patriots. >> i want the patriots to win. so i have to root for the rams. >> who's playing again? definitely the rams. i can't believe every year we have to watch the patriots in the super bowl. you know? get somebody new in there like the rams. >> i have the rams. the patriots beat my falcons in the super bowl. i hate the patriots. >> i have never hated a team more in my life. >> reporter: samuel adams brewery has a reminder for the haters. the g.o.a.t. is too old, too slow and still here. it's not even 9:00 a.m. should be an exciting weekend
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for the patriots, the rams and fans. >> it will be hard to top the excitement happening right here right now, dave briggs. >> the beer is part of the job, i understand, dave. i get it. thank you very much. >> all right. >> this is amazing. >> watch dave on the cnn bleacher report special tomorrow at 2:30 p.m. right here on cnn. the reason it's hard for us to talk, the other big showdown tomorrow. team ruff versus team fluff in puppy bowl xv on animal planet. >> i can like your football voice. tanner and tessa are flanking me. they are 9-week-old lab husky mixes. zucker, not only the name of our boss but the puppy john berman is holding. >> he's freaking out. i asked him for a raise. look. he's licking my face.
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>> now he's kissing john. your raise is good. i'll take one, too. we have tizzy, an 11-week-old boxer mix. they are cute and up for adoption. >> they are all here on behalf of the danbury animal welfare society website. for info on how to adopt them visit the animal welfare society website. daws.org. >> there are 93 puppies who will be participating. i could read you more of the notes but in real life, tessa ate my homework. i have never been able to say that before. >> the dog ate my homework. >> they are from shelters across the u.s. including puerto rico, costa rica. i'm told there is a halftime show involving cats. the atlanta acro-cats. >> they work with 51 different animal shelters and rescue organizations across the united states, costa rica, puerto rico. it is on 3:00 p.m. sunday on animal planet. the puppy bowl, they are almost
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as cute as tom brady. >> almost as cute as john's man crush. >> sunday at 3:00 p.m. eastern on animal planet. thank you so much. there is a lot more news coming up. my face has to get licked a lot more. we'll be right back. my experience with usaa has been excellent. they really appreciate the military family and it really shows. with all that usaa offers why go with anybody else? we know their rates are good, we know that they're always going to take care of us. it was an instant savings and i should have changed a long time ago. it was funny because when we would call another insurance company, hey would say "oh we can't beat usaa" we're the webber family. we're the tenney's we're the hayles, and we're usaa members for life. ♪ get your usaa auto insurance quote today. woman 1: i had no symptoms of hepatitis c. man 1: mine... ...caused liver damage. vo: epclusa treats all main types of chronic hep c. vo: whatever your type, ask your doctor if epclusa is your kind of cure.
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the u.s. adding 304,000 jobs in january despite the record-breaking government shutdown. this is the 100th consecutive month of job gains. let's get to christine romans here. this is a big number. >> it's a big, strong number. aum

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