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tv   Early Start with Christine Romans and Dave Briggs  CNN  May 28, 2019 1:00am-2:00am PDT

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another first -- burst of tornados punishes the midwest. more flooding could further devastate oklahoma. the white house renewing an assault on climate science, a stunning report in the "the new york times" shows a white house at odds with science. people are pushing themselves, we're not even capable of doing it. >> a traffic jam at the world's highest peak. an american is now the 11th
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climber to die on everest this year. and if you're feeling burned out at work, you're not alone. burnout is now an actual medical diagnosis. good morning, and welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans. >> how are you feeling? >> i feel a little burned out. >> just thought i'd ask. good morning, everyone, i'm dave briggs. it has tuesday, may 28th. 4:00 a.m. in the east. we start with the severe weather. the tornadoes just keep oncoming, at least 449 reported in the month of may. the latest target, dayton, ohio, two tornadoes touching down there monday night. 3 miles and 30 minutes apart. dayton has lost power to both water plants and pump stations. officials are asking citizens to conserve water. >> i heard whistles, like a train was coming through. i told my fiance to get inside the tub. next thing i know, windows was breaking, i heard a lot of debris flying around and just
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stuff crashing, and glass just everywhere back there right now. it's really terrible. >> so far no reports of injuries or fatalities in the dayton area. a local church was badly damaged. the steeple and roof winding up in the street. the tornado hitting when children were inside. >> you have to say it's an act of god that there were no injuries with the young people that were inside the church, even though the church received structural damage, that can be replaced. >> the city of salina, ohio, was also hit by a tornado last night. seven people were hurt and there is significant damage. mayor jeff hazel tells cnn affiliate whio power is out to the entire city with door-to-door checks right now. we are also getting reports of considerable damage in pendleton, indiana. the high school serving as a shelter for those who have been displaced. >> the whole town is devastated. trees are down on almost every street in the town.
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>> oh, my gosh. oh, my gosh. holy crap. >> that was the terrified voice of ben smith, an iowa state meteorology student. take a look at this hailstorm in the chicago suburb of oak lawn. just part of a much broader outbreak throughout the midwest. let's bring in cnn's pedram javaheri live in the weather center. wow, may has just been wild. >> it has been, unlike any we have seen in recent memory at least when you take a look at the number of tornadoes and severe weather reports in recent days. 46 reports of tornadoes in the past 24 hours. as you mentioned into the month of may approaching 500. in the last 12 days, we have had tornadoes each and every day, covering an area about 17 states, that's 321 tornadoes in a 12-day span. really an incredible set up and
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most notably in the past few hours out of dayton, ohio, the metro population approaches about 800,000 people across this region. certainly when you see a tornado shut down in an urban environment and a high population zone, an area of concern, the debris ball signature, another area of debris estimated to be several thousand feet high as tornadoes crossed portions of oklahoma. you see quite a bit of damage on the ground, officials reporting you have to use a snowplow to remove debris off i-75 with all the damage that's been left in place and even into montgomery county where dayton is located 97% of the county without power. speaks to the amount of damage potentially left behind with this particular line of active weather. thunderstorms tapering off. transitioning to heavy rainfall. the flooding concern that remains in place and more on that here in a little bit as well. >> thank you so much for that. thank you. much of the water logged planes in the midwest bracing for yet
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another round of heavy rain. the arkansas river in tulsa, oklahoma, is near a record crest. the river spirit casino resort in tulsa, oklahoma, has been closed almost a week because of flooding. water overtaking the pool deck, t tiki bar, spa, the casino says 1,600 employees are getting paid throughout the closure. the tulsa county sheriff's office posted these photos showing dramatic flooding. oklahoma's governor saying the situation still could get worse and they're not out of woods yet. president trump wheels up from japan and on his way back to the unite. he used a memorial day address aboard a navy ship to tout his defense spending and question advances in technology. he asked u.s. sailors if they preferred steam or electric based aircraft catapults, the president suggesting the new technology was too costly and less reliable. >> you know, steam has only
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worked for about 65 careers. steam or electric. steam? electric? they're always coming up with new ideas, they're making planes so complex you can't fly them. we all want innovation, but it's too much. >> that was interesting. sounded like a shot at boeing, perhaps, but the big take away from the president's trip to japan is north korea and mr. trump's efforts to get kim jong un to denuclearize. wh let's go live to tokyo and bring in cnn's ivan watson. good to see you, my friend. is this a good cop bad cop dynamic or is the president just siding with kim jong un, or is there an actual fracture?
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>> reporter: it's really tough to tell. it's very clear that president trump is doubling down. he is all in on his personal diplomatic initiative with kim jong un, and he's willing to overlook things that -- like short range ballistic missile launches, that took place less than three weeks ago from north korea, and as a result you had this strange situation wherein this very restricted bilateral meeting where there were four american and japanese officials in the room. the japanese prime minister, john bolton, the white house national security adviser and president trump, president trump was the only one in the room that does not publicly believe that those missile launches were violations of united nations security council resolutions. and so he said that on a stage next to the japanese prime minister. this was a visit that was celebrating the alliance between the u.s. and japan, high on
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symbolism, low on real concrete substance. the white house did not get a trade deal with japan that it had wanted in the run up to the meeting, and while they were showing the strength of their alliance, there were cracks there such as how do you define a short range ballistic missile launch, and president trump endorsing kim jong un's insults of joe biden, a former u.s. vice president and rival to president trump, but not at least publicly endorsing the north korean's slamming of his own national security adviser, bolton. we heard president trump say he still stands by bolton for now. dave and christine. >> and those trade talks expected to resume after july elections but you're right, no huge take away from this trip abroad. ivan watson live in tokyo. thank you rch. president trump took the side of kim jong un, over joe
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biden, misspelling the former vice president's name, and drawing criticism from the 2020 democratic contenders. >> it's just one more example of donald trump proving that he cares about donald trump, first, last and in between. and not protecting the interests of the united states of america. >> kim jong un is a murderous dictator, and the vice president biden served this country honorably. it's one more example of the way this president tries to draw attention to himself by saying things that shock the conscience. >> obviously we have a crisis in north korea, and we need to absolutely deal with it with a strategy, not with him doing foreign policy by tweet or lying to the american public and saying there's nothing to worry about. >> we don't want a war but nobody should be believing that this guy has anything in terms of his values with the united states. we don't need to be praising kim jong un. >> so biden has not commented.
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he returns to the campaign trail today. a teacher town hall in houston this afternoon will be his 12th public event since entering the race. by contrast, bernie sanders has held half that many since saturday. the trump administration hardening its assault on climate science. according to the "the new york times", the president is planning to limit climate science projections and federal studies to the year 2040 instead of the end of the century. the move effectively eliminates reporting on climate changing worst case scenarios, and science warns it will give an incomplete and false picture. >> this appears to be an attempt to influence the next assessment. the trump administration has reportedly proposed a new climate review panel headed by willi william happer, a physicist compared demonizing carbon
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dioxide to hitler's treatment of the jews. an american climber has died on mount everest. that brings the death toll to 11 this year. 62-year-old attorney christopher john coolish of colorado died after reaching the top of everest. his family said he died doing what he loved, survived by his mother and younger siblings. there are concerns about overcrowding. crowds got stuck in a line of the summit, most people could only spend a matter of minutes at the summit without extra oxygen supplies. >> it has become a death race there because there was a massive traffic jam and people are pushing themselves, we're not even capable of doing it. they try to do it, they try to summit and instead of summiting, they kill themselves. >> wow. tourism officials in nepal say any suggestions that the deaths are related to heavy traffic at
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the summit are quote baseless. burnout at work is real. just ask your doctor. according to the world health organization, burnout is now a legitimate medical diagnosis. it even appears in the w.h.o.'s handbook. the symptoms include feelings of energy depletion and increased mental distance from a job, and reduced production at work. they are to rule out anxiety and mood disorders before diagnosing workplace burnout. >> trying to diagnose it. you're just tired. >> i'm a very happy person. >> you're never burned out. just a little bit tired. nothing wrong with that. german chancellor angela merkel, what she says about the european election and quote dark forces going mainstream.
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u.s. markets back open today, monday provided a break for investors as they braced for another volatile week. last week stocks posted several days of big declines. the dow suffered its longest weekly losing streak since 2011. investors are growing increasingly worried the u.s. china trade war is here to stay. trade tensions will remain at the forefront as retail earnings roll into another week, worried the trade war will affect businesses and hurt customers. a handful of retailers report
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earnings this week so expect to hear more about the tariff danger. gap, abercrombie & fitch, and lieu li lulu lemon are delivering first quarter results. the second estimate of first quarter gdp comes on thursday. german chancellor angela merkel said dark forces are finding mainstream support in her country and other parts of the world. there is work to be done to face up to them. merkel sat down with christian amanpour. one day after nationalists failed to live up to support in the european elections. after 13 years as chancellor, merkel has shouldered a lot of the blame for europe's populist wave because of the handling of the refugee crisis. >> what do you answer to the people who say it was a great germany but these dark demons have risen again.
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>> translator: germany will not uncouple itself from developments we see all over the world. we see this in germany as well, but in germany obviously they always have to be seen in a certain context, and the context of our past, which means we have to be that much more vigilant than others. >> recently, german jews were warned by a leading government official not to wear yamikas in public because of the rise of anti-semitic attacks. in public for the first time since her ordeal, we'll hear from her next.
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the title. >> number 6, bill buckner. buckner there was finally welcomed back to fenway bark in 2008 after the red sox won two world championships. the team and its fans fondly remembering the late first baseman. >> a generation may have only remembered that moment in game 6 of the 1986 world series but the truth is he was an extraordinary player, worthy of discussion for the hall of fame. and without question, he was a hall of fame gentleman. >> buckner was battling louie body dementia, surrounded by his family before his death, he was just 96. the hiker who was rescued after 17 days in a forest in maui makes her first appearance. amanda eller smiled and greeted dozens of well wishers, to thank the people who found her.
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>> i didn't know what i was doing. i didn't know what i was getting closer to. the only thing i could do was trust. i had nothing else to go by. i didn't have a compass. i didn't have a phone. i didn't have a shirt. i'm a girl who got lost in the woods and you guys showed up hard. this is true aloha, and i have lived here for four years, and i have never experienced anything like this. >> by all accounts, she's lucky to be alive. she survived on berries, river water and by all appearances, pure grit. she's still recovering but plans to share her harrowing story of survival at a news conference later today. >> very much looking forward to that. an astounding 449 tornadoes now reported this month alone. another damaging round overnight, devastation in indiana. and cutting off water in dayton, ohio. gumming up its performance., add finish dishwasher cleaner with your detergent to help dissolve this grease so you're ready for your next meal.
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another burst of tornadoes punishes the midwest, ohio and indiana hit hard overnight and more flooding could further devastate oklahoma. short-term research for long-term problems, the white house tried to mislead the public about climate change. it has become a death race there. people are pushing themselves. we're not even capable of doing it. >> a traffic jam at the world's highest peak in america. it is now the 11th climber to die on everest this year. if you're feeling burned out at work, you're not alone. burnout is now an actual medical diagnosis. hopefully we can come up with the cure in the next hour and a half. >> the prescription is what, get a new job, i'm not sure. >> take a vacation. welcome back to "early start," i'm dave briggs. and i'm christine romans. the tornadoes are still coming,
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449 in the month of may. the latest target, dayton, ohio, two tornadoes touching down monday night, 3 miles and 30 minutes apart. dayton has lost power to both water plants and pump stations. officials are asking citizens now to conserve water. sn snowplows were brought in to move debris out of the streets. >> i heard the whistle, like a train was coming through. i told my fiance to get inside the tub and next thing i know, windows was breaking, and i heard a lot of debris flying around and just stuff crashing and glass just everywhere back there right now. it's really terrible. >> so far no reports of injuries or natfatalities in the dayton area. a local church badly damaged and its steeple and roof winding up in the street. the tornado hitting when children were inside. >> you have to say it's an act of god that there were no injuries with the young people that were inside the church, even though the church received structural damage. that can be replaced. >> the city of salina, ohio, was
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also hit by a tornado last night. seven people were hurt. there's significant damage. mayor jeff hazel tells cnn affiliate w.h.i.o., power is out for the entire city with door-to-door checks underway, and we are getting reports of damage in pendleton, indiana, the high school serving as a shelter for those who have been displaced. >> the whole town is devastated. trees are down on almost every street in the town. >> oh, my gosh. oh, my gosh. >> that was a terrified voice of ben smith, iowa state meteorology student who captured footage of a possible micro burst in yorkville, illinois. take a look at this hailstorm, pelting the chicago suburb of oak lawn, part of a much broader outbreak throughout the midwest. cnn's pedram javaheri live in the weather center with a look
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at all of this. good morning. good morning, this is an incredible run of severe weather. i believe i heard christine talking about 450 tornadoes so far in the month of may. i looked into a 30 day period, we have exceeded 500 reports, you see about 51 coming in across portions of midwest and central plains in the past 24 hours, and the last 12 days, 328 reports of tornadoes. notice the area of coverage. 17 states impacted by this. it's not an isolated pocket of the country. every single day in a 12-day span but the last time, only four times in recorded history have withe had this many tornad in a recorded period. it's quite a rare event taking place here. in dayton, ohio, of course, one of the tornadoes touching down at 11:07 local time, the debris ball coming in north of town telling us quite a bit of damage done across this region as christine noted using snowplows
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to remove the degree off interstate 75 and of course with the damage in place, we know of at least 93% of montgomery county where dayton is located still without power at this hour. an incredible run of severe weather here, and storms beginning to finally taper off, and you notice it took a good six to seven hours post sunset to lose some of this energy that was in place. thunderstorms quieting down. wet weather beginning to taper off. another round of it expected going in towards the afternoon hours, guys, the daytime heating across the midwest. >> thank you so much for that. we'll continue to watch that all day. much of the water logged midwest is bracing for heavy rain. the arkansas river in tulsa, oklahoma, near a record crest. the river spirit casino and resort in tulsa has been closed almost a week because of flooding. water is overtaking the pool deck, the tiki bar, the spa. the tulsa county sheriff's office posted these photos showing dramatic flooding.
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the president spoke with oklahoma governor from japan vowing assistance. the governor says his state is not out of the woods yet. more now from cnn's ed lav lavandera. >> reporter: the governor has issued a state of emergency. you can see why. we are nearly a mile away from the banks of the arkansas river and this is how far the flood waters have come. we arrived in this neighborhood in west tulsa, and there was a roadblock here. most of these homes are taking on anywhere from 2 to 6 feet of water as you make your way back there toward the river. the concern is not just in tulsa but downstream into western arkansas, the fort smith, arkansas, area, where the fear and concerns of flooding, and really what emergency officials are concerned about is the levee system and whether or not it will be able to withstand the pressure from all of these flood waters, but this is just another day here in what has been a long week of severe weather from texas to chicago to wyoming, all
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over the central part of this country, severe weather, tornadoes, and flood waters really taking a toll on the central region of the united states. dave and christine? >> ed lavandera in tulsa. president trump on his way back to the united states. he use add memorial day -- used a memorial day address to thank the troops and questioned advances in technology asking sailors if they preferred steam or electric based aircraft. >> you know, steam has only worked for about 65 years perfectly. steam or electric, ready? steam? electric? >> they're always coming up with new ideas. they're making planes so complex you can't fly them. we all want innovation but it's too much. >> that sure sounded like a shot at boeing. the big take away from the
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president's trip to japan is north korea and mr. trump's efforts to get kim jong un to denuclearize, the president finding himself increasingly isolated, siding with kim over his own national security adviser when it comes to north korea's rocket launches. let's go live to tokyo and bring in cnn's ivan watson, and the president as we have seen him before just unable to criticize the kim regime here and say that these recent launches are somehow negative. >> no, he is all in when it comes to his historic personal diplomacy with kim jong un. the problem, then, comes up, though, when his own evaluation of something like the may 9th launch by north korea of two short range ballistic missiles, it's when president trump's analysis of that doesn't match up with his japanese ally nor his own national security
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adviser. so that gives you an end result of during one of the meetings here of four individuals, the president, john bolton, his nsa adviser, the japanese prime minister and the japanese national security adviser, president trump was the only person in that room who did not agree with the others that the launch of those two short range ballistic missiles were violation of united nations security council resolutions, so there is a dissonance there. prime minister shinzo abe, he pulled out all the stops. he was out there to flatter president trump, to celebrate a very strong alliance that goes back generations between japan and the u.s., and by all accounts, it looked like it worked. president trump appeared delighted to walk into a standing ovation in a stadium for a sumo tournament. he loved the honor and the flattery of being the first
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foreign leader to meet japan's newly enthroned emperor, but amid this demonstration of unity, there were also these moments where the two leaders did not agree, though president trump made a concession to japan to postpone some trade talks until after his ally, shinzo abe has elections in july for the upper house of the japanese legislature. christine, dave. >> ivan watson for us in tokyo where it is 5:40 in the evening. thanks, ivan. the trump administration is hardening its assault on climate science, the president planning to limit the climate studies until 2040 instead of projecting to the end of the century. it effectively eliminates reporting on worst case scenarios and scientists warn it will present the public with an incomplete and falsely optimistic picture. this appears to be an effort
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to influence the conclusions of the climate projection. the president has a climate review panel headed by william happer a physicist known for defending the virtues of carbon dioxide and compared demonizing it to hitler's treatment of the jews. the number of measles cases in the u.s. this year has now grown to 940 in 26 states. that is 60 more cases than last week, and 26 shy of surpassing the 25 year high set in 1994. maine and new mexico are new to the list of states with confirmed measles cases. maine becoming the fourth state in the nation from prohibiting people out of vaccination for philosophical or religious reasons. burnout at work is real. just ask your doctor. according to the world health
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organization, burnout is now a legitimate medical diagnosis. it even appears in the w.h.o.'s handbook. the symptoms include feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion. increased mental distance from a job or negative feelings about a job and reduced production at work. doctors are urged to first rule out anxiety and mood disorders before diagnoses workplace burnout. >> i think we just checked that first box, exhaustion, that's it. >> what's the prescription, a new boss, a new job. >> stand by as we search for a cure. 42 minutes past the hour. german chancellor, angela merkel, what she thinks about dark forces going mainstream. even our pets know to go directly to petmeds.com
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merkel says dark forces are finding their way into mainstream support, and there is work to be done. merkel sat down one day after nationalists failed to live up to predicted surge in support in the european elections. after 13 years as chancellor, merkel shared a lot of the blame for the populist because of her handling of the refugee crisis. >> what do you answer to the people who say it was a great germany under your chancellorship but these dark demons have risen again. >> translator: germany can and will not uncouple itself from developments we seek all over the world. we see in in germany as well but in germany obviously they always have to be seen in a certain context and the context of our past which means we have to be that much more vigilant than others. >> recently, german jews were warned by a leading government official not to wear yamakas or skull caps in public because of
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a rise in anti-semitic attacks. merkel says there is not a single synagogue, school for jewish kids in germany that does not need to be guarded by police. all right, an american climber has died on mount everest. that brings the death toll to 11 this year. a 62-year-old attorney, christopher john kulish of colorado died monday after reaching the top of everest. his family said he died doing what he loved. he is survived by his mother and younger siblings. there are growing concerns about overcrowding. last week, crowds were stuck in a line to the summit. >> it has become a death race there because there was a massive traffic jam and people are pushing themselves. they do it, they try to summit, and instead of summiting, they kill themselves. >> all right, so cnn was just at everest base camp and she joins us live. she's in nepal.
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what are you hearing on the mountain? why are there so many people trying to summit here? why are the lines so long? >> reporter: it's a real combination of things. every single climber has that one goal of trying to reach the peak of everest because they want to see how far they can challenge themselves physically, mentally, and emotionally. the issue right now is that based on what we're hearing on the ground, what we are hearing from sherpas who are on the mountain who have years of experience is a number of climbers who are coming through don't have the skill set to be able to handle a mountain like mount everest, and perhaps most importantly, they don't know how to listen to their bodies. trying to climb mount everest is a very fine balance of taking calculated risks but also knowing when your body is quite literally telling you enough. that photograph that has gone viral showing that long line of
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climbers waiting during that crush to reach the summit, that was taken in an area called the death zone and it's called that for a reason. it's because when you're up at that altitude, you don't have enough oxygen. when you take a breath there, the amount of oxygen that you take in is a third of what you would be taking at sea level. that's why people carry up tanks of oxygen with them. that's why they try to calculate how much time they're actually going to be spending at this significantly high altitude and so when you have those hours long waits, some say yes, that had an impact on this year's death toll. people don't die, though, for the most part when they're going up to the top. most of those who died made it to the summit. it was when they were coming down that their bodies succumb to altitude sickness. you don't have enough oxygen, your organs started degrading, people fall into a coma, and never wake up again.
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the government has come under criticism with the number of permits they issued. you have the issue of inexperienced climbers, and some organizations wanting to get their clients to the top, trying to push them through. there's the burden of responsibility on climbers themselves and i can tell you having been at base camp when we were there for two hours, it makes such a difference when that oxygen level that we're normally used to isn't available to you. short distances are exhausting. your fingers start to tingle. you feel very lightheaded and so one of the most important things we're hearing about when trying to do these kinds of summits, these kinds of climbs is ensuring that you're getting enough oxygen. fortunately with these crowds that we're seeing, with this backlog, it doesn't seem like people are able to take the precautions we need. >> fascinating, we're so fortunate to have you there talking to climbers and talking to the, you know, people who are equipping the climbers to find out really what's happening on
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everest. arwa damon, thank you. >> surprising that they are refusing to do anything about the permits. a new gillette ad features a milestone between a transgenderson and his father. cnn business has the details next. whoops! but julie has resolve pet expert. its latest formula attacks odors at the source. no odor. no stain. no nothin'. whatever happens, no big deal. resolve. can't see what it is yet.re? what is that? that's a blazer? that's a chevy blazer? aww, this is dope. this thing is beautiful. i love the lights. oh man, it's got a mean face on it. it looks like a piece of candy. look at the interior. this is nice. this is my sexy mom car. i would feel like a cool dad. it's just really chic. i love this thing. it's gorgeous. i would pull up in this in a heartbeat. i want one of these. that is sharp. the all-new chevy blazer. speaks for itself. i don't know who they got to design this
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shipstation. the #1 c[ slurps ] of ogwho's a good boy? it's me. me, me, me. hey guys! you're gonna want to get in on this. i know how to those guys in here. let's pause the internet on their devices. wohhh? huhhhh? [ grumbling ] all: sausages! mmm, mmmm. bon appetite. make time for what matters. pause your wifi with xfinity xfi and see the secret life of pets 2 in theaters. 4:56 eastern time and the hiker who was rescued after 17 days in a forest in maui making her first public appearance since the ordeal monday. amanda eller sitting wheelchair because of leg injuries smiled and greeted dozens of well wishers at an event organized by
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her family to thank the people who found her. >> i didn't know what i was doing. i didn't know what i was getting closer to. the only thing that i could do was trust. i had nothing else to go by. i didn't have a compass. i didn't have a phone. i didn't have a shirt. i'm just a girl that got lost in the woods and you guys like showed up hard. this is true aloha, and i have lived here for four years, and i have never experienced anything like this. >> the 35-year-old yoga instructor survived on berries, river water and by all appearances, pure grit. amanda is still recovering but plans to share her harrowing story of survival at a news conference later today. just another night at the office for james holzhauer. >> did he risk enough, 58,000. that looks pretty good for me. >> not the record. >> no, $122,000 and a 28 day
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today of $2,195,557. >> holzhauer's 28th straight jeopardy win, just shy of the single game record he set just last month. holzhauer getting awfully close to ken jennings jeopardy record of more than 2 1/2 million dollars. jennings did it in over 74 games. let's get a check on cnn business this morning taking a look at global markets, you can see a mixed performance a little bit higher for the asian markets but european markets have closed down or opened down a little bit here on wall street. futures just nudging lower here. wall street finished higher on friday but for the week was still down due to trade war fears. the dow declined .7%, the longest losing slump since june 2011. the s&p 500 lost 1.2% on the week, the nasdaq fell 2.4%. the race for electric and self-driving cars, thinking about a merger with fiat
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chrysler, renault. as they face pressures of a quickly changing industry. it's not clear how a merger with fiat chrysler would affect that alliance. a young man's first shave is a milestone, and for transgenderm transgender man, samson brown, it was memorable for several reasons. >> now, don't be scared. shaving is about being confident. >> brown shared this experience with his father in an ad for gillette. the video shows brown standing in front of a bathroom mirror as his father coaches him. gillette shared the video with the caption, whenever, wherever, however it happens, your first shave is special. it now has close to a million views. gillette had another socially relevant ad earlier this year. it's we believe ad, addressed several issues like toxic
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masculinity, sexual harassment and me too. >> i don't think i ever had that moment with my father where he teaches me how to shave. 3 >> you haven't had a moment with a razor in a long time, apparently. >> excellent point. >> somebody get brigs a razor. >> who needs a razor, sorry gillette. "early start" continues right now. another burst of tornadoes punishes the midwest. ohio and indiana hit hard overnight, and more flooding could further devastate oklahoma. >> short-term research for a long-term problem, is the white house trying to mislead the public about climate change? it has become a death race there, and people are pushing themselves. we're not even capable of doing it. >> a traffic jam at the world's highest peak. an american is now the 11th climber to die on everest this year. and if you're feeling burnt out at work, you're not alone. burnout is

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