Skip to main content

tv   American Morning  CNN  November 9, 2010 6:00am-9:00am EST

6:00 am
ahead. girl power in afghanistan. a u.s.-sponsored program is helping afghan women break with the past to build a better future one paycheck at a time. our special series "the other afghan offensive." i've seen a lot of football, but nothing like this. a trick play by a texas middle school. just ahead, we're going to talk with the coach who came up with the penalty play as it's called. and the quarterback who turned the trick into a 67-yard touchdown. first, though, president obama arriving this morning in his boyhood home of indonesia. the second of four nations on his ten-day trip to asia. also a visit he's had to cancel twice before. once to work on health care and then again because of the bp oil spill. >> our senior white house correspondent ed henry is traveling with the president. he's live in jakarta for us. so the president had to cancel this trip in the past, and we're hearing this morning he may have to cut this one short. >> reporter: that's right, john. so breaking news this morning. almost seems like this visit is cursed in some way because of
6:01 am
the two previous cancellations. now robert gibbs telling us a short time ago that the president may have to cut the schedule short, leave a little early, and get to south korea for the g-20 summit because of this volcanic ash that is spewing out of mt. merapi. you can see this i-report we have, a fascinating still photo that shows how much is coming out. and that can be dangerous, destructive to jet engines. so obviously for the safety of the president and everyone traveling with him as part of the delegation, they're probably going to cut short either a speech he's giving tomorrow at the university of indonesia or a visit to a local mosque. they say white house aides do, he's hoping to give this speech because he's planning on a major address here, but they may have to cut other stuff short. >> we talked about the economic ties when he was in india and the importance of establishing or bolstering that relationship. what is he hoping to accomplish on this trip to indonesia? >> well, what's interesting is
6:02 am
that they are talking, white house aides are about the fact that this is a country that is the largest muslim majority country in the world that's a democracy. and it is basically one that is engaged with the west. it's basically working with the u.s. on trade. as you noted climate change, counterterrorism, and so what interests the president in particular is the fact that it was sort of a country that keeps its muslim identity but at the same time is reaching out and forging ties with the west. and by the way, as i mentioned a democracy, if you look at all the stops on this trip. india, now indonesia, south korea, and then japan, all democracies here in asia circling around china, a not so subtle message to that communist country that the u.s. has these close ties with all of the democracies in the region. >> ed henry for us this morning, traveling with the president. a trip that may be cut short because of mother nature.
6:03 am
thank you so much. well, barry sotoro, that's the name he went by. was he a teacher's pet? we're going to talk with someone who knew the president growing up and check in with her in the next hour. yesterday white house press secretary robert gibbs actually went to bat for them. it happened while the president was meeting with india's prime minister yesterday. indian officials tried to allow only five american journalists into the meeting instead of the previously agreed upon eight. that's when gibbs put his foot down. >> they're going this because they're going in with me. the whole group is going in with me. all of them go in. all of my guys go in. okay? >> no problem. >> that's the new agreement. >> and eventually all eight journalists were allowed in. >> at one point he put his foot in the door. michael bloomberg says he didn't say it. he did not call president obama the most arrogant man he'd ever
6:04 am
met. according to rupert murdoch bloomberg made the comment after playing a round of golf with the president over the summer is. bloomberg says he doesn't remember the conversation that way and he doesn't think president obama is arrogant. well, folks in the northeast might be wondering what the heck happened to fall. the weather seemed to go right from summer to winter. the northeast picking up this morning after a nasty, windy storm. gusts hit 65 miles an hour in maine. more than enough to knock down trees, knock down power lines, and leave people cold without electricity this morning. >> and the new york city area got sleet and snow. long island saw the earliest dusting in a couple of decades. >> rob marciano is in the weather center in atlanta. good morning, rob. >> how about that, guys? a little snow in the big apple yesterday. put a little scare in you. reminder that winter is almost here. no more snow expected in new york or across parts of eastern mass. it should be sunny in d.c., but it will be breezy. and we do have some storms
6:05 am
rolling into the pacific northwest and also in through the inner mountain west. still dealing with this low that gave you the wet snow mixing in with the rainfall yesterday. and it's slow to move out. so still some eastern new england rain today. and everyone will see breezy conditions, especially across parts of eastern mass where winds are still sustained at about 20 miles or so and gusting higher than that along the cape. a little bit lesser amounts across parts of new york. but it probably will be enough to slow down air travel. 12 to 20 of snow across the wasatch, 6 to 12 inches of snow expected across the colorado rockies where a number of ski resorts are beginning to open. we'll break that news to you as we get it. even some of the ski resorts down south opening already. so let's turn -- there you go. in north carolina. that's right. north carolina, they're strapping in to shred.
6:06 am
banner elk up there on sugar mountain. a lot of that's been manmade, but it's been cold enough the past week and a half to make a lot of that snow. it's been chilly and 'tis the season, so get out there and enjoy. it's close, guys. come on down to north carolina. >> you did put a scare in us yesterday. we walked outside, wait a minute? is this snow, is this rain, is it sleet? it's only november. >> seems like yesterday it was 95 degrees and everybody was sweating. >> and in l.a., it was just yesterday. >> but 20 inches of powder in the wasatch. that's great, rob. >> it is. they're not all open just yet, but some of them -- i think solitude has opened. get back to me in half an hour and i'll let you know. >> what about the bird? is it open yet? >> i don't think it is yet, but they're working on it. >> thanks, rob. former president george b. bush sitting down for a candid interview as his book is released. we'll tell you why he supported waterboarding then and whether or not he would do it again
6:07 am
today. conan o'brien talked off the ledge by an angelic larry king. more about that later. we're going to speak with the middle school assistant coach who thought this one up, and the quarterback who was able to pull it off. seven minutes past the hour. hey, did you ever finish last month's invoices?
6:08 am
sadly, no. oh. but i did pick up your dry cleaning and had your shoes shined. well, i made you a reservation at the sushi place around the corner. well, in that case, i better get back to these invoices... which i'll do right after making your favorite pancakes. you know what? i'm going to tidy up your side of the office. i can't hear you because i'm also making you a smoothie. [ male announcer ] marriott hotels & resorts knows it's better for xerox to automate their global invoice process so they can focus on serving their customers. with xerox, you're ready for real business. we helped keep your skin clear. now we have a solution for wrinkles. neutrogena anti wrinkle with retinol sa smoothes even deep wrinkles. it works...beautifully. neutrogena. climate protection. challenges as vast as the space race a generation ago. and vital to global security. to reach this destination, our engineers are exploring every possibility.
6:09 am
from energy efficiency to climate monitoring. securing our nations clean energy future is all a question of how. and it is the how that will make all the difference. we wouldn't have to worry about what's in our water. but most of us live here. so we need the brita pitcher. for healthier, clean tasting water. (announcer) new icy hot spray.
6:10 am
relief that's icy to dull pain, hot to relax it away. and no mess. new icy hot spray. don't mess around with pain. ♪ ten minutes now after the hour. george bush's new book is coming out today. it's called decision points. and in it the former president opens up about the war in iraq and his battle with alcohol. last night he sat down with nbc's matt lauer and defended his administration's controversial use of waterboarding. >> on september 11th, i vowed i would do my duty to protect the american people. >> why is waterboarding legal in your opinion? >> because the lawyer said it was legal. said it did not fall within the anti-torture act.
6:11 am
and i'm not lawyer. but you've got to trust the judgment of people around you. >> he went on to say that he felt it prevented future attacks and then he also said we only used it on three people. so he wouldn't change anything today. >> yeah. well, that was the line of his administration in hindsight. wouldn't expect him to say, oh, we would've done things differently. >> candy crowley will also be sitting down with the former president. you can watch her special "state of the union," sunday night 8:00 p.m. rolls royce may have identified what caused an engine to explode last week. exactly what that is, they're not saying. but investigations continue. oil leaks were discovered in the engines of three qantas a-380 jumbo jets. new airline security measures in effect today. passengers can no longer travel with toner or ink cartridges weighing more than a pound.
6:12 am
and cargo will undergo additional screening. this comes after two explosive devices mailed from yemen were found onboard cargo planes. the asian man who allegedly boarded a flight from hong kong to vancouver disguised as the man on the right, an elderly caucasian. a passenger on the flight tells cnn she warned three flight attendants the man was wearing a mask shortly before takeoff and was ignored. a spokesman claims the crew did not drop the ball and they alerted the authorities to meet the aircraft upon landing. welm, thl, this was a terri case. a jury saying a man must die for a brutal home invasion. the case drew national attention. steven hayes was convicted of murdering a mother and her two daughters and setting the house on fire before attempting to flee. he's also forced jennifer hawk pettitte to go to a bank and
6:13 am
withdraw money before she was killed. don't miss "pure evil," nightmare in connecticut, saturday and sunday 10:00 p.m. eastern. >> really upsetting story. 12 1/2 minutes past the hour right now. coming up next, michael jackson's mother sat down and talked with oprah about her late son. plus, how one woman was able to solve this puzzle on "wheel of fortune" with just one letter showing. how did she do it? breathe in, breathe out.
6:14 am
as volatile as markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and relax? ask a financial professional about pacific life. the power to help you succeed.
6:15 am
6:16 am
6:17 am
16 minutes past the hour right now. time for our morning talker. some of the most interesting stories in the news room this morning. we all remember her emotional speech during michael jackson's memorial. yesterday paris jackson opened up to oprah winfrey about her dad. it was a rare appearance by all three of michael jackson's kids. prince michael, paris, and blanket talking about what a good dad michael was. >> i kind of felt like no one understood what a good father he was. like, he was like, i would say he was the best cook ever. >> a cook? really? >> everyone's all, a cook? like they're surprised to hear it. >> yes, i am. >> he was just a normal dad, except he was actually the best dad ever. >> catherine jackson admitted he was addicted to plastic surgery and painkillers, but she says she only spoke to her son about drugs once. hey, owners of android phones beware because an app called the sms replicator allows
6:18 am
someone to forward their texts to their phone. it's so sneaky it's been banned from the marketplace. no word on how many people downloaded the app before the ban. so watch what you text if you downloaded that. >> the point of it is to catch somebody you suspect cheating on you. so if you suspect your spouse or boyfriend or girlfriend is cheating, you get their texts and the ones they send out. that's why it's so popular. doesn't work on the iphone, though. >> what was that line from mr. deeds? i fear you underestimated the sneakiness. well, mark hobb spent two months on, i guess, you could call it the convenience store diet or twinkie diet. he limited himself, though, to less than 1,800 calories a day and lost 27 pounds and his body fat went down 8%. he says it proves his theory that weight loss is all about calorie counting. >> you can eat twinkies and lose weight. >> as long as you stay within
6:19 am
1,800 calories. >> i wouldn't think there was a lot of nutrition in that. but he did take vitamins and other things to make sure he got his daily requirement. i don't know about that, though. pat sajak himself called it the most amazing solve in the history of "wheel of fortune." one letter is all caitlin burke needed to solve the puzzle. take a look. >> "l." >> one "l." >> i would like to solve. >> what's that? >> can i solve? >> okay. >> it is a prize puzzle. "i've got a good feeling about this." >> that's right! >> wow. >> well, you heard the crowd chuckle at her when she said can i solve this? now she's laughing all the way to the caribbean. she talks about how she decided to roll the dice last night on "360." >> did you think at all holding
6:20 am
out to maybe win more money? >> well, no, because the last -- i kind of decided after the last round before that i knew the puzzle and i had spun and i went bankrupt. and i was really mad. and so the next one i was like, you know, i want to go home with something. i'm taking this trip. it was a prize puzzle and decided to go for it. >> wow. >> i think caitlin's missing her calling there. >> there were some people saying, wait, it had to be rigged. >> maybe she's just really intuitive. >> well, she got it. anyway, conan o'brien is finally back. we've been talking about this a lot. he returned on our sister network tbs, and the show opened with a familiar face, at least for us. offering words of wisdom to a distraught o'brien after getting booted from the "tonight show." >> don't do it, conan! >> larry king?
6:21 am
>> i'm your guardian angel. >> but you're not dead. >> never mind that. i have two words for you. basic cable. >> basic cable. >> conan, i think you'll find our terms very attractive. >> i think we have a deal. >> well, conan's first guest was arlene wagner. she runs the nutcracker museum in washington state and she was chosen in an online poll that conan said was rigged. but hey, she brought the nutcracker out with her. congratulations to everyone. all's well that ends well. conan airs weeknights 11:00 on basic cable. >> there was another great segment where he got up and played and sang with jack white.
6:22 am
thinking to myself, wow, conan can play and he can sing too. not bad. we're looking forward to a good future for conan on tbs. cash or credit? what should you be using this holiday season? our christine romans with some expert advice just ahead for you. ♪
6:23 am
everything you need to stretch out on long trips. residence inn. ♪ everything you need to stay balanced on long trips. residence inn.
6:24 am
okay, now here's our holiday gift list. aww, not the mall. well, i'll do the shopping... if you do the shipping. shipping's a hassle. i'll go to the mall. hey. hi. you know, holiday shipping's easy with priority mail
6:25 am
flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. yea, i know. oh, you're good. good luck! priority mail flat rate shipping starts at just $4.90 only from the postal service. a simpler way to ship. ♪ one a day, whether you need it or not up until december 25th. >> we had the comedian lewis black on. he wrote a new book, in which he likens the run-up to the christmas stuff to the running
6:26 am
of the bulls. it's crazy enough the christmas season begins at thanksgiving and thanksgiving comes a week earlier this year. can we back off a bit? >> you've got to plan ahead a bit. >> absolutely. if you were planning ahead and know what you're doing and setting a budget. look, there are 13 million americans according to one survey who still have debt from last christmas. if you put $650 in christmas spending on your card last year, you're spending all year paying it off, you're paying more like $750 on christmas last year. so paper or plastic. are you going to pay for your gifts and your preparations this year with a credit card, debit card, or cash? i'm going to take you to the wall and tell you what to do. if you use cash and you've got a problem, you are not going to really overspend. the money in your pocket is what you're going to pay for christmas decorations, food, and gifts. so if you're talking about $650
6:27 am
to $700, which is about the average, cash might be the way to go if you're having trouble sticking to your budget. debit card, 70% of americans surveyed by the national conference of -- credit council say they're going to use cash or debit card. debit card, you can track your spending, it's hard to go over if you do not sign up for overdraft protection, your card will be simply rejected at the mall so you can't overspend that way. again, 70% of people surveyed plan to use cash or a debit card this year to pay for the holidays. and a credit card. look, a lot of people want to say banish the plastic, forget it, this got us into trouble. in fact, new numbers from the fed shows people are paying off at pretty record numbers. but if you pay the bill in full, it can help you build a positive credit history, and it can actually help you raise your credit score if you pay it off. if you can afford it and you pay it off. if you don't, if you have
6:28 am
existing balances, this is simply not for you for the holidays because it's a really easy way to continue to get in to trouble. gail cunningham says it's not for you if you've got a lot of balances already. it's early, but if you plan now, you're going to help yourself in the beginning of the year not be having that hangover in january and february. >> you also mentioned this last year, the return of lay away, and i've seen a few commercials for target or walmart, one of the big superstores and the woman's telling her husband, honey, this is all paid off. i started putting it on lay away. >> some say they don't like lay away because you're giving your money to someone else to use. you should just wait because you can't take it home right away. but others say if you can't afford it another way, that might be the way to do it. it's a real sign of the times. this is the second year we've seen a lot of lay away. look, the bottom line is, if you can't afford it, don't buy it.
6:29 am
just don't buy it. you've -- >> don't buy it now thinking i'll be able to afford it sometime in the future. >> if you can't afford it this minute, if you can't pay for it in three months, you should not be buying it at all. >> good advice from the woman who knows smart is the new rich. thanks. >> thanks. coming up on the half hour, time for this morning's top stories. president obama is in indonesia this morning. during his two-day long visit he will continue to push for opening markets to u.s. goods. he'll also give a major speech on relations with the muslim world. alabama congressman spencer baucus told a local chamber of commerce group last week that the senate would be republican if not for tea party candidates like christine o'donnell in delaware, candidates who sarah palin endorsed. he backtracked a little on that saying he did credit palin with the turnout that led to the huge wins in the house. a radical muslim cleric is
6:30 am
calling for americans to be killed. he has been connected to the ft. hood shooting suspect and the man who tried to bring down a plane on christmas with a bomb in his underwear. >> this week we've been looking beyond the u.s. military presence in afghanistan to what we're calling the other afghan offensive. helping the afghan people build better lives. >> this morning, jill dougherty looks at a u.s.-sponsored program that's given some afghans the power to break with the past. what's this all about? >> well, glad to be here. it's women. and the stereotype we often have of afghan women is they're oppressed, invisible, unable to contribute to society. and it is true, you do see many women on the streets. even the big cities in afghanistan wearing burkas. we met several women who broke that mold under the most difficult circumstances.
6:31 am
>> reporter: a shocking sight for afghans, women renovating a building. women like salma, working outside the home is almost impossible. >> i need to work, my husband cannot work. i was taking in laundry for students, washing it at home, then i heard about this program. >> reporter: it's called cash for work. an american-sponsored program to help these women, most of them widows survive. >> their family members are desperate. but if we can give them a job, get food on their tables, their kids wouldn't join insurgencies. >> reporter: in this home in afghanistan, women learn the basics of construction work. the women start out as unskilled workers and earn $5 a day and then they can become skilled workers and they actually earn $9 a day. that is as much as men earn for the same job, which is rare here in afghanistan. 18-year-old shakila uses the pay to support her family. >> was it difficult for you to think about doing a man's job?
6:32 am
>> translator: it's not a problem for me. if a man can do it, why can't a woman? >> reporter: this is men's work in afghanistan for the most part. so when they started this program, there actually was a bit of nervousness about women doing a man's job. >> this is a woman's hostel, it's okay for them to do it here. >> across afghanistan, women are in the background, hidden their clothes on the street. getting women into the workforce is a major initiative as it seeks to build up afghanistan. like this program for female journalists in herat. she says that's her dream, but first she has to convince her husband. >> things in my life, for example, i will be a good mother. i will be a good wife for you.
6:33 am
he say, okay, i will see. salma already found new painting jobs, which she does when men aren't present. >> translator: i'm proud about me, and i'm doing something for my family. i'm very happy i can work like man and go outside of my home that i can work and get money for my family. >> and she's training her 14-year-old daughter to work with her. >> yeah. really great. you know, one big concern many women have, though, is what will happen if the taliban are brought back into the government through the process of reconciliation? the government says they'd have to first accept the constitution and the women's rights it contains. but some women fear that peace could come at the price of women's freedom, even the limited freedom they now have. john? >> as we know, the taliban doesn't tolerate that sort of thing. the last woman you talked about who's training her 14-year-old daughter, is she thinking of starting a business?
6:34 am
a family business? >> a little mini business. when we talked to her, she was amazing because she said, hey, you want to invest in our business? she's already kind of like a little capitalist in the making. but really, the guts and determination that they have is -- is very impressive. because these widows have nothing in that society. no opportunity whatsoever. >> what a great story. jill, thanks for bringing it to us. tomorrow, jill takes us inside the heavily fortified complex in kabul, a day in the life of carl i i i ikenberry. >> how long before you see this play in the nfl? we were wondering that. the middle school assistant coach pulled off this trick penalty play and took it all the way for a touchdown and a win. [ woman ] you know, as a mom,
6:35 am
i worry about my son playing football. which is why i'm really excited. because toyota developed this software that can simulate head injuries and helps make people safer. then they shared this technology with researchers at wake forest to help reduce head injuries on the football field. so, you know, i can feel a bit better about my son playing football. [ male announcer ] how would you use toyota technology to make a better world? learn how to share your ideas at toyota.com/ideasforgood. over a million people have discovered how easy it is to use legalzoom for important legal documents. at legalzoom we'll help you incorporate your business, file a patent, make a will and more. you can complete our online questions in minutes. then we'll prepare your legal documents and deliver them directly to you. so start your business, protect your family,
6:36 am
launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. an accident doesn't have to slow you down. from new car replacement and guaranteed repairs to accident forgiveness, we do all we can to help you move on. liberty mutual auto insurance. responsibility. what's your policy?
6:37 am
37 minutes after the hour. love this one. how does a texas middle school football team make it on sports center? practice what might be the best trick play ever and pull it off in a championship game. >> yeah, check it out. we showed you the video yesterday, now we're going to get more background on this. the quarterback for the middle school pretends to need help on the sidelines. the center hands him the ball and the quarterback runs through the confused defense before taking off for a 67-yard touchdown. it ended up being the difference in the game. the video's gone viral. and joining us from corpus
6:38 am
christi, the coach, and the player who ran it. congratulations, both of you. >> thank you. good morning. >> good morning. >> coach, you're the brain child of this so-called penalty play. set it up for us, how does it work? >> initially we set up the opposing team by drawing them off sides with a hard count. the referees mark off the five yards, then we line up, go to the huddle and say penalty play. the offense then comes to the line and i yell from the sideline, jason, jason, move it up five more yards, it should have been a ten yard penalty. so he asks the center for the ball and marks off five yards and in the process the whole team's like jason, what are you doing? and as soon as he clears the line backers, he sprints towards the end zone and breaks the tackle to score. >> you'd practiced this before. what did you think when the coach called that play? >> i thought it was nonsense. i didn't think it was going to work at all.
6:39 am
>> well, there you see it did. you thought you were going to get a couple of yards and ended up runninging it for a touchdown? >> yes, ma'am. >> so your fellow -- this whole charade is set up -- coach, we couldn't hear them on the videotape, but how did the lines men get involved, as well? >> as jason's walking, the line men somewhat say, jason, what are you doing? as if they're confused, as well. and that causes the defensive linemen to somewhat be, you know, confused and then basically just walked right through them. as a matter of fact, i think jason had a few words with the middle linebacker for the opposing team. he asked him what jason was doing and he said, walking five more yards. >> what was the other team's reaction? did they think it was sort of a cheap shot? did they think you guys sort of cheated a little?
6:40 am
>> i think it was. i thought -- i think they were in shock that it was legal. >> coach, what did they say to you? what did the other coach say to you? >> they haven't really said much. we haven't had a chance to talk to them much after the game. it was a good game. the opposing team ended up winning due to rules about penetration and stuff. and it was a good defensive battle, and the trick play was an intricate part of us tieing the game up and putting us in a position to win. i don't think there were any hard feelings from the other coach. we haven't spoken yet, but i'm sure we will. i don't know, it was just a unique experience. >> jason, this play is really only designed to get a first down as we see there marking off the five yards and then, boom, going. when you saw that open field in front of you and said, wow, i can convert 10 yards into a
6:41 am
67-yard touchdown, what went through your mind? >> i don't know. it was just a rush. adrenaline. i think i said that right. it was fun, i had a blast doing it. i didn't think i was going to get very far, but it turned out to be a touchdown. >> yeah, because you were thinking when you executed this play, oh, my gosh, i'm going to walk right through the line with no protection, they're going to kill me. >> that's what i was thinking at first. that's what was running through my mind the whole time. >> in practicing the play we even said there's going to be two results of the play. either jason's going to get really hard by a linebacker or safety or he's going to get a first down or touchdown. and for us, thank goodness it was the latter. >> a lot of people have weighed in. most people support you guys and say this is great. some people say, wait a minute, you know, that was kind of a low
6:42 am
blow there. that it maybe isn't legal. how did it end up being ruled by the referees? >> prior to the start of the game, we always have a discussion with the referees to discuss any trick plays we might run. it was a legal snap, there was nobody else in motion. it was a side snap. in football you can have a side snap with one motion or have a snap in between your legs to the quarterback. and jason threw them off to the center, and it was essentially just a quarterback sneak, but a really slow quarterback sneak until he got off to about five yards and took off running. >> he walked right by the line. anyway, congratulations to both of you. the assistant coach and the offensive coordinator and jason garza the quarterback, thanks for joining us this morning and congrats on that. >> thank you. you have a good day. >> we'll see you guys later. coming up on 43 minutes
6:43 am
after the hour. in just a few minutes we're going to go live to jakarta, indonesia where president obama is holding a live news conference with the president of indonesia. and we're just looking at opening remarks now. we'll take a quick break and we'll be back with that when the president begins to talk. still to come this morning, rob is going to have this morning's travel forecast right after the break. and also in ten minutes, they know him as barry sotoro. suzanne malveaux talks to president obama's childhood friends from the time he lived in indonesia. traveled to the frontlines pric of nfl training camp to put our 24-hour frequent heartburn protection to the test for two weeks. [ diehl ] people think that we're indestructible, but if you're out there and you're feeling burning it's gonna affect the way that you play. [ herrera ] in my world either you get it done, or they're gonna find someone to get it done for you. [ diehl ] prilosec otc is the one thing i can count on to block my heartburn. prilosec otc is protecting me. [ male announcer ] take your own 14-day challenge.
6:44 am
prilosec otc. heartburn gone, power on. makes me want to show 'em a new ford fusion. i can't help myself. i'm kinda ready to move up to get to the next level. fusion... yeah, i like it. ...i should probably brag about this a little bit. the projected resale value can't be beat by camry. 33 miles per gallon on the highway. wow. the sync system... gps correct. phone. yes. i love it. get our best deals. 0% financing and, as a holiday bonus, we'll give you $1500 to use toward your first three payments. holly has something she'd like to say. [ male announcer ] nature is unique... ...authentic... ...pure... and also delicious. ♪ like nature valley. granola bars made with crunchy oats and pure honey. because natural is not only good, it also tastes good.
6:45 am
nature valley -- 100% natural. 100% delicious.
6:46 am
time now for your a.m. house call. stories about your health. new research out today. people who drink 100% fruit juice are more likely to meet the recommended levels of certain key nutrients than those who don't. nutrients like vitamins a, c, magnesium, calcium, and potassium important in blood heal health. president obama is in indonesia and he is speaking right now. let's take a listen. >> friendship and your partnership. after more than one attempt, it
6:47 am
is wonderful to finally be back in indonesia. and i'm very pleased my wife michelle is joining me for her first visit to the country. i assure you it won't be her last. and i want to thank the people of jakarta for the wonderful reception when we arrived, even in the rain people were there to greet us. and we're very appreciative of that. of course, we're mindful that this is a difficult time for indonesia. first, the recent earthquake and tsunami, and now the volcanic eruptions. and our thoughts and prayers are with those who have lost their loved ones or their homes. i know president yudhoyono has been tireless in efforts to make sure that people are safe and that this difficulty is dealt with in as effective way as possible. we are fully supportive of him. the united states will continue to support the relief efforts in
6:48 am
any way that we can. and i hope that my presence here today is a reminder that in good times and in bad times the united states stands as a friend with indonesia. now, obviously much has been made of the fact that this marks my return to where i lived as a young boy. i will tell you, though, that i barely recognized it as i was driving down the streets, the only building that was there when i first moved to jakarta was serena. now it's one of the shorter buildings on the road. but today as president, i'm here to focus not on the past, but on the future. the comprehensive partnership that we're building between the united states and indonesia. as one of the world's largest democracies, as the largest economy in southeast asia, and
6:49 am
as a member of the g-20, as a regional leader, on the front lines of climate change, and as a society or extraordinary diversity, indonesia is where many of the challenges and the opportunities of the 21st century come together. at the same time, the united states is leading again in asia. we are strengthening our alliances, we're deepening relationships as we're doing with china. we're reengaging and joining the east asia summit. and we're forging new partnerships with emerging powers like indonesia. our comprehensive partnership is bringing our countries closer together, and i want to focus just on three key areas. and we discussed a wide range of issues during our meeting. first as president yudhoyono
6:50 am
mentioned, we are looking to expand our trade and investment and commercial relationships. because it can create prosperity in both our countries. trade between us is growing fast, and that includes american exports to indonesia. and that's why indonesia's one of the growing markets that we're going to be focused on as part of my initiative to double the u.s. exports. president yudhoyono and i discussed ways to encourage additional trade and investment. he mentioned we're number three right now in terms of trade volume and investment, and i informed him we don't like being number three, we want to be number one. and so we're going to be doing everything we can to expand this trading relationship. and i'm pleased to announce that the overseas private investment corporation or opic will host in indonesia to highlight new ideas for partnership here and across the region.
6:51 am
to strengthen cooperation in science and technology that fuels growth, we are going to be pursuing joint research in areas like energy and biodiversity conservation. and we are expanding educational partnerships between our young scientists, engineers, and doctors. and building on the entrepreneurship summit that i hosted in washington, which was attended by some very talented young indonesians. i'm pleased that indonesia will be hosting a regional entrepreneur conference next year. as we prepare for the g-20 and apec summits, president yudhoyono and i discussed the importance to make sure it is strong and balanced and creating jobs in all of our countries. so that's focus number one. trade, investment, and the economy. second, we're forging new ties between our people to address common challenges. we're expanding partnerships between our students and our universities. we aim to double the number of
6:52 am
educational exchanges between our two countries within five years. and i thank president yudhoyono's office for additional scholarships for young americans to study in indones indonesia. i think that's a wonderful thing that needs to happen. we're proud to support indonesia's leadership under president yudhoyono in confronting climate change. i understand there's been a lot of rain this year. and obviously, we can't look at one year as indicative of the future. but i think there's no doubt that indonesia will be on the front lines when it comes to the potential impacts of climate change. we're glad to work with president yudhoyono on this issue. and we welcome and will support the new partnership between indonesia and norway. we're bringing on -- we're building on indonesia's inspiring transition from
6:53 am
dictatorship to democracy by launching a new effort to help indonesian civil society groups who tackle corruption and promote human rights at home to share their experience with civil society groups across this region because i think people can learn from the experiences of indonesia. and i would note that many of the partnerships i've mentioned are a direct result of my call in cairo for a new beginning between the united states and muslim communities around the world. and it involves the private sector, as well, thanks to efforts like partners for a new beginning, which is forging partnerships around science, education, and entrepreneurship. the third element of our comprehensive partnership is to deepen our political security cooperation. we're already enjoying strong cooperation in preventing terrorism, piracy. we look forward to indonesia's leadership as the chair next year and i look forward to returning to jakarta next year for the east asia summit.
6:54 am
one of the challenges the world will continue to face is burma. i commend indonesia for standing up for the people of burma and their rights. last week's election in burma was neither free nor fair, and we will continue our efforts to move burma toward democratic reform and protection of human rights. as a first step, the burmese authority should immediately release all political prisoners. so promoting prosperity, expanding partnerships between our people, and deepening political and security cooperation, these are the pillars of our new partnership with so much of the good leadership of my friend president yudhoyono. i think our partnership has only begun.
6:55 am
someone who knows firsthand what indonesia can offer the world. i say it as president. a president who knows what indonesia and the united states can offer the world together. we work together in the spirit of mutual interests and mutual respect. >> saying he's looking forward to a long and fruitful relationship with indonesia expanding trade, education, and opportunities and other issues like biodiversity, preservation, climate change, and then, of course, they're all getting together to head to yudhoyono's now. but the leaders of the g-20 nations will be joining together in the south korea for the big summit there. >> it's also interesting, this is the second time we've heard the president deliver a speech
6:56 am
in india and heard jakarta, indonesia, heard him mention human rights in burma. well, we're going to take a quick break. we'll be back in a moment. it's 55 minutes past the the hour.
6:57 am
6:58 am
three minutes till the top of the hour, let's check in with rob marciano. if you were out yesterday, you felt winter came a little early. at least up and down the east coast. >> yeah, snow flying through the air, and in many cases tieing records of the earliest trace of snow. definitely wind and leftover rain showers from this very slow moving and pretty strong low pressure system that's trying to get out to sea. but eastern massachusetts will continue to see some rain. and everybody from new york up to boston will see the the wind. and that's going to slow down air travel both in boston and new york metros. we had delays yesterday. also storms moving through the colorado rockies. and light snow later on today, seattle, low clouds and rain slowing down air travel down, in between, though, nice stuff. new orleans, 76 degrees. above average in minneapolis, chicago, and detroit, and a couple storms in the pacific northwest and making the western
6:59 am
half of the country fairly active. but the midwest, looking nice. back to you guys up in new york. >> all right, rob. thanks so much. the next hour of "american morning" starts right now. good morning to you once again, it's tuesday, november 9th. >> here are this morning's top stories. the man behind one of the most horrific crimes in the the past decade is headed to death row. the end of a long nightmare for the sole survivor. former president george w. bush in his own words nearly two years after leaving the white house, the the former president is speaking out, giving a series of interviews. yesterday he spoke with matt lauer. this morning we're going to hear what he calls the worst moment of his presidency. and a man who added three years to the life of people in one city is sharing tips for healthy living. tips he got from the oldest people in the world. and you may be on the list for his next wellness makeover. it's a segment that literally could add years to your life later on this hour.
7:00 am
first, though, we start with the third time a charm this morning after canceling two previous trips, president obama is now in indonesia. we just heard him speak live a moment ago with that country's president. it's the place he spent four years of his childhood. and it's the second stop on the president's ten-day trip to asia. he arrived in jakarta earlier this morning, he just wrapped up his news conference and his brief two-day visit may be cut short because of that ash cloud from mt. merapi, which has been erupting over the past week or more. ed henry joins us on the phone from jakarta. we had a chance to listen to the president's speech. what was notable to you, ed? >> reporter: what's interesting right now, the president is getting questioned about his own personal connection to indonesia. he spent four years here as a boy starting at the age of 6, and he was commenting on how the landscape has completely changed. there were dirt roads, et cetera, when he was here in the early '70s. and he's reflecting a little bit on the personal, something he doesn't do very often because obviously this is the most
7:01 am
populous majority muslim country in the world. and his time here as a boy has helped fuel some of this skepticism about whether he was really born in the united states and raised questions about whether he's muslim or not. and the president, you know, has obviously struggled with dealing with those questions, which he's called silly because he's not muslim, he's christian. and so he doesn't always talk about that personal side. i think he's balancing that with the heavy substance of, look, the u.s. trying to expand trade ties, also trying to work together on counterterrorism. there have been terror attacks here and elsewhere. it's something the two countries are working on closely. and i think more broadly when you talk to senior white house officials, they say what the president wants to do here on this visit is really highlight the fact that this is a country that's protecting its muslim identity while also engaging with the west, not pulling back and actually engaging on issues like the economy and climate
7:02 am
change. and that's far more than the other countries here in asia and the mideast. and it's a contrast to china since this is a democracy. and if you notice, all the big countries the president's visiting from india to indonesia, south korea next and then ending it in japan, all democracies around china and not so subtle hint that we've got other allies in this region, kiran. >> and also, just practically speaking about the president's trip i was know they were looking forward in indonesia. he's supposed to give a big speech at the university. this volcano about 375 miles away, it's been erupting. it could cut the president's trip short. what is the latest on that? >> yeah, white house spokesman robert gibbs told us a short time ago looks like we're going to be leaving a few hours early. the president was going to be here in less than 24 hours anyway, but he'll maybe have to cancel a couple of events here. but the bottom line is you have experts saying this volcanic ash can be destructive to jet
7:03 am
engines. and the last thing they want to do is put air force one in an unsafe situation as well as the press plane here that we're going to be on. and there are other planes that are part of the official u.s. delegation. and so we're going to probably leave here a little bit early. and it's sort of a strange circumstance because you'll remember, this is now the third time the president has tried to come to indonesia just this year. the first time was canceled because of the health care debate in washington, then the gulf oil spill was overshadowing things, now the third one, he finally got here, but cutting it short, kiran. >> ed henry traveling with the president in indonesia today. thanks, ed. as we watch the president in southeast asia, former president bush is back in the spotlight nearly two years after leaving office. he's written a book. it's called "decision points." it comes out today. and in it he writes about everything from waterboarding to kanye west. he spoke about the now infamous photo of him taken aboard air force one as he surveyed the damage from hurricane katrina.
7:04 am
>> yeah. huge mistake. >> and it made you look so out of touch. >> detached. and uncaring. no question about it. >> whose fault was it? >> it's always my fault. i should have touched down in baton rouge, met with the governor, walked out and said, i hear you. we know, we understand, and we're going to help the state and help the local governments with as much resources as needed. and got back on up to washington, and i did not do that and paid a price for it. >> the president also touched on what he called the worst moment of his presidency when kanye west said he didn't care about black people. >> you say you told laura at the time it was the worst moment of your presidency. >> yes. >> i wonder if some people are going to read that and they might give you some heat for that. and the reason is this -- >> don't care. >> here's the reason. you're not saying the worst moment in your presidency was watching the misery in louisiana, you're saying when someone insulted you because of
7:05 am
it. >> and i also make it clear that the misery in louisiana affected me deeply, as well. there's a lot of tough moments in the book. and it was a disgusting moment pure and simple. >> chief political correspondent candy crowley is also sitting down with the former president. you can see her special edition of "state of the union" sunday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern. also new this morning, the jury saying the man must die for the brutal connecticut home invasion and murder. a case that drew national attention for how shocking and disgusting it was. steven hayes convicted of murdering a mother and her two daughters and setting the house on fire before attempting to flee. hayes also forced jennifer hawk petit to go to a bank to withdraw money before she was killed. new restrictions on air travel are in effect in the wake of the yemen bomb plot. travelers can no longer travel with toner cartridges weighing more than a pound. and high-risk cargo is banned from passenger planes and will be subject to additional screening.
7:06 am
in michigan, a state attorney general is out of a job today. calling the university of michigan student president chris armstrong racist and a liar -- his attorney claims his client was exercising free speech. fears of inflation sent the price of gold and other precious metals soaring yesterday. gold hit an all-time high closing at $1,403 an ounce. investors worrying that the fed's $600 billion monetary stimulus will devalue the dollar. here's a stat that should wake you up. according to aaa, 2 out of 5 drivers admit to falling asleep behind the wheel. more than a quarter say they've had trouble staying awake while driving in the last month. and passengers who are flying on air tran, delta, and virgin america will have wi-fi in the sky this holiday season for, listen to this, free. google is partnering with the
7:07 am
airlines to offer wireless internet free of charge on all domestic flights between november 20th and january 2nd. and isn't that a nice holiday treat? >> yeah, get a lot more done. seven minutes past the hour, let's get a check of this morning's weather headlines. rob marciano this morning. is it warming up? >> yeah, a bit. and the free wi-fi will help pass the time. you were met with some snow flakes yesterday. in some cases record-breaking. lexington, new york state, 3.5, south berne, 2.5, and lanesborough, massachusetts. still windy on the backside of this thing, which refuses to move out, at least for eastern mass. still seeing rainfall there and certainly gusty winds. over 20 to 25 miles an hour in spots. and 10, 15, maybe 20-mile-an-hour winds in new
7:08 am
york city, and that will be enough to slow down air travel. but just out to the west to the midwest, 66 in chicago. that's way above average, 76 degrees in kansas city, 66 in minneapolis, and 74 in dallas. that's warm spring-like stuff and moving slowly off to the east. a couple of pacific northwest storms rolling into the in mountain west. talk more about that in about 30 minutes. hope those snow flakes didn't scare you too much. but kind of get you in the mood for holidays. >> didn't even notice them, thanks, rob. well, he's back, conan o'brien returning to the air more than nine months after being booted from the "tonight show." his new show kicked off on tbs. o'brien started the show by revisiting the months after he lost his job at nbc. and as you'll see, he was visited by a familiar face.
7:09 am
. >> don't do it, conan! >> larry king? >> i'm your guardian angel. >> but you're not dead. >> never mind that. i have two words for you, basic cable. >> basic cable. >> i think you'll find our terms very attractive. >> i think we have a deal. >> well, conan's new show is a lot like his last. he kind of monologued. there you see seth rogen. and he jammed a little bit with jack white. they were rocking it. one new feature, an oversized moon. conan or his side kick can move across the sky with the remote
7:10 am
control. see that? and who said there wasn't cool tricks in basic cable. by the way, you can watch conan's new show tonight tbs at 11:00 eastern. tonight's guests, tom hanks, jack mcbrayer and soundgarden. it's clinton versus kardashian. why the secretary of state says the kardashians aren't exactly the best ambassadors for the united states. and taking on a major policy issue. the fed's move to quote print money out of thin air. ten minutes past the hour. ♪
7:11 am
[ indistinct shouting ] ♪ another day ♪ another dollar ♪ daylight comes [ dogs barking ] ♪ i'm on my way ♪ another day ♪ another dollar ♪ working my whole life away ♪ another day ♪ another dollar
7:12 am
7:13 am
13 minutes after the hour. time for our political ticker. and hillary clinton no fan of the kardashians. the secretary of state brought them up during an interview on australian radio. using them as an example how trash tv in the united states affects how the rest of the world sees us. if you look at american tv, you
7:14 am
think we all went around wrestling and wearing bikinis. all right. sarah palin taking on the fed's plan to print money out of thin air as she said. she told federal reserve chairman ben bernanke to cease and desist with the $600 billion bond-buying program designed to boost the economy. she made the comment at the trade association conference in phoenix. the speech, meanwhile, creating buzz she's paving the way for a 2012 presidential run. >> and the republicans set to take control of the house in january. they're busy figuring out who is going to get powerful and influential leadership roles. and whether any newly elected tea party candidates are going to be a part of that group. our brianna keilar is live in washington this morning. and there's one tea party member in particular who may be in for leadership. >> that's right. and she is a freshman. this is christy nome of south dakota we're talking about. and one of the big issues here for republicans is when you have all of these new freshman
7:15 am
members and many of them are lined with the tea party, how do you make sure you keep them happy, you make sure they feel, unlike the voters who put them in their positions, how do you make them feel they have a seat at the table? well, it seems to actually give them one. what republican leaders are looking at is creating this new leadership position and sources are telling us that christy nome of south dakota who you just saw a picture of her. seen as a charismatic, promising candidate, that she's interested in this position. and so at this point, though, even though sources tell us she has the backing of some republican leaders, republican establishment, folks who have been there for a while, it would have to be the freshman class of republicans who would elect her to be in that position, john. >> and a lot of back room dealing with democrats, as well, but because they're in the minority now, not as many leadership roles as there were to go around and it's created a fight between prominent democrats.
7:16 am
>> that's right, steny hoyer and jim clyburn as democrats move to the minority, there's one less leadership position. and so this is an interparty squabble. both saying they're shoring up the votes, going to be successful here. but there's only one spot. so it's shaping up to be a bit of -- potentially a blood bath ahead of leadership elections. yesterday, steny hoyer tweeted making it official that he's going to be running. this isn't anything new. we knew he was going to be running. this is his way of trying to raise his profile. and there's this oneupmanship going on. steny hoyer is considered more of a moderate. he's had a lot of alliances with blue dog democrats, many of whom lost their seats in this last election. and on the other hand, you have jim clyburn who is the most prominent african-american in congress. he represents more of the -- that's actually eric cantor, jim clyburn is a different guy.
7:17 am
but he represents also the more liberal wing. you've kind of got this infighting among the two parts of the democratic party, john. and we are waiting to get more details today. >> and they still haven't settled yet on nancy pelosi as their leader, right? >> no, and we're checking to see whether she has support or if there's any vocal support against her. there is from one congressman who has suggested that he is going to challenge her. but we're sort of waiting to see exactly how all of that shapes out. at this point there doesn't appear to be at this point any sort of large tide against her. and she said she's been checking with the democrats to see if they support her. but at this point, her hat is in the ring, she's planning to run for minority leader. and at this point officially, she's uncontested. >> thanks so much. well, it was just one letter, one letter is all it took to solve a wheel of fortune puzzle. after the break, the stunner
7:18 am
that shocked even pat sajak. and the future of the american auto industry may depend on it. we test drive the chevy volt coming up. stay tuned after the break. [ advisor 1 ] what do you see yourself doing one week, one month, five years after you do retire? ♪ client comes in and they have a box. and inside that box is their financial life. people wake up and realize i better start doing something. we open up that box. we organize it. and we make decisions. we really are here to help you. they look back and think, "wow. i never thought i could do this." but we've actually done it. [ male announcer ] visit ameriprise.com and put a confident retirement more within reach. affect wheat output in the u.s., the shipping industry in norway, and the rubber industry in south america?
7:19 am
at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex global economy. it's just one reason os beat their10-year lipp. t. rowe price.invest . request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses, and other information to read and consider carefully before investing.
7:20 am
7:21 am
♪ 21 minutes after the hour. and time for some of the stories that got us talking in the news room this morning. pat sajak himself called it the most amazing solve he has seen in the history of "wheel of fortune." one letter is all caitlin burke needed to solve the puzzle. have a look at this. >> "l." >> one "l." >> can i solve? >> what's that? >> can i solve? >> okay. >> it is a prize puzzle. >> yeah. >> i've got a good feeling about this. >> that's right.
7:22 am
>> not bad. you heard the crowd chuckle thinking, what? she's going to solve it on one letter? now she's laughing to the caribbeans. now we'd like to introduce you to the angry french canadian. four guys from montreal created this baguette. basically it is the greasiest sandwich ever, made of steamed hot dogs, they added bacon because you've got to do that, of course, french fries with cheese and gravy and topped it all off with maple syrup. this tips the scales at 5,343 calories and it has 207 grams of fat. >> but it has absolutely the world's perfect food inside of it because french fries with cheese and gravy. an unusual experiment, especially for a professor of nutrition. mark hobbs spent two months on a convenience store junk food diet limiting himself to less than
7:23 am
1,800 calories a day. he lost 27 pounds, his body fat went down 8%, basically eating carbohydrates and sugar. it proves his theory that weight loss is not about what you eat it's how much you eat. it's all about calorie counting. >> you cut him open, there's just twinkies in there. that can't be good for you. here's 45,000 people running over the bridge in under two minutes. the people who run new york's public transportation. a time lapse video of the start of the new york marathon. those are not cars, those are all the people running down there. if only they could do that to the traffic. >> if only they could do that to my running. i'd love to run that fast. salmonella at an ohio egg farm leads to the recall of eggs. details just ahead. 23 minutes past the hour. [ mal] one hundred years ago, chevrolet sprang bolt by bolt, car by car, out of the very best america had to offer. ingenuity.
7:24 am
integrity. optimism. and a belief that the finest things are the most thoughtfully made -- not the most expensive. today, the american character is no less strong. and chevrolet continues as an expression of the best of it. bringing more technology to more people than ever in our history. inventing new ways to get around our planet while preserving it at the same time. exploring new horizons of design and power. and making our vehicles amongst the safest on earth. this isn't just any car company. this is chevrolet. and the strength of our nation can be found in every car and truck we make. it's why, today, tomorrow, and on into a bright future, we can proudly say... ...chevy runs deep. ♪ to bring you a low-price medicare prescription drug plan called the humana walmart-. it's a new plan
7:25 am
that covers both brand ans and has the lowest-pricednatioy of only $14.80 per month and in-store copays as . when you could save over, you can focus on the things . ♪ go to walmart.com for details. ♪ ♪ came in last night at half past 10:00 ♪ ♪ that baby of mine wouldn't let me in ♪ ♪ so move it on over ♪ move it on over ♪ move it on over ♪ move it on over ♪ move over, little dog, 'cause the big dog's movin' in ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] a dog & a chevy, what else do you need? ♪
7:26 am
♪ 26 minutes after the hour, the chevy volt, the nissan leaf, the auto industry is hoping the cars you have to plug in are finally affordable enough and cool enough for the mainstream to finally drive. both cars are hitting showrooms, they should be out there in the the next few weeks or so. peter joins us now on his own take of the two vehicles and whether they are worth your investment. first of all, let's take a look at the chevy volt. you drove this, by the way, we should say from washington, d.c. to new york city.
7:27 am
it's the electric/gas combo, although it only powers the generator to the battery backup. you can get an extra 300 miles more if you run the gas engine. priced about $33,500 after maximum tax credit. what was it like to drive? >> actually, it was a really good car. and that's what pleased me. i've driven prototypes before, so i was familiar with the the technology. what i wanted to see was what kind of car it would end up being. it was very pleasant to drive at almost luxury-like quality. super quiet, even when the gasoline engine kicked on to generate electricity after the first 30 to 40 miles, it was still just super quite on the roadway. >> the cockpit is pretty interesting. >> yeah. >> very space age. >> very high-tech. it's always bad to say a car is like an appliance, but in this case, it's like one of those fancy italian coffee makers with little buttons. something you'd want to show off
7:28 am
to your friends. >> what about performance? is this the sort of thing where you get on the highway, you put the accelerator to pass somebody and you just -- it's basically going to go -- as you try to get around them, or does it have some snap to it? >> it's decent. gm puts the official 0 to 60 at 8.8 seconds. every time i went up a hill, i jammed on the gas to see the power, it's okay. it's not a thrill ride. >> is there a certain golf cart -- >> no, definitely not a golf cart. it's up there with your typical family sedan like a toyota camry, it accelerates decent. >> the difference between this and say the prius from toyota is that's got a gasoline-powered assist that actually drives the car. this car is always driven by an electric motor, you just have the gas-assisted charging. >> some people are going to be picky about this. at high speeds at 70 miles an hour and more, it can provide a little assistance that way, but
7:29 am
just a little bit. the difference with the prius, it is assistance with the electric motors, this switches around, it's almost 100% electric. >> let's take a look at the nissan leaf. this is all electric, maximum range of 100 miles, priced $24,280 after the tax credits, more economical, what's the drive like here? >> it's a little bit more fun. it's a little peppier around town. >> you mean than the volt. >> excuse me, than the vault. the difference is, this one isn't carrying around a gasoline engine as well as the battery. >> lighter weight. >> and more peppy. and the downside is you do get that roughly 100-mile range in city driving, probably less on the highway, less if you use the air-conditioner. so there's a practicality cost there. >> so do you get range anxiety when you drive something like that? >> you certainly can. and i have driven a lot of electric cars. i remember driving a ford electric car a while ago where i was the fifth or sixth journalist that day and we were
7:30 am
sweating getting back to the garage. and it's just a natural part of things. people who -- when you get in the leaf, they give you that lot of information about how much range you have and how far you can get. so you're always aware of it so you won't be caught by surprise. >> economical. but the statistics on that, cost analysis based on $3 a gallon gasoline, 25 mile per gallon car, costs you 2 cents per gallon. when gas was headed $4 a gallon, people were throwing money into alternative energy sources. will we see a lot more of these in ten years? or will it always be a niche market? >> not always a niche market, but it is going to be a much longer, slower process than most people think. my son is 8 years old. i think when he goes to buy his first car, i bet you money it'll have a gasoline engine in it. because the fact of the matter is, gasoline is convenient, easy to use, takes you five minutes to fill up, you can drive hundreds of miles on it.
7:31 am
we still need more work to do on the batteries in electric cars to make them cheaper, the charging to make them faster to charge. those will come and eventually we'll see electric cars becoming more and more and more common on america's roads over the coming days. >> peter valdez, i envy you. thank you so much for stopping by. appreciate it. we're crossing the half hour this morning. indonesia's latest stop on president obama's ten-day tour to asia. the president just held a joint news conference with indonesia's president. and he's scheduled to give a major speech at the university of indonesia tonight. the visit, though, could be cut short because of the eruption from the mt. merapi volcano. new research tops the health benefits of 100% fruit juice. a study found it's a good source of key vitamins and nutrients that many americans are not getting enough of. they recommend 100% fruit juice as part of an overall balanced
7:32 am
diet. more eggs being recalled after evidence of salmonella found at an ohio farm. the distributor is recalling 288,000 eggs purchased from ohio fresh eggs. the company says that they were distributed and sold in arkansas, california, illinois, iowa, kansas, missouri, oklahoma, and texas. well, all this week we're taking a look at the military presence in afghanistan and beyond that. the other afghan offensive as it's being called. helping the afghan people build better lives. and this morning in part two of her series, cnn's jill dougherty looks at u.s.-sponsored programs that's given some afghans the power to break with the past. jill joins us now with more. especially concerning the women in afghanistan. >> absolutely. that's our subject today. and the stereotype we often have of afghan women is they're oppressed, invisible, unable to contribute to society. and it is true, i saw it there, and you know, on the streets of even the big cities you can see
7:33 am
women wearing the cloaks that cover them from head to foot. but on our trip, we also met several women who broke that mold even under the most difficult circumstances. >> reporter: a shocking sight for afghans, women renovating a building. for women like salma, working outside the home is almost impossible. >> i need to work. my husband cannot work. i was taking in laundry for students, washing it at home, then i heard about this program. >> it's called cash for work. an american-sponsored program to help these women, most of them widows, survive. >> their family members are desperate. but if we can give them a job, put the food on the table, their kids wouldn't join the insurgencies. >> reporter: at this home, women learn the basics of construction work. the women start out as unskilled workers and earn $5 a day and then they can become skilled workers and they actually earn
7:34 am
$9 a day, that is as much as men earn for the same job, which is very rare here in afghanistan. 18-year-old shakila uses the pay to support her family. >> was it difficult for you to think about doing a man's job? >> it's not a problem for me. if a man can do it, why can't a woman? >> this is men's work in afghanistan for the most part. and so when they started this program, there actually was a bit of nervousness about women doing a man's job. >> it's okay for women to do that kind of work here. we couldn't have them do this on the construction work on the outside. >> reporter: but empowerment projects are being replicated across the country by the u.s. getting women into the workforce is a major initiative as it seeks to build up afghanistan. like this program for female journalists in herat.
7:35 am
she says that's her dream, but first she has to convince her husband. >> things in my life. for example, i will be a good mother for my child. i will be a good wife for you. and also, i would be a journalist. he say, okay, i will see. >> reporter: salma sees a glimmer of hope for her future. she's already seen new painting jobs, which she does when men aren't present. >> i'm proud about me and i'm doing something for my family. i'm very happy i can work like man and go outside of my home, that i can work and get money for my family. >> reporter: and she's training her 14-year-old daughter to work with her. >> and you know, one big concern that many women have right now is what will happen if the taliban are brought back into the government through that process of reconciliation? the government says those men would have to first accept the constitution and the women's rights that are contained in it. but some women fear that peace could come at the price of
7:36 am
women's freedom even the limited freedom that they have right now. >> you know, and that's one of the concerns with the draw down of u.s. forces. what happens when they're not there to hold the line? and taliban fighters and local tribal elements are able to exert more influences. is there a fear there? >> there is. and also, you know, these programs are supposed to last for a long time after american troops begin that drawdown. but that's the question. there are a lot of programs all over the country, but can they really be pooled together in some sort of net that will have the critical mass to bring women into education and give them better lives? and that's a really huge challenge. >> jill dougherty, great to see you this morning. thanks. and tomorrow in part three of her series, she takes us inside the u.s. elm bmbassy complex in kabul. make sure you're here for that. it's going to be great. he added three years to the life of one town by sharing the secrets of good health from the
7:37 am
oldest people in the world. now he is here to tell us which cities are next. are you on the list for a wellness makeover? also, how long before we see this bit of trickery tried, perhaps, in the nfl? it's a trick play by a texas middle school team that's gone viral. now we'll hear from the quarterback and the coach that pulled it off. it's 37 minutes past the hour. ♪
7:38 am
[ man ] i thought our family business would always be boots. until one day, my daughter showed me a designer handbag. and like that, we had a new side to our business. [ male announcer ] when businesses see an opportunity, the hartford is there. protecting their employees and property and helping them prepare for the future. nice boots. nice bag. [ male announcer ] see how the hartford helps businesses at achievewhatsahead.com. i worry about my son playing football. which is why i'm really excited. because toyota developed this software that can simulate head injuries and helps make people safer. then they shared this technology with researchers at wake forest to help reduce head injuries on the football field. so, you know, i can feel a bit better about my son playing football. [ male announcer ] how would you use toyota technology to make a better world? learn how to share your ideas at toyota.com/ideasforgood.
7:39 am
7:40 am
7:41 am
40 minutes after the hour. mcdonald's on the brain. mcdonald's in their bellies, a new poll shows we are still a fast food nation. 2/3 of patients polled said they fed their kids mcdonald's in the past week. 15% of pre-schoolers are so aware of mcdonald's that they ask for it every single day. marketing works. happy meals probably have a lot to do with that. and soon they may be illegal in the city of san francisco. city leaders will vote today on a happy meal ban. under the ordnance, mcdonald's and other chains would have until december of next year to make kids meals healthier, or else they'll have to lose the toys. well, 41 minutes past the hour, our next guest knows a lot about healthy living. he learned from the oldest people in the world. dan butner set out across the globe to bring lessons of a healthy lifestyle back to the united states. in his book, he's already made over one particular town in minnesota adding three years to
7:42 am
the life expectancy there. and dan joins us now with an exclusive announcement about his next longevity makeover. welcome, by the way. >> thank you. >> i want people to know a little bit about these blue zones, and these are places around the world where people live 10 to 12 years longer on average. >> it was an eight-year national geographic project that identified, geographically confirmed demographic areas where people are living ten years longer or have a fraction of the rate of cardiovascular disease. our goal was to give a prescriptive for americans. you can tell people all day long what's good for you, it's actually getting people to do it. that's the trick and that's what we tried to do with this project. >> so it's interesting, because in places -- a couple of the blue zones. okinawa, japan, a neat peninsula in costa rica. >> yeah.
7:43 am
you can't ask how they got to be 100? what it boils down to their environment. they were nudged into the right eating, right level of physical activity, the right level of socialability. none pumped iron or did marathons. >> what lessons did you take away from the blue zone vitality project that you put to work in this one particular town? what about 18,000 people in minnesota, albert lea? >> yeah, if you look at the public health initiatives throughout the world, which we did, you find what works is behavioral economics. not trying to get people to change their behaviors but change their environment. set it up so that healthy option is the easy option. and another way to think about it is you don't look for the silver bullet, you look for the silver buck shot. so 50 or so small things that make it more walkable and bikable, make it harder for kids to eat junk food, easier for people to connect. >> so you did this project in albert lea, minnesota, and got
7:44 am
startling results from it. we want to show a couple on the screen. so you dropped health care costs in this town, or in this city by 48%, nearly cut it in half. people calling out sick from work down 20%, people's weight loss 3 pounds, but you say on average it was how much? >> if you add it up, 10,000 pounds of weight loss a year. >> and their life expectancy also jumped by three years. what was the trick? what changes did you put into place in albert lea, minnesota? >> well, there were seven schools. and one of the things we got them to change was eating food in hall ways and classrooms. and that cuts eight hours of junk food eating out of a kid's daily diet and will lower their bmi by 11% just by doing that. we put in 1.7 miles of sidewalks. instead of saying put these sidewalks in, we brought in experts to help work with the city planners to figure out the natural pedestrian route. and we did farmers markets. we got people to cluster in groups of five and become friends with other active people because we know who you hang out
7:45 am
with has a huge impact on your health behaviors. >> yeah, your friend gets you to go to the gym, right? it's easier. >> if your three best friends are obese, there's 150% chance you'll be overweight. if you get people connecting with people's idea of activity as bowling or walking, that behavior's going to be contagious too. >> now you're going to choose your next cities to get this makeover. announcing today on our show. who are the lucky winners? >> well, we teamed up with a huge well being company called health ways. they know how to make populations healthy. and we send it out -- 55 cities in america responded. we narrowed it to three, and today we're announcing, we're actually going into los angeles. specifically the cities of hermosa, redondo, and manhattan beach. >> you thought it might ultimately be the best suited.
7:46 am
i don't automatically think of southern california as being a place where people are healthy. they have a lot of sunlight, they have water access, it's not always the case? >> well, if you look at the statistics, they're not unlike the rest of america. about 60% are overweight or obese. and you're right along the ocean, you see healthy people. but if you go in a few blocks, they're just like people in minnesota or new york. they're not that much different. also we're really attracted to the fact this is a community that really wants this. the mayor, the city manager, the superintendent, they all really wanted us to come in. and we believe we're unleashing internal will. >> all right. well it' well, it'll be interesting to see how it turns out. and you have another new book called "thrive" and this is secret from the world's happiest people. and that's out right now, as well. >> thanks for joining us. >> thanks, kiran. white house press secretary robert gibbs had to get a little rough with security in india. find out why the man who battles
7:47 am
the press on a daily basis was sticking up for reporters. and another chilly start to the day for much of the east coast, rob's got this morning's travel forecast right after the break. it's 47 minutes after the hour. [ male announcer ] montgomery and abigail haggins had a tree that bore the most rare and magical fruit, which provided for their every financial need. [ thunder rumbling ] [ thunder crashing ] and then, in one blinding blink of an eye,
7:48 am
their tree had given its last. but with their raymond james financial advisor, they had prepared for even the unthinkable. ♪ and they danced. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you.
7:49 am
7:50 am
pretty picture this morning looking across central park from columbus circle, and you can see the reservoir there. it's 43 degrees, mixture of cloud and sunshine right now, later on today, it's going to be mostly cloudy to high of 55. it's supposed to warm up toward the end of the week into the low 60s. >> beautiful shot of the trees turning color. so nice. a first for america's national christmas tree. here it is. it's destined to decorate the capitol building in washington, d.c. think it's big enough? it is coming from wyoming for the first time. and a cnn producer was on hand to capture it for us. 80 trees taken by truck to the capitol for dozens of offices. it is so long we haven't seen the top. >> cut done every tree on the hillside to find the right one, too. no trees. look at. there you go. >> 50 minutes past the hour right now. let's go to rob marciano. is it that pretty in atlanta?
7:51 am
chilly in new york. >> it is a beautiful day in atlanta to start things off. yeah, clear cutting for christmas. nothing like getting in the spirit. >> you are teasing. now everyone will be writing in. deforest the mountain top. >> we are teasing, everybody. good morning. we are ready to say happy holidays. folks across new england happy to get rid of the storm that lingers. brought torrential rains, snows at times and wind that did some damage. portland, maine, 62-mile-a-hour winds yesterday and bringing down trees, power lines. yesterday, 60,000 people without power and the crews trying to repair things as the storm did more damage and threw down more snow than we thought it would. that's the nature of the beast here. over 30 miles per hour off the cape. and that will trigger some air delays in boston and new york metros. denver seeing delays because of a little storm rolling through
7:52 am
the area with snow. but for the time of year, certainly notable. lexington, new york, not kentucky, 3.5 inches. parts of rhode island with one and two inches. mostly wet snow and the grassy surfaces. a couple of storms into the inner mountain west with snow to colorado. six to 12 inches of fresh powder expected there. and another storm coming into seattle with a high of 46. in between these two systems, some unseasonably warm temperatures. john and kiran, back up to you. >> get some of the 70s back up here. love the powder in the wasatch, though. that will be great. >> start piling it up. >> lots of beautiful trees in the wasatch, too. >> exactly. >> thanks, rob. coming up, if you thought up the most outrageous trick play on the football field, would you ever think of this? >> side arm snap. just kidding. remarkable play by a team.
7:53 am
hear from the coach and the quarterback just ahead. the smartest thing you could do is cut the fuel supply... ♪ ...unlock the doors, and turn on the hazard lights. ♪ or better yet, get a car that automatically does it for you. ♪ right now, during the sign and drive event, get the all-new 2011 jetta for practically just your signature.
7:54 am
7:55 am
7:56 am
trick play drawn up by a texas middle school team has football fans across america talking. so-called penalty play was executed to perfection by
7:57 am
driscoll middle school quarterback jason garza that walked and then ran past the confused defense far game-tying touchdown. earlier, on "american morning" we asked garza and the coach that devised the play what they were thinking as it came off. >> it was just a rush. adrenaline. i think i said that right. it was fun. i had a blast doing it. i didn't think i was going to get very far but i -- it turned out to be a touchdown. >> in practicing the play, we even said there's going to be two results to the play. either jason is hit really hard by a line backer or a safety or getting a first down or touchdown and for us, thank goodness, it was the latter. >> look at, just walking through the line backers. thinking i'm going to get killed, i'm going to get killed. video of the trick play on youtube gone viral with nearly 170,000 hits and a thousand comments, as well. >> most of them supportive of the team. >> people questioning the
7:58 am
legality of the play. wondering if the refs got it right or wrong. >> the coaches asked before the game, are these legal? >> tipped them off to say watch for a funny play. they got away with it. top stories after a quick break. stay with us. - and i saw things. - incredible things. - and people you never forget. - i did my job. - for my country. - my buddies. - for total strangers. - and i was proud. - so grateful. - for my family. - my freedom. foall who served and all who serve, we can never thank them enough. affect wheat output in the u.s., the shipping industry in norway, and the rubber industry in south america? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex global economy. it's just one reason os beat their10-year lipp.
7:59 am
t. rowe price.invest . request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses, and other information to read and consider carefully before investing.
8:00 am
good morning. thank you so much for joining us on this "american morning," tuesday, 9th of november. i'm john roberts. >> i'm kiran chetry. president obama in indonesia. it's a country where he spent part of miss childhood. mt. merapi may force him to cut the visit short. sarah palin takes a shot at the fed's latest attempt to kick start the economy saying the printed money is printed out of thin air. and coco's comeback. he was booted from "the tonight show" and last night the firing jokes flew fast and furious. >> people asked me why i named
8:01 am
the show conan. i did it so i'd be harder to replace. he's out! get another conan. >> there's no other conan. he also got some advice from a familiar face here at cnn. we'll have more on that coming up. >> also conan the barbarian. president obama in indonesia, the world's largest muslim majority nation. the second stop on the ten-day tour of asiaize his home coming could be cut short because of an ash cloud from mt. merapi. ed henry is traveling with the president. they thought the third time was the charm because he had to cancel the trip two other times and could be looking at a shorter trip because of mother nature. >> reporter: that's right. good morning, kiran.
8:02 am
the first trip canceled because of health care and then the gulf spill and then the ash out of mt. merapi. probably shaving a few hours off the stop here. needs to safely get to south korea which is the next stop, the bottom line is that experts say that volcanic ash can wreck havoc of jet engines and the last thing the white house will do is put air force in a difficult situation with the jets accompanying the u.s. delegation. obviously as you mentioned, the president spending four years here as a boy. he was reflecting on that a little bit at a joint news conference with the indonesian president, talking about how much it's changed here in jakarta and had a little bit of a joke about how even on a rough day it's still pretty cool to be president. >> when i first came here was in 1967 and people were on bedchats which for those of you not
8:03 am
familiar, sort of a bicycle rickshaw thing and they were on bemmles sort of like little taxis but you stood in the back. and it was very crowded. and, you know, now as president, i can't even see any traffic because they block off all the streets. >> reporter: blocked off all the streets, indeed. the motorcade getting through here and the president has a big state dinner celebrating tonight with the first lady and then he's planning to give a speech as well as a tour of a big mosque here in jakarta but some of that may have to be shaved down because it's looking more and more likely the president is going to have to urgently get out of town sooner because the voluntaricanic ash is causing problems. >> ed, the president made news to the indian parliament. anything of substance?
8:04 am
>> reporter: he didn't make as major news as yesterday with the announcement of supporting india's bid of a permanent seat on the u.n. security council and this is more of the broader vision on the visit. bring more trade and bringing u.s. jobs if you increase exports here to indonesia just as we have seen a quadrupling in india. also here, you have to remember the most populist muslim majority country in the world and the president trying to show it holds true to the muslim identity, it works with the west, reaches out to the west on issues like climate trade and counter terrorism. and so, they want to use that as a model for other muslim countries. >> ed henry for us this morning, thanks. from age 6 to 10, president obama lived in jakarta and everyone knew him as barry. what was the future president like as a boy? suzanne malveaux talks to the people that knew him growing up.
8:05 am
well, job you recalusually battling reporters. this happened while the president in india meeting with the prime minister there yesterday. indian officials tried to allow five u.s. journalists into the meeting instead of previously-agreed upon eight and gibbs put his foot down. >> whole group is going in because they're going in with me. the whole group is going in with me. those guys, if there's a pool spread, all of them go in. a you will of my guys go in. excuse me. okay? that's the new agreement. >> well, eventually all eight journalists were allowed in. >> that's the new deal. cnn security watch now. new airline security measures from homeland security are now in effect. if you were thinking about it, don't do it because passengers can no longer travel with toner or ink cartridges weighing more than a pound. never seen anybody bring them on the plane. high-risk cargo is banned and
8:06 am
under going new additional screening. two devices were on car gunshot do planes. a cnn exclusive. a passenger on the air canada flight boarded by a man disguised as an elderly american has come forward saying she warned no less than three flight attendants it was a mask to make himself appear like that elderly man there. a spokesperson claims the crew alerted authorities at -- and then getting them to meet the aircraft upon landing and the passenger will be right here exclusively on cnn in the 10:00 hour. >> pretty amazing mask, really. wow. former president george w. bush is back in the spotlight this morning. his new book is being released today. it is called "decision points" and the former president sat down with nbc's matt lauer to talk about the aftermath of hurricane katrina to the war on terror. >> i can never forget what happened to america that day. i would pour my heart and soul into protecting this country, whatever it took.
8:07 am
it took two wars. >> yeah. >> it took thousands of lives, american lives, billions of dollars. you could say it took kwan tan no and abu ghraib and government eavesdropping and waterboarding. did it take too much? >> we didn't have an attack. 3,000 people died on september the 11th and i vowed that i would do my duty to protect the american people. >> why is waterboarding legal in your opinion? >> because the lawyer said it was legal. it did not fall within the anti-torture act. i'm not a lawyer. and -- but you got to trust the judgment of people around you and i do. >> one part of the evening i introduced kanye west. were you watching? >> nope. >> do you remember what he said? >> yes, i do. >> george bush doesn't care about black people. >> called me a racist. >> he said george bush doesn't care about black people. >> that's a racist. i didn't appreciate it then. i don't appreciate it now. one thing to say, you know, i
8:08 am
appreciate the way he's handled the business. it's another thing to say this man's a racist. i resent it. it's not true. and there's one of the most disgusting moments of my presidency. >> the former president says he would like his brother jeb to run for president and tells fox news his brother made it clear he is not going to run in 2012. chief political correspondent candy crowley sitting down with the former president. see the special edition of "state of the union" sunday night 8:00 eastern here on cnn. chilly, chilly, chilly here in the northeast. what happened to fall? going straight to winter? rob marciano for us. not cold everywhere, rob. >> no, no. just warming up across parts of the mid section and a chilly breeze for sure across the northeast. but not quite as nasty as it was yesterday. yesterday, 30s and lower 40s with rain blowing sideways and snow mixing in. that's pretty much done but there's still rain in the eastern new england, extreme
8:09 am
cape and the eastern mass. temperatures still in the 30s and 40s there but winds still blowing 25, 30 and sometimes gusting to 40 miles per hour so that slows down air travel but in between from new orleans to d.c. back through the great lakes, temps in the lower 60s. and that's well above average for this time of year. chicago might get into the upper 60s. 68 degrees, expected high temperature for chicago and minneapolis. a couple of storms coming into the pacific northwest and the inner mountain west. snow potentially in denver. talking more about that in about 30 minutes. john, kiran, back up to you. >> rob marciano for us, thank you so much. conan o'brien is back on the air. the much-anticipated debut of the cable tv show "conan" it aired last night on tbs. so how did he do? [ female announcer ] imagine the possibilities with stelara® for adults. stelara® helps control moderate or severe plaque psoriasis
8:10 am
with 4 doses a year, after 2 starter doses. in a medical study, 7 out of 10 stelara® patients saw at least 75% clearer skin at 12 weeks. and 6 out of 10 patients had their plaque psoriasis rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and increase your risk of infections. some serious infections, like tuberculosis, require hospitalization. before starting stelara®, your doctor should test for tuberculosis. stelara® may increase your risk of cancer. always tell your doctor if you have any sign of infection, or have had cancer. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems. these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal condition affecting the brain. tell your doctor if you or anyone in your house needs or has recently r. with 4 doses a year, after 2 starter doses it's stelara®.
8:11 am
8:12 am
12 minutes after the hour now. conan o'brien is back. he returned to a little-night television last night on our sister network tbs. he was booted from "the tonight show" in january you'll remember after refusing to move his show to midnight. a decision o'brien says may have
8:13 am
backfired. >> i put myself and my staff through this ordeal refusing to go on at midnight. okay? and then i got this job at 11:00. then yesterday daylight savings time ended. right now, it's basically midnight. >> o'brien started the show by revisiting the months after he lost the job at nbc and you will see he was visited by a familiar face. ♪ >> don't do it, conan! >> larry king? >> i'm your guardian angel. >> but you're not dead. >> never mind that. i have two words for you. basic cable. >> basic cable. >> conan, i think you will find our terms very attractive.
8:14 am
>> i think we have a deal. >> you can catch the show tonight on tbs at 11:00 p.m. tom hanks, soundgarden, as well. >> yesterday's jamming with jack white. conan himself. >> he can play and he can sing. i never knew that. >> multitalented guy. congrats, conan. keep it up. how about hillary clinton? the secretary of state talking to an australian radio team saying that the kardashians are perhaps not the best ambassadors for the u.s. although i don't know if they're trying to be. she used them as a example of how trash tv in the u.s. affects how the rest of the world sees us. >> they started the year thinking they might be the first team to play a hometown super bowl. now the dallas cowboys have fired the home coach wade phillips after a 1-7 start to the season. ouch. offensive coordinator jason
8:15 am
garret takes over. they head to new york next year. well, there's an app to catch a cheating partner called the sms replicator. you can forward e-mails without a person knowing about it. the person whose texts are tapped has no idea which again makes it perfect for monitoring suspicious activities of your significant other. google decided that the app goes too far and banned it from the marketplace. >> apparently only works on the android so this is a thing where if somebody wanted to check up on you or me, they get the app and plug in our number and monitor everything going on in our phones? >> not available on the iphone. you have to have an android for it to work. >> right. oh. that's interesting. happy meals may soon be illegal in san francisco. city leaders will vote today on a happy meal ban. under the ord daninancordinance
8:16 am
until next year to make them healthier. a kansas state nutrition specialist spent two years on a junk food diet. two thirds of what he ate in the day and he lost 27 pounds, 8% body fat and proved the theory that it doesn't matter what you eat but how many calories you consume. eating that junk, he limited himself to 1,800 calories. bag of cheetos after the show. sarah palin, taking aim at the monitor policy and she is not the only one. christine romans is coming up next.
8:17 am
8:18 am
8:19 am
but earlier tonight, somebody else was eliminated from "dancing with the stars." take a look at this. ♪
8:20 am
>> that's right. that's president obama's in india right now. he's over there visiting our jobs. thank you. that's what he's doing. >> oh, twofer from letterman today. christine romans is minding your business now and there's too much truth to that zinger. >> yeah. a little bit too much truth. it's interesting. as the president is on this trip, he is getting blowback from the friends and partners there concerned with what the fed is doing and injecting the money into the system and it's interesting. here's a quiz for now. what do china, germany and sarah palin have in common? >> they don't like the fed move. >> all three of them have been critical of the federal reserve. sarah palin, darling for the tea party this year, of course, and the vice presidential candidate for john mccain, coming out with some very specific comments about the federal reserve and its efforts to try to stimulate
8:21 am
the economy an giving a big major speech in phoenix last night about this and expected to speak about it tonight in pennsylvania. so let me tell you first what she said. last night she was speaking to a trade association in phoenix and she basically said the fed's quantitative easing plan is printing money out of thin air. she said that ben bernanke and the fed should, quote, cease and desist what they're doing and concerned about inflation down the road and printing up money is not a way to solve our problems. also, she tweeted that today she will be in pennsylvania, school event, quote, a school event to start discussing quantitative easing with kids around the u.s. so they prepare for fed's experiment with their future. she is not the only one concerned. basically, buying up treasuries, taking the treasuries off the market and injecting money into the market, money that it is printing. germany is concerned about this.
8:22 am
finance minister saying with all due respect u.s. policy is clueless. chinese strong against this. concerned about what the fed is doing. the president defended the move noting that the fed is an independent body. not the president that ordered this but the fed is doing this to try to get the economy back on a more even keel. the chinese interestingly enough stepped back from the criticisms getting closer to the g-20 meeting in seoul. you have people around the world starting to ask questions about this and sarah palin weighing in a week after the midterm elections of what's a complicated, pretty big policy issues. many times you don't see political leaders in this country openly criticize the fed. rand paul has, of course, congressman. people concerned about the fed and the fed's role in general but mostly this is an independent body. usually see elected officials steer clear of open criticism. >> in a nutshell, what is quantitative easing? >> quantitative easing is a fed
8:23 am
measure to loosen monetary policy, to get more money going out. they can't lower interest rates anymore. they're so low. usually how the fed does it. >> negative territory. explain why, quickly, why germany and china are particularly against this. >> they're concerned about this because -- well, germany's concerned because as the dollar is lower and lower it makes the exports more attractive and theirs less. >> and china? >> we have been complaining about china manipulating the currency and this is also the u.s. pushing down our currency. now, the china currency is pegged to the u.s. currency and the g-20 last year with speaking with one voice and doing policy together to try to get the economy going again, but this is the u.s. on its own. >> got you. thanks. christmas is coming early for millions of air travelers. free wi-fi on flights. google makes it available on air
8:24 am
tran, delta and virgin america. more than 700 planes and estimated 15 million fliers. still ahead, we know him as president barack obama. they know him as barry sataro. we are taking you back to president obama's childhood home in indonesia where she spent four years and we get to know him through the eyes of his neighbors and friends. [ male announcer ] in the event of a collision,
8:25 am
the smartest thing you could do is cut the fuel supply, unlock the doors, and turn on the hazards. or get a car that does it for you. ♪ one month, five years after you do retire? ♪ client comes in and they have a box. and inside that box is their financial life. people wake up and realize i better start doing something. we open up that box. we organize it. and we make decisions. we really are here to help you.
8:26 am
they look back and think, "wow. i never thought i could do this." but we've actually done it. [ male announcer ] visit ameriprise.com and put a confident retirement more within reach. ♪ express yourself ♪ ♪ express yourself ♪ ♪ oh, do it ♪ oh, do it [ female announcer ] the newest seasonal flavors are here. ♪ express yourself [ female announcer ] introducing gingerbread latte, eggnog latte, and sugar & spice. because coffee is like the holidays. it's better when you add your flavor. coffee-mate. from nestle.
8:27 am
27 minutes after the hour. president obama touched down in jakarta, eindonesia, a few hour ago. the world's largest muslim majority country is an ally for america and also happens to be the boyhood home of president obama. >> back then, everyone knew him as barry. white house correspondent suzanne malveaux joins us this morning with a "a.m. original." he was talking about his fond memories of living there for
8:28 am
four years. what do indonesians remember about this boy that would glow up to be the american president? >> what they remember is he loved to eat. he loved to eat. he ate all the time. he was a big kid in elementary school and stood out. teased a little bit for it and he liked to tease back and he adapted to some of the local customs like he had small crocodiles for pets. he spent hours flying kites. i was in indonesia in march traveling before the president canceled the trip and i talked to those that knew him or close to him as they really see him. they see him as a son, one of their own. when barack obama living in jakarta, indonesia, he was barry soetoro. also running around with the neighborhood boys. >> running and bicycle. >> reporter: this was his friend that lived around the corner from obama's first home. >> barry energetic boy.
8:29 am
>> reporter: obama's first house in jakarta where he lived for three years is largely hidden behind concrete. paving the street now. >> yeah. i think -- >> reporter: his home. >> the street -- >> reporter: for his arrival, yes? >> i think so. >> reporter: for 40 years a dirt road leading to obama's home. now, a makeover with friendly neighbors eager to see the 6-year-old who grew up to become the american president. just down the street is obama's first elementary school, a catholic school. st. francis of asisi. obama's first grade teacher remembers a sweet kid who helped her erase the black board. >> translator: his mother took him to school every day. she walked him to the front gate. obama was a good listener. >> reporter: she likes to think the success now has something to do with the indonesian experience. >> translator: his attitude, his leadership maybe comes from the neighborhood he used to live. it was a small area but full of
8:30 am
diversity and every aspect. that might affect his personality as a president. >> reporter: when his family moved into a more upscale neighborhood, 9-year-old barry went to the public school in the u.s. presidential campaign some news outlets incorrectly labeled a radical muslim school. the classmates here recall obama stood out in many ways. they say he was a boy scout, couldn't stand kids that cheated in sports and he could hold his own. i understand he was teased a little bit because he looked different? >> yes. some of the kids tease him but he like to tease also. >> reporter: four years in indonesia and it seems everyone that knew barry soetoro remembers him well. >> he take me very high and lifted me and -- >> reporter: dropped you? >> yes. >> reporter: will you remind him that he picked you up and dropped you? >> of course.
8:31 am
still pain, no? >> reporter: still hurting? >> yes. >> unfortunately, for him and the others that had been hoping to see the president during his visit very likely not going to see him this time. he is only scheduled to be on the ground for less than 24 hours and now you have this erupting indonesia volcano and the president's trip is cut even shorter. when i was there in march, many of the friends wanted to see not only president obama but first lady michelle, daughters to welcome them back to the family home, the neighborhood. white house officials say that might happen next year when he goes back to an east asia summit in indonesia. in march, so much excitement. kids had songs and they were cheering, signs up and all of that. very disappointing when they realized he wasn't coming and now very, very quick trip. >> yeah. >> at least you got to see it. >> i loved it. i got to see all of it. a little statue of the president when he was a little boy at an elementary school. and all of them, i mean, they
8:32 am
had his -- the road in front of one of his homes, had been a dirt road for like 40 years and quickly paving over it. he's not going to see it this go around. >> what a unique sense of pride. never before in indonesia, an american president lived here for four years. >> a lot of excitement around it, too. >> understandable. suzanne malveaux, thanks so much. >> good trip. crossing the half hour now. erupting volcano, mt. merapi may force the president to leave indonesia. pushing for open markets to u.s. goods. a major speech on the relations with the muslim world, as well. new restrictions in place. if you're planning on traveling with a toner or ink cartridge, it cannot weigh more than 16 ounces. while cargo deemed high risk is banned from passenger planes. the new rules come after two explosive devices were mailed from yemen found aboard cargo planes. a republican lawmaker saying
8:33 am
that sarah palin cost his party control of the senate. alabama congressman spencer bachus said last week that the senate would be republican if not for tea party candidates like o'donnell in delaware, candidates who sarah palin endorsed. a spokesman for the congressman backtracked a little bit on that saying he credited palin with the turnout that led to huge wins for republicans in the house. >> the republicans are set to take control of the house come january and they're now busy figuring out who gets powerful and influential leadership roles. and one of the questions, a huge one out there, is whether any newly-elected tea party candidates will be a part of that group. brianna keilar is live in washington and there's one tea party-backed candidate in particular that the republican leadership has their sights on. >> reporter: that's right. christine gnome from south dakota. she is a freshman. she's seen as a promising republican. she ran a campaign against a
8:34 am
very charismatic democrat and noem herself seen as charismatic and she won and we're told she is interested in perhaps a new position, that gop leadership is talking about creating at the table for a tea party member. but you have to remember that she would have to run for this. this is an election process and would have to have the endorsement of the freshman class an has to do with a very big question for republicans and that is with this huge influx of new republicans, many of them aligned with the tea party, how do you make sure that they're represented in a way that's going to keep those members of the congress happy and the voters that put them in congress and the answer seems to be according to sources to create a position so a tea party member and a freshman has a seat at the table, john and kiran. >> interesting. meanwhile, the other side of the aisle, back room dealing with the democrats trying to figure out their joint leader and the other roles. there's not enough leadership
8:35 am
roles to go around now that they're a minority party. >> reporter: that's right. democrats experiencing a squeeze here moving into the minority in the new congress. they lose a leadership position so you have jockeying going on between steny hoyer and jim clyburn, and this is a bit of an inner party feud going on or really a battle because they represent different wings of the democratic caucus. steny hoyer aligned with moderates, many of whom lost seats in the election. jim clyburn, prominent african-american seen as someone that represents the liberal wing and support of the congressional black caucus. and so, you know, we are sort of waiting to see how all of this shakes out. i just learned from senior democratic aide that hoyer and clyburn met yesterday for about half an hour and still trying to figure out exactly what was discussed as this jockeying continues. >> all right. hey, is it me or you?
8:36 am
we'll have to see what happens. >> reporter: yeah. >> thanks so much. if you want to add years to your life, how about figuring out where people live longest? ten to 12 years longer than the average american and some parts of the world. one happiness researcher shows us how to take the secrets and put them to work for us. 36 minutes past the hour. [ male announcer ] introducing listerine® zero™. we removed the alcohol and made it less intense. ♪ it still kills bad breath germs
8:37 am
for a whole-mouth clean. and it's never felt so good. new less intense listerine® zero™. key lime pie, pineapple upside down cake. no, i've actually lost weight... [ female announcer ] over 30 delicious flavors at around 100 calories each. [ wife ] babe... i gotta go. [ female announcer ] yoplait, it is so good. the new healthcare law gives us powerful new tools to fight it.... to investigate it... prosecute it... and stop criminals. our senior medicare patrol volunteers... are teaching seniors across the country... ...to stop, spot, and report fraud. you can help. guard your medicare card. don't give out your card number over the phone. call to report any suspected fraud. we're cracking down on medicare fraud. let's make medicare stronger for all of us. the smartest thing you could do is cut the fuel supply, unlock the doors, and turn on the hazards. or get a car that does it for you.
8:38 am
8:39 am
39 minutes after the hour. mission to make america healthy, a town at a time.
8:40 am
the author of a new book called "thrive" joined us earlier. >> he brought back secrets of the healthiest cities in the world and helped a town in minnesota lose 10,000 combined with 3 years added to the livs s halving health care costs. he told me a few steps. what was the trick? what changes did you put into place in albertlee, minnesota? >> seven schools and one thing to change is prohibit eating food in hallways and classrooms and that alone cuts eight hours of junk food eating out of a kid's daily diet and lower the bmi, body fat, by 11%. sidewalks and instead of putting them in, we brought experts in to help them work with the city planners to figure out the natural pedestrian routes and farmer's markets. we got people to cluster in groups of five and become friends with other active people. we know who you hang out with
8:41 am
has a huge impact on your health behaviors. >> dan buettner announced the next big cities. beach towns in southern california. manhattan beach, hermosa beach and redondo beach. banning junk food and snacking in the city schools except for in the lunchroom. >> what's the matter with new york? what are we, chopped liver? come on. let's get it going here. storms in the northeast. midwest, temperatures bouncing back to a lovely fall-like warmth. rob marciano is coming up next. [ woman ] you know, as a mom,
8:42 am
i worry about my son playing football. which is why i'm really excited. because toyota developed this software that can simulate head injuries and helps make people safer. then they shared this technology with researchers at wake forest to help reduce head injuries on the football field. so, you know, i can feel a bit better about my son playing football. [ male announcer ] how would you use toyota technology to make a better world? learn how to share your ideas at toyota.com/ideasforgood. [ male announcer ] what does it take to excel in today's business world? our professors know. because they've been there. and they work closely with business leaders to develop curriculum to meet the needs of top businesses. which means when our graduates walk in the room,
8:43 am
they're not only prepared... they're prepared to lead. devry university's keller graduate school of management. learn how to grow the business of you at keller.edu. nah. we have something else. but if you're hurt and miss work does it pay cash like aflac does? nah. or let you spend it in any way you want like for gas and groceries? nah. or help with everyday bills like aflac does? nah nah nah. [ male announcer ] there's aflac and there's everything else. visit aflac.com for an agent or quote. aflac!
8:44 am
great shot this morning in atlanta, georgia. sunny and 51 degrees. a pretty nice day there. more sun, high of 74 in atlanta. >> which is why it's great to live in atlanta and that's where our rob marciano is this morning with a look at the weather across the country. good morning, rob. >> good morning, guys. winters are short. summer's long, yeah. but this time of year it's pretty nice. good morning, guys. across the northeast is where we start right now as far as the focal point of the weather. pretty windy yesterday.
8:45 am
pretty wet and at times it was kind of snowy. still breezy today with wind gusts over 30 miles per hour. eastern long island and eastern new england, lesser winds in new york. more pleasant day today and air travel issues. over an hour probably in boston and new york. denver seeing light rain and some snow at the higher elevations and may slow down some stuff. speaking of snow, lexington, three and a half inches of snow. mostly wet stuff accumulating on the grassy surfaces. some snow across here, colorado and the wasatch of utah. a couple of storms rolling through. six to 12 inches of snow potentially. especially above elevation. in the pacific northwest, seattle, wet. warm-up in the mid section of the country. yellows and oranges on the map. 76 potentially today in kansas city, maybe as high as 68 degrees in minneapolis and chicago and 76 degrees in st.
8:46 am
louis. so feeling more like spring heading into the middle of november. some of the warmth to the east coast after today. 74 as you mentioned here in the atl. john and kiran, back up to you. >> sounds good, rob. thanks so much. it was a trick play drawn up by a middle school assistant coach in texas an football fans are now cheering and talking about this so-called penalty play. it was executed to perfection by the quarterback, jason garza. walked and then ran past the confused defense making a 67-yard game-tying touchdown. >> earlier we asked garza and the coach that devised the play what they were thinking as it all unfolded. >> it was just a rush. adrenaline. i think i said that right. >> yeah. >> it was fun. i had a blast doing it. i didn't think i was going to get very far but it turned out to be a touchdown. >> in practicing the play, we
8:47 am
even said, there's going to be two results to the play. either jason is hit really hard by a line backer or safety or a first down or a touchdown and for us, thank goodness, it was a latter. >> it was perfectly executed. basically gets a call from the sidelines. walk off another five yards in that penalty. asked the center for the ball. the line backers saying, what are you doing, jason? he walked across the line. video was posted on youtube. gone viral, of course. getting nearly 170,000 hits and a thousand comments so far. >> we got one funny comment on twitter saying that play is good for middle school. in high school and college, the qb would be killed. >> can you imagine the nfl? sure. >> at this point, dallas will try anything. refugee kids from countries like afghanistan, congo, finding a sense of hope and community in a very special soccer league right here in the u.s. dr. sanjay gupta introduces us to the fugees next.
8:48 am
y but there's one that's so clever, it makes your skin look better even after you take it off. neutrogena healthy skin liquid makeup. 98% of women saw improvement in their skin's natural texture, tone, or clarity. does your makeup do that? neutrogena® cosmetics recommended most by dermatologists.
8:49 am
8:50 am
8:51 am
ten minutes to the top of the hour. when you're here, you're family a. georgia woman getting high marks for combined soccer and education to give refugee kids from war-torn countries a new lease on life. >> she is the matriarch of the fugees' family. dr. sanjay gupta has her story in today's "human factor." >> reporter: at first glance, they look like a bunch of kids playing soccer. but take another look. a closer one. this is the fugees family. anybody who wants to be a part of this family can be? >> any refugee that wants to be a part of the family can be. >> reporter: and that's what binds them together. they're refugees. 86 children and teens from more than 28 countries. >> any country that's had a war in the post 20, 30 years we have had kids from those countries. >> reporter: what started as a casual soccer team six years ago is a school full of students most of whom had never been in a
8:52 am
classroom before. >> i come here from russia. >> reporter: robin, sharply dressed in the school's uniform blue sweater and tie is an eighth grader at the academy. something that would have been almost impossible in his native sudan. right after you moved to the united states, someone said, robin, what will you do with your life, what would you have said? >> i really didn't know what to say. during that time. but now, i look at myself, i want to be someone like very good, make my people proud. >> reporter: life in america has not always been good to robin. when you're an outsider from sudan living in the united states, what is that like? what happens to you? >> it is very hard. like, everyone is picking on you. they're treating you really different like you don't belong here. >> reporter: what did you do? >> i used to fight a lot but nowadays i don't really get into figts. i try to resolve them and not make people fight. >> reporter: while there are refugees all around the united
8:53 am
states, this family is the only group only bining soccer with the hope for a better future. are there other organizations that you know of like this around the country? >> no. >> reporter: this is it? >> this is it. we get e-mails every week from people around the country and the world, when will you bring them to us? >> reporter: how many more years until you finish? >> four more years. >> reporter: and then? >> another four years. >> reporter: of? >> college. >> reporter: dr. sanjay gupta, cnn, georgia. >> what a great program. she nailed it. for serious "wheel of fortune" fans it is an epic. meet the new york city woman that guessed this puzzle with one letter revealed. coming up next. fiber one chewy bar.
8:54 am
how'd you do that? do what? you made it taste like chocolate. it has 35% of your daily value of fiber. tasty fiber, that's a good one! ok, umm...read her mind. [ male announcer ] fiber one chewy bars. [ male announcer ] you're at the age where you don't get thrown by curve balls. ♪ this is the age of knowing how to get things done. ♪ so why would you let something like erectile dysfunction get in your way? isn't it time you talked to your doctor about viagra? 20 million men already have. ♪ with every age comes responsibility. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain, as it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects may include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours.
8:55 am
stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. see if america's most prescribed ed treatment is right for you. [ ted ] for years, i was just a brewer. until one of the guys brought in some fresh bread that he'd made from our pale ale. and from that first bite, i knew my business would never be the same. [ male announcer ] when businesses see an opportunity to grow, the hartford is there. protecting their property and helping them plan their employees' retirement. ♪ beer or bread? [ male announcer ] see how the hartford helps businesses at achievewhatsahead.com.
8:56 am
♪ well, certainly a good night for one contestant on "wheel of fortune." >> one letter is all caitlin
8:57 am
burke needed. jeanne moos with more on the stunner. >> reporter: she was excited then. and she's still excited. whoo! you'd be excited, too, if all you needed to solve this "wheel of fortune" phrase was a single letter. >> "l." >> one "l." >> reporter: one "l" and as to to fee don't help most people. what is this phrase? >> oh my god. >> um -- >> oof. >> um, can i buy a vowel? >> i have no idea. i'm stumped. >> reporter: fashion editor caitlin burke wasn't. pat sajak was momentarily mute. >> can i solve? >> okay. >>s is a prize puzzle. >> yeah. >> i've got a good feeling about this. >> that's right! >> whoo! >> reporter: no one looked more shocked than her fellow contestant. look at his face.
8:58 am
>> i had a good feeling about it. >> reporter: this transplanted new yorker is such a fan of the show that she got tears in her eyes the first time she spun the wheel. >> if you're a long fan of the show, there is a strategy. always the apostrophe helped. >> reporter: it was i've or i'll. if you think she is a one-letter wonder, what's really amazing is she says she had the phrase figured out before any letters up. so you knew it when it was empty? >> yeah. i do this all the time at home. i call it before there's letters or a few and half the time i'm right. >> reporter: skeptics called her a witch. said it was staged, rigged. >> i think that's just funny. i don't know how you would cheat. >> reporter: she won a total of around $53,000 with a caribbean trip, plans to pay off the student loan. >> i have a bucket list of things to do and number one was be on "wheel of fortune." and own a chanel bag.
8:59 am
>> reporter: the fact she solved it with one letter prompted someone to solve i can't even solve it when there's only one letter remaining. we saw contestants blow it with no letters remaining. leaving us with a bad feeling. >> i had a good feeling about it. i have a good feeling about this. >> reporter: jeanne moos, cnn, new york. >> she'll probably got an iq of 165 ire good for her. a huge fan of the show. got on it. getting herself a chanel bag. >> just want add spot on "wheel of fortune" and a chanel bag. she's easily satisfied. that was amazing, though. pretty incredible to see her do that. that wraps it up for us. see you back here bright and early tomorrow morning. >> meanwhile, the news continues. hey, kyra. >> good morning. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast. 6:00 a.m. out west. here's the tories that had us talking this

275 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on