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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  June 27, 2016 8:30pm-12:01am EDT

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>> host: congressman you use this term or this idea that this is not a very issue. how do you get the attention of appropriators and leadership etc.? >> guest: people recognize it as an important issue. i represent 29 counties in texas urban areas and her areas in the last 17 months i have done over three and an 20 meet and greets and there are two questions i've gotten asked by each one of those big question on national security isis or iran related and the other one is security. the question is different every time. people are nervous that they keep reading about these high-profile attacks that have happened almost every week. how many people have had to get a new credit card because their information was stolen lexus is something that impacts everyone and i think some folks are afraid of the difficulty, the
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topic in the technicalities involved in the topics that people definitely recognized that this is a threat and this will only become an increasing threat as we move into a more interconnected digital age. we can talk about the internet of things or all of our devices start talking to one another, driverless cars. as we put more stuff into the cloud and are connected to each other that increases potential areas that can be attacked and we can continue to grow and leverage technology for good that we have to begin with security and how we protect that information. >> guest: another issue you have been active on congressman is something called the -- arrangement. there've been talks recently. administration officials have gone to vienna and tried to list some of these export control restrictions for cybersecurity countries that have you done any update on how those talks went
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and is not what would you like to see as the ideal outcome? will would be the final thing you would like to see happen to make it better? >> guest: this whole issue is a success. this is where a multilateral agreement was negotiated and the u.s. government is trying to figure out how to implement it. they got feedback from the private sector in the private sector said we have serious problems and long-term ramifications that weren't taken into account in this agreement was negotiated. the department of congress was realizing the congress played a role in having a conversation on that and the department decided to go back and renegotiate the entire multilateral agreement and they decided to take a private sector expert to europe for the negotiations so that is a huge victory and what i have heard about the negotiations over the last couple of days is
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that the technical expertise of the private sector came from the private sector with invaluable in discussing how we have a multilateral agreement that helps prevent bad guys from getting the tools but doesn't hurt international businesses and local businesses from doing everything to protect themselves. i think this is a good example of when strong oversight from congress led to something that was a good outcome. >> host: finally congressman hurd what do we expect from your subcommittee in the coming months or year? >> guest: one of the things you can expect is talking about what is said digital act of war. we can also look at how do we allow the chief information officers within an agency to utilize some of the things they realized in their networks for other projects. these are two areas that i think are very important that we
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continue to play our oversight role within congress on fitara and making sure our agencies are moving in that direction of improving our security across the networks and one thing that i am passionate about is making sure that there is true interoperability between the department of defense and the va when it comes to electronic health records. a soldier or sailor or airman marine should not be told when they are leaving dod to print out the electronic health records and physically carried to the b.a.. it's 2016 we should be a load to do that with a button and if the va is able to achieve interoperability they can use -- be the standard for the world and that leads to a lot of great things, everything from doing a research cohort where you can dt lifesaving drugs to the market quicker.
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as an individual you can see all of the documents you have ever had and that will help you be healthier and live longer. there are some really exciting things in the federal government can lead in this area if we get our act together. >> host: congressman will hurd is it republican from texas, a freshman and chairman of the subcommittee on information technology. tim starks cover cybersecurity for "politico." this is "the communicators."
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massachusetts -- massachusetts senator elizabeth warren talked about the economy and corporate influence on the country at a rally in cincinnati, ohio. this runs about 50 minutes. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [applause] [applause]
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[applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you for that warm welcome. i am always happy to come to ohio. it is good to be in the home state of my great friend and your great senator, sherrod brown. [applause] and it is good to be in a state that is going to send ted strickland to the u.s. senate in november. [applause] now, i am here today because i
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am with her. [applause] we are all here today because we are with her and we are going to work our hearts out to make hillary clinton the next president of the united states. [applause] i am ready. are you ready for this? [applause] yeah. we are here with someone who gets us every single day and fights for us. someone who spent her whole life fighting for children, spent her life fighting for women, spent her life fighting for families, fighting for health care, fighting for human rights,
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fighting for a level playing field, fighting for those who need her the most. we are here to fight side-by-side with hillary clinton. [applause] [applause] i want to talk about values. my daddy's old fencing and carpeting and ended up as a maintenance man and after his heart attack my mom answered the phone to sears to keep our family above water. here are some of the values that i learned up close and personal. my oldest brother was career military, 288 combat missions in vietnam. [applause] and i learned from him that we honor our promises to our servicemembers and veterans, always. [applause]
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and after my middle brother john got out of the air force he got a good union jobs operating a crane. [applause] today he gets attention because of that job. i learned from him that you can build -- unions built america's middle class and unions will rebuild america's middle class. [applause] my youngest brother david got out of the army and started a small business. he worked his rear end off. it was tough and today i'll be has left is a social security. i learned from him that we honor hard-working people by protecting and expanding social security. [applause]
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now mia i was -- i was wanted to be at teacher. i went to commuter college that costs $50 a semester and opened a million doors for me. i learned that america's public schools can build opportunities for all of our kids, yeah. [applause] i am the daughter of a maintenance man who made it all the way to the united states senate. [applause] and hillary clinton is the granddaughter of a factory worker who is going to make it all the way to the white house. [applause] [applause] now we believe in that in
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america but we are worried, worried that those opportunities are slipping away and a lot of america is worried. worried and angry, angry that too many times washington works for those at the top and leaves everyone else behind, but washington lets giant oil companies guzzle billions of dollars in tax subsidies. there's no money to help kids refinancing student loans. washington gives corporations tax breaks for ceo bonuses but won't raise the minimum wage. washington pushes big corporate interest in trade deals but won't make the investments in infrastructure that creates good jobs here in america. [applause] angry that friends and neighbors right here in ohio lost their jobs and their homes when wall
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street wrecked our economy, angry that instead of sending people to jail, washington gave bankers a bail out. now your pensions are in trouble in washington won't lift a finger to help. that's not right and we are here to change it. [applause] we are here to change it. [applause] now, donald trump says -- donald trump says he will make america great again. it's right there. it's stamped on the front of his goofy hat. you want to see goofy? look at him in that hat. but when donald trump says great, i ask, great for who
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exactly? [applause] for millions of kids struggling to pay for an education? for millions of seniors surviving on social security, for families that don't fly to scotland to play golf? [applause] when donald trump says he will make america great he means they could even greater for rich guys just like holtrop. great for the guy who doesn't care how much they have already squeeze from everyone else. great for the guy who eyes once more because that's who donald trump is, the guy who wants it all for himself and watch out because he will crush you into the dirt to get whatever he
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wants. that's two he is. [applause] just look at the evidence. donald trump cheered on britain's current crisis which has billions of dollars out of your retirement accounts to kiss he said hey it might bring more rich people to his new golf course that he cheered on the 2008 housing crash so that he could scoop up more real estate on the cheap. he cheered on students desperate enough to sign up for his state university so he could bleed them dry and turn a profit for himself. what kind of a man does that? what kind of a man wishes for people to lose their jobs, to lose their homes and to lose their life savings? i will tell you a kind of a man, a small insecure money grabber.
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[applause] what kind of a man? a nasty man who will never become president of the united states. [applause] because hillary clinton will be the next president of the united states. [applause] that's right. hillary clinton will be the next president of the united states because she knows what it takes to beat a thin-skinned bully who is driven by greed and hate. she knows you beat a bully not right checking tail and running but by standing your ground and
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fighting back. [applause] just look at her history. she has been on the receiving end of one right-wing attack after another for 25 years, but she has never backed down. [applause] she doesn't whine, she doesn't run to twitter to call her opponents that big sword dummies no, she just remembers who really needs someone on their side and she steps up and she keeps right on fighting for the people who need her the most. [applause]
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[applause] [applause] [chanting] hillary, hillary, hillary. [applause] so here's what it boils down to. hillary has brains, she has guts, she has thick skin and steady hands but most of all she has a good heart and that's what america needs, and that is why i am with her. are you with her? [applause]
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[applause] this election is about values. let's just do a view, donald versus hillary. donald trump believes in defrauding students to benefit himself. hillary clinton believes that every kid should be able to get an education without getting crushed by debt. that means you refinancing student loans. hillary will fight for us. donald trump believes that poor little wall street bankers need to be free to do fraud anyone they want. hillary clinton believe that we need strong rules to prevent another financial crisis.
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yes, hillary fights for us. [applause] donald trump cheats his workers and wants to abolish the minimum wage. hillary clinton believes in no one should work full time and live in poverty and that means raising the minimum wage. hillary fights for us. [applause] you know i can do could do this all day. i really could i won't, i won. okay, one more, one more. donald trump calls african-americans bugs, muslims terrorists, latinos, and criminals and women, bimbos. hillary clinton believes that racism, hatred and justice and bigotry have no place in our country.
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[applause] she fights for us and we must fight for hillary clinton. [applause] please join me in welcoming to the stage our next president. [applause] [chanting] hillary, hillary. [applause] >> thank you cincinnati. [applause] i especially want to thank all the people outside who couldn't get in.
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thank you for coming today. [applause] i am so delighted to be here with my friend and a great leader, senator elizabeth warren. [applause] you just saw, you just saw why she is considered so terrific, so formidable, because she tells it like it is. [applause] i am very grateful for that introduction but more importantly i want to thank her for fighting every single day for families like hers, families like yours, and millions of hard-working americans who deserve to have more folks on
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their side. [applause] you know, elizabeth and i came of age around the same time and when we were coming up, as you heard her talking about her parents, her brothers, we believed in the american dream. it wasn't always going to be easy. my dad was a small-business man. it was hard work. he got up every single day and went off to work and worked hard and lots of times my mother and my brothers and i would be there to help. we -- he printed drapery fabrics in a long warehouse with a long cable. it was dark and not very pleasant but it was decent, honest work. and he believed, and he taught
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me, that's what you do in america. that's the basic organs. you work hard and you do your part, you will get ahead and stay ahead and we need to make sure that is alive and well in 2016. [applause] elizabeth is leading the fight to liberate millions of americans and the burden of student debt and to make sure -- [applause] to make sure washington never again profits off of our students. she and i agree the federal government should not be making money off of sending our young people to college to get an education. [applause] and no one works harder to make
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sure wall street never, never rex main street again. she has come up with a lot of great ideas but here is one that authority made a big difference. it's called the consumer financial protection bureau. [applause] it's been around a few years under the leadership of a great leader from ohio, richard cordray who is leading the charge. [applause] it has already, think about this, it's only been around a few years but it has already returned over 10.8 billion dollars to 25 million americans who have been hurt by a legal financial practices. now that is what standing up and fighting to write economic wrongs looks like.
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[applause] and i must say i do just love to see how she gets under donald trump's skin. [applause] as elizabeth made clear at donald trump proves every day he is not in it for the american people, he is in it only for himself and elizabeth reminds us of that every chance she gets. [applause] it is really important that voters here in ohio and across america understand it. she exposes him for what he is, temperamentally unfit and totally unqualified to be president of the united states.
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[applause] now, some of the best tv since elizabeth came to the senate is actually on c-span. so whenever you see her pressing a bank executive or a regulator for answers, refusing to let them off the hook, remember she is speaking for every single american who is frustrated and fed up. she is speaking for all of us and we thank her for that. [applause] i am thrilled that elizabeth could be here with me in this glorious, beautiful building
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that has been in rehab and put two new use as a museum because we want to make the point together that we must have an economy that works for everyone again, not just those at the top, not just the rich or the well-connected, everybody. [applause] now one might ask well, yes that is what we believe. it sounds simple, doesn't it? honestly i think it is. shouldn't become for gated but there are too many politicians and corporations that don't agree. they don't even seem to get it. but you do, and we do and for the past now more than a year, i have been traveling across our country meeting people who have told me they are wages haven't
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budged even though they see executives who give themselves big onus is. and you ask yourself, well wait a minute. why do the richest americans and the biggest corporations get away with manipulating the tax code so they pay lower rates than you do? that's a good question. it doesn't make any sense. it doesn't make moral sense, economic sense, historic sense and you know what else doesn't make sense? when leaders in congress give more tax breaks to hedge fund millionaires instead of making investments in many faction clean energy and education that will actually create more good jobs. [applause] it doesn't make sense when
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corporations stash their profits overseas or send them to influential shareholders instead of making long-term investments in raising wages, training and research are when governors and legislatures used every trick in the book to weaken unions and make it harder for americans to organize themselves for better wages and benefits. ..
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let's make it right for hard-working americans. >> it is a nonstop struggle for him to compete against the bigger guy. if we keep our economy growing and make sure small businesses like stands get the right support, we can give more people the chance to succeed under that american basic bargain. let's make a right for young people, like the gal in westlake, she dreamed her whole life of going to ohio university in athens. [applause]. but, but the housing crash in 2008 wiped out her parent
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savings and their small business. so to get her college degree at a public university erica wound up $100,000 in debt. we cannot let this student debt crisis continue. we have got got to give hard-working students and families relief. you know what erica is doing now? she is volunteering for our campaign and working to elect democrats across ohio. [applause]. stan is volunteering with us to because he, like like so many people across ohio and across the country know that we are fighting for a better future. i got into this race because i wanted to even the odds for people who have the odds stacked against them. this is not a time for half
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measures. to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, we have to go big and we have got to go bold. [applause]. we need to take that frustration , the fear, the anxiety, anxiety, and yes, the anger and after we have vented it we need to work together to achieve the kind of changes that will give everybody in this country a better shot. let's break through washington and make the biggest investment since world war ii, let's do it we need to do to invest in
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infrastructure like president eisenhower did, like the interstate highway system that's when republicans used to believe in building america and putting americans to work. that is what we are going to do again [applause]. let's set the goal of making college debt free for everyone, like erica. [applause]. and let's provide debt relief, let's provide debt relief as soon as we can, as soon as we start to work elizabeth. it we will take a day off for the inauguration and then the senate, the congress, the white house we are going to get to work to get students and their
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families relief from this debt. [applause]. we have more work to do so let's set the goal of rewriting the rules. so more companies share profits with their employees, not just their executives, instead of shifting profits and jobs overseas, we have got the greatest country in the greatest economy in the world, let's start acting like it. let's make it clear that the companies have to be part of that greatness! [applause]. let's set the goal of making sure that wall street and the wealthy pay their fair share of taxes. now, there are couple of ways of doing this. i have been proposing a number
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of them, something called the buffett rule after warren buffett. note millionaires should pay a lower tax rate than someone working for him like a secretary. [applause]. the people who have profited the most, even since the great recession are people who now need to get back. this country has given so much to all of us and everybody should share the burden. i have made a pledge, i will not raise taxes on the middle class but we are going to raise taxes on corporations and the wealthy! [applause].
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don't you think it is about time we put american families first #we are not living in the 50s or 60s anymore. we have got to catch up to how americans actually live and work in the 21st century. i have met so many stressed-out young parents. i have met so many stressed-out middle aged and older folks, young parents because they are trying to balance what should be there joy of their lives like our new grandson is for us and our granddaughter. [applause]. i remember, i was talking to elizabeth on the phone when she was visiting her family, her grandchildren and we talked about all of this important stuff and what we have to do. and that she then she said i have to go because i have to buy my granddaughter some sparkly shoes. [laughter]
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there's no rater joy but then to see young struggling so hard and older ones taking care of their parents. we have work to do, we should not make it so difficult to do your job at home and do the job to put food on the table and a roof over your head. let me just say a word about rewriting the rules. there are a lot of businesses striving right here in ohio who see their employees the right way. they see them as assets to invest and not cost to cut. [applause]. but unfortunately there are too many who take the opposite view
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and their behavior contributes to stagnant wages and lower economic growth. that is why as president i will work to reward companies that share profits with their employees, on top of paying a good wage. if they can do it to for their executives they sure can do it for their workers. [applause]. we will encourage companies to invest in worker training and to build high-quality apprenticeship programs where you earn where you learn. we will strengthen unions because they are the bedrock of a strong middle class in america. [applause]. unions help bring back the auto industry in ohio and they will help bring back america from coast to coast. so here is our message, here is our message to every corporate boardroom. do the right thing to your
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employees and your country and we will stand by you. but sheet your employee, exploit your customers, pollute pollute our environment or rip off taxpayers, and we will hold you accountable. [applause]. because when companies take taxpayer dollars with one hand and give out pink slips with another and ship hundreds of jobs overseas, we are going to make them pay back those tax benefits and we are going to take that money and we invested in workers and communities and we are going to slap in and sit tax companies that move their headquarters overseas to avoid paying their fair share of taxes. [applause].
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we will defend american jobs and american workers by saying no to bad trade deals like the transpacific partnership and unfair trade practices like one china dumped cheap steel in our markets or uses weak rule of origins to undercut our carmakers. i am going to appoint a trade past prosecutor who will report to the president so we are going to end the abuse of our market, our workers, our people! [applause]. you know what? we are going to compete and win in the global economy by not
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letting anybody take advantage of our workers, not china, not wall street, not anyone. we are going to defendant strengthened the top rules of terrain and wall street that were put in place after the crash. when corporations pay fine for breaking the law those fines should cut into executives and bonuses [applause]. and, if laws are violated individuals not just corporations should be held accountable! [applause]. i will veto, i will veto veto any effort to weaken protections for consumers. while we are at it, we are going to finally make wall street, big corporations, and the super wealthy do more that is not only fair in terms of paying taxes but which is right, because we can use that money to make these big, bold investments. that will help us build a stronger a stronger economy for decades to
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come. you know what, it is not only good for families and workers, it is good for companies, for businesses. we are 70% consumption economy my friends, that means the more money you have in your pocket that you can spend the better it is for the economy. when things are right now, people are afraid, they are holding back, we have got to liberate the american consumers by protecting and helping the american worker. we are going to make more things in america, we are going to ensure that we have the most competitive auto and auto-parts industries in the world. [applause]. when we invest in infrastructure we are not just going to be investing in roads, bridges, tunnels, ports, transit and water systems, we, we are going to connect every home to high-speed broadband so they can get into the global marketplace.
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[applause]. we are going to fight climate change by making america the clean energy superpower of the 21st century! [applause]. and to complement your mayor who is here, your state rep, alicia, cincinnati is already one of the biggest cities in the country to run 100% on clean energy, congratulations! [applause]. i will tell you what mayor, i hope you do not mind if i go around the country and say if you can do it in cincinnati, you can do it anywhere, that, that is what we need across america!
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[applause]. while we are at its we are going to raise the national minimum wage $7.25 per hour is a poverty wage, workers deserve better. they deserve a living wage in a job with job with dignity. families deserve real support like quality affordable childcare, paid family family leave, and equal pay for women! [applause]. i know when i talk about these things donald trump says, i am playing the woman car. well i tell you what, if fighting for families is playing the woman card, deal deal me in a commission point [applause]. [applause].
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[applause]. i have to say now in order to achieve these goals we have to go in and the political dysfunction that is holding our country and economy back. so let's overturn citizens united and get on accountable money out of politics! [applause]. let's shut off the revolving door in washington and make sure the foxes are not guarding the hen house! [applause]. and let's learn how to listen to each other and work together again. i am determined to break through the gridlock, to get to get things done for working
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families. i know democrats and republicans to work together, i know it because i have done it. i have worked with republicans and democrats to create the children's health insurance program. today it ensures a million kids. i've worked with republicans and democrats to bring jobs back to upstate new york and to help new york city heal and rebuild after the 9/11 attack. i probably served us secretary of state and i do not just represent democrats, i represented represented all americans because you know what? [applause]. we are all on the same team. it is time we start acting like it. there's no no limit to what we can achieve if we do. i confess, i confess, it's true, it's true, i can be a little wonky. [laughter] but i have this old-fashioned idea, if you are running for
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president, you should say what you want to do and how you will get it done. [applause]. so now that you have heard some of my plans for the economy, ask yourself what are donald trump's plans? well, best i can tell he has no credible strategy for creating jobs. maybe we should not expect better from someone who's most famous words are, you're fired. [laughter] now, he rails against other countries doesn't he? he says he is for our workers, but trump's own products are made and a lot of countries that are not named america. trump suits were made in mexico. he could have been made in
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brooklyn, ohio. trumps furniture is made in turkey, instead of cleveland. trumps of barware is made in slovenia instead of toledo. so how does that all fit in to his talk about america first? but that is just the start. this is a man who plays boy with white supremacist and mocks people with disabilities, who talks about banning an entire religion from entering our country, who advocates getting rid of gun free zones in schools, letting more countries have nuclear weapons, defaulting on our national debt, turning back the clock on marriage equality and just like elizabeth, i could go on and on. this is someone who's reaction to the horrific mass shooting in
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orlando was to publicly congratulate himself. on friday when britain voted to leave the european union he crowed from his golf course about how the disruption could end up creating higher profits for that golf course. even though within 24 hours americans lost $100 billion from our 4o1 kays. he tried to turn out global economic challenge into an info mission. imagine donald trump is sitting in the oval office the next time america faces a crisis , imagine him being in charge when your jobs and savings rx steak, imagine him trying to figure out what to do in case of an emergency.
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it is no wonder is it that risk analyst listed donald trump, a donald trump presidency as one of the top threats facing the global economy ahead of terrorism. well, we are not going to let donald trump bankrupt america the way he bankrupted his casinos! [applause]. we need to write a new chapter in the american dream and it can't be chapter 11. [applause]. if you believe that donald trump is wrong for america and our best days are ahead of us, please join us in this campaign.
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we are stronger together, we are stronger when we grow together, when we lift each other up, when our economy is working for everyone not just those at the top, let's get to work ohio, let's stop at doors and registered voters! let's send alicia reese back to columbus, let's get more strong progressive leaders like senator warren in washington and statehouses, this november let's take our country in the right direction with confidence and optimism. that is what we can do together! thank you thank you all, and god bless you! [applause]. ♪ this is my fight song. ♪ ♪ i still got a lot of fight
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left in me. ♪ ♪ this is my fight song, take back my life songs in the ♪ ♪ prove i'm all right song ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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>> the hard-fought 2016 primary season is over. with. with historic conventions to follow the summer. colorado, florida, texas, ohio. >> watch c-span as the delegates consider the nomination of the first woman ever to had a major political party and the first non-politician in several decades. watch live on c-span. listen on. listen on the c-span radio app, or get video on demand at c-span.org. you have a front row seat to every minute of both conventions on c-span. all beginning on monday, july july 18. >> on july 1, 1976 the smithsonian national air and space museum opened doors to the public with president gerald ford on him for the dedication. friday march the 40th anniversary of the museum and american history tvs live coverage starts at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span three.
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we'll tour the museum and see one-of-a-kind aviation and space artifacts including the spirit of st. louis and the apollo lunar module. plus live events at the front of the building. learn more learn more about the museum as we talk with its director, general j or jacket daily, the curator, and valerie neal, chairman of the space history department. you can join the conversation that will be taking your phone calls, e-mails and tweets. the 40th anniversary of the smithsonian national air and space museum, my friday evening beginning at 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span threes american history tv. >> secretary discussed the united kingdom about to leave the european union at the annual meeting today. from washington, this this is just under one hour. >> good morning. could i have your attention? i want to welcome you all, i'm
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bill bill rosen i'm a member of the brinton woods advisory council. we are very happy that we could make it here on this very important day, particularly since we are already entered in the summer so we are especially happy that you're here. secretary of the treasury will be speaking shortly and of course you cannot ask for a more important time for the secretary to speak to this meeting with the question of the bracket in the markets we have seen in the last couple of days. if you could put your cell phones on silent and if you have to take a call you can always go outside, we are not going to have any breaks, we have the coffee and the breakfast right there. we will have a question and answer period after each speaker
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now i would like to introduce our executive directive randy rogers who will be introducing secretary lou. thank you. [applause]. >> welcome everyone, thank you bill. i would just like to share with the committee to, good news news and that bill has been planning on increasing integral role with our leadership team and the committee is all the better for it. we hope that continues in the future. we could not have foreshadowed a better program title based on recent events. we are very fortunate to have secretary lou here to help us decipher it. secretary lou was confirmed by the united states senate on
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february 27, 2013 to serve as the 76 secretary of the treasury. previously he served at the white house chief of staff in the obama administration and in hell the various positions in the obama and clinton administrations and was a speaker with thomas p o'neill earlier in his career. all of you have been well aware of the committee's effort for the last five years to help try to drive quota reform to the u.s. congress. secretary lou was instrumental in helping push this long overdue quota reform for the cover/year. on behalf of the entire bretton woods committee i would like to express our sincere appreciation for that. [applause]. i will leave it there and with that i will invite secretary lou for to the podium for his opening remarks. >> [applause].
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>> good morning and thank you randy for that kind introduction and for your leadership within this great organization. it is a pleasure to join all of you again. this is an important and very timely discussion. i'd like to start with a few words about the united kingdom's referendum on every ship in european union. we respect the decision of the voters of the u.k. and work closely with the london, brussels and our international partners to ensure continued economic stability, security and prosperity. in europe, and globally. in recent weeks i have been in regular contact with my counterparts in financial market participants in the uk, the eu, and around the world. we will continue to consult closely in the days, weeks, and months ahead.
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the bretton woods institutions were born more than 70 years ago out of a sense of international interdependence, cooperation, and responsibility. they helped. they helped usher in a period of unprecedented economic gains, lifting people out of poverty and creating conditions for a more peaceful world. we must all build upon that shared responsibility by recognizing it we have the capacity and political will to boost growth and overcome the challenges facing the global economy. we must also continue to reform the broader economic system including the bretton woods institution to confront today's challenges. policymakers must double the effort to clearly explain the benefit that flow from these large institutions which can also seem removed from the day-to-day lives of citizens. as we move forward it is important to stress that the u.k., european and global policymakers have the tools
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necessary to support not just financial stability, but also to promote economic growth. it is and commented upon major economies to use all tools available, that means fiscal, monetary, monetary, and structural tools to boost global demand and create the kind of inclusive economic growth that has been lacking worldwide. as we work with partners from the world to advance his critical work, we are reminded again of the reports of u.s. leadership in the global economy. sustaining that leadership in adapting it to the challenges of our time remains indispensable to the well-being of american workers and families as well as to the ability of the united states to project its values and achieve its larger foreign-policy objectives. to that end, we have worked tirelessly to build and strengthen our position while using it to promote policies that foster economic growth and opportunity that home and around the world. when i spoke to this group last
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year we faced an uncertain fate in congress, the export import bank that congressional authorization and the path for approval of imf quota reform remained unclear. since since then, we have made significant progress. tigers passed tpa last summer and in the fall we finalize negotiations on the historic donation transpacific partnership. in december, bipartisan breakthrough let the reauthorization of the export import bank. as a result of concerted effort of our team in treasury and many of you in this room, congress finally approved imf quota reform. we could also add to this list the iran nuclear deal reached last summer and the landmark climate agreement reached in december. these are meaningful accomplishments but as i noted recently in a foreign affairs essay, the case for continued u.s. economic leadership faces a
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wide range of challenges. in order to confront those challenges and sustain our position in a rapidly changing world we must take a long-term view of our economic influence and its value to our citizens of the world. history has shown that u.s. economic leadership is vital to the well-being of american workers and families and has been an essential tool for protecting our values and achieving broader foreign-policy objectives. those benefits are the central motivation behind the transpacific partnership which will level the global playing field for u.s. workers while getting other countries to meet a high bar on environmental, labor, and intellectual property standards. notable global markets by connecting u.s. businesses with consumers and many of the world's fastest brain economies. that is why the president remains committed to securing congressional approval this year. we also continue to make progress on the transfer 'trade
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investment partnership. similar negotiations are underway in reaching a trade and services agreement that would deepen integration and influence the development of the global services architecture with countries representing roughly 70% of services output. going forward, we need to ensure their global trading system continues to set high standards in terms of engagement and more robust protection. u.s. workers need to be able to compete on a level playing field in a world with high standards on labor, environmental, and ethical business practices. be a quota reform we continue to work to modernize the imf allowing for a candle and resourceful review of issues like exchange rates, current account balances, and shortfalls in global aggregate demand. we need to ensure that the world bank and the regional development banks have the resources and expertise they need to address today's complex challenges and promote the kind of sustained development that
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benefits all people in all communities around the world. in the international financial regulatory system reforms have already been resulted in capital standards, greater greater transparency, stronger tools for addressing struggling institutions. we must continue to focus on implantation and potential emerging threats. financial institutions in the u.s., u.k., and europe just last week demonstrated greater resilience because of the progress we have made. as we remain vigilant we must also keep pace with advancements used by our adversaries. the u.s. and his partner countries have stepped up efforts to combat terrorist financing, corruption, money laundering, and other financial kinds as they pertain to isil and other pets. finally, we must all commit to making greater progress with emerging market economies to address priority such as open investment, improved implementation of tax policies,
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and greater financial inclusion. we know that a system built on cooperation and high standards of economic governance works. earlier this month i returned from the strategic economic dialogue in beijing where our discussions led to a number of important commitments by china. the united states and china are the two largest economies in the world and have been the primary engines of global economic growth in recent years. this is why so important to maintain close engagement with china as we continue to press them to reform their economy. china pledged to implement important domestic reforms to coincide with its transition to a consumer consumption led economy. we challenge china's policies and to savannah sharper than workers including currency practices, trade traders, and access capacity and industrial sectors. china committed to undertake further steps to resolve its domestic excess deal capacity not mind the package of her
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structural reform policies that would enable the steel industry to be more responsive to market forces. while the signs are promising we know that more remains to be done to further open china's market and encourage greater foreign business investment specifically with regard to removing discriminatory trade and investment barriers. and partly, we also received commitments from china that new organizations like the asia infrastructure investment bank will conform to the high standards set by existing international financial institutions. for more than 70 years of their buttonwood institution have served our global economic system by providing the foundation for greater international corporation. this this has contributed to both the greater economic well-being and geopolitical stability. it is in that spirit that we press ahead to ensure that our modern economic architecture is positioned to confront the new
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challenges that we face in the years ahead. thank you all for coming to these meetings ever what you bring to these discussions. i look forward to taking randy's questions and your questions. thank you very much. [applause]. >> thank you mr. secretary. let's start with brexit, the news of the weekend. i think it is fair to say that the only certainty at this stage is uncertainty which implies plenty of market volatility to come. many would characterize a brexit as a political event is certainly for the market. it has created a political crisis in the u.k. an existential crisis for the e.u. certainly it will have to be
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determined economic, financial, social, geopolitical, potentially trade and an estimate repercussions to come. so i wanted to ask as far as u.s. risk, both short-term and long-term. on the one hand the u.s. a financial system is in much better shape right now, we have banks much more capitalized and far less levered than they were in 2008. the u.s. the u.s. economy seems to have been resilient as well. are you concerned at all about short-term risk to the financial system and how do you potentially see brexit affecting the u.s. in a more longer-term. >> first randy thanks so much having me today. obviously we have been looking at the potential outcome of the vote for some time, working closely with our counterparts in finance industries and central banks in europe and around the
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world. unlike a natural disaster or surprise, everyone knew the vote was happening on thursday and everyone knew that it was going to go one way or the other. i think if you look at the preparations that were made, the reflected how much stronger our financial institutions are then they were in 2008 and how and how much better our system of communication and cooperation is than it was in 2008. on friday there certainly a lot of volatility. it's a big change. it will have implications in terms of short, medium, short, medium, and long-term developments, particularly in europe and the u.k. but you do not see markets operating in a disorderly way, quite to the contrary you saw them operate in an orderly way. the fact that they were moved in asset values is a reflection of
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how changes absorbed by markets. we have to assume that we are entering a period of change. regardless of the timetable, the u.k. and the e.u. workout in terms of next steps, that. of change will take some time. when i some time. when i think about the u.s. economy i think it has been a source of strength and are relatively weak global economy. our economy is 85% roughly a domestic economy and the bulk of that is consumer driven. so we have resilience built into our economy but we are not cut off from the world. our economy has been growing, notwithstanding headwinds from the global economy. this is another headwind. so what i believe we need to do in the united states is stay
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very focused on what can we do to keep the u.s. economy growing. what can we do to address some of the anxieties about inclusive growth that are present in the united states and have been for some time. and what can we do to work with our colleagues around the world to use all the policy tools that they have to promote growth and environment which is now influenced by the change of last week's vote. i think policymakers here and around the world continue to have tools. the challenges for us to use those tools effectively and for the events that will unfold to unfold in an orderly way. >> very good. let me shift a little bit towards our program team, the the spirit of multilateralism and i wanted to have you give us a litmus test on the current levels of u.s. commitments of multilateralism and some might string together this projection
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of the e.u. are british citizens as a rejection of globalization to some degree. widely populous movements grant throughout the west, and you can even consider potentially emerging actors whose middle class has actually benefited greatly over the last several decades looking to try to gain their own influence by establishing institution such as that aib of the bricks bank. is there the underpinnings of a story there about multilateralism to be had? >> i think as i have wrote recently in a foreign affairs article if you look at the history of the u.s. abuse towards multilateral endeavors it has always been an uphill battle.
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from woodrow wilson in the league of nations to the formation of the bretton woods organization in the aftermath of world war ii. i think what what we have learned in the last 70 years is help with the commitment to multilateralism has been, to promoting a stable, growing, global economy that have lifted people out of poverty and have created opportunities for countries to work together in a peaceful way. if you look at the areas of the world where growth has created stability and imagine a different picture, a world that cannot have that it is not a better world, it's not a safer world, a safer world, it's not a world where american values had a better chance of prevailing. u.s. values are seen in all of these international and financial. we help to build them and helped play a leading role in them. when we promote things like fair trade, when we promote things like high standards on financial labor and environmental practices, that reflects american values. when we work with our colleagues
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around the world, other nations around the world to try to do things like bring pressure to bear on a country like iran or north korea, our ability to do that is important related to the centrality that the u.s. a place in the global economy, both by being the world's reserve currency reserve currency and by being a moral leader in these institutions which are not just financial institutions. i think think the american people benefit greatly from that. we think have fallen short and i think all of us who believe in multilateralism is translating the benefit of that into the day-to-day lives of people were not think it of the global economic stage, they're thinking about their job, the paycheck, and what the future means for them and their family. i believe these commitments to multilateralism have made a more secure future but we have not succeeded in translating that. part of the problem is that we have an underlying division which are not just since the financial crisis that has been developing over decades where
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the distribution of opportunity and economic benefit has grown increasingly disparate from people at the top, people in in the middle, people at the bottom. i think we need to focus on translating the economic benefit from better level of growth to day-to-day lives of working people. the answer is not to drink the pie, the answer is we have to make sure we all have access to the skills they need to compete, the infrastructure they need to have to have a better future, and to have a rising tide truly lift up all. >> i want to ask one more question before we open it up to the audience and that is on china. you mentioned in your remarks that you're there for the economic dialogue, how do you view the progress being made in china's economic rebalance? there are a lot of risk out there, what areas really concern you most about spillovers within china's financial system?
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are you concerned about the overall levels of debt floating around in the system or shadow banking, or any other aspects of china's financial system? >> as i said while i was in china and when i gave some remarks after i returned, i believe china's economic policymakers understand what they need to do in the very difficult economic transition that they're going through. from principally industrial export driven economy to consumer driven economy. where the things that happen in the economy and where jobs are going to be created are very different in the future than they were in the past. it has lead to excess capacity which needs to be reduced. it has led to concentrations of people living in places where there would have to move. this is all very hard. the question is, will they, will they have the political will to do it in a timeframe to take advantage of
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having the tools to deal with it? i believe they they have the tools to manage the transition. when you look at china's economy , clearly is one of the two largest economies in the world, it has a lot to do with the global macro economic condition. if you look at china's financial interconnection with world it is not the same as either american or european rate u.k. financial institution. the principal spillover is the macro economic spillover, it is not through financial challenge. that is not to say that they do not have a challenge in managing the overhang of credit. they are going to have to make some tough, tough decisions about what institutions have to be restructured or eliminated and what institutions they were there to protect. they do have some systemic internal issues that they need to distinguish among. that is not spillover globally
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unless it means that the economy of china is going to have a hard landing. i think the big financial concern, the global concern is that china have a soft landing. i do not believe china leveling off to a sustainable level of growth that is in the single digits is a surprise or a bad thing. everyone knew that the doubled digit growth rates cannot go on forever. the question is how to get from where they were to where they are going. at the beginning of the air was on to pessimism about china which was largely driven, i think by a lack of confidence that they would navigate the past. you look at at the tools that china has, they have still an enormous fiscal capacity, they have enormous foreign reserves, they have political decision-making process where they ought to be able to execute hard choices. that is something that if they can get from here to there i believe they can manage a soft landing.
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i think the worlds will be better off to with a stable, growing china because as i said in my remarks, the united states and china have been key to global growth in the last decade. >> i think we have an opportunity to open it up for a couple of questions. we have questions in the audience, we will go to committee members here, one here, and one there, and then from the wall street journal. upfront here. maybe we can ask both of these questions one after the other and then let secretary lee respond. >> thank you. i'm with george mason university. my question is with china, i'm just i'm just wondering what physical headroom you believe china has to stimulate this transition to domestic spend in the economy
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considering their revenues as a percentage of gdp at 22% is rather low. so what tools would they have, what physical tools with a have to put more money in the hands of consumers and at the same time manage to supplement the fiscal revenue side which is actually week for an economy of its size? >> mr. secretary, you mentioned the paris climate agreements. i wanted to ask you what opportunities you secretly u.s. leadership at the agreement climate fund. we have pledged 3 billion, we have sent 500,000,000, but i understand things are spending in terms of operations. what you see that we can do to get that going? >> thank you. let me me get started on the china piece.
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the private level of indebtedness in china is quite high. government indebtedness is actually quite low. just in the most recent decisions that were announced at the national people's congress a few weeks ago, china decided to pursue a more expensive physical policy by increasing its short-term borrowing. in the long term they clearly need to have a revenue base that can support sustainable levels of spending. i think in terms of a short-term actions they take to trigger economic growth, particularly growth and a transition where there will need to be a cushion as they go through some pretty disruptive change, i believe they have ample capacity. i actually think the issue is not so much with the headroom but do they use that capacity to drive for the transition to a more consumer oriented economy.
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i think the risk of using that headroom to reinforce investments in old industry and old sectors is actually more of a risk then do they have the headroom to pursue more stimulative fiscal policy. we have very much encouraged china to do things that put money into the hands of consumers as they make moves. they have a need to do simultaneously, structural reforms and fiscal stimulus. it is not either or, they need to change much about the organization of their economy in terms of services versus industrial capacity. they need to allow for market forces to play an increasingly dominant role in the allocation of resources. they also need to create more consumer spending capacity and cushion some of the transition. we have engaged for some time on
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these issues, i believe they are moving in that direction. frankly i think they they could move a little bit more in that direction. but as far as the green climate fund, we have been an enormous supporters of it. it was very important for us to get the u.s. contribution in place as quickly as possible. we achieve that with last year's budget agreement. we have. we had the resources to do so. now we are at the point of unveiling the institution and moving into the governance space. i can tell you that we are committed to getting it off the ground quickly, we are committed to letting it have high standards and promote the alternative energy and resilience. i think the fact that we were in a position to make the contribution is key to ongoing u.s. leadership. sitting here, having this conversation with a ims, i am just deeply aware that when the
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u.s. it makes a commitment and it takes a long time to keep it, it makes it much harder to maintain maximum pressure to achieve our policy goals. we have done have done pretty well with some pretty attenuated periods of the world waiting. in the case of green climate fund, critically important with a new program for us to be on the ground with a financial commitment so that we can helped drive the organization of it and have it reflect what we think the right course of it is. i'm pleased that we're able to make the contribution and we're going to have to roll up our sleeves with our partners run the world to get it into action. >> i'm with wall street journal. mr. secretary, forgive, forgive me for hitting brexit again, but it seems to be a continuing toppled event. firstly, what are you advising your colleagues or your
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counterparts in the u.k. and europe? it seems like we may not have a new prime minister willing to declare article 50 before october, chancellor merkel is saying it's been to be a slow process. what is your advice there? secondly, are you aware, madame will guard said there had been liquidity provided by central banks, are you aware of any specific liquidity operations? or was this just the swap lines open. finally, if i can remember the third, no, it's gone. >> two is enough. >> i'm not sure i would be able to remember that there. >> i have been a very close touch with our counterparts in both finance administrators and governors not just on thursday night but for the weeks preceding and we remain in touch going forward.
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i think we're in a. that which will not be defined as a period of change. it it is not going to be a day or a week. it is going going to be a period of change. i think the question of the pace at which the formal discussions will take place is something the united kingdom and the e.u. will have to work out on a mutually acceptable basis. what we all need to do is keep focusing on what we can do as policymakers to continue to promote growth, to promote shared steak and economic growth and economic activity, and we have to do that within our own borders and we have to do it internationally. we'll be we'll be meeting at the g20 in just a few weeks in china, i had a good conversation with the vice premier of china yesterday, i think think it is not just a question of what do people say
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the morning after, it is how do we as policymakers show the political will to use the tools we have to continue to drive economic growth during a period of change. now you only asked to and i forgot your second question already. oh, on liquidity was a very a very important that the united kingdom prepare in advance and institutions have a great deal of liquidity, the bank of england have the bank of liquidity of the need and the central banks around the world had worked with the bank of england to make sure their view liquidity if needed and all currencies. we have seen orderly market conditions where liquidity needs have been provided for and i think it is not to say that there haven't been substantial volatility in markets, but but it has been volatility in well-functioning markets which
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is actually very important when you think not just about the days, weeks of losses but the question of ongoing financial stability. . . from the counsel of scientific study. the united states is changing what constitutes the word "work." "porkplace," "work force" perspective the economy. are we using the right measures to talk about things like
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productivity, talking about growth, when in fact, if maybe 40% of our people are, quote, free agents, worng at home and so forthand creating economic value and wealth but not following the models and the policies we have been using for so long? >> i think that is a question that economists are thinking real hard about. there is clearly been a lot of change in the economy. not just technology but as you say, modes of business organization. whether or not that is all measured accurately is a question that probably won't be resolved quickly. in the 1990s, we didn't see at the time the full benefit of productivity improvement from technology even though we knew it had to be there didn't show up except for the lag. i think that whatever the
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measure is, we know that the things we can do as policymakers to promote more innovation, to promote research and development, to promote more training, build infrastructure, those all contribute to better economic activity in the future. regardless of the form of business organizations or the particular technology that is deployed. so, i don't think we as policymakers should wait until macro economists come up with the knew theory of gdp measurement. i think we need to stick to the things that we know, which are that economy of the future is going to need to have roads and ports that work. it's going to need to have workers trained with the skills for a modern economy and it's going to need to have a sense of fairness where there isn't a
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growing sense that the benefits of economic growth just sit with investors at the very top and don't make their way to paychecks. those things we need to deal with regardless of where macro economists come out over what i think will be a long period of thinking about this. >> nancy jacqueline, former u.s. executive director at the imf. you talked about country needing to use all of their tools to promote growth, and i think we all know, if the world continues to rely on monetary policy, the story isn't going to have a happy ending. now we have another crisis, and we have had head winds for the u.s. and the global economy. the question is whether this crisis is sufficient to be able to deal with the political paralysis in the major industrialized countries in
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dealing with fiscal issues, and trying to create some kind of fiscal policy compliment to monetary policy. do you see anything in terms of the upcoming meeting to give you and our own economic and political environment, to see any hope at all of in fact dealing with these head winds as opposed to letting them blow us all down. >> well, earlier this year we had a g20 finance minimum ministers meeting in schapping -- in shanghai and another one in japan, and discussed these issues and the communique from shanghai reflected a new consensus. it reflected a commitment to using all policy tools to promote growth. it didn't reflect the kind of debate over austerity versus growth that was characterizing past discussions. the situation in each country will be different.
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there's different amounts of fiscal states. different needs for different kinds of structural reform and different extents to which monetary tools have been used and where economies are in terms of the appropriateness of changes in monetary policy. i don't believe there's a one-size-fits all answer to using all the levers. what i do know is that to have the best economic performance, each of us needs to use all the tools we have, and overreliance on any one is going to lead to a suboptimal outcome. in the jap e aftermath of the g20 commitment to use all tools you saw movement in a number of key economies. china held the national peoples congress weeks afterwards committed to using greater fiscal stimulus. canada has embarked on a new set of fiscal policy structural policy, and china has new structural reforms inch europe, while there hasn't been any
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formal announcement to relax fiscal tightness, you have seen two things happen. one, relaxation of the targets in countries that are heavily burdened by the refugee crisis, and wailingness in country we space to spend additional resources to address the refugee crisis. so, europe has begin to use some of its fiscal space for a specific reason but with macroeconomic consequences going into shanghai some people thought we should have some kind of converted decision but this isn't a moment for every economy to move in exactly the same way at the same time. it's a time for each economy to look at what can we do to use our political systems and our economic levers, all of our economic levers, to create both the greatest possibility of domestic growth and contribute to a global economy that badly needs more demand.
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the u.s. economy has been supplying a fair amount of the demand in the global economy and we need to have other economies doing more. i believe that there is increasing focus on using all the tools but i'm not going to back away from making the case that the time to do that is now. frankly, it was true before the vote. it's true after the vote. what we can't do is be in a period of uncertainty and create the sense that policymakers are just going to kind of stand back. that's not what i think we should do. it's not what we have been doing. there was deep engagement by policymakers to help prepare for either outcome last week. there's ongoing consultation and we'll immediate again in a few weeks itch don't think this period of change will be marked by one moment when everything gets turned around.
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it's a question of just continuing to move things in the right direction, and if we do that, i believe we can help to create more growth globally. >> one more question. yes? in front here. >> neil rowland, business news. how does brexit change u.s. regulators' approach to trying to harmonize financial relations transatlanticly, soon you'll face not just one intent with the european union but two intent and you have lost jonathan hilt was your point man. >> we have worked quite hard over the last three and a half years that i've been at treasury but a number of years before
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that 0, to work with the fsb to promote high standards in financial regulatory approaches around the world. we have worked bilaterally with the bank of england, with the european institutions, institutions in other parts of the world. we'll continue to engage with our counterparts. i think that we should all walk away from this last week with a heightened understanding of the benefit of having high standards. high standards of capital. high standard of leverage. high standards of resolution. as i said many times, not going ever be something that we declare job done because the financial system isn't going to stay exactly as it is for all time. it will continue to evolve. there's increasing discussion amongst financial authorities about what are the challenges of the future, both in terms of technology and in terms of business organization and where risk in the future will come
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from. these conversations have been going on and are going on and will continue to go on and i think we have very robust mechanisms to continue to work internationally to have high standards. >> i want to wrap it up with one final question and bring it back to this spirit of multilateralism. here we are at the fund coming up next, we have david lipton and -- in front of us. the traditional institutions have mutually reinforcing missions and like to hope that a regularly cooperating we all know that there's room for improvement across them, but now we have a new one across the pond, too. in the asian infrastructure investment bank, and specifically what can the u.s. do to help the institutions promote harmonious development
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approach? what can we do from u.s.a. leadership standpoint. >> we're doing quite a lot from the u.s. leadership standpoint, both in terms of the leadership role we play within the institutions, what we do bilaterally to compliment what the institutions do, and even when we are not part of an institution by providing counsel, guidance and a public context. we talked about the green climate fund. the u.s. has been a leader in driving towards coming together, using the existing resources that supplementing them with new resources and working to balance what we do multilaterally and bilaterally to deal with one of the great challenges of our day. with a new institution like the asia infrastructure bank we were deeply engaged in discussions with potential participants and ultimate participants about how to make sure that institution, which is geared towards dealing
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with a very real problem, a lock of a shortage of resources resod infrastructure around the world, but how to do it in a way that compliments the high standards of the imf and the world bank, and i think that as a result of our interactions with both the designers in china and the other countries who have joined the institution, the commitments that have come out, both to partner with the existing, the old international financial institutions and to seek to meet standards that are on the same order, that's very important, because getting more resources in at high standards is a good thing. we said that from the beginning. and i think the united states has a unique role in the international financial architecture as one over the principle designers of the system 70 years ago. we also have a key role in recognizing that as the world changes, we need to have inclusive roles for emerging economies, which is one of the
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reasons i'm a pro reform is so important. it wasn't just about money. it was important for the imf to have adequate resources to deal decisively with whatever comes up in the global economy. so, yes, it's about money and the economics. it's also about the investment that countries around the world thatting growing have in the international architecture, and sending the message that you need to be part of the system of high values. you're reexpect sped you're at the table. think the response that i've gotten around the world to the approval of imf reform has reflected the importance of that. we have, i think, made clear that our actions back up our words in terms of our commitment to ongoing u.s. leadership in these important institutions, and that's one of the ropes i'm so happy to be here today with you and the committee because this is a group that worries
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about it day in and day out and i think one of the challenges we have is to make the case so that it's something that people who don't deal with the international financial institutions, but look at what does it mean in their day-to-day lives, can understand and translating it into that language is something that al of us have to take more seriously. >> we have been very fortunate to have your investment in the committee two years in a row now, and especially this year in light of circumstances, we're very pleased you could join us so have a round of applause for the secretary. [applause] >> thank you very much, mr. secretary. [inaudible conversations]
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>> the supreme court ruled 53-against the texas law, and sam baker talks about the most significant ruling on borings in two decades and the president of the constitutional accountability center discusses the court's ruling ruling in ths abortion access case and other key rulings, and the author of book "the four faces of the republican party" talks about the potential impact on the 2016 presidential campaign. washington washington journal tuesday morning. join the discussion. >> tomorrow morning on capitol hill the senate foreign relations committee gets an update on the fight against isis from the state department's special presidential envoy for the global doings counter isil,
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live at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. and in the afternoon a senate judiciary subcommittee takes a look at the tomorrow "radical islam" and terrorism. that live on c-span3. >> former national security adviser to president obama, james jones, and former nato ambassador under president george w. bush, nicolas burns, talked about the future of nato at an event at the atlantic council today. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. let's get started. i'm damon will son, the executive vice president of the atlantic council and delighted to welcome you here today for the launch of a very important report on nato.
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we're here four days after the british electorate decide the uk can -- the u.k. can would lead the european union, i think our community here at the atlantic council believes one thing is to certain. no matter what, our alliance will become more important and be the glue that helps keep us together across the atlantic, within europe, and a vehicle to help defend our way of lives. we're here today to talk about a report, row storing nato's power and purpose, that was heldly two great americans who serve on the atlantic council's boar, general jim jones and ambassador nick burnses. thank you for your leadership and service and being with us today. we're delighted their joining us for a conversation which one of our senior fellows well help lead in just a minute. we're here for this conversation on nato after brexit and we're being joined by a much larger audience online and then on of
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and we encourage all of you to contribute to this conversation. some your thought, questions, using the #future nato and also the #stronger with allies. today's product is a result of an atlantic council strategy. bat year ago we set out to look at what was happening on both sides of the atlantaic. concerned about america's role in the world and our ability and desire and will that seems to play a leadership role and at the time what was happening in europe as forces of fragmentation were undermining the sense of solidarity among our allies in europe. brexit delivered that message in very sharp terms. what brings these two sets of issues together is that we tom together through nato. in the contention of uncertainty the issue of brexit, the instant certainty where at the european project is headed, believe the u.s. role in europe is going to become even more to help ensure
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a sense of predictability. i'll leave the report to ambassador burns and general jones to lay out their conclusions and findings but i want to put it in context of four reasons why the atlantic council moved forward on the report. before the debate there was a concern about perhaps the marginalization of nato. no longer at the center of our national security and foreign policy. there's a lot of talk about nato as "them." if you sit in was we refer to them across the atlantic. if you sit in europe, they refer to them as the americans. if you don't own this alliance its will wither and that's one of the points we wants to make a call for leadership imagination, particularly american leadership. second, we're headed to warsaw which will prove to be a cervixant summit for this alliance, but our point is that what is happening right now in terms of european security and uncertainty of the world we need to be prepared for the long term.
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that's not just deterrence over a short period and if you look at our budget you look at political resolve, we're not yet postured for the long-term reality we're faced and i think we worry as our response commence rat with the challenges we face when you look to the east and the south, look to internal challenges. third, there's beginning to be the remnants of a very strong anywhere take playing out across europe today. the broken promises anywhere take president putin used in the wake of the annexation to crimea that we broke a promise to russia and justified russia's actions. the exercises in poland and he baltic states. that warsaw strategy is provocative, and yet i think we felt there was a problem, that if we couldn't actually exercise, couldn't actually demonstrate the reality of our ability to probability our allies in the east we would be negligent of our responses, and so i think that will be a coming theme we'll see play out as a
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way to frame the public perception. i warsaw doing what is responsible for provocative overreach and making the case for the use of sanctions against russia when we go through our own transition, and finally in our own debate, the atlantic council has been one of the strong voices calling on our european allies, canadian allies to do more in terms of investment. that will continue. but if our only debate in the united states is one of burden-sharing, we're going to undermine the sense of understanding of the value of our alliance was be believe our aligns are morse multipliers for values, interests, and that it's one of our greatest strategic assets that our adversaries only wish they had. so with that i'll invite evelyn up to the stage, dep the assistant secretary of defense at the pentagon, a strong voice on the issues in and out of government, and a former keefe adviser to nato to help moderate our conversation.
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i want to invite general jim jones and am burns -- ambassador burns to join her. general jones was the -- a former supreme allied commander in europe. he currently is the chairman of the brent scowcroft center at the atlantic council and head of the jones group, ambassador nick burns, who serves on the atlantic council board, serve as undersecretary for political affairs in addition to being ore permanent representative to the nato alliance and ambassador to greece, is currently a professor at harvard. let me turn it over to evelyn to get the conversation started. >> thank you for being here today. i am very honored to be here with these who gentlemen to discuss this report. i think it's quite timely. i'm hoping that maybe through this report and through this discussion we can transform the discussion and make the discussion about nato and institutions a little more sizzling and make these two
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gentlemen like the spice boys of internationallallism so we'll try to keep it light and interesting because if bernie sanders can do it, you guys can, too, so let's make it a little more conventional and approachable. i think it's important just to kind of spring forward a little bit and use some of the words damon discussed about values and defending our way of life. i think this report, while it looks like a very dry, all the usual presummit and report on nato, right? and both of you have -- good, good. okay. so both of you have read a lot of these reports. but the reality is, i think what doesn't convey often when we have these conversations is it's really about our values. why do we have these institutions? why do we have cleaningtive security? you have to have some understand of the history. what we're trying to prevent. but also about spreading democracy, strengthening democracy, protecting our economic freedom of navigation, freedom of commerce. these things are not to be taken
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for granted and without strong alliances canner without a military, indeed without dedenser, without defense, you cannot have all of those economic things, prosperity and then democracy. so that's my two cents. you're not their listen to me. you're here to listen to the sizzling spice boys. sow you have each five minutes to give your synopsis or just the high points, the things you think are most important about the report. i have a few questions for you and then i'm sure these folks have interesting questions and comments. so over to you, ambassador burn. >> thank you. first i want to tutu to the atlantic council itch told fred and damon earlier it's the fastest growing think tank in washington and when fred and damon took it over, it had fallen on hard times and now one of our most influential centers for learning, and for debate in washington. so congratulations to fred and damon and david and everyone else at the atlantic council. second i want to say what a pleasure it's been to work with
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general jones, jim, over the last eight months on this report. we worked together at nato at a tough time. after 9/11, during the iraq and afghan wars and i have tremendous respect for jim, and thank you for his continued leadership. why did we write the report? we believe that nato and the european union, the european allies are facing the greatest celts of challenges since the end of the cold war 25 years ago when the soviet union imploded, december 25, 1991. i never thought we would come back to this time. i was serving in the administration of george h.w. bush on the nfc on receive yet affairs and we -- receive e soviet affairs and we fell liberated from the cold war ask the threat of imminent destruction from the wordses of bush 4, 1 europe had become whole, free and at peace and that was our strategic mantra threw the clinton administration, through the george w. bush administration and into the obama administration.
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that all changed in march of 2014. president putin decided he would invade crimea and annex it, and then to divide ukraine, of having invaded georgia in 2008. but this report is underlined by some strategic timelines we find very negative both for the united states and canada as well as for europe. first is this redivision of europe by the russian federation, the search of the czars did for strategic depth. that's why they went into georgia, why they've intimidate armenia ands a jerry buy january and -- azerbaijan and the current pressure on the baltic states. it requires a response from nato. and so the number one recommendation that i think is important in this report is nato should station troops permanently in the baltic countries in light waynea, lat via and estonia, permanently in poland and permanently in
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romania and bulgaria and the black sea, and have the capacity to act in the air and the sea in both the black sea and baltic regions. this is not war mongering. that's what the russian federation, i the putin government, wants you to believe. damon and i were in europe last week in brussels and berlin together, and the russians are out saying, nato is provoking a crisis. these are clearly modest in terms of troop commitments. measures designed to stabilize the alliance, protect our smaller allies in the east, and do what the nato alliance has to do protect member states and collective security in europe, and we need to establish effective deterrence against putin, and that's why our number one recommendation is a permanent basing of nato troops in those areas. second, the united states and canada and europe should maintain the economic sanctions on russia. those sanctions are now in question. prime minister renzi went to the
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st. petersburg summit and sid we should trade more with russia. president hoe hoe land says we should question the sanctions in december, right in the middle or our presidential transition, some europeans want to make a move to return to business as usual with russia. i think thankfully chancellor merkel has been giving every indication that unless heed a meres to them to the letter, germany, under her leadership, will not relax the sanctions but there's going to be a big battle in europe and across the atlantic on this issue and we believe sanctions should be maintained. that's what effective det. is. third, obvious -- deterrence is. third, we have to have a
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stronger nato as we move forward with deterring the russian federation and president putin and right now exactly five of the allies of 28 spend more than two percent of gdp on defense. that is the floor, by the way. , the minimal expectations. used to be three percent. but you spend two percent of gdp in defense. and it is true that 20 of the allies have inched up in their defense spending. ...
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>> >> there is a big set of challenges ahead and i will end on this point we're the leader of this alliance and we always have been in leadership when obama goes to the summit in 10 days' time it will be very dramatic british folk to leave the european union and relatives to early to know where this is going the there is the second referendum we're looking at
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a fractured united kingdom and the irish question coming back one century later you will need to see the united states embraced united kingdom is the fifth largest economy there still be able to work with them but the british are the tough pragmatic voice on issues like of continued sanctions against russia so therefore the united states can see a deeper relationship with germany but that relationship will have to go further in this administration and the next.
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thinks for being here and pod like to echo the importance to a knowledge my predecessor who is your for all of us their privilege to follow in his footsteps to underscore the work of the chaff white flecked to provide this report thank you very much your performance was extraordinary disregard to russia but the less the
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uncertain leadership is policy and time will tell. that people are talking about the terms of the dialogue so otherwise of without deterrents there is a much of a conversation. and i am pleased to see those terms. to highlight the seven with
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the bases in romania and bulgaria. into quadrupled reassurance is also extremely helpful and the fact that is the official is quite useful purpose rome but with those troubles of ambition the first run it comes to my mind is why nato would be used for the 21st century with that simple paradigm it was the defensive reactive alliance of the 20th century or the 21st century with the speed it comes out of. is seems to me nato must be
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more proactive and i don't mean triggering war is everywhere but preventing them or predictable disasters from happening so we wind up with another afghanistan or iraq for decades but this beats wall to the enhanced program that was started years ago. we need to do more of that but on a grander scale. migration is a big problem with incredible tensions politically but preventing the uncontrolled movement of millions of people is something the grand alliance of 20 countries should focus on and doing something about
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to prevent those kinds of kossel movements of people that is something we should worry about. i think nato first job is to enhance the security of the also other like-minded countries in africa and other developing countries figure our power to have their own securities so i think the of pro-active the is a new word that nato and i am glad to see it is included in the report. for what they can and should be the 21st century. and something that neck covered very well if we don't achieve this through gdp shame on us. and in the proximate then we
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still have to many countries falling short of what they agreed to many years ago. and with nato's credibility is suspect. the u.s. leadership, i will let you think, that a little bit. than the u.s. president has to be engaged what it is about you cannot simply walk away from us 28 member nation alliance to pretend it is not used and useful but it is but the potential for nato and as far as i can
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see is tremendous but ask to be used correctly but it won't with a sitting u.s. president to make sure the secretary general is recognized almost a head of state to level is as important as any single country in rings the voice of 27 in sovereign countries how we react to that is important well have a firm commitment to leave the alliance and never really figured out this is not a
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military problem that cannot solve these problems extremely well we cannot afford to have to separate military san hierarchy's and we have proven that in the balkans and militarily could be proven again so especially is important for the united states leadership to come together it is possible so those are the points that i would make. >> a very high-ranking nato official said deterrance
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before dialogue and it was interesting of the transatlantic unity we see that now come to fruition that asthma of macro question and also to get a few things out there into the discussion it is clear with the 10 recommendations leadership than being proactive if you have those elements you can take care of the other eight. of course, you can't fit everything into one report and you did touch upon these lightly but there are three other areas where how we use leadership to be proactive one has to do with expansion
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if i would make up recommendation to say make a big deal about the fact you are expanding with insecure institutions don't expand the fact that they are admitted into nato will not contribute but will contribute to its own defense and has been all along so the question is he mentioned in the dialogue they are pushing back also on nato expansion to say somehow this is a move against russia to counter rush job but in reality nato expansion was aimed at
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spreading security is stability because we do have a message for them but the other element that could be fleshed out is hybrid warfare unconventional warfare a little green men or the demonstrators are they you comes into play for anything that requires law-enforcement that is what nato does not have competency to work closely with the e.u.. they will make a statement about that by interested if you have any comments on that and finally mention being proactive so hanging
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over all of us is the catastrophe that is syria. is there something that nato could or should be doing? you can accuse -- pick and choose. >> i will bader tried to answer all your questions but first it was striking to be in europe last week. we went to brussels and to berlin to do the same thing the europeans some of them are quite reluctant to b-2 truculent with president putin so in 10 days from now deterrents and dialogue many europeans revised you americans need to go even
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those equally and my response was i don't think so. i worry about dialogue with the russian federation secretary of state john kerry that i deeply admire is on the phone constantly. there is no absence of discussion there is an absence of productive work with the federation but to most often in succeed in diplomacy when you're strong city strategically so that he tarrant to move those troops and these are very modest levels but to show the president did we will be true to the continent is vital if he believes we are powerful and not afraid to exercise that he'll be much less likely to engage in productive dialogue.
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so they're both important for deterrence the dialogue but at this stage given what he has just done is much more important i hope that will be the message from warsaw. with the propaganda campaign across europe trying to insinuate tonight is states has caused the problem presently. i was personally disobeyed -- dismayed.
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one. >> to put together a plan to get at 2% of gdp to have saber rattling - - rattling it is more than the. >> to withdrawn from the conventional forces respecting any of the core and after 2001 to secure europe instead states is now walked away from any of its commitments and so we have to be clearer about the
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problem and may have witnessed the german elections by friends kept telling me the u.n. to play into russian hands it to have enough self-confidence about what we're trying to do but in those terms for the rest of us with the open alliance of democracies we never said this but undermining nato history we will not trade one country's future over their heads with the russians.
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not georgia or ukraine. all of us every administration believes every european nation should have the right to choose its future. and nato enlargement was demand have not expanded nato into the balkans he's to separate estonia and russia those states would be threatened if it is very important historically by three american presidents
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democratic and republican to do this. this is another putin line i don't believe that for a minute so we should be proud of what we have created. >> thank you that is very eloquent. >> i completely agree with the last statement and to reform our president that there was an agreement for it to be taken into its membership and that we violated an agreement we're still looking for that agreement. [laughter]
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but it is interesting the president of russia. sunni delicate history the same way. but what they might want to consider is to look at the enlargement and the partnership programs because they are lumped together right now. and their two vastly different things. and as they're eligible meeting the requirements for membership, the member should bring value to the alliance. and we should have common values. then we should do that. with the partnership program
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but it may be possible to reach out to the modern arab states even the far east. even with interoperable of the with nato and training procedures. to respond was seated across the board with dash humanitarian missions and other missions. when you think about the middle east you think of the
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collections have the common religion that it could be an interesting example as an organization. and then to help the arab states with the security treaty organization. i am for enlargement and also looking at the partnership. but the hybrid question and we haven't addressed very well this is where they could really work together because with that type of warfare this is something that we should work on.
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nato ought not to be impervious to use cybersecurity or even economic security one of the responses that would certainly send a message to the russian president is the construction from the baltics with 1314 different countries reducing their dependence on russian energy for example, lookit the long-term consequences of
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mr. putin actions and this is a hybrid response to russian aggression to have a tremendous impact on russian thinking and what lastly with syria i actually believe a few years ago we might have had an opportunity to forestall the of the supreme square replaced by the europeans but had we been more forceful in 1991 that we
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could have created with the nato partners and modern arab states from the no-fly zone or whatever you call it, that consequence to use chemical weapons on his own people i think we could have had a safe zone for refugees of a pretty significant chunk of syria with the military capability which of the arab states you could have forestalled the migration problem i am not sure it is off the page completely. >> is a little more complicated because back then there was a russian presence but i would not
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completely dismiss it. >> it is hard to envision nato as whole because we operate by consensus so each of the 28 allies would have to agree that is not going to happen if the humanitarian situation worsens think of the datapoint with the u.s. thought there were 22 1/2 to millions of citizens over 12 billion now homeless should that situation worsen reclaim the entire country supporting militarily in russia i think violating the assurance that it gave the united states to the next imperative at some point demands we ask what can we do? we have learned our lesson from iraq. but do we have a
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humanitarian obligation to focus on the issue that who were refugees? syrian turkish border and a jordanian important border is a possible save some it is tremendously complicated their many reasons not to do it but if that 12 million becomes 1,314,000,000 they were in a situation like bosnia in 1995 that you have to act and you have to challenge the russians to help us and that ought to be the first call to see how cynical they are. >> you can stop talking. >> i agree having worked in bosnia of course, you were both actively engaged in
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diplomacy with your military careers at the time to know what it looks like in '94 and '95 and sometimes even if you don't know how you will resolve the conflict you still have a responsibility you have to mitigate that suffering we did have a say so on network and actually ended up and survive deficit it is incredibly informative dynamic you have a chance to spice up to make a little more interesting i think there are some of their with microphones and i will call on people.
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>> the key for the report and recommendations we will try to be a little provocative. given the events of the last couple of years with the european union and nato's own difficulties given the fact the administration only has eight months left in all of the effects that will happen then maybe separate organizations as we realizing given the fundamental question to we have a shared value of our way of life? that is part of the debates of the united states among the alliance members so do you think it is possible to
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the historic power and purpose of the alliance? >> if you don't know he was a great american and diplomat and most recently ambassador to afghanistan we urge the alliance tuesday and a you feel deeply about that the last tuesday he assured us nato was staying as the defense minister and i thank you put your finger on the central issue we're a political alliance we're bound by shared democratic values that is who we are we don't invite the country's in better not democratic etiquette that executive summary says we are
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concerned about some of the populism right wing nationalism that is occurring in europe will get the questions the people have of the new polish government i will speak for myself. some of that is going on in our country stick i am comfortable for you to speak for me as well. [laughter] >> here is a candidate for the presidency who questions whether the united states should continue to be in nato and has threatened if they don't pay yet he will walk out providing the answer is we need presidential leadership really is needed american presidential leadership we are the upsize country we're to 75% to would like to reduce that ratio to have the europeans contribute more but obama in the wake
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of the vote in britain has a responsibility but also the opportunity to show our faith to the united kingdom and a stronger world for germany and working to the report to believe we need a stronger military aid to be stronger politically pallid say on the merck was probably the most respected leader all right now so that relationship with their british exiting if it becomes central to everything united states needs to do it does give back to values and i respect obama very much i hope to give that declaration for the american commitment to there is any doubts that trump could be a minority of
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one and maybe they could.org and hillary clinton deftly stance of the nato alliance and everything she is doing. >> i have one caveat. it is not only about paying your way you should do what you agree to do no doubt i think the american public is the longer willing to be the only one dawning in these missions and think they will have to stand up to the combat roles in a lot of them do. >> even partners like georgia. and a lot of them do it
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would be much better if everyone did one of the difficulties of the 28 nation in the near future is agreeing to the same thing i thank you have to have a more agile capability house someone to do some things like we did in libya because if you and says to on anonymity will be very difficult but i do think it is fair to say some allies need to step up to the true commitment to do the hard work. >>.
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>> i am a citizen. what to have to do for the ukraine and with the ukraine should do to become closer? >> both wore our native ties today. >> i think one of the big policy questions for us in the united states what is the extent of our support for ukraine? it has very sound political support but what happened? it is crossing their brightest redline so they haven't felt the military support i believe we should have legal assistance and think they deserve that have the right to defend their
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country but that is up policy question that obama answers in a negative on that. with ukraine and nato they have them partners for a long time. a relationship going back over the last decade. ukraine has a long way to go. because of territorial divisions of the corruption and the democracy. we don't call on his report to be admitted next month but i certainly believe as ukraine has a right to to work toward the future, the timeline who space was just finish by going back to the point is very important to
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signal to the russian federation that even if they invade countries that will not stop them from working with them to have a relationship that could or could not a lot will depend on the ukrainians themselves. let's hope that it can't. >> the training government has passed the laws and now is on implementation so now to the back of the room i will go the furthest back on the right. >> could to see you. many of us will remember at a time and a wonder when
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looking back at it was that kind of thinking to pull those land forces out of germany that were truly central to the purpose. we need to be careful about making that mistake that nato should not be the tool dealing with migration issues expanding nato's role in the middle east and to keep our focus on nato as a self-defense organization. >> really have 15 minutes left so i will bundle a couple of questions.
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>> there has been a lot of talk about the brexit vote that u.s. will lose a vigorous friend in that even if it goes forward. heidi's think that affects britain's role in nato and a particular house has been that all the militarily but if you point? >> just to follow up on margaret's point cuddy you envision the organic relationship in order to consider threats to the european allies that could be dealt with by both institutions such as 20 at of the 22 are members of
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both? >> m1 to salute the of pivotal figure in the state department but i agree with the thrust of your question the we're back to the revision of south and west of the russian federation. if the core responsibility was to protect when the people then the primary goal has to be a deterrent against russia given what putin has done and as to imply they cannot do everything for every mission around the world you have to choose. i would say in september or
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october 95. and did not lose a single soldier to combat. then we made the right decision to go into kosovo. so i am proud of those missions as a collective mission and we believe in this report. it is well monger's subject. -- longer subject but it is permanently out even if cancer roomed by internal a next the bigger voice is britain's voice because brexit to share the common strategic outlook but there
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will be of better judge of this in a country willing to deploy and we have done that and afghanistan so we do need a strong britain and nato to suppliers to argue for years and we need that voice going forward into bill's question, jim was ringing the village bell we ought to envision a joint council that would bring the united states for what we desperately need. >> on the core mission
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certainly that is what it was with the 20th century i am not sure the globalized world rapidly non-state actors with the entire country's that we can afford to have the nato waiting for something to happen to be the of main contributor and raw you can do everything those they're coming towards us that mandate we pay attention to them that we want to fight somewhere so
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to be proactive consideration is more effective in is a big trading mission that you could prevent any number of countries from being overwhelmed of the radical ideologies against us we're the collective bad guys of the fundamentalism they should be engaged in a way that is less expensive fuel not have economic developments and governments and rule of law must you have a security organization
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and river we can we should export. >> i think britain's role is of record the two most powerful military is there are a lot like to see the u.k.'s step up a little bit with the agreed upon percentage and maybe even one more time. >> the basically the top three trainings. >> one wrote want to be misunderstood and i'm
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advocating for those missions to help the country's steel their borders and help train the military to function under civilian leadership to encourage the growth of democracy and economic development to avoid future conflicts. >> 31 years in the state department i thought this was fabulous as they get the word out because it is very important.
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so you listed three-year for things that were vital three of them get the attention of everybody things like exercises come up putting permanent troops of stronger nato. the then you talk about sanctions with "the new york times" and people ignore it. i wonder if you and everybody else should talk about the business as usual pro russian types. i wasn't going to me you mentioned a donald trump. three weeks ago you talked about brexit end you said what is that? i don't know i will get back to now he is in a hotel room
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calling the end of the world. template is out with the new wizard who loves putin. the rest of us have to register because we're now lawyers why don't you go after the trump crowd for sucking up to russia rather they're protecting united states of america? >> thank you a was a very spicy question. [laughter] >> the question is region specific we have the mission and a coordination in the baltic region what about the black sea?
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with disparate military is in countries turkey and georgia and ukraine better not currently members what type of coordinating structure would you recommend for the nato summit? because it is not clear how you coordinate the air sea and ground space elements of that and what is the timeframe you look at to implement that? thank you very much. >> and all that was here or elsewhere but i think maybe you are hinting towards that question.
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>> this will be the last question. >> with the number of active duty and non-military declining with sequestration really hurting the budget and with the budget well under way how can reassure the european allies without become of it -- becoming overextended? how do we balance our priorities especially with exercises of 100,000 troops? >> getting genocidal lot about that.
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as they made the correct decision when putin witten to crimea behalf no article five obligations we don't want a war with the russian federation but we had to have a response that would be effective in now to see three european leaders before printed as many of the conditions to encourage him towards further mayhem so this is a very important principle i am quite confident they will hold the line and from what i heard last week chancellor merkle
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intends to everybody has to agree to pitch the sanctions for word so it will be a real battle smack in the middle of our presidential transition as he boasted by some of the europeans don't challenge united states during a presidential transition don't challenge the outgoing and incoming president just to the right thing but the last question i certainly don't want gse cut the defense budget the rebalancing to asia is the right idea and obama is right for those resources in japan and south korea to see those u.s. carriers and makes the big statement but you have to have a healthy
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budget to do that you're healthy enough and wealthy enough and the global leader so with rebalancing we hollowed out our military to fight the afghan and iraq wars i very strongly support dash carter to convince congress to rebuild the american military we need to do more that two other strategic deterrence against britain to put into their regular budget which is very welcome by the europeans. >> one of my favorite sayings that if you want to
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be a superpower you have to be a superpower you just can pick and choose so all this discussion about pivoting and rebalancing just restates the obvious in my view most americans want this country to have the same type of privacy in the glow bin 2015 and 1950 but in that will create vacuums that don't have the best interests at heart we have seen the recently in the valley hist and other places as well. so the next administration has to get on board fully in
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a rarity want to take this country and places like the black sea they are important battle in militarily and strategically but economically one of the things that i noticed talking to eastern europeans and western europeans seem more inclined to forgive and maybe we shouldn't do the sanctions and you don't get that at all. and just come back from romania i was very pleased to discover 700 marines were training and got them to modernize and 2006 if you go
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to those countries to talk about how serious they think the threat is with that same kind of rhetoric talking about the cold war so the united states finds itself as a global power not focused only on the east west strategy that has dominated the thinking for the last 70 years but also new realities that the rise of the african continent upon us before you think and we have to be engaged it is in our own national interest
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that we want to do good things all over the world but it is our inheritance from the 20th-century and we have to organize ourselves i talk about the national security council not to facetiously we need a 24 hour security council you cannot afford to go to sleep in this world you could work the new deal with everything that happened in the sixth seven hours you caught up on your sleep. this is a different world from a different century reinstituted for the cold war with a difficult time of reacting to the speed in meeting the variety of the challenges and conventional
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military of the nomination stage actors so i think we have to figure out how we do all the things that we want to do well take organization and found it much easier to deal with regions you could understand the world a lot better here tend to have a mind-set dealing with countries in washington with the unified command and other inheritance from the 20th century we could have regional strategies with regional representation with all of government and then
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we could engage much more success in areas for that. . .
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>> , [inaudible conversation] [inaudible conversation] [inaudible conversation] [inaudible conversation] [inaudible conversation] >> tomorrow morning on capitol hill the senate foreign relations committee gets an update on the fight against isis from brett -- the state department special presidential envoy for the global hundred
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iso. that's at 10:00 a.m. on c-span. in the afternoon a senate judiciary subcommittee takes a look at the term radical islam and terrorism. that terrorism. that is live at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span three. >> massachusetts senator elizabeth worn made her first appearance with hillary clinton on the campaign trail today. they talked about the economy and corporate influence of the country at a rally in cincinnati, cincinnati, ohio. this runs about 50 minutes. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪ ♪ this is my fight song ♪ take back my life song ♪ prove a mall right song ♪ [applause]. [applause].
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[applause]. >> yankee for that warm welcome. i am always happy to come to ohio. it is good to be in the home state of my great friend sh and your great senator, sharon brown. [applause]. it is good to be in the state that is going to send ted strickland to the u.s. senate in november. [applause]. now, i am here today because i am with her. [applause]. yes, sir.
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we are all here today because we are with her and we are going to work our hearts out to make hillary clinton the next president of the united states. [applause].are you read i'm ready, are you ready for this? [applause]. we are here with someone who gets up every single day and fights for us. someone who has spent her whole life fighting for children, spent her life fighting for women, spent her life fighting for families, fighting for healthcare, fighting for human rights, fighting for a level playing field, fighting fortior those who meet need her most. we are are here to fight side-by-side with hillary clinton exhalation point [applause].
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i want to talk about values.enda my daddy's old benson and carpeting and he ended up as a maintenance man. after his heart attack my momhef answered to keep our family above water. here are some of the values i learned up close and personal mildest brother don reed was career military, 280 combat missions in vietnam. our i learned from him that we honor our promises to our servicemembers and veterans, always. [applause]. and as my middle brother jack got out of the air force he got a good union job operating a crane. of t today, he has a a pension because of that job.
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i learned from him that you build america's middle class and unions will rebuild america's middle class. [applause]. david got and my youngest brother david got out of the army and started a small business. and he worked his rear end off. it was tough, and today all he has left is his social security. i learned from him that we honor hard-working people by protecting and expanding social security. [applause]. now when i was a baby and i always wanted to be a teacher. i went to a commuter college
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that cost $50 per semester and it opened 1,000,000 doors for me. i learned that america's public schools can build opportunity for all of our kidss [applause]. i'm the daughter of a maintenance man, who made it all the way to the united states senate. [applause]. and hillary clinton is the granddaughter of a factory worker who is going to make it all the way to the white house [applause]. b we believe in that america but we are worried, worried that those opportunities are slippinw away. a lot of america is worried, worried and angry, and great that too many times washington works for those at the top and
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leaves everyone else behind.hi but washington like watch giant oil companies guzzle down oil tax subsidies but says there's no money to help kids refinance their student loans. but washington gives gives corporation fast tax breaks for ceo bonuses but will not raise the minimum wage. now washington pushes a big corporate interest and trade ths deals but want to make the investments in infrastructure that create good jobs here in america.[applause] [applause]. angry that friends and neighbors right here in ohio lost their jobs and their homes when wall street wrecked their economy.si angry that instead of sending people to jail, washington gave bankers a bail out. now your pensions are in trouble and washington won't lift a finger
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to help. that's not right and we are hert to change it! [applause]. we are here to change it. [applause]. now, donald trump says he will make america great again, it's right there, no it is stamped in the front of his goofy hat. [laughter] you want to see goofy, look at him in that hat. [laughter] but when donald trump says great, i asked great for who exactly? [applause].for millions o for millions of kids struggling to pay for an education? for millions of seniors barely surviving on social security?
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for families that don't apply to scotland to play golf? [applause]. great he mea when donald trump says he willll make america great, he means make it even greater for rich guys just like donald trump. [applause]. great for the guys, who do not care how much they have already squeezed from everybody else. great for the guys who always want more because that is who donald trump is. the guy who wants it all fororas himself. and watch out, because he will crush you into the dirt to get to whatever he wants. [applause]. that is who he is. [applause]. just look at the evidence. donald trump cheered on britain's a current crisis whicw
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has sucked billions of dollars out of your retirement account because he said hey, it might bring more rich people to his new golf course.e he cheered on the 2008 housing crash because he could scoop up more real estate on the cheap. he cheered on students desperate enough to sign up for his faketu university so he could bleed them dry and turn a profit for himself.heir homes and t what kind of a man does that? what kind of a man routes for people to lose their job, to lose their home, to lose their life savings? i'll tell you what kind of a man.a a small insecure money grubber who fights for no one but himself [applause].
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what kind of a man, a nasty man will never become president of the united states [applause]. because hillary clinton will beat the next president of the united states. [applause]. hillary clinton will be the next president of the united states because she knows what it takes to be a thin skinned bully who is driven by greed and hate. she knows to be a bully not by talking tail and running but by standing your ground and fighting back. just look at history. she has
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has been on the receiving end of one right wing attack after another for 25 years. but she has never back down! [applause]. >> she does not call her opponents fat pig or dummy, no, she just remembers who really need someone on their side and she steps up and keeps right on fighting to the people who need her most. [applause]. [applause].
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[applause]. [chanting] hillary, hillary, hillary. >> what it boils down to, hillary has a brain, she has has got, she has thick skin and steady hands, but most of allth? she has a good heart and that is what america needs, and that is why i am with with her! are you with her! [applause]. this election is about values so
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let's just go through a few. donald versus hillary. [laughter] donald trump believed in dividing students to benefit himself.es hillary can clinton believes that every kid should be able to get an education without getting crushed by debts. that means debt-free collagen refinancing student loans [applause]. hillary fights for us. donald trump believes for sad little wall street bankers need to be free to divide anyone they want. hillary clinton believes that we need strong rules to prevent another financial crisis, yes! hillary fights for us! [applause]. donald trump sheets his workers and wants to abolish the minimum wage. poverty a
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hillary clinton believes no one should work full-time and live in poverty and that means raising the minimum wage, hillary fights for us! [applause]. you know i could do this all day, i really could, but, but i will not. okay, one more. donald trump calls african-americans thugs, muslimd terrorist, latinos, rapists and criminals, and women, bimbos. hillary clinton believes that racism, hatred, injustice and bigotry have no place in our country, she fights for us! she fights for us and we will fight for hillary clinton! [applause]. please join me in welcoming to the stage our next president
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[applause]. to your. >> next president, hillary clinton a mission point [applause]. >> thank you cincinnati. [applause]. i especially want to thank all of the people out side who cannot get in, thank you for coming today. [applause]. i am so delighted to be here with my friend and a great leader, senator elizabeth
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warren! [applause]. now you know why she is considered so terrific, so so formidable because she tells it like it is. [applause]. i am very grateful for that introduction but more importantly i want to thank her for fighting every single day for families like hers, families like yours, and millions of hard-working americans who deserve to have more folks on their side! [applause]. you know, elizabeth and i came of age around the same time and
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when we were coming up, as you heard her talking about her parents, her brothers, we believed in the american dream. it was not always going to beadl easy. my dad was a small businessman, it was hard work. he got he got up every single day, went off to work and worked hard and lots of times that my mother, my brothers and i would be there to help. he printed drapery fabrics and along warehouse with a long table, it was dark and not very pleasant, but it was decent, honest work. and he believed and he taught me, that is what you do in america, that is the basic part again. you work hard you do your part, you will get ahead and stay ahead. we need to make sure that basic bargain is alive and well in
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2016! [applause]. elizabeth is leading the fight to liberate millions of americans from the burden of student debt and to make sure -- [applause]. to make sure that washington never again profits off of our students. she and i i agree, the federal government should not be making money off of sending our young people to college to get an education! [applause]. and no one works harder to make sure wall street never, never rex main street again. she has come up with a lot of great ideas, but here is one that has already made a big difference,nc it is called the consumer
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protection bureau [applause]. it has been around a few years under the leadership of a great leader from ohio, richard who is leading the charge. [applause]. it has already, think about this it has only been around a few years but it has already returned to over $10.8 billion to 25 million americans who have been hurt by illegal financial practices. now that is what standing up and fighting to write economic wrongs look like. [applause]. i must say, i do just love to g see how she gets under donald
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trump's thin skin. [applause]. as elizabeth made clear, donald trump approved every day he is not in it for the american people, he is in it only for himself. elizabeth reminds us of that every chance she gets because -- [applause]. vote it is really important that voters here in ohio and across america understand this. she exposes him for what he is, temperamentally on fit and totally on qualified to be president of the united states. [applause].est tv since now some of the best tv since elizabeth came to the senate is actually on c-span.
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, so whenever you see her pressing a bank executive or a regulator for answers, refusing to let them off the hook, remember she is speaking for every single american who is frustrated and fed up. she is speaking for all of us and we thank her for that. [applause]. i am thrilled that elizabeth could be here with me in this glorious, beautiful building that has been rehabbed and putin to new use as a museum becausean we want to make the point t together, that we must have an
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economy that works for everyone again, not just those at the top. not just the rich or though well-connected, everybody. [applause]. now one might ask, well yes that is what we believe, it sounds simple doesn't it. honestly i think it is, it should not be complicated, but there are too many politicians and corporations that do not agree. they do not even seem to get it. but you do, and we do, and for the past now more than one year i have been traveling across our country meeting people who have told me their wages have not budged. even though they see executivesv to give themselves big bonuses. and you ask yourself, wait ast s
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minute why do the richest americans and the biggest corporations get away with manipulating the tax code so that they lower rates than you do? that is a good question. it does not make any sense, it does not make moral sense, economic sense, historic sense, you know what else is it make sense? when make sense? when leaders in congress give more tax break to hedge fund millionaires instead of makingme investments in manufacturing,ct clean energy and education that will actually create more good jobs. [applause]. it doesn't make sense when corporations stash their profits overseas or send them to influential shareholders instead of making long-term investmentsn
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in raising wages, training, and research. or when governors and legislators use every trick in the book to weaken unions and make it harder for americans to organize themselves for better wages and benefits. [applause]. you know what i am talking about. well, you have heard of right to work laws, while they are wrong for workers and they are wrong for america. none of this is right, my friend. but the selection is a chance for us to make it right for the future, for for our kids and our grandkids. [applause]. let's make it right. let's make it right for hard-working americans like stan hall in cleveland who owns a small
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trucking company. it is a nonstop struggle for him to compete against the bigger guys. but if we keep our economy growing and we make sure small businesses like stands get the right support, we can get more people a chance to succeed under that american basic bargain. let's make let's make it right for young people like erica in westlake, she dreamed her whole life of going to ohio university in athens [applause]. but, but the housing crash in 2008 wiped out her parentr small savings and their small business. so to get get herne college degree at a public university erica wound up $100,000 in debts.
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we cannot let this student debt crisis continue. we we have got to give hard-working students-wu and families relief. you know what erica is doing now? she is volunteering for our campaign and working to elected democrats across ohio! [applause]. stan is volunteering with us to, because he likes a many people across ohio and across the country note that we are fighting for a better future. i got into this race because i wanted to even the odds for people who have the odds stacked against them. this is not a time for half measures. to build an economy that works for everyone, not just those at the top, we have to go big and we have to go bold.o go big and [applause].
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so we need to take thatwe need frustration, the fear, the anxiety, and, and yes, the anger and after we have been to did we need to work together. we need need to achieve the kind of of s changes that will give everybody in this country a better shot. so let's set five ambitious goals for economy. let's a breakthrough the dysfunction in washington and make the biggest investment in new, good paying jobs since world war ii. let's do it we need to do -- [applause]. to invest in infrastructure like president eisenhower did with the interstate highway system. [applause]. that is when republicans used to believe in building america and.
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putting americans to work, that is is what we're going to do do again! [applause]. let's set the goal of making college it debt-free for everyone like erica. [applause]. [app and let's provide debt relief, let's provide debt relief as soon as we can, as soon as we start to work elizabeth, we'll take the day off for the inauguration and then the senate, the congress, the white house, we are going to get to work to get students and theirus families relief from this debt! [applause]. we have more work to do so let's

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