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  National Security Adviser John Bolton News Conference in Moscow  CSPAN  October 25, 2018 7:14pm-8:01pm EDT

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his game. on the mimi swarts on her book. the quest to create an artificial heart. watch live coverage in austin on book tv. >> both the house and senate are away on break, the house will be back on tuesday november 13. the chambers expected to start work tough on the federal government. the senate returns that same day with lawmakers planning to work on coast guard programs and a nomination for the federal reserve board. follow the house live on c-span apollo the senate live on c-span2. >> earlier this week, national security advisor john bolton met with russian president vladimir
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putin in moscow to discuss issues including syria, russia interference entrance decision to leave the intermediate range treaty. he held a news conference with reporters following that meeting. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> good evening everyone, my mayor sarah tinsley. before i introduce the ambassador i would like to tell
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you how we will proceed this evening. the ambassador will make a brief statement, then he will take questions from all of you. my colleague here will be calling on the reporter. before we began, first let me recognize the ambassador. thank you for everything you have done. make it so delightful as well as the rest of the u.s. embassy staff in moscow. we cannot begin before we think our host. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> thank you. >> thank you. and thank you very much for being here. i also want to thank interfax who come here many times beginning in september or october of 2001. when i came to deliver news to the bush administration's decision to withdraw. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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>> i also want to thank john and his team, they're doing a fantastic job here in moscow under very difficult circumstances. limited personnel and very trying environment. to have us descend on them with all of the needs and requirements really puts a strain on the embassy. we are very grateful to him and everybody was pitched in. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> in moscow over the past few days i've had a series of very
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comprehensive and very productive discussions with senior russian officials. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> that includes about an hour and a half meeting with the president putin, from which we have just come. with foreign minister sergei, with my direct counterpart this secretary of the russian consulate and with president putin's foreign affairs advisor. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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>> this was the second meeting, especially with the secretary following up on the median helsinki between president putin and president trump on their instructions to us and our colleagues on our respective security councils to look at ways to enhance practical cooperation and expansion of dialogue between russia and america. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> we had discussions that covered the range of issues differing in certain respects depending on who we are speaking with from the russian side.
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just to give a couple of highlights of what we covered in what we discussed, as president putin said in the opening of the meeting today when the press was there, his words now it would be useful to continue a direct dialogue with the president of the united states, primarily on the fields of international events that will take place in the near future, for example in paris. if the american side is interested, president putin said when i said yes and president trump would look forward to meeting with him in paris. we'll make the precise arrangements on that but it will happen in connection with the 100th anniversary of the celebration of the armistice that the french are hosting on november 11. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> among the issues we discussed where we agreed that we have more discussion actually to tighten coordination an in-depth discussion of russian-american policies with respect to syria. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> we discussed following on from conversations in helsinki. all good is to be able with the secretary we agreed that the russian u.s. counterterrorism dialogue at the level of the deputy secretary of state and vice foreign minister in russia, would begin again in december. we will fix the back dates but the counterterrorism dialogue we view as important ten will be complemented into course with the resumption of dialogue on narcotics and human trafficking issues. >> [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> on another subject that the president putin and president trump discussed in helsinki, we agreed that the meeting, the first meeting of the joint u.s. russia business council would take place in the first quarter of next year. this is something that ambassador huntsman has been
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particularly involved. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> we discussed continuing concern with russia meddling in the election so why was particularly harmful to russian american relations without producing anything for them in return. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> we had lengthy conversations
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about arms-control issues, the new strategic landscape, the president's decision on the inf treaty. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> with that, let me turn it over to our moderators. i would be happy to answer some questions. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> before you ask your questions, please be so kind as to give your name and the name of your media outlet before you answer the question. answer. >> [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] >> if the united states and russia can federation would find themselves free to withdraw from the inf treaty, what are they going to be doing next? are they going to be concerned about china? are they going to be placing their missiles in europe? are they going to be green on some territorial deployment of the missiles? what's next for both countries? >> i think were a long way from answers on those questions. from our perspective as president trump set on saturday, and said again yesterday, to deal with the question of russian violation for the inf treaty is a position that russia doesn't agree with with which we
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feel strongly about. it was the preacher factor in our decision to withdraw. i might say for the context involved, this is not a subject that arose yesterday. this question of russian violation is long and deep. it is something that both the trump and the obama administration's were very concerned about. in fact, just to give a little context, i would like to read from a speech in 2015 by the obama administration under secretary of state for arms-control insecurity rose, this is what undersecretary said in 2015. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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>> i am quoting rose, she said that russia tested started in 2008, ground launch cruise missile that flies to ranges banned by the treaty. the band ranges are between 505,500 kilometers. we are quite sure they have tested a capable missile that applies to those regions and try to get away with it. we called with them on it starting in may 2013 and we have been butting heads ever cents. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> i might also direct your attention to the reports filed annually by the state department available on the website beginning with the compliance report of 2014 which cover 2013 and which referred to it up to the present day six years of russian noncompliance mimic. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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>> there is another aspect your question raises. that is, what is the activity of other countries like china, iran, north korea, and others who are not covered by the treaty. who are free to do whatever they want in the intermediate range and have made substantial strides to have that capability. we estimate that in china one third and one half of all of their ballistic missile capability violate the inf that they were a party to. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> there is a new strategic reality out there. this is a cold war, bilateral ballistic missile related treaty. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> on this latter points of the more complicated global strategic environment, something that concerns the russians very substantially. we talked about that. >> [speaking in native language]
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>> the problem is there are russians there now. the threat is not america withdraw from the inf treaty. the threat is the russian missile. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> thank you. now a question. >> thank you. to follow up on that, did you discuss the possibility of a modified inf treaty that would include other countries or to put that another way, if russia
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were to come back into compliance with inf with you would you support withdrawal anyway? >> i would like to. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> with respect to russia compliance, it is the american position that russia is in violation. it is russia's position they are not in violation. one has to ask if you have to ask them to come back into
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compliance with things they don't think there violating. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> it's not like this is a new subject, they been butting heads for a while. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> on universalizing the treaty that is something we thought of as far back as 2004. some efforts were made to see if it would be possible to extend the treaty that ended shortly thereafter. they all failed.
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>> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> just in the past few days china issued a statement that said it wants the united states to stay in the inf treaty. if i were living in beijing, i would probably think the same thing but i'm not. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> in terms of filing the formal notice of withdrawal it has not been filed, it will be filed in due course. it will be filed with the abm
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treaty. i remember this very vividly. i was due to fly to moscow on december 11, 2001. obviously it's in happen. i came later in the week on a government plane. that's all we had discussions on the subject and found the withdraw. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] >> i was wondering what to think about you add the sanctions in russia in november. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> i would rather keep the questions on the subject of the meetings in washington. that subject to come up and i can tell you we are looking at the statutory obligations we have in light of the chemical weapons attack but we have night made a decision yet. >> [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> i said that sam is here in washington not moscow. i've been here so many times i get confused. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> the current time? >> you already mentioned that we would present hooton or russia
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in the u.s. election to think it's melting into next month's midterm election and what steps do you have planned to it interview. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> were watching these very closely, christopher ray said about a month ago that if we did not detect anything like the level of involvement in 2016. as he pointed out that could change with one keystroke. we have two weeks to go until the election. i hope there's not meddling at
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all it's worth noting that the president signed an executive order about a month ago that would require a report within 45 days if any meddling took place. we will be examining the information on ongoing basis but particularly afterwards. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] >> we will get a microphone back there. >> you have said that you discussed in your visit to russia have you discuss the possible cooperation with the russian counterparts. it may not have been part of the meetings but you mentioned it in the meetings, i was going to revise your partnership with saudi arabia in regards to this? >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> that i reiterated what president trump has said about the significance of avoiding a catastrophe with the agreement between russia, syria and turkey although they remade a large number of unresolved issues and perhaps most importantly it was one piece of the syrian conflict which is incredibly complicated with a large number of forces crammed into a very small space. it's one of the reasons why we
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thought it was important through a conversation to see if we can't look at syria more comprehensively. that something we see truths over overall resolution of the problem but particularly in light of the iranian involvement right through to lebanon and iran's continued behavior across the middle east. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> on saudi arabia, i did brief president putin wrote president trump and others in the administration, the secretary of state cia director, and others have been doing.
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since i have been over here assuming the meetings with moscow for the last two days i would rather not comment on it further except perhaps to refer you to vice president pentz's comments a few hours ago. i think those are the most recent from the most senior level of our government. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] >> charles? >> you mentioned that an attempt to universaliz universalized thy in the past, what options are available going forward. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> i think it is important for us to look at the reality that the treaty was outvoted, being
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violated and being ignored by other countries. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> under that view, exactly one country was constrained by the inf treaty, the united states. >> they wanted [speaking in native language] >> i think it is also important to avoid some of the rhetoric comfortable with the treaty and what the implications of u.s. withdrawal would be. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] >> in 2001 we used to have a joke with respect to the abm treaty on computer screens and media outlets all over the world, whenever someone type the treaty there is said key that the reporter only had hit one key and it would type out the cornerstone of strategic strategy. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> there's like one word, the abm treaty of 1872.
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if you take away the cornersto cornerstone, the entire construct of international stability collapses. it was not true. it will not be true now with the withdraw from this treaty. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> i think we have time for tomorrow. >> [speaking in native language]
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[speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] >> you mention the russian federation tried to interfere without any success in the u.s. election. but it failed. does this mean that russia should have done something else? or does that mean that if it's proven there was snow results from the election that the sanctions will be lifted. >> it's the efforts alone to interfere in our objections that are objectionable. the fact to us, the outcome would be the same by all of the evidence we have. if the word evidence to the contrary we would have heard it by now. once the meddling did create was distrust and animosity within the united states.
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it particularly made it almost impossible for two years for the united states and russia to make progress diplomatically. that is a huge loss to both countries, particularly to russia. it is a lesson, don't mess with american elections. >> [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language] [speaking in native language]
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>> [speaking in native language] >> just took off on this last question, with the russian meddling it seems the u.s. security community haven't yet concluded the same thing. on the 2018 meddling also i would like to check if the latest accusations if a person worked very close to president putin was set a signal that we may see sanctions based on the already criminal corrections made. thank you very much. not all done norma.
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. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> well of course we only know what has been disclosed publicly in the form of indictments and related information, but certainly taking what we've seen so far, there's no possibility that the outcome of the election would have been changed if new
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information comes to light obviously we'd have to take that into with account. >> [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> and that applies to the indictment of the internet research associatings accountant that would be release said look back to see the time periods involved. >> [speaking in native tongue] >> and if you want to talk about a really massive influence effort on the american political
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system, i'd suggest you read vice president pence's speech on china's eferlts his speech was three or four weeks ago. looking at everything that china was doing, a very, very senior u.s. intelligence official said it makes russia look like the it junior varsity. >> [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue]
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>> so thank you all very much for leaving very early tomorrow for because baku. >> this morning we're live in montpelier vermont for the 49th spot on the bus capital tour. vermont's lieutenant governor will be the guest on the bus starting aff7:40 a.m. eastern. "new york times" best-selling author jody picoult is our guest on in-depth fiction edition. her live call in program november 4th. her recent book is a spark of light. other books include small great things, the story teller, lone wolf, plus 20 more novels. she's written five issues of the wonder woman comic book series for dc comics.
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watch this with jody beaky live sunday november 4. watch in-depth fiction edition when author brad pleltser will be our guest. on book to have on c-span 2. >> tonight on c-span 2 we'll get a prove of the upcoming midterm elections. that's followed by attorney general jeff sessions on efforts to combat the opioid epidemic. and with 12 days to the election we'll show the recent debates starting with the iowa give's race. and later a debate from pennsylvania's first congressional district. >> former members of congress came together this week to discuss the current political compliement and the strategy for democrats and republicans. heading into the midterm elections. the eventent also looked at the history of so-called wave elections. and how the the confirms of supe court justice brett kavanaugh might impact v