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tv   U.S. Senate U.S. Senate  CSPAN  May 13, 2019 2:59pm-6:32pm EDT

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tests. why is that? it was designed just for women but there's nowhere on the internet the picture or video of a woman actually doing the new army pt test. >> guest: if you'd like to -- if you like to see pictures of women actually wearing bucket on patrol i suggest the collar go to the vds or dv ids pentagons location or station where they post -- >> you find this and other washington journal segments online go to c-span .org. we leave this here now to check your life to the u.s. senate
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which is voting today on advancing the nomination of a u.s. district court judge for the eastern district of texas. that vote is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. eastern time. watch live gavel to gavel u.s. senate coverage here on cspan2. the president pro tempore: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. god of our destinies, keep our spirits attuned to the graciousness of your loving providence. deliver us from the emotions and
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actions that thwart your purposes for our lives. lord, guide our lawmakers and engender in them a spirit of unity, as they respect the integrity and patriotism of their colleagues. give us the wisdom to use this day to strive to do your will on earth even as it is done in heaven. as you show us the way to advance your kingdom on earth, provide us with goodness and mercy, wisdom and strength. we pray in your mighty name, amen.
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the president pro tempore: amen. please join me in the pledge of allegiance. please join me in reciting the i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of americ, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
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mr. grassley: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from iowa. mr. grassley: i ask to speak for two minutes as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. grassley: first, i'd like to tell my colleagues in the senate a project that i worked on in iowa getting a history from various veterans. this morning i delivered 20 stories from veterans to the veterans history project at our library of congress. these stories will be preserved in the permanent collection of the library of congress, making accessible the personal accounts of american war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. i want to thank all of our veterans, including those that were interviewed, who have
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sacrificed for the defense of our freedoms. their service ensures that all americans will live in peace and prosperity for generations to come. secondly, may is national foster care month. due to the opioid crisis and other substance abuse issues plaguing communities in iowa and all across america, the number of kids in foster care is rapidly rising. in 2017, there were 443,000 kids in care. 96,000 entered foster care because of parental substance abuse. these families need help. that's why congress passed the family first prevention services act, which will allow states to receive federal reimbursement for services to help kids with their parents. these services include substance
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abuse treatment programs. as we celebrate this month of may as national foster care month, i hope you'll think about the number of kids that are there and do what we can to help those kids have permanency and parents. that's the two things as chairman of the caucus on foster -- young people, that i hear from them. by listening to them, going from foster home to foster home sometimes two or three times a year, they tell me they'd like to have parents. they'd like to have a home. they want stability. i yield the floor and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: will the senator withhold his suggestion? does the senator withhold his
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suggestion? under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. morning business is closed. under the previous order, the senate will proceed to executive session to resume consideration of the following nomination, which the clerk will report. the clerk: nomination, the judiciary. michael j. truncale of texas to be united states district judge for the eastern district of texas.
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the presiding officer: the senator from iowa. mr. grassley: this week marks national police week, which is dedicated to the brave men and women of law enforcement. police officers prioritize the safety of their neighbors and fellow citizens above their own. this week gives us an opportunity to reflect on the dedication and perseverance of law enforcement officers across the country. we should also honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice
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while serving our communities. it's because of the commitment and because of the bravery of police officers, firefighters, first responders, and other public safety officers that we can feel safe in our homes, places of work, and our communities. i'm particularly grateful for the men and women in blue who serve my fellow iowans. i'd also like to thank the officers that serve in washington, d.c., the capitol police for diligently every day to ensure everyone who works here and everyone who visit the capital are safe. each member of the capitol police works selflessly to protect us and their dedication to service doesn't go unnoticed. national police week serves as a reminder to thank specific
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members of law enforcement that we know and care about. however, we can't forget to honor those who sacrifice their lives to protect ours. these individuals are heroes. according to the national law enforcement officers memorial fund, a total of 1,582 officers died in the line of duty during the past ten years. that's an average of one death every 55 hours. in 2018, 158 officers were killed in the line of duty. at the national law enforcement officers memorial, the names of some 200 iowans are inscribed amongst those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. each name represents a unique individual who answered the call
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of duty. we're indebted to each and every one of those people. to that end, i'm pleased that the senate judiciary committee recently approved three bills, two of which i cosponsored and one that i introduced. my bill, the protecting america's first responders act, seeks to fix issues in the federal public safety officer benefit program. officers whose lives have been transformed by injury in the line of duty deserve our support, and that bill lends to their support and makes sure that it's actually accomplished. unfortunately, the federal program that's created to assist them has fallen short in responding to claims efficiently. this important bill improves this program to ensure that
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disabled or fallen officers receive the benefits they deserve. my bill enjoys the wide support of multiple groups, including the fraternal order of police, federal law enforcement officers association, sergeants benefit, national association of police organizations, peace officers research association of california, wounded blue, how to love our cops, billings, montana, police department, national volunteer fire council, national association of school resource officers, and the violently injured police officers organization. i look forward to passing it into law and want to thank all of the bill's cosponsors for helping move this bill forward. in addition to the protecting america's first responders act,
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we also moved two other bills out of the judiciary committee. the first is the patrick leahy bulletproof vest partnership grant program reauthorization. this bill allows state and local law enforcement officers to purchase lifesaving bulletproof vests for those officers working in the field. i'm happy to cosponsor this legislation and support my colleague, senator leahy's tireless efforts to improve the availability of bulletproof vests to our police. the other bill that passed out of committee last week is the supporting and treating officers in crisis act. mental illness and suicide among police officers continues to grow. senator hawley introduced this bill and i'm proud to cosponsor it with him because it addresses a critical issue far too many
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officers face. this bill seeks to provide necessary resources to law enforcement on mental health and suicide prevention. i urge my colleagues to support all three of these bills. passing them into law is one way to say thank you to the brave men and women who serve us so selflessly. mr. president, i'd like to conclude my remarks by once again thanking all members of law enforcement for their dedication and sacrifice. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
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quorum call:
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quorum call:
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quorum call:
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mr. mcconnell: mr. president. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i move to proceed to legislative session. the presiding officer: the question is on the motion. all in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes do have it. the motion is agreed to. mr. mcconnell: i move to proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 230. the presiding officer: the question is on the motion. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes do have it. the motion is agreed to. the clerk will report the
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nomination. the clerk: nomination, department of justice, jeffrey a. rosen of virginia to be deputy attorney general. mr. mcconnell: i send a cloture motion to the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the cloture motion. the clerk: cloture motion, we, the undersigned senators, in accordance with the provisions of rule 22, do hereby bring to a close debate on the nomination of jeffrey a. rosen, of virginia, to be deputy attorney general, signed by 17 senators. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent that the reading of the names be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent that the mandatory quorum call be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: this week the senate will consider a number of well-qualified nominees for important positions.
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several weeks ago we put an end to two years of unprecedented, systemic partisan obstruction that had kept abundantly qualified nominees on the sidelines for no substantive reason. the senate took a modest but important step to turn back toward the institutional traditions that shaped our work and nominations throughout our history. we put in place a reform to speed up the postcloture floor time on nominations, or should i say supposedly debating them. since then we have filled several important posts in important branches at a more reasonable pace. in many cases these unobjectionable candidates received the overwhelming bipartisan support they deserved, 90-8, 90-8, 95-3, and over the next few days four more will receive consideration and votes here on the floor.
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we'll begin by processing the first of two more well-qualified nominees to our nation's are district courts, michael j. truncale, of texas, to served as u.s. district judge for the eastern district of texas. he is a graduate of yufortd of north texas and southern university school of law. he has a distinguished reputation in law. she has served on the board of regions for the texas state university system and the prepaid higher tuition board in the texas controller's office. his nomination earned a well-qualified rating from the a.b.a. and favorably reported by our colleagues on the judiciary committee. so i hope each of our colleagues will join me and add mr. truncale's to the growing list of nominees passed in an
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orderly fashion. we will vote on kenneth lee's nomination to the ninth circuit court of appeals and wendy vitter's nomination to serve as the eastern judge for the eastern district of louisiana. and then we will consider brian bulatao. he will be responsible for such critical things as embassy security. his nomination was submitted to the senate in june of 2018. nearly a year ago. and following those four individuals, the senate will also consider this week the nomination of jeffrey rosen to serve as our next deputy attorney general. mr. rosen is a graduate of northwestern university and the harvard law school. he built a strong record in private practice as a litigators before entering public service in 2003. prior to his current position he served as general counsel at the
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department of transportation and the office of management and budget and as adjutant professor at georgetown university law center. the american people deserve that their department of justice be fully staffed, fully operational, and fully committed to upholding our nation's laws. i hope that each mf my colleagues who review this impressive nominee and vote to confirm him this week. actually, mr. president, he's the deputy secretary of transportation. he may have been general counsel at some previous point but he's currently the deputy secretary of transportation, a department with which i have some familiar tivment of course, as we continue our efforts in the person personnel -- personnel business we are looking to provide relief for communities that have been hard hit by natural disasters. hundreds are without power.
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the recent spate of tornadoes that killed 23 and injured dozens more in alabama and georgia. and the devastating floods that created damage to homes, businesses and infrastructure across the midwest this spring. there will be aid to cover those in need from our territories to those who suffered through west coast wildfires, east coast hurricanes, disaster assistance has not been partisan, it has been over a half year since many of these disasters hit. our country is in need. so i'm grateful to chairman shelby and our colleagues on the appropriations committee for continuing to push for a bipartisan solution that addresses these most urgent needs. and i would urge democrats and republicans in the house as well as the senate to identify our common ground and produce an outcome for the american people they've been waiting entirely
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too long. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
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mr. schumer: madam president? the presiding officer: the democratic leader. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call bees dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: now, madam president, tomorrow secretary of state pompeo will meet with vladimir putin, and there's something important he must do. the mueller report, for all its revelations about the president's conduct, also reminded us of things we've known to be true and must resist at all costs. the mueller report documented the sweeping and systematic -- their words -- disinformation campaign directed by president putin to undermine our 2016 elections. whatever you may think of the president's behavior, foreign interference in our elections cannot be ignored. it was an attack on democracy itself, and in my view america's
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response has not been adequate. the point of going -- of looking at this is what happened in the past happened as bad as it was but it's to prevent it from happening ever again in the future. we don't know what country will try to change our elections and who they might support -- russia, china, iran, north korea -- so we have to bolster ourselves and until we get a full, full description of what happened and a plan to stop it from happening in 2020, america should not rest. because it's an attack on democracy itself. america's response thus far has not been adequate. the congress passed sanctions but then president trump failed to implement some and watered others down. only a few months ago the treasury department cut a sweetheart deal on sanctions relief with russian oligarch and putin crony oleg deripaska. even rhetorically, the president
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and members of his administration have shown an unbelievable willingness to look past president putin's actions in 2016. a little over a week ago, just after the mueller report came out, president trump held a phone call with president putin in which he reportedly brought up the russian hoax, and he did not warn putin not to meddle in our elections. of course the press conference in helsinki last year was the epitome of president's to confront president putin about his interference in our elections. any softness on the part of the administration will be read by putin and other foreign powers as an invitation to try and interfere with our elections again. we know, thanks to the testimony from f.b.i. director wray and our national intelligence chiefs, that foreign adversaries are gearing up right now -- right now -- to try again and
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interfere with our elections in 2020 and it may not be just russia next time. china, north korea, iran, who knows. so it is long past time that the trump administration make it crystal clear that another interference campaign by putin will not be tolerated. the secretary of state, michael pompeo, has an obligation to warn president putin that any action to interfere in our elections will be met with an immediate and robust response. secretary of state pompeo must make clear that the cost of trying to interfere with american elections will be dear. secretary of state pompeo must deliver a shot across the bow to putin and any other foreign adversary that would dare think about trying to influence our elections. anything less from secretary pompeo will be a failure of diplomacy. here in congress our response also must be strong.
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in the wake of multiple warnings about future election interference, we must do everything we can to harden our election infrastructure before 2020. there are multiple bills, bipartisan, sponsored by democrats and republicans, in committee right now that would do just that. but leader mcconnell will not commit to bringing them to the floor -- another example of his legislative graveyard. instead, he just schedules nomination after nomination. this is now the third week in a row that the senate will spend processing only nominations. leader mcconnell slowly but surely is change the chamber into a legislative graveyard. where even the most urgently needed and bipartisan bills on election security and russia sanctions get buried. now on health care, it's not just election security, of course, that finds itself in the mcconnell graveyard. bipartisan bills, background
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checks, paycheck fairness, violence against women act have all passed the house with republican support but languished in the senate. i wouldn't be surprised if health care legislation is soon added to the list of too many stones -- t tombstones. last week the house passed a critical piece of legislation that would reverse president's attempt to weaken the health care of americans. it is publicly supported by several state senate republicans up for reelection. this week the house is poised to pass another great package of health care legislation to further protect preexisting conditions and help people sign up for quality health care coverage. compare that to the trump administration's policies, which have only increased costs and lowered the number of americans
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who have health insurance. the uninsured rate had been on steady decline until president trump took office. now for the first time since 2013, the number of americans without insurance has been on the rise and the leader of the majority in the senate, senator mcconnell, has had a responsibility to use our time here to help the american people. as insurance rates fall, protections for preexisting conditions are under attack and prices go up for middle-class americans. i believe the senate must act to improve the nation's health care system. and so we have multiple house-passed bills awaiting action. leader mcconnell need only call them up for debate but, instead, legislative graveyard, where good legislation doesn't even get debated or amended, let alone passed, is upon us. finally, on disaster relief,
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last week our colleagues in the house passed yet another bill that would provide crucial aid for disaster-stricken communities, including our fellow citizens in puerto rico who are still suffering. importantly, the bill passed with 34 republicans voting in favor. negotiations on a disaster package continue, but i believe the house vote is a sign that republicans in both chambers are beginning to realize that the people of puerto rico cannot be left behind -- and rightly so. there will not be any bill if it doesn't treat all of america fairly. so don't complain just about your state. go to the republican leadership, if you are a republican senator, and tell them we must pass a bill that protects everybody. the president's animus for the people of puerto rico is antithetical to our values our americans. americans help each other in times of need. we wouldn't short this change the farmers in iowa or the people of texas or california or
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florida. so why should we ask three million fellow citizens shall -- the people of puerto rico are u.s. citizens -- to keep waiting for help to rebuild from a storm that made landfall over a year and a half ago? the bottom line is simple -- very simple: we have to help everybody, and our republican colleagues are beginning to realize. their constituents are complaining and say, what's the holdup? and we all know the story. it wasn't the original idea of the republicans in the senate to treat puerto rico unfairly. president trump came to a lunch, demanded -- demanded -- that aid for puerto rico be eliminated or greatly diminished. and our republican friends went along. they thought we would just bow down, as they did. we have not. neither in the house nor senate. and now let's get moving.
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it's encouraging that republicans are beginning to realize that puerto rico needs help, or at least that they have to be part of the aid panel. -- aid package. i hope these green shoots soon bear fruit and we can send something to the president's desk and give the relief to all of those who need it -- california and texas and iowa and nebraska, alabama, and florida, and puerto rico. i yield the floor. i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call:
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quorum call:
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mr. isakson: madam president. the presiding officer: the senator from georgia. mr. isakson: madam president, i rise to --. the presiding officer: the senate is in a quorum call. mr. isakson: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from georgia. mr. isakson: thank you, madam president. madam president, we're called upon many times to do many things in this chamber, and
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i've been called, in 21 years i've been called to do a lot of different ones but today may be the most different of all. but in a way it's something a joy to do. it's about a place in bartow county, georgia, a small town being caught by the urban growth in the city of atlanta, and one of the biggest cities in the united states of america. it is a great town. the first sunday of every month there's a breakfast for the guys in town at 7 a.m. where we all go and talk about politics, talk about the future of the county, talk about what's happening, share good ideas and bad ideas, tell jokes and come back moongt later to see how -- a month later to see how things are going. it's something i started to do, when two or more are gathered you go to make sure they get to know you. i've been in politics a long times and learned a lot of things. the best thing i learned is to
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know your neighbor and people. i also learned about business. the number two revenue is tourism. it is number two for sales and use taxes for hotel-motel taxes or entertainment taxes. they generate money that helps our cities and counties buy and build facilities for educational centers or whatever. i'm paying close attention to see what someone is doing new around the country that we might not have been done in georgia before. i've been sitting on a ham sandwich starving to death, every month when i go to the breakfast, i go to something exactly that, unique to country. i thought i would tell you a little bit about it. it's about a guy named dean louis, dean's family home place in bartow county, georgia.
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he grew up on a piece of property in 2009 that was a junkyard of old cars. in fact, 40 years worth of old cars. the kudzu, it is something to stop erosion, we have 40 years worth of kudzu that has grown through the cars. so they are almost canopy hidden by the kudzu. dean lewis looking across the street, at what is old car city, said that is an interesting place for people to visit. because people look for old cars to get a new part. people can come and get an old part for their car from dean.
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one person came from the atlanta ballet and said this would be a great background for our ballerinas in a photo contest. so the atlanta ballet used the backdrop of old car city, so the atlanta falcons are using it, visitors around the world have used it. it's a famous place. it is not famous because it is handsome or beautiful. it's famous because it's unique. dean lewis and his family took something of their that was unique to them, molded it into something people would come and see, and it is one of those if you build it, they will come, if you saw the movie where all the headlights were weaving through the town to see the field that was built. that is the same thing with car lot city, it is where people want to come to get old parts or come get their picture take wen the cars, international
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companies want to do business there where it is one of the most attractive places in north georgia. i came to the floor to pay tribute to dean lewis in white, georgia, because he has taken an old car in a junkyard and a jalopy and now it raises money for the community and something that is a part of our past and make something good. if we can do that we will be good as business people, as tourist promoters, so i rise tonight to commend dean lewis for what he has done and his family, to commend old dar city and making it -- cold car city and making it it a tourist attraction and telling them to keep on doing the work and making chicken salad out of good fried chicken, thereon shno -- and there is no better fried
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chicken than old car city in georgia. i yield my time. and note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call:
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quorum call: mr. perdue: ask the that the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion: we, the undersigned senators, in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the standing rules of the senate, do hereby move to bring to a close debate on the nomination of michael j. truncale of texas to be united
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states district judge for the eastern district of texas. signed by 17 senators. the presiding officer: by unanimous consent, the mandatory quorum call has been waived. the question is, is it the sense of the senate that debate on the nomination of michael j. truncale of texas to be united states district judge for the eastern district of texas shall be brought to a close. the yeas and nays are mandatory under the rule. the clerk will call the roll. vote:
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vote:
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vote:
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the presiding officer: has any senator not voted? does any senator wish to change their vote? on this vote the yeas are 49. the nays are 43. the motion is agreed to. a senator: mr. president. the presiding officer: the senator from pennsylvania is recognized. mr. casey: mr. president, i would ask consent to speak as if in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. casey: mr. president, i rise today --.
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the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mr. casey: i rise today to celebrate the 54th anniversary of head start and the 25th anniversary of early head start on may 18. we know that in january of 1964, president lyndon bains johnson declared the war on poverty in his state of the union address. sergeant shriver who was then the director of the office of economic opportunity then assembled a panel of experts to develop a comprehensive child development program to help communities meet the needs of disadvantaged preschool children that resulted in project head start launching in the summer of 1965. over 50 years later head start and early head start have served hundreds of thousands of children with high-quality comprehensive early learning and
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wrap-around services. the presiding officer: will the senator suspend for a moment. the senate will be in order. mr. casey: just to give the senate a reminder on what head start is in terms of the ages, head start serves children ages three to five. early head start serves up to three. so under the age of three. we know that these early learning experiences provide children with the tools they need to develop and succeed in school. when children learn more earlier in life, they earn more later in life. it's not just a rhyme. all the evidence, the research shows that there's a connection, a direct connection between early learning and later earning. a study of head start children in harrisburg, pennsylvania, found that they had higher scores in fifth grade than a controlled group on all academic
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and executive functioning outcomes. these benefits stay with children through adulthood. research shows head start children have a higher likelihood, a higher likelihood of graduating from high school and receiving a postsecondary degree. also these benefits even flow to the next generation. as the children of head start graduates are significantly more likely, more likely to finish high school and enroll in college. and they are significantly less likely to become teen parents or to be involved in the criminal justice system. one of the core tenets of head start that has made it so successful is its responsiveness to local community needs. in pennsylvania, for example, like many other states, the opioid epidemic has hit far too many communities, and head start has responded to that crisis with innovative
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programming. for example, the safe start program in allentown, an early head start program, provides early intervention to assist development of infants and toddlers who have suffered abuse or neglect. after completing safe start, the new program in allentown, 68% of three-year olds were on age developmentally and 100% of the children had significant improvement in their drug-impacted symptoms, with 53% showing resolution. of the women who became pregnant while their substance impacted child was enrolled in safe start, 88% gave birth to a full-term, drug-free and healthy second child. this whole family approach and
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integration with local community partners has created not just better outcomes from families -- or for families, i should say -- but resulted in significant savings. through this program, 91% of children achieved a stable permanent home and caregiver, and it is estimated that the safe start program has resulted in nearly $1.5 million in foster care savings and over $9.5 million in child welfare involvement by stabilizing 106 families. so we're grateful for those results from the safe start program in allentown. head start is a critical program for lifting families out of poverty obviously and providing children with the early learning experiences they need to start kindergarten ready to learn. unfortunately, still only about a third of eligible children have access to head start and
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less than 10% -- these are national numbers -- less than 10% have access to early head start. and again, early head start, zero up to three and head start three to five. so funding for these programs is critical. just to give an example of those numbers in pennsylvania, the numbers are even a little lower. in pennsylvania, just 27% of eligible, eligible three to five-year olds have access to head start, and only 7% of eligible children under three have access to early head start. this is purely a question of funding even with a lot of children being eligible but not served. as we celebrate over 50 years for head start on may 18, we must work to ensure these programs receive robust funding and continue to serve low-income children and families across the
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nation. mr. president, i would yield the floor and note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call:
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mr. mcconnell: mr. president. the presiding officer: . the majority leader is recognized. mr. mcconnell: i ask consent that further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent that all postcloture time on the truncale nomination expire at 10:30 a.m., tuesday, may 14, that the president be immediately notified of the senate's action. 10:45 a.m. tomorrow. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection.
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mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed toking legislative session, be in a period of morning business with senators permitted to speak therein for ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the appointment at the desk appear separately in the record as if made by the chair. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the consideration of s. res. 202, submitted earlier today. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: senate resolution, 202, congratulating the students, parents, teachers, and leaders of charter schools across the united states and so forth. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, and the motions to reconsider be considered made and laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the consideration of s. res. 203, submitted earlier today. the presiding officer: the clerk
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will report. the clerk: senate resolution 203, recognizing the 80th anniversary of the aircraft owners and pilots association. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, and the motions to reconsider be considered made and laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the immediate consideration of s. 1436, submitted earlier today. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. 1436, a bill to make technical corrections to the computation of average pay up public law 110-279. the presiding officer: is objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. mcconnell: i further ask that the bill be considered read a third time and passed and the motions to reconsider be considered made and laid upon the table. the presiding officer: without
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objection. mr. mcconnell: i ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 10:00 a.m., tuesday, may 14, further, following the prayer and pledge, the morning hour be deemed expired, the journal of proceedings be approved to date, and the time for the two leaders be reserved for their use later in the day, morning business be closed, and senate proceed to executive session to resume consideration of the truncale nomination. finally that the senate recess from 12:30 until 2:15 p.m. to allow for the weekly conference meetings. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mr. mcconnell: if there's no further business to come before the senate i ask that it stand adjourned under the previous order. the presiding officer: the senate stands adjourned until senate stands adjourned until
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>> stacey abrams was the 2018 democratic nominee for governor of georgia. she spoke about the role diversity plays in foreign affair ands the global impact of issues like climate change, income inequality and voter suppression. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, everyone. >> good afternoon. >> glad to see we have a lively crowd, a full house. i think you're going to be very happy with the next hour or so. but first, a little bit of spinach before we get to the highlight of the afternoon. i'm jim lindsey, i am senior here at thent council, and it is my great honor and pleasure to welcome you to this keynote address and closing session of the seventh annual conference on diversity in international affairs. this conference is jointly

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