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tv   House Session  CSPAN  June 15, 2015 2:00pm-9:01pm EDT

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particular case. lincoln ignores dred scott. in every other context. i would enforce the judgment in the particular case, i don't have to follow it as a rule. it will force the debate back into politics and you get in every other context. i would enforce the judgment in the particular the public deliberation that the constitution is designed to create. >> going to leave this forum on the supreme court at this point. can you see the last few minutes on our website. go to c-span.org. live now as the u.s. house about to gavel in. members will be returning for brief speeches this afternoon. legislative work will start at 4:00 eastern today. seven suspension bills on the agenda in the house today. including one encouraging iraq to release three u.s. citizens being held in that country. votes after 6:30. this is live coverage of the u.s. house here on c-span. thspear mpe: the ouse wilbener. the prayer will red ourpla, faher conro chaplain conroy: letpr
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california, ms. sanchez. ms. sanchez: please join me in our pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. this the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. burgess: i rise to ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: it seems like the whole of washington is awaiting the result of a supreme court decision referenced as king vs. burwell. mr. speaker, let me give you the simple truth. as i see it, the president broke the law he broke the law and people are hurting as a consequence. once this ruling comes down, congress will be required to put
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in place mechanisms to keep people from being hurt any further. but the fact of the matter remains that premiums have gone up, deductibles are completely out of sight, leaving many families functionally uninsured. we need to address these problems. furthermore, power needs to be devolved back to the states, states can do a better job of running their health care systems because they are closer to the people that they represent. the fact of the matter is, this health care law was a big mistake. it's time that it be fixed and this will be a first step in the road to do so. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. johnson: our nation's airports are economic and cultural engines that drive our local, state, and national
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economy. they are the front door for many of our communities. unfortunately, they are also a known target for those seeking to incite fear. two weeks ago a man entered the world's busiest airport in atlanta, georgia carrying a loaded ar-15 automatic weapon with an extended capacity 100-round magazine he did so only to make a point, and that was to show that he was legally able to carry his firearm in the airport. mr. speaker, actions like this which follow shootings at airports in los angeles and houston, undermine public security in the same way as yelling "fire" in a crowded theater. today i will introduce legislation to prohibit the carrying of loaded weapons in our nation's airports. the airport security act is a commonsense bill and i urge my colleagues to join me in keeping the traveling public safe. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman from georgia has ex-peered. for what purpose does the -- has expired. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. ms. sanchez: thank you mr. speaker. today i rise to commemorate the three-year anniversary of the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, known as daca. over the past three years, daca has changed the lyes of more than 640,000 -- lives of more than 640,000 young undocumented immigrants brought to the united states as children, including an impressive immigrant in my office named marie nasm she moved to the united states when she was 6 years old. now as college student with a 4.0 g.p.a., she tutors children and has given -- and is giving back to the country that has helped her reach her goals. as we mark the three-year anniversary of daca, thousands
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more dreamers are waiting for their opportunity to come out of the shadows. sadly the court battle over daca continues. we must rededicate ourselves to fixing our broken imgame -- immigration system. students like marina deserve the chance to live free of free and contribute their talents to keep our country vibrant and the envy of the world. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you mr. speaker. house republican leadership is once again threatening to bring us to the edge of yet another deadline that threatens american jobs and our very economy. there are just seven days left for congress to re-authorize the export-import bank. a critical entity, an agency that gives american manufacturers, small businesses the tools and access to capital
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they need to sell american-made goods overseas. mr. kildee: that's how we grow our economy. letting the export-import bank endangers hows -- houns of thousands of good paying jobs in the united states. in my home state of michigan alone, 228 exporters with $11 billion in export value are at risk if congress fails to re-authorize the ex-im bank. and that will all end on june 30. no new support no new loan guarantee no, new loans to help exporters sell goods across the country and keep americans at work. it is reckless, it's irresponsible that we're facing another fiscal cliff. this is a cliff for our own manufacturers and our own economy. mr. speaker, a majority of this house of representatives supports the export-import bank. let's vote this week to re-authorize ex-im. with that, i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. pursuant to clause 4 of rule 1, the following enrolled bill was signed by the speaker pro tempore thornberry on friday, june 12, 2015. the clerk: senate 1568, to extend the authorization to carry out the replacement of the existing medical cents of the department of veterans affairs in denver, colorado, to authorize transfers of amounts to carry out the replacement of such medical center and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12a of rule 1, the chair decrares the house in recess until approximately 4:00 p.m. today.
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he said there are options for the house to consider but declined to elaborate. house leaders will be meeting late they are afternoon to consider how they might move forward, we'll bring you any update that come in that meeting. on "road to the white house" now, former governor jeb bush is expected to make an announcement
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for the 2016 nomination. he'll be making remarks at miami-david's largest campus in kendall. if he does declare for the presidency, he'll be the 11th candidate to announce for the republican nomination. you can see that live at 3:00 p.m. on c-span3. >> tonight on the commune -- on "che communicators." talk about technology issues and patent legislation before congress. >> 97% of the people that are sued by pat tent trolls have to settle because they don't have the $3 million to defend themselves. 97% of them settle. they pay an average of $300,000 to the patent troll that's suing them. when they pay the $300,000 settlement, they're locked up under a nondisclosure agreement,
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a contract that says they're never allowed to tell anybody what happened to them. >> are they excited to have legislation on the topic, we are going to speak as many congressmen as possible to discuss the issues and see what is the best way to help entrepreneurs defend their products but more importantly be able to run their business. >> we are concerned about this. we need to help those who create it makes it more difficult to use the courts to enforce their property rights. that's the big divide. >> tonight, at 8:00 eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2.
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and now supreme court justice ruth bader ginsburg and her former law clerk took part in a discussion on justice ginsburg's life and thoughts on gender equality and being the notorious r. bmplet g. about an hour. >> i first became involved with a.c.s. because i believe in its mission. like a.c.s., i believe law should be a force to improve the lives of all people and it is a privilege to support a.c.s. in its efforts to make that happen. i've also developed a deep appreciation for everything my a.c.s. membership has given me including countless professional development opportunities and a fantastic network of creags and friends. at this particular moment i'm deeply grateful to a.c.s. for
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the opportunity to introduce our final featured speakers of the convention two extraordinary jurists. justice ruth bader ginsburg's biography is well known. before -- i'm going to give a little bit of it anyway. before her appointment to the u.s. supreme court she served on the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit and prior to becoming a judge she was a law professor at rutgers and columbia university. over her decades of service, she's been an unwavering advocate for women both on the bench and as one of the founds of the women's rights project for the aclu, where she served as general counsel and on the national board of directors for nearly a decade. i had the extraordinary honor of clerk wrg justice two ginsburg which was as amazing and life changing an experience as you would expect. among my fondest memories of that year were the champagne and cupcake birthday parties that the justice would host for each of her clerks and secretaries. so fully aware of just how crazy
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it is to have a birthday party with ruth bader ginsburg, my co-clerks and i would plan for days in advance, trying to come up with a perfect list of questions to ask her and we did pretty well. we heard amazing stories about her summers in sweden, where she was learning and writing about swedish civil procedure, we heard about her first supreme court arguments, her confirmation hearings, and her beloved husband, marty, a distinguished tax attorney and chef supreme whose love and support for the justice is legendary. if tumblr had existed before he passed away, no doubt he would have started the notorious r.b.g. blog himself. [cheers and applause] when the clerkship ended, i had a deep sense of remorse when i
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thought about the questions we didn't get to ask and the stories we didn't ghet to hear. this is a dream come true for me, one more chance to hear about the incredible life and career of ruth bader ginsburg with the best interlo cutor available. he's an expert in constitutional law and the supreme court. he was a popular teacher winning u.c. berkley's law distinguished professor award and became the associate dean. he was also on the board of direct grors a.c.s. for a number of careers -- directors for a.c.s. for a number of years. [cheers and applause] but long before all of that, justice lew was a law clerk first on the d.c. circuit, a for
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a long-tile friend of a.c.s. and then for justice ginsburg. he's perfect for 24 job -- for this job because i know he too has a long list of questions left over from the chamber birthday parties. please join me in welcoming justice lew and justice bader ginsburg. [cheers and applause] >> welcome everybody, thank you for being here on a saturday afternoon. thank you also to justice girnsburg, it's a busy time on the court, as june often is so thank you for spending time if us here. you're now finishing your 22nd term on the supreme court. a lot of people noticed that in recent years you have had quite a substantial public presence.
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you have a huge fan base everywhere you go. people call you a rock star, an icon. there's an emoticon that looks like you. there are t-shirts with the notorious r.b.g. name. some of the some of them also say i love r.b.g. and then there's my personal favorite which is, you can't spell truth without ruth. [cheers and applause] and then there are young women who have tattoos of your likeness.
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now that's love. that's real. i mean, all of this, i think, is unusual for a supreme court justice. justice scalia gets out a lot too, but i don't think there's anyone with a justice scalia tattoo, not even at the federalist society. so i want to just start by asking you, how did this happen? justice ginsburg: it's amazing. to think of me, an icon at 82. i owe it all to a law student who started a tumblr, the notorious r.b.g. and at first i didn't quite know what to make of this. i didn't even know who notorious b.i.g. was.
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when my law clerks explained to me you two have something in common. you were both born and bred in brooklyn, new york. i should explain right away, a number of my feminist -- a criticism a number of my feminist friends have raised. ginsburg comes before scalia alphabetically, why isn't it -- so why is it scaa ginsburg saddam lea was appointed some years before gins -- scalia was appointed some years before ginsburg. justice liu: there's going to be
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a buy og of fi called "the notorious r.b.g." and there's a bio-pic coming too. are you in on these projects? justice ginsburg: i can't claim credit for notorious r.b.g. but i like it and so do my grandchildren. "on the basis of sex," that's what the biopic is called, i have a nephew who is a script writer and he asked if he could write a script about a case in which marty and i were involved in 1971. and i said, yes, you would like to spend your time doing that
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that's -- he finds it interesting. i hope it will be paired as the turning point case in the supreme court. the case was charles e. moss, commissioner of internal revenue, charles e. moss was a man who took guide care of his mother, though she was 93 at the time, we argued the case in the 10th circuit. this is his story. there was a business deduction apublic to believe a woman or a divorced man. it covered elder care. charles e. moss didn't get the deduction because he was a married man. he appeared pro se in the tax
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court and his brief wascism policity. if i were a dutiful daughter, i would get this deduction. i'm a dutiful son. it makes no sense. one day, marty came into a room where i was working on away on something i was writing and he said, ruth, read this. i turned to him and i said, it's a a tax advance sheet, i don't read tax cases. he said read this one and told the story of charles and said let's take it. marty would write the tax part and i would write the constitutional law part. so a part of this is about the case and about our argument in the 10th circuit in denver. and then it includes the aclu and some women who were saying the same things that i was saying in the 1970's at a time when no one was prepared to
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listen. so dorothy kenyon had a role in this. i think if we're -- i think it will go into production in the beginning of 2016 and maybe by the end of the year it will be out. natalie portman came to talk to me about this and we had a very good conversation and one thing interesting that she insisted on, it held up the project for a while. she said i want the director to be a woman. there are not enough women in this industry, there are many talented out there. and now they do have a woman director. [cheers and applause] >> we look forward to it. -- justice liu: you mention marty. he's been mentioned many times. let me take you back a little bit. for many years i think, you've been described as shy and
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reserved. especially compared to your gregarious and very loving husband marty, who was, as kelsey said, an outstanding chef and always very quick with a joke. some people called him a serial wisecracker. but first of all, do you think marty would be surprised at your celebrity today? justice ginsburg: i think he would be delighted. he was always my biggest booster. justice liu: i saw a picture of you and marty in fort sill, which was not long after you were marry. you met marty in your first year of college at cornell, is that right? you said in the past he was the first boy you ever dated who cared that you had a brain. justice ginsburg: i like -- yes. justice liu: i like that.
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and you had two kids and a two-career marriage two lawyer in fact, which was unusual at the time. can you describe a little about that period and what kind of social pressures you faced with respect to your marriage you family life, and your career? justice ginsburg: the big change in the time from my first child jane born in 1955, and the second one james, in 1965, when jane was small there were very few women who worked outside the home. by the time james was born, it wasn't unusual to have a two-earner family. and what was it like? well, it's hard for today's students to imagine what the world was like for women not all that long ago. i think when i started law
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teaching in 1963, maybe 3% of the lawyers in america were women. there was no title 7 when i graduated from law school. so they didn't want any lady lawyers. they had a woman once and she was dreadful. i'll tell you santa day -- i'll tell you sandra day o'connor's story. she graduated from law school, top of her class, a few years ahead of me. she couldn't get a job. she volunteered to work for a county attorney and said, if you think i'm good enough, after four months, you can put me on the payroll. that's how she got her job. my first job was as a district court, federal district court law clerk. how did i get that job? jerry was in charge of
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clerkships. he called every judge on the second circuit, every judge in the eastern district and the southern district of new york. the answer was, well we might take a chance on a woman but we can't risk a mother, her daughter is 4 years old. so jerry called judge andy palmieri, who always took his clerks from colombia -- from columbia law school. and the judge explained well, her record is good but sometimes we work on saturdays, even on a sunday. how would i count on her? jerry said, give her a chance and if she doesn't work out, then there's a young man in her class who will leave his wall street law firm and accept the clerkship. so that's the carrot.
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then there's the stick. the stick was if you don't give her a chance, i will never recommend another columbia law student to you. i got that and all the women of my generation, when you got the job, you did it as well, probably better than anyone else so the second job wasn't hard but opening that first door was difficult. justice liu: now, of course, you have had many clerks yourself who were parents at the time. is that right? is that unusual at the court today, do you think? justice ginsburg: not today. i have had a number of clerks with two children. the first i hired who was a primary custodian of his children was a man. david post who is now teaching at temple law school.
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in his application he explained he was going to georgetown at night, his wife was an economist, i think for the international monetary fund or the world bank, and so she had a full-time day job he took care of the children during the day. so that was a dream fathers who care about children as much as mothers. there was something else about him that made him irresistible. his writing sample was not just a usual brief. it was his first year writing essay and it was on the theory of contract as played out in wagner's ring cycle.
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[laughter] justice liu: so -- that's actually a good segue to next question. you seem -- you've seen lots of change and transformations from the time -- since the time you co-founded the aclu women's rights project in 19 2, four decades later until today. because of the work you did there, we now have the elimination of most overt forms of gender discrimination. from your vantage point, what do you think are the most pressing challenges left now for gender equality? justice ginsburg: i don't think the meaning of feminism has changed. it has always been that girls
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should have the same opportunity to dream, to aspire, and achieve, to do whatever their god-given talents enable them to do as boys. and that there should be no place where there isn't a welcome mat for women. people misunderstand what feminism is. i know in some quarters it's called the f word. but that's what it's all about women and men working together should help make the society a better place than it is now. [cheers and applause] justice liu: current challenges?
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justice ginsburg: as you said, goodwin, all the overt things are gone there are a couple that the supreme court has left standing and that's unfortunate. but for the most part the parts of society that were riddled with sexism have changed. there was legislation and other changes to push that along. what is left, what is harder to get by is unconscious bias. sometimes there is a technique to overcome unconscious bias. my example is the symphony.
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so they had the idea to drop a curtain so the people judging didn't know if it was a woman or man. and with that, almost overnight women started to show up in symphony orchestras in numbers. i was telling this story last summer at the castleton festival and a young violinist said to me, you left one thing out. he said, not only do we audition behind a curtain but we audition shoeless. that can't be duplicated in every area but it's hard to get at. my favorite case in that line was a title 7 case from the 1970's the lawyer was my colleague at columbia harriet
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grant. it was against at&t for not promoting women to middle management jobs. there were several criteria that women did at least as well up until the last test and that was called the total person test. it consisted of an interviewer meeting the candidate and then doing an evaluation. women flunked disproportionately at that stage. and why? because the person conducting the interview was generally a white male and anyone who was different made the interviewer feel slightly uncomfortable. so if a person looked like him he was comfortable. but with a member of a minority group, or a woman, they were
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strangers. and it wasn't a case of i'm deliberately setting out to avoid promoting women. it wasn't that at all. it was unconscious bias. that operated. justice liu: you now sit on a court with three women on it. i actually sit on a court that has a majority of women on it including a woman as chief justice. do you think that the law would be much different if there were say, four or five women on the u.s. supreme court? justice ginsburg: i think it's pretty good that we have three there. three makes a big difference because we're all over the bench. i'm on the middle because i've been around so long. justice kay began is at my left. justice sotomayor at my right. if any of you have come to watch the show at the court, you know
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that my newest colleagues are not shrinking violates. they're very active. -- violets. they're very active in questioning. i've often quoted what gene koren from the minnesota court said, at the end of the day, a wise old man and a wise old woman will reach the same decision. but there are some cases that i think would have come out the other way if there were five women or more. and one of them is lily led better's case. every woman understood lily's problem. whether it's the carhart case. two cases involving children whose parents were not married they could become citizens if
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their mother was a u.s. citizen but not if the father. the supreme court was wrong about that twice. so i think it's fair to predict that the result would have been different. but for the most part in the years that david suter and i serve on -- david souter and i served on the court together we were more alike than any two other justices, even more than justice thomas and justice scalia. justice liu: i look forward to the souter-ginsburg opera. a couple of months ago you appeared on "time" magazine's 100 most influential people in the world list that's quite an honor. we have some pictures of that.
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you should see the lovely picture they have of you from the first year at cornell, it's a beautiful picture. the inscription that accompanied your listing was written by your colleague, justice scalia, who said this, i quote, ruth bader ginsburg has had two distinguished legal careers either one of which alone entitle her to be one of "time's" 100. one, of course, is your career as a judge, first on the d.c. circuit and now of course on the supreme court. the other is your earlier career as a professor and lawyer. so i guess i'll ask you, what did you learn from your experience as a lawyer that prepared you for your role as a judge? justice ginsburg: the importance of having a sense of humor. and some advice i told many audiences, it was the advice that my mother-in-law gave to me on our wedding day, marty and i were married in the home in
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which he had grown up and his mother said, dear, i'd like to tell you the secret of a happy marriage. and that is, it helps sometimes to be a little hard of hearing. [cheers and applause] and i find that such good advice. marty was a very funny fellow but in dealing with my colleagues even. [laughter] justice liu: you were nominated for the supreme court in june of 1993, to fill the seat vacated by justice byron white.
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some pictures of that. and you were confirmed by the senate exactly 57 days later on august 10, 1993, by a vote of 96-3. must have been nice. i'm just saying. [laughter] anyway. other than the happy outcome what do you consider the most memorable part of your confirmation process? justice ginsburg: the bipartisan spirit that existed in that congress probably my biggest supporter was orrin hatch. my biggest problem well, the white house, preparing me for the confirmation process they
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would put questions like, you were on the aclu board in the year so and so. and that year they passed resolution x. how did you vote and would you defend that position today? and my answer was stop, there is nothing that you can do to persuade me to bad mouth the aclu. i think they are a vital institution of our society. and then, and this would never happen today but not a single question was raised about my aclu connection. justice breyer was similarly fortunate the next year. how did we get back to that? i don't know what the magic would be. i was the beneficiary of what
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had happened in the clarence thomas nomination. so the committee was embarrassed. they had no women for the thomas nomination so they added two for mine. and they had a meeting with the committee before the public hearing. it was supposed to be anything bad on my record they could bring out and i'd have a chance to answer before we went public. in all my records nothing in the f.b.i. files was questionable. so they said tell us what you think we should do to improve the confirmation process. at that point, i hadn't yet been confirmed so i was somewhat hesitant. i still have, to this day a supply of strom thurmond key
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chains that he gave me, voted against me when i was nominated for the d.c. circuit but he was in my corner for the supreme court nomination. justice liu: so since being on the bench on the u.s. supreme court, you've been a very vigorous voice on a whole range of equal protection cases, not only sex discrimination but in the racial discrimination area most recently in the shell bowe -- shelby county case you had a very lively dissent about the voting rights act. i want to ask you, you at times compared the interesting progress that's been made so rapidly on questions of discrimination based on sexual
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orientation, contrasting that with our more enduring difficulties with racial inequality. what do you think explains the difference in how sticky the issue of racial inequality has been? justice ginsburg: i think that when gay people began to stand up and say this is who i am, when ha happened, people looked around and -- when that happened, people looked around and it was my next door neighbor of whom i was very fond my child's best friend, even my child. they were people who belonged to our community. it wasn't, still today, there is a high degree of segfwation in living patterns in the united states -- segregation in living patterns in the united states
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new york schools. so i think it's the difference -- in the united states, in schools. so i think it's the difference when it comes to race, for gay people, once we find out they are people we know and we love and we respect and they are part of us, i think that's accounts for the difference. during the years when gay people hid who they were there was a kind of discrimination that started to break down very rapidly once they no longer hid in the corner. justice liu: can you tell us what went into your thought process on the voting rights case? that was a much-quoted dissent your famous line about throwing
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an umbrella away in the rainstorm because you're in the getting wet. tell us about your thinking process in that case. justice ginsburg: it was very much, the view that i had of a school segregation case some years before. i think it was -- it was about jefferson county, kentucky, that for years and years had been under a federal court decree to desegregate. and then the court said, now the county is up to speed they don't have to be under the thumb of the federal judge anymore, so i'm going to dissolve the injunction. the people in that county said, we liked the plan that was kept in place by the injunction. we would like to keep it.
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and the supreme court said no you can't, because that's deliberate discrimination on the basis of race. in the shelby county case it was one of the most successful pieces of legislation congress ever passed and passed by overwhelming majorities on both sides of the aisle. the voting rights act, i think, most of you know, worked this way. if you had had a bad record of keeping people from voting, then any change you made in the system had to be precleared either by a three-judge district court in the district of columbia or by the attorney general. it was a mechanism to get out. if you showed you had a clean record for x number of years you could bail out. and you could bail out on a county by county basis, you didn't have to wait until the whole state was up to speed.
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they had a built in mechanism for getting out. the supreme court held that the coverage formula was outdated. that from 1965 until 2000, states had changed so congress had to redo the form lafment but practically, what senator or what representative is going to stand up and say my state or my county still discriminates? it was impossible. it was impossible to come up with a new formula for that reason. and yet there was the bailout mechanism that would work when they had been -- when there had been a genuine change. politically, it wasn't impossible to do the kind of revision that was needed and so this most successful piece of
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legislation is largely inoperative. justice liu: you've written a number of memorable dissents in recent years. you wrote a separate opinion in the affordable care act case, the personal clause, you wrote a vigorous defense in the hobby lobby case and ledbetter as well, which congress listened to and acted on. we talked about carhart, the abortion case, and then title 7 cases like the ball state case about who is a supervisor under title 7. so i think you may know that "saturday night live" recently did a couple of skits about you on their "weekend update." this is slide nine if you could show them. the comedian, kate mckinnon, plays you as a hip, sassy judge, dishing out these feisty
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one-liners and then dancing after every one. i'm not going to ask you to dance for us. but feel free to bring it if you -- if you've got it today. what i really want to ask is, how do you go about writing your dissents in terms of tone and style? your tone is actually not sassy. it's respectful. but it also makes a point. how do you think about the right balance? we have a lot of colorful writing from the supreme court which spans a broad range of sfiles. how do you think about yours? justice ginsburg: when it's time and i'm on the dissent side i try to have the dissent drafted before i get the majority opinion. that i way i don't get trapped
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into writing not so, not system of i tell the story affirmatively. and the biggest putdown i have for the court's opinion is to deal with it in footnotes. you'll remember from your time clerking for me, it was quite a term, that was the year of bush v. gore. all this business began that year. people said, i dissent. people were struck that i didn't say i respectfully dissent. i never say respectfully dissent. think of my colleagues who have just criticized the court's opinion, from stevens, profoundly misguide. or from scalia opinion is not to be taken seriously. then after you say that, you show no respect at all.
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so i never used respectfully. i would say i dissent or more often, for the reasons stated, i would affirm the decision of the court of appeals or if it came out the other way, reverse the decision. justice liu: now because of your seniority on the court you have the assignment power, both in majority opinions when you happen to be senior and in dissenting opinions when you happen to be senior. what goes into your thought process? justice ginsburg: we're not majorities yet. when we split 5-4 i generally decide it. i succeeded to the role that john paul stevens had when you were chloricing for me. -- clerking for me. i think there's a consensus in the case of health care, hobby lobby, shelby county, that as the most senior person on the
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dissent side, i should write the dissent. for the rest, i try to be as fair as i can, to distribute them evenly and there's been much grumbling from my colleagues about that. justice liu: when you think about your two decades now on the supreme court, do you think there are things that you feel more sure footed about today than you did when you first began? justice ginsburg: well i was a new judge, i had been on the d.c. circuit for 13 years so i wasn't too quiet except the very first sitting in october. i asked a lot of questions at oral argument. my then-chief, for whom i came to have great affection decided i had been a little smart alecy so at the end of the sitting, instead of giving me what is
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traditional for the junior justice, that is an easy unanimous decision he, gave me a most miserable erisa case, where the court divided 6-3. i went to the justice to complain i said, he's not supposed to do this, is he? he said -- they said ruth, just do it. just do it. get your opinion in circulation before he makes the next findings, otherwise you're likely to get another dull case. that was her attitude. whenever was put on her plate she just did it. that was the beginning of my relationship with the old chief and in that first year, it was interesting that you mentioned the supervisor case in my first year on the bench, the question
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was, there are no supervisors and they are therefore unable to organize under the nlrb. i said of course they are employees, not supervisors. but that was the fore people. coming around the other way now, it's very hard to be a supervisor under the bench decision. justice liu: you mentioned justice o'connor. when you arrived at the court in 1993, you were only the second woman ever to serve on the highest court. your colleague justice o'connor was appointed by president reagan 12 years earlier. when you think back to that time
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and your experience for 22 years, working with a very wide range of colleagues, what do you think you learned about the art of persuasion? is it possible to persuade one's colleagues? and if, how? i'm really interested. justice ginsburg: possible, yes. is it something that happens often? no. i can remember one dissent, john paul stevens assigned to me, dissent came around, the vote at conference was 7-2. he the opinion came out 6-3. but the two had swelled to six. now that was some heady experience. turning the dissent into a comfortable majority opinion. we're trying to persuade each other all the time.
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so if a conference vote is one way, you try to write your position as persuasively as you can and hope to be able to peel off one or another vote. but most of the time that doesn't happen. do we try? yes, we do. i can say with assurance up to this very term, when people it's closely divided, the author of the majority or the dissent is trying to pick up one more vote. justice liu: in your experience how does that persuasion happen? is it on paper? or in person? or how do the justices -- apart from sitting around the conference table which happens after argument. justice ginsburg: it is largely on paper. read my dissent. read it carefully. you should be persuaded by it.
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[laughter] there's no vote trading, there's no if you side with me in this case i'll side with you -- that never happens. justice liu: we mentioned chief justice rehnquist a couple of times. it's well known you have a warm relationship with justice scalia as kind of an interesting polar opposite. but it's perhaps less well known that you also had a very warm relationship with chief justice rehnquist, who among other things took the meaningful step of assigning you the v.m.i. decision and eventually himself wrote the majority decision in the hitt case for the provision of the fmla. can you describe your relationship with chief justice rehnquist? how did the two of you have such good chemistry? justice ginsburg: i would say it's cool at first.
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but sandra and i were talking about what to do about the ladies room. the court is a very traditional institution, so it was the ladies' dining room. we came to him, we would like to rename it the natalie cornell rehnquist dining room. he had a very happy marriage, his wife sadly died. he couldn't resist that it be renamed for her. he had seen her suffering from cancer. the year that i had my first bout with cancer, he could not have been more supportive. after the surgery, he called me into his chamber and he said, ruth, i'll give you something light for this assignment.
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i said no, not this one, i'm ok now. wait until the chemotherapy and radiation start, then i'd like to be kept light. he said which case do you want? he said, that's the one i was going to assign to myself. but he assigned it to me. then i watched his relationship with his granddaughters, when his daughter janet, who had been divorced, he was kind of a substitute father to those girls. he wanted them to keep in tune with their swedish heritage. he would take them to the festival at the swedish ambassador'sres. debs dense. and they -- residence. and they loved him dearly. that was a side of him a lot of people didn't see. so i consider me -- the chief in
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mid passage. i brought home the decision in family and medical leave act, i brought home the decision and marty said, did you write this? but it was the chief. justice liu: so when you think back cross these couple decades, what do you think is the biggest changes you've seen in the court, whether it's public perceptions of the court, the lawyers who appear before you or the nature of the docket what do you think are the biggest transformations? justice ginsburg: right now the public -- has anything to do with government so the supreme court has slipped but not really as much as congress -- as congress has. [laughter] justice liu: that's an understatement. justice ginsburg: the big change in the court composition came not when we had a new
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chief but when justice o'connor left us. and i have said many times that the year that she left, every time i was among four rather than five, i would have been five four if she remained with us. she was a big loss in many ways. justice liu: met me ask you sort of another big picture question about your approach to judging. i think many observers -- and we're now seeing some books being written about your corpus of work -- many people described your approach to judging as incrementalist. and indeed at your confirmation hearing, here's what you said. isn't it terrible people quote your confirmation hearing back to you? [laughter] justice liu: in your case it's very, very -- it's very good. you said, my approach -- this
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is you -- is neither liberal nor conservative. rather, it's rooted in the place of the judiciary of judges, in our democratic society. so in other occasions you have spoken out against judicial activism noting that current court is the most activist in history in terms of willingness to overturn legislation. you've written long ago that roe vs. wade perhaps went too far too fast. in contrast to the step by step approach that characterized much of your litigation approach as a lawyer. so i just want to ask, have your views about gradualism changed at all in the course of your two decades on the supreme court or has it reinforced your sense that gradualism is the right approach? justice ginsburg: i don't know if i would use the word gradualism.
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i do think it's healthy for our system if the court and the congress can be in dialogue. i think of some great examples of that. when the court in the 1970's said discrimination on the basis of pregnancy is not discrimination on the basis of sex, there was a coalition formed to pass the pregnancy discrimination act. people from all parts of the political spectrum were on board with that and that was repeated again with lilly ledbetter. if it caused a statutory determination there could be a healthy back and forth between the supreme court and the political branches.
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let me put it this way the court is not in a popularity contest and it should not be influenced by today's headlines, by the weather of today, but as paul said, inevitably it will be affected by the climate of the era. i think that's part of the explanation of why the gay rights movement has advanced to where it is today. the climate of the era. the court is really in front including brown v. board, which was social change. it was -- on behalf of the united states in that case said essentially we were fighting a war against racism and in that
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war until the very end our troops were rigidly segregated by race. a huge embarrassment and now the soviet union is pointing to the united states this apartheid racist society. it's an embarrassment. it's time for segregation of the racism in schools to end. that was the poss that the government was taken. made it easier for the justices, and yet it took them 13 years from brown v. board until loving v. virginia to declare it unconstitutional. they had lots of opportunities bethey waited until the climate of the era had largely changed. so the court can be important
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in reinforcing social change and it can hold it back as well. but it doesn't initiate change. justice liu: do you think that's in some tension with the conventional understanding of the court as a countermajoritarian institution, that the role of the court is supposed to be countermajoritarian? and yet some people would argue saying it's unrealistic for the court to be at the forefront even when individual rights are at stake. justice ginsburg: it should be countermajoritarian. when the bill of rights says these are the rules that congress has to abide by so the court should be vigorous in enforcing the rights in the bill of rights and in the 14th
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amendment. the court is the guardian. the constitution makes the court the guardian of those rights. so yes, the court must be vigilant but we can't do what, say, a political party can do. here's our platform, this year we're going to try to get through this and that. we have to wait until -- it has to start with the people. if it doesn't start with the people it's not going to get to the court. so you have to have a concerned citizenry to help these rights. justice liu: let me take us out of the law for a second and ask you, as our time runs out here, who are your most important mentors in your life? justice ginsburg: who -- what women were my role models i say in my growing up years one was
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real and one was fictional. the real one was amelia earhart and the fictional one was nancy drew. [applause] justice ginsburg: but amelia -- in my college years, certainly law school, never had a woman teacher. people asked me, did you always want to be a supreme court justice? i wanted to get [inaudible] in the law. that was my goal. women weren't on the bench in numbers on the federal bench until jimmy carter became president. he deserves tremendous credit for that. he was in office only four years. he took a look at the federal judiciary and said, you know, they all kind of look like me, but he was determined to appoint members of minority
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groups and women in numbers, not as one at a time curiosities. at least 25 women to federal district courts and i was one of the lucky 11 appointed to a court of appeals during his time. if he said in october of 1980 when he had a reception for the women he had appointed to the federal bench even though he had no supreme court vacancy to fill he hoped he would be remembered for how he changed the complexion of the u.s. judiciary. and no president went back to old ways. president reagan determined to put the first woman on the supreme court. justice liu: as you reflect on the entirety of your life and career, what do you think -- what aspects or events have
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given you the greatest personal satisfaction? justice ginsburg: i was tremendously fortunate to be born when i was, to be a lawyer with the skill in the 1970's to help move that progress and society along. if i had been born even 10 years earlier it would have been impossible. in the turning point brief we put on a cover of that brief the names of two women, paul even mary was one and -- what's the one i already mentioned? the one who was concerned with putting women on juries. all over the country. we put their names on the briefs to say they kept the
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message alive even when people were not prepared to listen. and we owe them a tremendous debt. how lucky we are. just think of the quote, the first case, it comes out unanimous judgment and most of the others came out the right way in the 1970's. so i count myself enormously fortunate to be around when it was possible. to move society to the place where it should be, for the
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betterment of all of us. everyone is a beneficiary of ending gender discrimination. women, men, like charles morris. children. justice rehnquist, this is a story of a man whose life died in childbirth. he was left the sole caretaker of the child, wanted social security benefits that would help him be able to work only part time while his child was young. those benefits were for mothers, not fathers. so the court decided that case, i think it was in 1975. it was a unanimous judgment. one, discrimination against the women as wage earner. her social security taxes don't get for her family the same protection. and then a few of them thought it was really discrimination against the male as parent. he would not have the opportunity to render personal care to his child. and then rehnquist all along said totally arbitrary from the point of view of the baby.
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why should the baby have the chance to be cared for by a parent only if the parent is female and not male? but it's that realization that we will all be better off if we end the discrimination, if we end the era of women for the home and children and men are for the outside world. both should be in both worlds. justice liu: well -- [applause] justice liu: before we go, let me say on behalf of everyone here i think we are all enormously fortunate that you've lived the life that you have and been such a tremendous inspiration to so many generations and we look forward to what's still to come. thank you so much. [applause]
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[captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2015] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] >> the u.s. house is going to gavel in in about 45 minutes at 4:00 p.m. eastern. the seven suspension bills on the agenda in the house including one urging the country of iraq -- iran to release three u.s. citizens being held in that country. votes today after 6:30. now also possible later this week a revote on the trade adjustment assistance or t.a.a. that could come tomorrow, and laura barron lopez of the huffington post tweets out that
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president will be speaking with house speaker john boehner on trade. white house chief of staff clatted with nancy pelosi earlier today about trade. again, that revote on trade adjustment assistance could come tomorrow. see live coverage of the house when they gavel in here today at 4:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. and we are live now on the campus of miami-dade college for more "road to the white house college." today, former florida governor jeb bush expected to make an official announcement of his candidacy. here it should get under way in just a moment. [singing in spanish] ♪
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♪ >> thank you. thank you. this next song was made famous by another very famous group of siblings even though they were not from miami. they ended up making miami their home. i don't know if you ever heard of them, the bee gees. we love to sing this song. we are going to do our little version for you. >> ♪ but the heartache lives on
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>> ♪ it's over and done but the heartache lives on inside and who's the one you're clinging to instead of me tonight? and where you are now now that i need you tears on my pillow wherever you go i'll cry me a river that leads to your ocean you never see me fall apart ♪ ♪ in the words of a broken heart it's just emotion that's taken me over tied up in sorrow, lost in my soul but if you don't come back come home to me darling you know that there will' be nobody left in this world to
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hold me tonight nobody left in this world to kiss good night good night good night ♪ ♪ you're there in my heart and the part of all the things you are but you've got a part of someone else you've got to find your shining star ♪ ♪ and where are you now now that i need you? tears on my pillow wherever you go and cry me a river that leads to your ocean you infer see me fall apart ♪ ♪ in the words of a broken heart it's just emotion taken me over tied up in sorrow, lost in my
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soul and if you don't come back come home to me, darling don't you know that nobody left in this world to hold me tight nobody left in this world to kiss good night good night good night good night ♪ [applause] >> all right. ladies and gentlemen, well it is our privilege, our honor and our pleasure to introduce our parents, willie chirino and lizette.
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>> good afternoon. ♪ o say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed
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at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ o say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
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o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave ♪ [applause] >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. we are very happy to be here today. my name is willy chirono. >> and my name is lisette, our daughters. the chirino sisters. >> and we are cuban americans. we were born in cuba and we came to the united states through the pedro pan project.
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>> 14,000 kids. we left without our parents to come here looking for freedom. >> as a matter of fact senator martinez was one of those 14,000 cubans. we're celebrating freedom. we celebrate the fact that we live in a country that every four years the people has a chance to choose who is the person that's going to lead this country, this nation for the next four years. that doesn't happen anywhere. in our native cuba that opportunity hasn't arrived in the last 55 years so let's celebrate freedom tonight. let's enjoy the fact that we live in this country and let's not take that for granted. >> god bless the united states of america. >> god bless america. [applause] >> thank you.
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>> please welcome to the stage dr. r.b. holmes. >> jeb! jeb! jeb! dr. holmes: let us pray. eternal god, we are thankful for this country. we're thankful for this place, this event. we ask that you bless this country and bless jeb bush and his family. let your peace be with us. we give you glory and honor. in your name lord, jesus, we
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pray, amen. [applause] let me -- let me tell you about the jeb bush that i know and the jeb bush that i admire and respect very much. he is a dear friend. i have known him for over 20-plus years. he is fair, he is fort right and thoughtful. -- forth right and thoughtful. jeb is a person who truly cares about all people. jeb is a person who does not judge people or label people or marginalize people. he respects people for who they are and what they can become. as one of the most successful governors in this great state
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of florida -- [applause] dr. holmes: i had the honor of working with governor bush. i was able to see his strengths , his skills and his gifts. i was highly impressed with his good heart sincerity and humility. it is the because of these attributes that i am able to call jeb a beloved brother and friend. [applause] jeb bush -- jeb bush is a man of character. jeb bush is a man of deep conviction courage and compassion. jeb bush is a leader.
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[applause] jeb bush is a good listener. jeb bush is a visionarian. he's proud of his family. he's proud of this country. jeb bush believes in the power of personal responsibility. jeb bush believes in strong families. jeb bush believes in the power of faith. let -- let me make it very clear. governor jeb bush will be a great president of the united states of america.
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my friend -- my friends -- my friends, experience does matter . vision is necessary. and proven leadership is important. may god bless this country and may god bless jeb bush and his family! [applause]
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>> my mom, my brother and my uncle all dropped out of school. by the time i was in the third grade i failed twice. >> my first job was picking up garbage and hard work so i could have money to help feed my family -- my mother, my father. >> lucy has you a simple. she doesn't speak. she doesn't walk but not being able to speak is not having any sense of faith. people with disabilities want to be like everybody else. >> one out of four women will be hurt by someone that claims to love them. domestic violence is an epidemic. this is not a small problem. >> the barriers right now on people rising up is the great challenge of our time. so many people could do so much
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better if we fixed a few things. my core beliefs start with a premise that the most vulnerable in our society should be in the front of the line, not the back. as governor i had a chance to act on that core belief. >> governor jeb bush instituted the first voucher program in the united states to give low-income kids an opportunity to go to a private school. out of my immediate family i am the first person to graduate high school and then i went on to graduate from college. >> currently an account manager and the main reason i'm in the position i am right now because jeb bush allowed companies like goy foods of florida to grow, create high-paying jobs. i'm the perfect person for the american dream. >> it's not just about yapping about things. there's a lot of people talking and they're pretty good at it. we need to start fixing things. i said i was going to do these things and i did them.
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the result was florida's a lot better off. >> i think governor bush changed a lot of lives in florida. i'm very grateful that he was our governor. i don't think that we would be where we are today with regards to domestic violence had he not been the governor. he wanted women to not live the way that i found myself. it's changed so many lives. he really cares about us. he -- >> he really cares about us. he really cares about people with developmental disabilities. there are a lot of people today getting services because of what jeb did. he does not do it for himself. he does it because he's a true servant. he's the best voice that we can have. >> i'm proud of the fact that many families now have a chance to live lives of purpose and meaning. you can improve the life of people, whether it's in the programs for the developmentally disabled or changing our economy or fixing our higher education system. all of these things can be fixed. i'm absolutely convinced of it.
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what we need is new leadership that takes conservative principles and applies them so people can rise up. america's best days are in front of us and we are going to lead the world. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome birthie dela rosa. -- de la rosa. >> buenas tardes! are you excited? are you ready for jeb? wonderful. i am a proud naturalized u.s. citizen born in baranquilla colombia. in 1998 when i met my good friend jeb bush i thought he
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was going to be like every other politics, you know the tide that promise but never delivers. but jeb is different. he actually delivered. i'm a proud mom with three children. they're here with my husband, my 95-year-old mother, my brother. so my youngest daughter, luz, who's sitting there today we call her lucy. she has been my greatest teacher and she has been the greatest teachers of other people too. she has significant developmental disabilities. lucy can't walk. she can't talk. and she needs a lot of support. but thanks to a lot of people, some of them here with us today, lucy is able to live
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with us. so thank you, ladies. [applause] berthy: lucy has taught us not being able to speak is not the same thing as not having anything to say or as we say in spanish -- even though she can't speak, she has a lot to say. so when i met jeb for the first time i challenged him to get to understand our life, our struggles, our needs and our fears. and it was incredible because he didn't flinch. he said i want to learn. and he actually did. it was amazing. we took time and we visited group homes, we visited families, we visited schools. and when jeb met lucy it was special. because even though lucy couldn't speak jeb understood
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her loud and clear. it was amazing. so when he got elected, guess what happened? he became the voice. he became the voice for lucy and for others like lucy, for the lucys. [applause] berthy: thank you. thank you. so he created scholarships for students with disabilities. he transformed the state services for our kids. he increased funding for in-home community services so our kids could live with us and he convinced it every single year. jeb was relentless. so i don't think that there has ever been a governor in florida or anywhere else, for that matter that has ever done what jeb did for us in florida.
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[applause] berthy: and let me tell you one more thing which is very important. jeb didn't care about politics. when i met him i told him i was not a republican. [laughter] berthy: and he told me, it's not about politics. it's about people. it's about family. [applause] berthy: he told me it was about people it was about families like ours, people like lucy. and i don't mind saying that there aren't a lot of politicses like jeb bush. he doesn't -- politicians like jeb bush. he doesn't care your political affiliation. he doesn't care the color of your skin. he doesn't care where you were born. he doesn't care whether you speak like everyone else or if you don't speak at all. so in espanol --
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speaking spanish] [applause] berthy: because he cares about everyone and he will serve everyone because jeb is a great servant. that's what he is, a servant. but he turned me into a believer. he turned me into a republican. [applause] berthy: because jeb bush is a man of his word. he has a great heart. he understands our needs. he will be a voice. jeb [speaking in spanish]
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and he will deliver. [applause] berthy: so in 2016, with jeb bush in the white house -- [applause] berthy: we are going to have a leader that will serve all americans. thank you. thank you. gracias. gracias. [speaking spanish]
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>> please welcome florida's first lieutenant female governor toni jennings. lieutenant governor jennings: he said my name but i'll tell you again just in case. i'm toni jennings and it's wonderful to see so many friends here. it looks like family. the bush family. the big bush family. like you i've known jeb a long time. some of you know i was senate president when he was governor
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and we worked together. and then i was his lieutenant governor. what an honor. what a privilege. what an adventure. some of you may not know that i've actually known jeb for over 30 years. i met him as a young, bright, rock rib, head banging conservative when governor martinez appointed him the secretary of commerce. and i just happened to chair the committee that did his confirmation. well i'll share with you that that head has a little more gray hair in it than when i first met him. but i'll tell you that heart is exactly the same jeb that i met. [applause] lieutenant governor jennings:
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he's a guy who can't wait to take on a bee hag. now, that's not an opponent. those of you that have worked with jeb knows what a bee hag is. it's a big hairy, audacious goal. yeah. and you know what, after all these years he's still as idealistic as the guy i met 30 years ago. he always believes we can do better. and he believes in accomplishing really big things. he doesn't lower his sights just because things might be tough. he knows that if you want to change things for the better you do it piece by piece, day by day every day at it and you are relentless. i've seen it up close, real close sometimes.
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i saw when he took on the cause of reforming education and how he changed florida's schools for the better. [applause] lieutenant governor jennings: i saw how he took on the tallahassee bureaucracy and chipped away at the size of state government. and -- [applause] yeah, that's a good one. and i saw it as he took on issue after issue. whether it was cutting taxes, which we did a lot of -- [applause] or establishing a voluntary prekindergarten program for every single one of florida's 4-year-olds. or fixing a broken workers' compensation system so florida businesses could expand and
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could grow. [applause] or this one i know you'll remember -- handling four hurricanes in 40 days in 2004. no one who was in florida in 2004 will ever forget that. and i saw that his commitment was constant. he worked hard at it and he worked hard at it every single day. and you know smells else he was, he was relentless. you're going to hear this again. whenever jeb takes on an issue, he never backs away, even if it looks tough, even if it looks like it might be impossible. you saw a little bit of it in this video, but it was so vivid to me when he took on the issue
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of domestic violence in this state. and i will tell you -- [applause] when -- when you think about it, this is a crime that knows no boundaries. not race, not education not income. it is when someone who's supposed to love you does something to you often in your own home and does it repeatedly. well jeb said, we've got to do better and he took on this issue and he didn't just make a speech and hoped that things got better. he did something about it. he passed the family protection act and because of that -- [applause] yeah. and because of that we strengthened the penalty on those who would be convicted of domestic violence.
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we expanded and improved women shelters throughout florida. he increased the privacy protection so that abusive ex-partners could not use our own public records law to find their victims. and under his leadership and during the time he was in office the crime rate for domestic violence fell 27%. in the state of florida. [applause] now, that's a number that represents lives saved, that's a number that represents lives turned around. that's a number that represents lives given peace. all because jeb bush refused to believe that there was an issue too big to handle. that's how he is. that's how he will be. he refuses to settle for less than what he knows we all can do together. and that's the kind of leader we need in washington.
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[applause] that's the kind of leader we desperately need in this country and that's the kind of leader our nation is ready for. [applause] a conservative who is experienced. a conservative who inspires others. a conservative with a solid record of accomplishments and achievements, not just political rhetoric. and a conservative who still wants to take on those big hairy, audacious goals. so you know what, it will take all of us. it will take all of us working every day. it will take all of us being relentless to make sure that this is accomplished because that's jeb's style.
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that's what jeb delivers. and with your help jeb bush will be the next president of our united states. [applause] >> please welcome george p. bush.
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[applause] george p. bush: how you doing miami? last november i was privileged to be elected as the 28th land commissioner for the great state of texas. and two months later when i took the oath of office my dad stood with me. today it's my turn to stand with him. [applause] and i'm doing so not just because i'm here to support the kind of president that he will be but because the kind of man that he is. others -- others can speak to my father's record as governor or perhaps about his plans for the presidency, but i can speak to the character, to the judgment, to the temperament of the man i am blessed to call dad. my dad has given so many gifts to me, my brother jebby and
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my sister noel. first, my dad almost started going to mass with my mom and he decided to convert and become a member of the catholic church. faith and god organized his life. it gives him purpose and i know that faith has sustained him at all of his life's moments. the happy days and, yes, the difficult ones. my dad also taught us the importance of values. he knows who he is. he knows who he believes and if there's one thing he puts up there with his family and his faith, it's this -- we all have an obligation to serve others before we serve ourselves.
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that's why he ran for public office. that's why he worked so hard when he was governor, keeping those 16-hour days. that's why even after he left office he stayed on the cause of education reform. seeing him do so much for many others inspired me and so many countless others to think about how life can be more purposeful. it's why my first job out of college was as a school teacher in homestead, florida. it's why i stayed involved in the charter school movement in the great state of texas. it's why i joined the u.s. military as an officer. finally, my dad taught us about the importance of family. [speaking spanish]
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i'm so grateful for my dad for the example he has set for me and my siblings. he's always been there for others. his family, his kids, his grandkids. growing up i could always count on my dad giving me advice. sometimes whether i wanted it or not. [laughter] but what i appreciate the most about my dad is no matter where i go, no matter what i do he loves me with no conditions and no questions asked. my dad has always been there standing with me and now i'm
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proud to stand with him. [applause] ladies and gentlemen i'm proud to say that jeb bush is the greatest man i've ever known and he's going to make an excelent president of the united states of america. thank, y'all. [applause] >> we're going to cut away from miami. remind you right now you can go to c-span3 and watch former governor bush about to deliver his speech. we're about to take you in just a few moments over to the floor of the house. they're coming back in at 4:00 eastern. seven suspension bills on their agenda tonight. also, you can find governor bush's speech on our website at c-span.org.
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>> tonight on the communicators. austin meyer. nutrition founder zander and representative hank johnson talking about patent legislation before congress. >> 97% of the people that are sued by patent trols have to settle because they don't have the $3 million to defend themselves. 97% of them settle. they pay an average of $300,000 to the patent troll that's suing them. now, they're locked up under a nondisclosure agreement which is a contract that says they are never allowed to tell anybody what happened to them. >> so far this new congress seems very excited to have legislation on the topic and we're going to speak to speak as many congressmen to discuss
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the issues and see what is the best way to help both entrepreneurs defend their products but more importantly be able to run their businesses. these demand letters would put our company at risk. [inaudible] mr. johnson: it's closing the door to those who create making it more difficult for them to actually use the courts to enforce their property rights. so that's the big divide -- the hurdle we have to overcome. >> tonight at 8:00 eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. >> and a reminder if you're looking for the jeb bush presidential announcement that right now can be watched, can be seen on c-span3. also on our website at c-span.org and we'll be playing that again after it's over
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later on throughout the evening on the c-span networks. the house a couple minutes away coming back in. in addition to suspension bills today, they should have a resolution, a bill urging iran to release three u.s. citizens being held in that country. we expect to hear about that and then votes today after 6:30. also possible as early as tomorrow a revote on that trade adjustment assistance, or t.a.a., bill that was defeated last week. that could come, we say, as early as tomorrow. speaking of tomorrow 11:00 a.m. it's donald trump in new york city making his announcement. we'll hear or won't he run for president in 2016. we'll have that live for you on c-span3 11:00 tomorrow morning. >> like many of us, first families take vacation time. and like presidents and first ladies, a good read can be the perfect companion for your summer journeys. what better book than one that peers inside the personal life
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of every first lady in american history? first ladies: presidential historians on the lives of 45 iconic women. inspiring stories of fascinating women who survived the scrutiny of the white house. a great summertime read. available from public affairs as a hard cover or an ebook, through your favorite bookstore or online bookseller. >> this summer "book tv" will cover book festivals around the country and top nonfiction authors and books. this weekend watch for the annual roosevelt reading festival when the franklin d. roosevelt library. and we're live at the harlem book fair, the flagship african-american literary event. at the beginning of september we're live from the nation's capital for the national book festival, celebrating its 15th year. and that's a few of the events this summer on c-span2's "book tv."
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>> house majority leader kevin mccarthy met with reporters earlier today on capitol hill. what's called a pen and pad. what he said, no decision has been made on a possible revote tomorrow on that t.a.a. bill. he also said the best option going forward in his view was for house democrats to quote, come to their senses and support t.a.a. in a revote. of course, should that come to the floor we'll have that for you as we always cover the house from gavel-to-gavel right here on c-span. coming back in just about a minute. >> the new congressional directory is a handy guide to the 114th congress with color photos of every senator and house member, plus bio and contact information and twitter handles. also, district maps, a foldout map of capitol hill and a look at congressional committees, the president's cabinet, federal agencies and state governors. order your copy today. it's $13.95 plus shipping and handling through the c-span
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online store at c-span.org. >> and the house about to gavel back in. seven suspension bills tonight including one that urges iran to release three u.s. citizens being held in that country. votes after 6:30 tonight and then a possible revote on that trade adjustment assistance act could come tomorrow. live coverage of the house right here on c-span.
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the speaker: the house will be in order. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered. the speaker pro tempore: or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. recorded votes on postponed questions will be taken later. for what purpose does the gentleman from arkansas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2131. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will read the title of the bill. the clerk: house calendar number 38, h.r. 2131, a bill to designate the federal building at united states courthouse located at 83 meetinging street in charleston, south carolina, as the j. waities waring judicial center. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arkansas, mr. crawford and the gentlewoman from texas, ms. eddie bernice
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johnson, will each crow -- will each control 20 minutes. mr. crawford: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 2131. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. crawford: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. crawford: thank you. judge waring wasorn in chleston south carolina in 1880, after becoming a lawyer he was in the private practical sis of -- practice of lawnd eventually served as corporation council for charleston, south carolina. in 1942, after serving as assistant u.s. attorney he was appointed by frnkn roosevelt to serve as the judge for the united states district court for the eastern district of south carolina during his tenure on the bench, judge waring's opinions had a significant impact on civil rights. for example, in the case of duvl vs. the school boardhe ruled that equal pay must be
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guaranteed for equally qualified school teaches, regardless of race, and his dissent in briggs vs. eliott separating that separate education alpha silts are inherently unequal, formed the legal foundation for the supreme court'decision in brown vs. board of education. this bill is supported by the entire south carona delegation. given judge waring's dedication to the law, it's fitting to name this federal building and courthouse after him. thank you and reserve the balae of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. ms. johnson: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i rise in support of this legislation. and yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. johnson: thank you. this bill is, ocour to name the u.s. courthouse in charleston, sou carolina after judge julius waties waring. during judge waring'time as a federal judge in the eastern district of south carolina he
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was a trail blazer in the pursuit of justice for african-americans. jud waring consistently ruled for african-american plaintiffs in cases involving voting rights unequal pay and civil rights. before judge waring was named to the federal bench, he served as assistant u.s. attorney and a corporation counsel for the city of charleston. he is most famously remembered for a 1951 landmark school segregation case. dge waring wrote in his dissent, on a three-judge panel, that racial segregation in public schools was per se unequality. he became the first federal judge to take that position. since the trial -- it was ruled separate but equal, in his defense he went further to denounce segregation as an evil that must be eradicated. his dissent is commonly
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understood to provide the intellectual underpinnings of the supreme court's schooling segregation in brown vs. education. before judge waring's decisions were considered controversial at the time. he endured threats of violence and was alienated from most of charleston. he retired from the federal bench and moved to new york where he later died. 50 years after his death this legislation, naming the federal courthouse in charleston in his honor, is appropriate because judge waring's courageous jish service in the face of -- judicial service in the face of fierce opposition to the bedrock american value of justice for all and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the
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balance of her time. ms. johnson: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. crawford: i continue to reserve. if you don't have any other speakers. johnson scrons johnson mr. speaker -- ms. johnson: mr. speaker, i have no additional requests for speaking but i would like to ask unanimous consent to place mr. clyburn's statement in the record. he was detained and could not get here. at that i will yield back my time. and ask for support. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, that request will be covered under general leave. the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman is recognized. mr. crawford: thank you, mr. speaker. again i would just urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2131 and would yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2131. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from muir seek recognition? >> mr. speaker i move to suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 2559. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 2559, a bill to designate the p.f.c. milton a. lee medal of honor memorial highway in the state of texas. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from missouri, mr. graves, and the gentlewoman from texas, ms. eddie bernice johnson, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you. i ask that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. graves: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd yield myself such time as i consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. graves: i rise in support of h.r. 2559 which names a segment of interstate 10
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between mile marker 535 and 545 in kendall county texas, after private first class milton a. lee. p.f.c. milton a. lee joined the arm iny in san antonio in 1967 as a member of the 101st army airborne division and served in vietnam as a radio telephone operator. p.f.c. lee was killed in action at the age of 19 and is buried at fort sam houston in san antonio. he was awarded the medal of honor for conspicuous gallantry in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. h.r. 2559 is supported by all the local elected officials, community leaders, veterans organizations and i would urge my colleagues to support h.r. 2559. with that i'd reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from texas. ms. johnson: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of h.r. 2559 and yield myself such time as i may cufmente the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized -- as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized.
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ms. johnson: this designates a 10-mile segment of interstate 10 between mile post 535 and 545 in kendall county, texas, as the p.f.c. milton a. lee medal of honor memorial highway. i'm pleased to be a co-sponsor of this bill, along with my colleagues from texas. private lee was a hero who tragically lost his life at the age of 19 while fighting for his country in vietnam. milton a. lee was born february 28, 1949, in shreveport, louisiana. he later moved to texas and attended high school in san antonio before enlisting in the army. the actions preceding his death were nothing short of heroic. while serving as a radio operator with the third platoon company b, platt toon was surprised by -- platoon, -- the platoon was surprised by enemy
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fire. he gave life-saving first aid to his wounded fellow soldiers. as the platoon was advancing to reorganize, private lee noticed four hidden north vietnamese soldiers with automatic weapons. and a rocket launcher ready to attack the lead element of the platoon. he selflessly charged through the enemy fire and overran their position. killing the attackers and capturing their weapons. his actions saved the lives of his fellow soldiers and were instrumental in the destruction of the key position of the enemy defense. private lee died, april 26, 1968. he was awarded the medal of honor in 1970 for his gallantry at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. mr. speaker i am pleased that we can come to the floor of the house today and celebrate this young man's courage and conviction by naming a portion
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of interstate 10 in the honor -- this bill in his honor, this bill is a fitting tribute. before i close, i'd like to remind my colleagues that there are only 23 legislative days left before highway and transit program authorizations expire. here we are again on the brink of yet another extension. in the middle of the summer construction season. i strongly urge my colleagues to take up the charge to restore our nation's infrastructure. if we do not act quickly, we will soon not have any miles of road left worthy of naming after any great american. i support this bill and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman is recognized. mr. graves: thank you, mr. chairman. at this point i would like to -- or, mr. speaker at this point i would like to yield such time as he may consume to my good friend, the gentleman from texas, mr. smith. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: thank you, mr. speaker.
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i'd like to thank my friend and colleague from missouri, representative graves, for yielding me time. mr. speaker it is a privilege to recognize veteran patriot and medal of honor recipient, milton a. lee today. earlier this year i introduced h.r. 2559 which designates a portion of interstate highway 10 in bernie texas as p.f.c. milton a. lee medal of honor highway. p.f.c. lee was born on february 28, 1949, in shreveport, louisiana. while he was not born in texas, lee entered the army in san antonio, served honorably in the vietnam war, and is laid to rest at fort sam houston, which is located in my district. p.f.c. lee served as a radio telephone operator with the third platoon, company b, during an intense surprise hostile attack by north vietnamese army fighters. the third platoon maneuvered to position of cover to treat their wounded and reorganize. meanwhile, p.f.c. lee moved through the heavy enemy fire to
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give life-saving first aid to his fellow wounded soldiers. during the assault, p.f.c. lee continually kept close radio contact with the company commander and relaid precise and understandable information to his platoon leader. while advancing toward the objective p.f.c. lee observed four north vietnamese solders with automatic weapons and a rocket launcher lying in wait for his platoon. p.f.c. lee immediately and with great risk to his own personal safety passed his radio to another soldier and charge through the barrage of fire -- clarged through the barrage of fire -- charged through the barrage of fire. he successfully overran the enemy position, killing all occupants and capturing four automatic weapons and a rocket launcher. p.f.c. lee continued his one-man assault on another enemy position through a heavy barrage of enemy automatic weapons fire. although wounded, he continued to press the attack and crawled forward into a firing position
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to deliver accurate cover fire for his platoon. . not until the position was overrun did p.f.c. lee steady in the fire and succumb to his wounds. p.f.c. lee's heroic actions saved the lives of many in his platoon and was instrumental in the key position of the enemy's defense. p.f.c. lee's gallantry at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty epitomizes the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on himself, the 502nd infantry and the u.s. army. so today i urge my colleagues to support this bill and honor of an american hero. in giving his life for our country in such a selfless and heroic fashion, p.f.c. lee is deserving of our naming of portion of a federal highway in his honor. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from missouri is recognized.
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>> i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from texas is recognized. ms. johnson: mr. speaker, i have no requests for time. i'd yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with that i'd like to urge my colleagues to support this bill. i think it's very fitting what we're trying to do here and i'd yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 2559. those in favor say aye. ms. johnson: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative -- ms. johnson: mr. speaker, i'd like to request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule
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20, further proceedings on this question will be postponed. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. royce: i move the house suspend the rules and pass house resolution 233. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 233. resolution expressing the sense of the house of representatives that iran should immediately
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release the three united states citizens that it holds, as well as provide all known information on any united states citizens that have disappeared within its borders. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from california, mr. royce, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. royce: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to include extraneous material on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. royce: thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm going to yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, today we consider this house resolution expensing the sense of the house of representatives that iran should immediately release all detained u.s. citizens as well as provide all known information on any u.s. citizens that have disappeared within the borders of iran. as always, i appreciate the support of the ranking member, mr. engel of new york, in bringing this resolution to the
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floor, and i also want to acknowledge the author of this measure, congressman kildee of michigan as well as those members who continue to stress how important it is that this body speak out on this issue. these citizens need to be allowed to come home now. these are u.s. citizens. in particular, i wanted to thank mr. deutch who is with us today, a senior member of our committee and he's been consistently focused for many years on the case of his missing constituent. two weeks ago the foreign affairs committee held a hearing at which the family members of four americans three in prison, and one missing in iran for eight years testified. this was the first time all four of the families came together for such a hearing. we heard and saw the excruciating pain that they are living with day in and day out not knowing if and when they will see their husband or their
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father or their brother again. each of these tragic cases underscores the complete lack of justice and, frankly the brutal treatment that these americans have faced in iran. jason rizzian is a journalist who was born and raised in california. he had hoped to use his position at "the washington post" to present a greater understanding of the iranian people. instead, he has been arrested on trumped up charges and has been held for over 300 days at the infamous evan prison. last week a second closed hearing in his trial was held which, like all others a pecks of his case, was shrouded in secrecy. in september of 2012, iran arrested and later sentenced pastor siyad to eight years in prison for gathering with others to study the bible
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which, as his wife told the committee, is in fact a lawful act. even under iranian law. but one which the regime deemed a threat to national security so in jail his guards have attempted to coerce him. they have tortured him to try to get him to renounce his faith, telling him otherwise he'll serve even longer time. in august of 2011, amir, who is a former united states marine, was sentenced to death for alleged espionage. this is someone who went to visit his family his grandparents. upon his appeal his sentence was reduced, by the way, to 10 years. and his sister described to the committee, her family was told by iranian officials not to go public with amir's imprisonment or he will be put in even greater danger.
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well, as she described to us through tears despite their silence, amir suffered extensive torture, repeated torture beaten on his feet with cables, tasered repeatedly in the kidneys. at home his father is gravely ill but locked up, amir can't travel back to see his father. in 2007, robert levinson went missing on iran's kish island. they refuse to assist the united states in locating him. and his son testified, his father's now the longest held hostage in american history. mr. speaker, the house stands in solidarity with each of these families. our hearts break for them and we share their anger and frustration at the desperate position they are facing. and as we approach the deadline for negotiations on a nuclear agreement with iran, one that no matter what the terms will
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require us to have at least some trust in the regime. i have to ask the question -- what do these four cases say about the regime we are dealing with if a journalist can be suddenly imprisoned on bogus charges, what treatment can international inspectors for iran's nuclear program expect but more fundamentally if top iranian officials can't be counted on to assist these wrongfully jailed american citizens, can they be counted on to honor the commitments they make at the negotiating table? this, by the way, is why verification is such an important part of an agreement. but on that question, can they be counted on call me a skeptic. i also have to ask why the administration on the brink of silencing a deal in which we'd give the iranians tens of
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billions of sanctions relief is failing here. the bottom here expressed in this resolution today is that these four americans must be allowed home now. and that's a sentiment that all of us can support and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. engel: thank you mr. speaker. i rise to support h.res. 233 calling for the release of americans held or missing in iran, and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. engel: first of all, i want to associate my feelings with the remarks of our chairman, congressman royce. i think he hit the nail right on the head several times with his statement and i agree with every word he uttered. you know, it is just ludicrous that at a time we are completing, we're weeks away from extensively completing an agreement with iran that our hostages -- i can't think of
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any other word for them -- are being treated so shabbily by the iranian regime, as far as i'm concerned, it casts a pale on any agreement we have with iran on june 30. if this is the way they are treating americans, how can we rely on them or count on them to fulfill their obligations on any agreement we sign with them? it's just ludicrous that here we are, the 11th hour, you would think the iranian regime would want to start acting favorably so we in congress might look favorably upon any deal that might be reached. instead, they are continuing their old ways and doing just the opposite. it just doesn't make any sense. it doesn't help us to trust them. it doesn't help us to believe them and it only furthers all the things we have seen and heard and questioned about this
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rogue regime in tehran. now, i want to thank representative kildee for authoring this resolution. he has been a champion for these four americans and their families. as i said in our hearing, he's been unrelenting in terms of fighting for his constituent and for the others who are held in iranian prisons. along with representative deutch, who is the ranking member of the middle eastern subcommittee, who also has a constituent who is a hostage, also been very vociferous. representative huffman always talking to us about these issues, always looking to help to free all these americans in prison. and representative labrador, representative kildee has ensured that these americans are not forgotten here in the congress. as we mentioned two weeks ago, our committee heard from the
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families. their stories were heartbreaking. their pleas heart felt as they made clear in their testimony their cause is our cause, it's america's cause. we're a few weeks away as i said before, from an important deadline from the iranian nuclear talks. it is ridiculous that our citizens languish in iranian jails while we negotiate. ty same time, as the -- at the same time, as these families said, we must directly raise the cases of the four americans with the iranian government and we're ensured by the government that at every instance they raised these cases with the iranian government. i'm happy they raised the cases, i'm grateful they raised these cases. if we can't bring them home it's all for naught.
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it would be a deer lix of our duties and responsibility to have an agreement with iran while not bargaining or getting the freedom of these people. we don't want these people used as a bargaining chip but on the other hand we don't want these people remained in jail after there is some kind of agreement with iran. i wish we knew more about the conditions of these four americans but in these cases eye rain isn't playing by the rules once again. typically if an american were detained in iran, switzerland, the u.s. protecting power in iran, would have access to them for consular services. it's not the case here. in the cases of these three iranian americans, iran doesn't even acknowledge their duo citizenship, only their iranian citizenship. this position runs roughshod over long-established international law. without consular access we cannot judge the health and welfare of our own american citizens.
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this is unacceptable. the united states respects this access for iranian citizens held here, rerip rickal privileges are the least they could provide. sadly, mr. deutch's constituent, robert levinson's whereabouts are unknown. i simply don't believe the iranians have been forthcoming at all about his status. if he is indeed still a hostage, he's now the longest held hostage in american history. we shouldn't stand for this. we shouldn't sit still while this continues. . iran's leaders could send the american people a gesture of goodwill by providing more information about robert levinson and by freeing said, emir and jason. by the way, jason is the bureau chief of "the washington post."
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unbelievable. that he would be arrested for espionage. ludicrous, ridiculous. so this is a concern all of us share. it doesn't matter where you come from in this country or what your political affiliation is. these are americans and we all want to see these four americans come home safely to their families. so i applaud this resolution urge my colleagues to support it and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. >> thank you mr. speaker. mr. engel has shared with you that the government in iran refuses to recognize the nationality as a u.s. nationality for jason. mr. royce: jason was born in california. he was born a u.s. citizen here in the united states raised in california. and their position is that no, he's an iranian citizen, he was over there to see his grandmother, no he was over
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there reporting because he wanted to get an opportunity for greater understanding, you know, of the citizens in iran. the fact that we allow a situation like this to stand sta -- to stand when american citizens are being held like this, and subject to show trials, is appalling. mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. smith, chairman of the foreign affairs committee subcommittee on africa global health, global human rights and international organizations, and he is of course, a long time critic of the human rights abuses that have occurred in iran. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: i thank our distinguished chairman and thank both he and eliot engel for the leadership that they have both shown. mr. chairman, i want to thank you for keeping that focus on all issues related to iran, and for doing it so effectively. including in especially the human rights abuses that are
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occurring there each and every day. mr. speaker, the most important dutyy of the president of the united states is to keep americans safe from harm, whether they are at home or abroad. three innocent americans continue to be brutalized in iranian prisons and trapped in a system of sham trials. a fourth american, another innocent man, has been missing from iran for more than eight years. and presumed to also be imprisoned in that country. what americans have been hostages in foreign lands or on foreign seas, presidents from both parties have prioritized their rescue. sometimes even asking the finest from our fighting forces to risk their lives to save them. it is an important question, why the president has failed to make the release of our fellow americans his top priority with the iranian regime. how often have we heard the administration speak out, pressure being put to bear on the iranian regime even as the talks continue on the nuclear
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issue? seems to me, i'll never forget, when man came and testified at one of frank wolf's hearings, she said, and i quote, they told me there was nothing they could do for her husband at the u.s. department of state. thankfully a call to john kerry by mr. wolf, chairman of the lantos committee at the time, did yield fruit and they did begin to raise his name and his cause. the president seems to think, however, that the iranian regime can be trusted to keep a nuclear deal and no longer seek to develop and make nuclear weapons. i would suggest that a regime that continues to imprison our fellow citizens cannot be trusted. a regime that's so regularly violates the human rights and basic freedoms of its own people cannot be trusted. a regime that sponsors terrorism against other countries as a tool of foreign policy cannot be trusted. house resolution 233 makes very
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clear that iran should release all detained u.s. citizens immediately and provide any information it possesses regarding any united states citizen that -- citizens that have disappeared within its borders. mr. speaker, we must remember the husbands and fathers, sons and daughters, the families in addition to those who are being exploited and cruelly mistreated. i want to thank chairman royce for the hearing that he just convened a few days ago. we heard from the family members their plea was impassioned. it was heartbreaking. and it was very very motivating. imprisoned since 2012, pastor ab -- be a dinny 35 years old, a husband, his wife testified several times before my subcommittee, and has been an extraordinary champion for his release. father of two children he returned to iran to build an orphanage. he had gotten prior clearance, told that he could do it.
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once he was there they arrested him and they have mistreated him ever since. imprisoned since 2012, emir he cmadi. he returned to iran to visit his grandmother and other relatives. they scooped him up and he has been mistreated ever since. imprisoned since 2011, jason rezaian, 39 years elled, tehran's bureau chief of "the washington post," a reporter who publishes what is going on in that regime, he now is facing a trial, a show trial, a sham trial. imprisoned since 2014 robert levinson, 67 years old husband, father grandfather, missed in iran since the year 2007. mr. speaker pastor abedini, mr. rezaian and mr. levinson are all americans and they're being right today subjected to abuse and cruelty.
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they are all prisoners or missing in iran. we call on the administration to retriple its efforts to secure their release. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. engel: thank you, mr. speaker. it's now my pleasure to yield five minutes to the gentleman from ohio, again who has been the -- michigan, i'm sorry, who has been the staunchest supporter of getting these people free, who has raised this issue so many times, and who is the author of this resolution, mr. kildee for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. kildee: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to start by thanking chairman royce for his efforts on this resolution and my friend, ranking member engel as well for his efforts, along with the 201 members of this body who have co-sponsored this . most particularly mr. deutch, mr. huffman and mr. labrador, who has worked me and my staff in preparing this resolution.
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i want to speak briefly about a mir hekmadi. a youngen what who is an american citizen. born in the united states raised in my hometown of flint, michigan served in the united states marine corps, he's a brother, he's a son he's a michigan ander. back in 2011, for the first time he traveled to iran to visit his grandmother, as has been said. he notified the iranian government that he was going to iran, he traveled under his own name. he disclosed his history as a member of the united states marine corps. he was in iran for almost three weeks when he was apprehended. initially tried and convicted and sentenced to death for espionage. that sentence later set aside but he continues to languish in prison serving a 10-year sentence. i want the world to know about emir.
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i want people to know his name. just as we want the world to know the name of jason rezaian and saeed abednin. emir is a real person. grew up in flint. like me, played high school hockey. it's important that we remember these names, these are individuals, they are not just pawns in a geopolitical struggle between iran and the rest of the world. they're individuals, they're people, they have families. they feel pain. they suffer. emir has been in evan prison for 1,386 days. it is long past time for him to be reunited with his family. he's committed no crime yet he continues to sit in that prison in a dark cell. if iran is serious about rejoining the community of
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nations, about being a member of the international community, they will release -- immediately release emir and the other americans that they hold. and that's why it's so important that this house pass this resolution and speak for the american people with one voice. we have lots of disagreements in this place. but there should be no question here in the united states, across the world but especially within the iranian government and among the iranian people, there should be no question that this body, this house of representatives, which often disagrees, has no disagreement on the question of these americans. if iran wants to be taken seriously, if anything they do, if any engagement that they have with the world, whether it's a nuclear agreement or economic engagement, if any of that is to be legitimate, they cannot hold political prisoners and they need to take action to release emir and the other americans that they hold.
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now, the fact that the p-5-plus-1 negotiations are under way gives us space for something we hadn't had in 35 years, and that is bilateral discussion. on the sidelines of those nuclear agreements. but while it does provide the moment there is one point that i do want to make. others have spoken to. this it's difficult to imagine taking any agreement with them seriously, as long as iran holds these americans. but it's also important that we keep in mind that we never want to be in a position where as part of a transaction with iran we exchange the freedom of these americans for a concession at the nuclear negotiating table, a concession that may make the world a less safe place. we don't want that and i know that emir, through his family, has communicated to us that he does not want to be exchanged for anything. but i think it is fair, as
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members have said, that congress consider all of iran's behavior when considering any engagement with them whether it's a nuclear agreement or anything else. so when i've spoken to the president and the vice president or wendy scherman or samantha power our u.n. represent beive, i have made it clear to them that while it is important that we get our americans home, we don't want to see the world become a less safe place in exchange for the freedom of innocent people. and they have agreed with that and they have shared that with the iranian government at every opportunity. simple point. congress today will speak with one voice and say to the iranian people, say to the world, that these americans -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. kildee: thank you. i thank my friend. this resolution will say with absolute clarity that if iran
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expects to be treated as a member of the international community, they will unilaterally release these americans. it would advance their cause, presumably of joining the global community it. would send a strong message to the rest of the world and to the united states and to this congress that they can and should be taken seriously. but it's very difficult to imagine doing that if they continue to hold emir and the other americans they hold. i just want to reiterate my gratitude to chairman royce and ranking member engel and the whole committee, the foreign affairs committee, and the whole house for their support of this. the families of these individuals i know appreciate it very deeply and do as well. with that i yield back. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i continue to reserve mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. engel: mr. speaker, it's now my pleasure to yield two minutes to a gentleman who has
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allegation been fighting for his constituent -- who has also been fighting for his constituent, who has brought this issue up with us so many times, has been unyielding in trying to get the freedom for all the hostages, the gentleman from california, mr. huffman, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. huffman: thank you, mr. speaker. and i do want to start by thanking chairman royce and ranking member engel for moving this bill forward and a huge thanks to my great colleague from michigan, representative kildee. he's been described as tireless and courageous and relentless. he's all of that and more in working to highlight the injustice that these american detainees are facing in iran. one of these detainees, jason rezaian, has been mentioned as having grown in california. he actually grew up in my district. i have gotten to know his family and in some way i feel like i've gotten to know jason at least a little bit through this tragic situation. so i know something about the terrible hardship that he and his family have been going through for this past year.
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and it is with that unconscionable level of hardship in mind that i am proud to join with my colleagues in working to make sure that congress does everything that it can to secure jason's safe release and also the safe release of these other unjustly detained americans. passing this resolution on a bipartisan basis is one of the most important things that we can do to reaffirm to the iranian regime that the whole world is watching. . jason rezaian was the "washington post" tehran bureau chief when he was arrested last year. he's been held twice as long as any previous western journalist in iran. and the circumstances under which he's been held are an absolute mockery of justice. there's never been any evidence brought against him. for nine months there were no charges brought against him publicly. jason was denied the most basic rights. denied access to a lawyer for months. denied bail after he was charged and held in solitary
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confinement after his investigation ended. jason's family members and his fellow journalists have been fierce advocates for his freedom. and i hope that the passage of this resolution today will make the sentiment of congress very clear that iran should immediately release jason rezaian and the other detained americans. whatever issues or disagreements that we may have about broader issues involving iran it is important that we're able to speak today with one voice for the americans who are unjustly detained and for their families. i urge my colleagues to vote yes and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i'll continue to reserve, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. engel: thank you, mr. speaker. it's now my great pleasure to yield two minutes to one of the senior members of our foreign affairs committee, someone i turn to very often for advice and crown who's been a clear
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and effective voice in trying to bring our hostages home, the gentleman from florida, also the ranking member of the middle east subcommittee, mr. deutch, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. deutch: thank you mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i want to thank my friend, the ranking member. i want to thank the chairman and i especially want to thank my friend and colleague, mr. kildee from michigan, for spear heading this resolution his tireless efforts to bring back his constituent. mr. huffman mr. labrador. each one of us here has the solemn responsibility to represent the families of these american citizens. in this case, our constituents who are missing or held in iran. each of us has seen the suffering of these families firsthand. we have also seen a remarkable strength of purpose as they live this real-life nightmare and do everything they can to bring their loved ones home. for the family of robert
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levinson, my constituent, eight years is eight years too long not to have their husband, their father and their grandfather home. bob levinson went missing on iran's kish island on march 9 2007. since his disappearance, they received proof of life in forms of pictures and videos. iran's leaders have never provided any information about bob's disappearance despite repeated pledges to aid in the investigation. as negotiations with iran have taken place over the past year and a half, many of us have doubts about the ability to trust iran to follow through on the terms of any nuclear deal. we distrust because we have seen this regime time and again lie to the international community, support the world's worst actors and terrorists destabilize the region, deny history and chant death to america so if iran wants to be taken seriously by the
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international community, then it must start by dropping the bogus charges and releasing amir hekmati saeed abedini and jason rezaian and immediately assist in locating and returning bob levinson. mr. speaker, we are just weeks away from the june 30 deadline for a nuclear deal and we are grateful that the secretary and the other negotiators have raised this issue inside meetings. mr. engel: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. deutch: thank you, mr. speaker. but we have enormous leverage right now and we must use it for jason rezaian, for saeed abedini for amir hekmati and for my constituent, bob levinson. if iran wants the world to believe what it says at the negotiating table, if it expects the world to trust any of the commitments that it will make or promise to make in a nuclear deal then it should send these americans home. by passing this bipartisan resolution today, we will show the world that this is an issue
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that transcends politics. we gather here today in the united states house of representatives, the people's house, to show that members of congress and the american people are united in demanding the safe return of these four americans. mr. speaker, it is time to bring them home. and i urge my colleagues to support this resolution. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i'll reserve the right to close, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. engel: thank you, mr. speaker. and i'll close for our side. i, again, urge my colleagues to support this resolution at this critical time. i want to thank my colleague, the gentleman from michigan, mr. kildee, for his work on this. we're in the final days of a nuclear negotiation, as been mentioned before, with iran. as the families of these americans point out, when these negotiations are over, if we do nothing so, too, may be the
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chance for the united states to engage directly with iran over the faith of their family members. so we must not let this opportunity go to waste. we call on iran to release amir hekmati, jason rezaian and saeed abedini and robert levinson and live up to the pledge to provide further information about robert levinson. bring these men home to their families. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back the rest of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: thank you mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: as i have made clear before, i have serious reservations about the direction of our negotiations with iran, and this is based in no small part on its treatment of the four americans we are speaking about today and what that predicts going forward. let's not forget this is a
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regime and we can turn on the set and watch their rallies where regularly they chant "death to america" is used to rouse the most fervent supporters of the supreme leader. this is a regime that has killed its own citizens outright or convicted and imprisoned them based on confessions obtained by torture. this is a regime that takes u.s. citizens into captivity, tortures them and then denies them medical treatment, denies them basic legal representation denies them due process. last month just prior to jason's so-called trial, "washington post" editor martin barren issued a compelling statement -- and i'll read part of it. quote, it's worth recalling what kind of system we're dealing with. jason was arrested without
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charges. he was imprisoned in iran's worst prison. he was placed in isolation for many months and denied medical care he needed. his case was assigned to a judge internationally notorious for human rights violations. he could not select the lawyer of his choosing. he was given only an hour and a half to meet with a lawyer approved by the court. no evidence has ever been produced by prosecutors or the court to support these absurd charges. the trial date was only disclosed to jason's lawyer last week and now unsurprisingly but unfore gively, it turns out -- unforgiveably it turns out the trial will be closed. mr. speaker, we cannot allow ourselves to lose sight of these facts. faced with this those making the case that iran will be
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transparent with the international community on inspections that will be part of any nuclear deal seem to be thinking about the iran they want not the one in actuality, the one that is brutalizing americans. nuclear deal or not, these americans deserve to be back with their families today. i urge all members to support this resolution, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and agree to house resolution 233. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative -- mr. royce: mr. speaker, on that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question will be postponed.
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pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess for a period of less than 15 minutes.
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live coverage is back right here on c-span. washington journal continues. >> steve is vice president and news director at c.q. "roll call." president and news director at cq roll call. joining us this morning for the next 45 minutes to talk about the week ahead in congress. you can't talk about the week ahead without looking at the week behind. the headline over the weekend after that vote on friday on trade. house democrats spurn obama endangering a trade pact. a party in revolt is the sub headline. in a remarkable blow to the president, they have voted to end assistance to workers displaced by global trade. the program their party created and has supported for over four decades.
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it was not a small loss, it was a big feed for that measure. how did they move forward on this? steven komarow: that is the big question. the speaker left room for reconsideration of the vote or it that could happen tomorrow or tuesday. yesterday on television, paul ryan, who is the committee chairman who led the bill on the floor, said it is really up to obama to twist arms. they have to flip scores of democrats. the democratic party voted overwhelmingly against this provision and how the president gets there i really don't know. people are really scratching their heads over this one. it would be a remarkable turnaround. bill scanlan: we saw that picture of the president walking with democratic leaders. what has been his record so far in terms of going up to capitol hill or having members come to the white house for that sort of lobbying and interaction?
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steven komarow: it is kind of mixed. he is not by nature a big schmoozer. we have not seen him doing that much of it. we talked about how eisenhower would take members to play golf. obama does not do a whole lot of that. the congressional picnic is this week at the white house. they're going to have some staring down. bill scanlan: will that be before or after the boat? steven komarow: after the vote. that could be an awkward little time. on this one, he went -- roll call sponsors the congressional baseball game every year. obama went to the game and did some back patting and shaking hands. for the vote. it does not look like he changed a whole lot of mines. bill scanlan: the senators are trying to finish up their work on the defense authorization bill.
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how is that working in the senate? steven komarow: it has been slow with a lot of amendments. they have backed off some of the more controversial stuff. for example the authorization for military force against the islamic state in syria and iraq. that is on a separate track right now. john mccain, who is the chairman of that committee, is really eager to get a bill done. it is the earliest the senate has taken that up in a long time. they are going to have a cloture vote this week to try to get that done. bill scanlan: the issue of that authorization of use of military force goes back to the presidential lobby. your reporting in this week's cwq weekly that itaumf is not dead
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yet. president obama has still of skin political capital to take up the bill. he is in no rush. he re: possesses the adequate authority to go after the militants under the 2001 au mf. house speaker john boehner has been hammering the president accusing him of lacking any discernible strategy, all the while boehner has done little to move a contentious bill. in all likelihood, republicans are not going to help him on this. even though clearly some republican senators would like to have a specific aumf. steven komarow: that is right. senator kaine has negotiated his own alternative. what they're trying to do is cut it down the middle between what republicans want which is basically giving the president authority to have almost
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unlimited forces go in, and the democrats who want a very tightly written thing. they have negotiated an in between package. it isn't there yet. they both expressed optimism that over time, people will accept this. the legal authority the president is referring to in what you just read, a lot of people think is kind of suspect. this was in the wake of september 11. it was not envisioning the kind of thing the u.s. is facing now in syria and iraq. bill scanlan: does the likely defeat on trade on this issue further hindu the president's ability to move that sort of thing forward? caller: it might. steven komarow: it might. the problem with the trade issues this is something the president's want. when you lose something like this, it is a very important pan asian trade pact.
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if he loses on that, the term lame duck will be in every single reference to barack obama for the next 18 months. bill scanlan: steven komarow is director and vice president at cq roll call. we are talking about the week ahead in congress. your thoughts and comments are welcome. send us a tweet @cspanwj. you mentioned paul ryan and his comments on fox news sunday. i want to give our viewers a look at what he had to say in terms of the responsibility for moving the trade package forward. >> the president has a lot of work to do with his own party to turn this around to salvage this. i am optimistic. i think that this can be salvaged. i think people are going to realize just how big the consequences are for american leadership. for whether or not america is
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going to lead in the global economy, or we are just going to retreat? it is ironic. the democrats are the ones making him a very lame duck president. his own party. he has worked to do with his party. i hope you can get that worked on it we can fix this. >> you talk about the stakes here. if the pacific trade deal goes down because he doesn't even get the fast track majority, how damaging to the country, to its economic interest, to his strategic interests and how do you answer the argument by some democrats and by big labor that these trade deals are good for big corporations but bad for american workers who either lose their jobs or see their salaries lowered? >> it is the opposite. big corporations can set up a factory in another country to make it there and sell it there. bike getting trade agreements
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you are removing that barrier so they can make things in america. trade creates more jobs. one in five jobs in america are tied to trade. they pay more. it means more jobs. bill scanlan: paul ryan yesterday on fox news. steven komarow: there is a lot of suspicion especially the tea party wing of the republican does not like it. there is a populist issue tied to it. if you go across america, you can find empty factories still to this day that were shut down by imports from china and asia on textiles, furniture. it makes it a very touchy issue. on the democratic side it is the unions that are fighting the hardest against this. their membership was decimated in some areas. bill scanlan: i want to read from the washington times about the meeting that happened on friday with the president after the roll call baseball game.
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the washington times wrote that in that meeting with democrats president obama urged them to play it straight and pleaded for their support. but he also offended some democrats by think you had the nation's best interests at heart and suggesting that lawmakers who opposed the trade measure were motivated by political considerations. many democrats view the trade measure as poisonous to their reelection chances next year because of constituents's concerns that u.s. jobs are being lost overseas. representative peter defazio said mr. obama tried to guilt people and impugn their integrity. " he has ignored and disrespected congress for years and then he shows up at the baseball game with homemade beer and than comes to the caucus and lectures us for 40 minutes about his values and whether or not we are being honest by using legislative tactics to try to stop something which we believe the horrible mistake for the united states of america."
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are you surprised to ceiling would like that from democrats? steven komarow: it's interesting. it's also interesting that paul ryan >> we're going to break away from this prerecorded portion of "washington jourbling" and go back to the floor of the house. floresville veterans post office building. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 891, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 141 paloma drive in floresville, texas, as the floresville veterans post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule the gentleman from north carolina, mr. walker, and the gentlewoman from the virgin islands, ms. plaskett will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina. mr. walker: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and
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extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. . i rise today in support h.r. 91. it designates the post office located at floresville, texas, at the floor restville veterans post office building this honors the men and women of floresville texas, who served our country. we are grateful for their service and the service of all our veterans and their sacrifices in the service of our great nation. i urge members to support this bill and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to join my colleagues in supporting h.r. 891, a bill to designate the facility located at 141 paloma
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drive in floresville, texas, as the floor restville veterans post office building this commemorates the sacrifices made by service men and women of floresville texas. our service men and women have fwiven their time and energy to defend the freedoms we hold so dear. recognizing our veterans by naming in post -- naming this post office in their honor is the least we can do. i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill that would recognize the honorable service and countless sacrifices made by our veterans and their families. i urge passage of h.r. 891 and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the virgin islands reserves. the gentleman is recognized. >> i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized.
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ms. plaskett: i yield to the gentleman with with, mr. cuellar. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cuellar: i thank the gentlelady, and i want to thank chairman chaffetz and ranking member cummins for their support along with committee members for bringing this bill to the floor. i rise in support of h.r. 891 which designates the facility of the united states postal service located at 141 pa luoma drive in floresville, texas, as the floor restville veterans post office building. floor restville is the county seat of wilson county, texas, which has 4,636 veterans currently residing there. just across the street from the postal facility is the texas state veterans home, which houses about 154 of our american veterans. it's fitting to provide this acknowledgment to our floresville veterans correctly -- directly across the street
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from where many of them live now. there are many veterans across the county that have served but i want to highlight a few from floresville. let me start with frank vill rial who served in vote -- vill loo -- villa israeli who served in vote -- vil; -- villareal who served in vietnam. he received 15 awards for his service the national defense service medal, the vietnam serviced mele with al with two bronze star the fwallantry medal, and the combat air crewman insignia also. at to highlight a -- also to highlight a couple of others, pedro debora and gonzalez served too they survived a kamikaze attack on their vess eel and went home to live long lives in
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floresville. additionally, i want to say that mr. deborah and mr. gonzalez obtained the medals they earned in the service and recently got them from the department of navy. in deborah these medals include the victory -- the medal he is got, the presidential unit citation ribbon, the honorable service lapel pin and the pacific campaign medal with a bronze star also. for mr. gonzalez also these medals include the world war ii victory medal, american campaign medal presidential unit citation ribbon, combat action ribbon, along with the pacific medal along with a bronze star also. again there's only just a few examples of the men and women from wilson county, particularly from floresville who served. i want to acknowledge the sacrifice of those veterans along with the veterans from my
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congressional district, individuals who served and put their country ahead of self and for whom i'm recognizing with the renaming of the floresville postal facility. i also want to thank the work of the american legion post 38 in floresville and the v.f.w. post 8555 in wilson county for the work that they've done in supporting our local veterans. the v.f.w. post 8555 wilson county has done a great job. i want to thank them. 10 mr. speaker and to our ranking member and our ranking delegate also i want to say thank you so much and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from north carolina is recognized. >> i have no further speakers and am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized.
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ms. plaskett: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina. >> i urge adoption of the bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 891. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative the rules are awe spended, the bill is pass -- are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek recognition? >> i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1326, to designate the facility of the united states postal service low catted at 2000 full mord road in mullbury, florida, as the sergeant first place daniel ferguson post office. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 326 a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service
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located at 2000 mullford road in mullbury, florida, as the sernlt first place daniel ferguson post office. >> i yield myself such time as i may consume and ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. walker: i rise today in support of h.r. 1326, introduced by representative done dennis ross. it will designate the post office located at 200 mullford road in mullbury, florida, as the -- mullberry, florida, as the sergeant first class daniel m. ferguson post office. in a moment i will be happy to yield time to the gentleman from florida to discuss the merits of the bill and the life of sergeant first class ferguson. for now,, mr. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from the virgin islands is recognized. ms. plaskett: i yield myself such times macon tissue as i may consume. i'm pleased to join my colleagues in supporting h.r. 1326, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 2000 mullford road in mullberry, florida, as therst class daniel m. ferguson post office. daniel ferguson was a standout athlete at mullberry high school where he lettered in five sports, including baseball, football and track. after joining the army in 1993 he dedicated the rest of his life to the service of our country. over the next 20 years he completed tours in kuwait, iraq and afghanistan. following his final the employment he was stationed as an army transportation supervisor at fort hood, texas, beginning in march, 2013. on april 2 2014, sergeant first
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class ferguson made the ultimate sacrifice. he witnessed a shooting rampage break out on base. and seing the other shooters -- shooter approaching the room where he and his colleagues gathered held himself against an unlock door and used his body as a shield. tragically he, lost his life that day but through his courage and selflessness, many of his colleagues survived. sergeant first class ferguson is remembered by his fiancee fellow soldier kristen halley, and all those who nee knew him for his loyalty bravery and commitment. mr. speaker, we should pass this bill to commemorate the ultimate sacrifice made by sergeant first class daniel ferguson and to honor his devoted service to the protection of our country abroad as well as his fellow soldiers at home. i urge passage of h.r. 1326 and reserve the balance of my time.
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. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from north carolina is recognized. walkwalk at this time i'm please -- mr. walker: at this time i'm pleased to yield to the gentleman from florida, the sponsor of this legislation, congressman ross. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. ross: i want to thank my colleague from north carolina the gentlewoman from the virgin islands. i rise in support of h.r. 1326, to designate the postal service located at 2000 mullford road in mulberry, florida, as the sergeant first class daniel m. ferguson post office. however, some may not remember a heroism that came out of the horrific event. daniel ferguson, who was stationed at fort hood, along with his fiancee sacrificed his life for others.
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sergeant first class ferguson bravely wedged himself against a set of unlocked doors. without his heroic actions those present there said there would be many more casualties and fatalities. sergeant first class ferguson succumbed to the wounds he sustained. cleefing behind many heart -- leaving behind many heart broken loved ones but other fellows. he gave his own life to protect the lives of his fellow men and women in uniform. sergeant first class ferguson was a tremendous soldier, a graduate of mulberry high school who gave the ultimate sacrifice for the love of his country. that is why in honor of his courageous sacrifice i am proud to introduce this bill and proud to ask my colleagues to recognize such an honorable american for sergeant first class ferguson, his family and the residents of mulberry, florida, i ask that my colleagues join me in supporting such a worthy cause. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina reserves. the gentlewoman from the virgin islands is recognized.
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ms. plaskett: mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. walker: mr. speaker, i urge adoption of the bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1326. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed shes and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. -- the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek recognition? mr. walker: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1326, to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 442 east 167th street in bronx, new york, as the herman badillo post office
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building. the speaker pro tempore: did the gentleman mean to call up h.r. 1350? mr. walker: yes, that would be correct. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 1350 a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 442 east 167th street in bronx, new york, as the herman badillo post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from north carolina, mr. walker, and the gentlewoman from the virgin islands, ms. plaskett will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina. mr. walker: thank you mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. walker: i rise today in support of h.r. 1350, introduced by representative jose serrano. h.r. 1350 designates the post office located at 442 east
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167th street in bronx, new york, as the hemplean badillo post office -- herman badillo post office building. he was a united states congressman who represented the south bronx. he was born in puerto rico and has the distinction of being the first united states congressman of puerto rican heritage. throughout his life he overcame hardship and adversity. after being orphaned at a young man age, he moved to the united states when he was 11. from there he went on to achieve great things. mr. badillo graduated with honors from city college in 1951 and shortly thereafter graduated from brooklyn law school where he was valedictorian of his class. in addition to the first puerto rican born congressman, he was the first puerto rican born city commissioner and bronx borough president. i agree with my colleague, representative serrano'sess -- serrano's assessment of him, he was truly the american dream. he passed away in 20 146789
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naming a post office in the community that he served will -- he passed away in 2014. naming a post office in the community that he served is a great honor. i urge passage of the bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentlewoman from the virgin islands is recognized. ms. plaskett: thank you, mr. speaker. as a virgin islander living next door to puerto rico and as a former district attorney in the bronx county where mr. badillo lived, i join my colleagues in supporting h.r. 1350 a bill to designate the united states postal service located at 442 east 167th street in the bronx, new york, as the herman badillo post office building. born in puerto rico on august 21 1929, mr. badillo went on to become america's first puerto rico born congressman and a prominent figure in new york city politics. the only son of francisco and carmen rivera badillo he
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suffered the loss of both his parents by his 5th birthday. he was taken in by relatives and at the age of 11, without knowing english, moved to east harlem new york. he learned english, excelled in school, working his way through college and law school as a dishwasher, bowling pin pin center, an accountant and after graduating with high honors from city college in 1951, herman went on to become valedictorian of his brooklyn law school class in 1954. herman badillo practiced law in new york and won election as bronx borough president in 1965. he ran for congress and won in 1970. while mr. badillo was considered a democrat during his seven years in this chamber, he did not view himself as bound by party loyalties. mr. badillo served this chamber with honor and distinction. for seven years before resigning his seat in 1977 to serve the people of new york as
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deputy mayor to new york mayor ed kotch. mr. badillo continued to serve the city of new york and remained involved in education reform until he died at age 85 on december 3, 2014. he's survived by his wife, gail, and his son, david. mr. speaker, i urge passage of this bill to honor herman badillo's lifetime of service and dedication to the city of new york and to this country. i urge the passage of h.r. 1350 and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman is recognized. mr. walker: mr. speaker, i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina reserves. the gentlewoman from the virgin islands is recognized. ms. plaskett: mr. speaker, i yield to mr. serrano, the gentleman from new york, as much time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. serrano: thank you. i thank both of you for the
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time and thank you for that wonderful presentation of the life of one of my predecessors, herman badillo. so rather than get into the details that have already been mentioned, let me just tell you personally what it means to me what he meant to me and what this loss of his passing means to all of us. herman came along at a time when puerto ricans in new york was seen as good, hardworking people but some people were not crazy about the idea of us being in public office or government and he showed the way. having been valedictorian in law school, he came and he immediately got involved in local politics. it is said by the age of 18, he was already running for local office in east harlem. he became the first bronx borough president -- of puerto rican background and then he ran for congress being the first full voting member of congress. let me just explain that for a second. there's been a member of
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congress from puerto rico since 1998, but none to this day has had full voting rights. he was the first one of puerto rican background with full voting rights in 1970. he left this place that he loved so much to become deputy mayor because he felt he could make a difference in new york and he served under the administration of ed kotch. during the time he was here, he helped to fund the hispanic congressional caucus. he dealt with issues in education and housing and just economic development for our community. but for those that was starting out, he stood as a giant. he stood as a man which he was which was totally bilingual, which could speak well, could think well was so calm and yet so aggressive and he inspired all of us. i know on the house floor we don't mention political campaigns but it can be said when i first ran in 1974 for
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the state assembly he was at my side. that was part of who he was. he encouraged young people from the community, from all walks of life to get involved in politics. i remember he always used to tell me that make sure -- one of the advices he gave me, make sure the same thing everywhere you go. don't play to that audience and then play to that audience because first of all it's wrong and secondly you'll get caught up in making a mistake or telling a life so make sure you say what you feel from the heart even if it is up jets -- upsets people. now in new york it is very fashionable, although it takes hard work, for latinos of all different groups to be members of the city council and state assembly and state senate and, yes, the congress. when herman came along, that wasn't the case. he opened those doors and he inspired all of us to become who we are today. i could not be a member of congress now had he not shown the way that people like us could in fact be a member of
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congress. and part of most of the district i represent used to be in his district. so this was a great loss to us. by naming a post office we can at least always have his name vivid and respect vivid for this person that came from puerto rico who lost both his parents before the age of 5, who came to new york with not speaking english hardly at all and yet who excelled in school and became this figure that was nationally known. so, herman, we thank you for who you were. we thank you for your leadership. but most of all, we thank you for putting our community on the political map. and with that i yield back the rest of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from north carolina is recognized. mr. walker: i'd like to make delegate plaskett i have no further speakers and i am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. plaskett: mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields. the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. walker: mr. speaker, i urge adoption of this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1350. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek recognition? mr. walker: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 728, to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 7050 highway b.b. in cedar hill, missouri as the sergeant first class william b. woods jr. post office. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 728 a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 7050 highway b.b. in cedar hill, missouri, as the sergeant first class william b. woods jr. post office. the speaker pro tempore:
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pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from north carolina, mr. walker, and the gentlewoman from the virgin islands, ms. plaskett will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from north carolina. mr. walker: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. . the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. walker: i rise in support of h.r. 728 introduced by representative blaine luetkemeyer. it designates the post office at 7050 highway b.b. in cedar hill missouri, as the sergeant first class william b. woods jr. post office. sergeant woods was a native of herman missouri. after graduation from northwest high school in cedar hill, missouri he enlisted with the united states marine corps as a rifleman in 1996.
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he later enlisted in the united states army and in 2003 he attended the special forces qualification course. s.f.c. woods earned the green beret and was deployed in afghanistan in july, twine, in -- 2009 in support of operation iraqi freedom. in 2009, at a hospital in germany, serblingt first class woods died from wounds he sustained while conducting a mounted patrol in the gazni province, afghanistan two days before. sergeant first class woods will be remembered not only for his personal accomplishment graduating many of the army's elite schools and earning numerous medal, but also as the example of yurge and sacrifice. i urge members to support this bill to name a post office in
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honor of this brave young soldier. i would like to add that congressman luetkemeyer was un-- unfortunately unable to make thit evening for consideration of his bill. i ask unanimous consent to insert a statement from the congressman into the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. walker: i reserve the the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlewoman from the virgin islands is recognized. ms. plaskett: i'm pleased to join my colleague in supporting h r. 728 a bill to designate the facile toity of the united states postal service located at 750 -- 7050 highway b.b. in cedar hill, missouri, as the sergeant first class william b. woods jr. post office. sergeant woods studied photography following in the lock line of military men in his family he enlisted in the united states marine corps in 1996. there he served as a scout sniper until joining the u.s.
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army special forces as a senior medical sergeant in 2003. he was assigned to b company, second battalion, special forces group and stationed in maryland. tragically while serving as a doctor in gazhny province, afghanistan, he was shot and killed while on patrol, august 16 2009. sergeant firs class woods jr. is survived by his wife elizabeth and two daughters, lily and ella. he's remembered as an adventure -- adventurous outdoorsman a dedicated family man, loyal husband, and loving father. sergeant firs class woods jr. received a number of awards including the bronze star and purple heart for his service. mr. speaker, i ask my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill to honor the valiant service and sacrifices of sergeant first class william b. woods jr. and his family. i urge the passage of h.r. 728
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and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman is recognized. mr. walker: i would like to make delegate plaskett aware i have no further speakers and i am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. plaskett: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. walker: i urge adoption of this bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 728. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 12a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until approximately 6:30 p.m. today. washington journal
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continues. bill scanlan: steven komarow is
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vice president and news director at cq roll call. joining us this morning for the next 45 minutes to talk about the week ahead in congress. you can't talk about the week ahead without looking at the week behind. the headline over the weekend after that vote on friday on trade. house democrats spurn obama endangering a trade pact. a party in revolt is the sub headline. in a remarkable blow to the president, they have voted to end assistance to workers displaced by global trade. the program their party created and has supported for over four decades. it was not a small loss, it was a big feed for that measure. how did they move forward on this? steven komarow: that is the big question. the speaker left room for reconsideration of the vote or it that could happen tomorrow or tuesday. yesterday on television, paul
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ryan, who is the committee chairman who led the bill on the floor, said it is really up to obama to twist arms. they have to flip scores of democrats. the democratic party voted overwhelmingly against this provision and how the president gets there i really don't know. people are really scratching their heads over this one. it would be a remarkable turnaround. bill scanlan: we saw that picture of the president walking with democratic leaders. what has been his record so far in terms of going up to capitol hill or having members come to the white house for that sort of lobbying and interaction? steven komarow: it is kind of mixed. he is not by nature a big schmoozer. we have not seen him doing that much of it. we talked about how eisenhower would take members to play golf. obama does not do a whole lot of that. the congressional picnic is this week at the white house.
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they're going to have some staring down. bill scanlan: will that be before or after the boat? steven komarow: after the vote. that could be an awkward little time. on this one, he went -- roll call sponsors the congressional baseball game every year. obama went to the game and did some back patting and shaking hands. for the vote. it does not look like he changed a whole lot of mines. bill scanlan: the senators are trying to finish up their work on the defense authorization bill. how is that working in the senate? steven komarow: it has been slow with a lot of amendments. they have backed off some of the more controversial stuff. for example the authorization for military force against the islamic state in syria and iraq.
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that is on a separate track right now. john mccain, who is the chairman of that committee, is really eager to get a bill done. it is the earliest the senate has taken that up in a long time. they are going to have a cloture vote this week to try to get that done. bill scanlan: the issue of that authorization of use of military force goes back to the presidential lobby. your reporting in this week's cwq weekly that itaumf is not dead yet. president obama has still of skin political capital to take up the bill. he is in no rush. he re: possesses the adequate authority to go after the militants under the 2001 au mf. house speaker john boehner has been hammering the president
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accusing him of lacking any discernible strategy, all the while boehner has done little to move a contentious bill. in all likelihood, republicans are not going to help him on this. even though clearly some republican senators would like to have a specific aumf. steven komarow: that is right. senator kaine has negotiated his own alternative. what they're trying to do is cut it down the middle between what republicans want which is basically giving the president authority to have almost unlimited forces go in, and the democrats who want a very tightly written thing. they have negotiated an in between package. it isn't there yet. they both expressed optimism that over time, people will accept this. the legal authority the president is referring to in
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what you just read, a lot of people think is kind of suspect. this was in the wake of september 11. it was not envisioning the kind of thing the u.s. is facing now in syria and iraq. bill scanlan: does the likely defeat on trade on this issue further hindu the president's ability to move that sort of thing forward? caller: it might. steven komarow: it might. the problem with the trade issues this is something the president's want. when you lose something like this, it is a very important pan asian trade pact. if he loses on that, the term lame duck will be in every single reference to barack obama for the next 18 months. bill scanlan: steven komarow is director and vice president at cq roll call. we are talking about the week ahead in congress. your thoughts and comments are welcome.
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send us a tweet @cspanwj. you mentioned paul ryan and his comments on fox news sunday. i want to give our viewers a look at what he had to say in terms of the responsibility for moving the trade package forward. >> the president has a lot of work to do with his own party to turn this around to salvage this. i am optimistic. i think that this can be salvaged. i think people are going to realize just how big the consequences are for american leadership. for whether or not america is going to lead in the global economy, or we are just going to retreat? it is ironic. the democrats are the ones making him a very lame duck president. his own party. he has worked to do with his party. i hope you can get that worked
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on it we can fix this. >> you talk about the stakes here. if the pacific trade deal goes down because he doesn't even get the fast track majority, how damaging to the country, to its economic interest, to his strategic interests and how do you answer the argument by some democrats and by big labor that these trade deals are good for big corporations but bad for american workers who either lose their jobs or see their salaries lowered? >> it is the opposite. big corporations can set up a factory in another country to make it there and sell it there. bike getting trade agreements you are removing that barrier so they can make things in america. trade creates more jobs. one in five jobs in america are tied to trade. they pay more. it means more jobs. bill scanlan: paul ryan yesterday on fox news. steven komarow: there is a lot of suspicion especially the tea
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party wing of the republican does not like it. there is a populist issue tied to it. if you go across america, you can find empty factories still to this day that were shut down by imports from china and asia on textiles, furniture. it makes it a very touchy issue. on the democratic side it is the unions that are fighting the hardest against this. their membership was decimated in some areas. bill scanlan: i want to read from the washington times about the meeting that happened on friday with the president after the roll call baseball game. the washington times wrote that in that meeting with democrats president obama urged them to play it straight and pleaded for their support. but he also offended some democrats by think you had the nation's best interests at heart and suggesting that lawmakers who opposed the trade measure were motivated by political
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considerations. many democrats view the trade measure as poisonous to their reelection chances next year because of constituents's concerns that u.s. jobs are being lost overseas. representative peter defazio said mr. obama tried to guilt people and impugn their integrity. " he has ignored and disrespected congress for years and then he shows up at the baseball game with homemade beer and than comes to the caucus and lectures us for 40 minutes about his values and whether or not we are being honest by using legislative tactics to try to stop something which we believe the horrible mistake for the united states of america." are you surprised to ceiling would like that from democrats? steven komarow: it's interesting. it's also interesting that paul ryan used the lame-duck phrase. i think democrats feel that obama is not a plus for them anymore. they are all running for reelection and he is not. they are cutting distance from him.
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we are going to see that for the rest of the presidency. on this issue in particular, where they do have a strong constituency that is with them in the labor movement, it is exercising maximum clout for them. bill scanlan: let's go to crawford, georgia. jane is here on the republican line. good morning. go ahead. caller: good morning. i just want to mention this. according to take morris on youtubdick morris, on youtube, this trade bill has more to do with immigration than it does trade. from what i understand, if it passes, or borders will be open to any of these countries and that includes their people coming over and taking more jobs. i just think they are doing a good thing if they vote this trade bill down. 7 bill scanlan:bill scanlan: what your
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thoughts? steven komarow: i don't think there is a direct connection between the two things. the real issue on immigration that has to do with this -- if relations with these countries get over time, immigration would get easier. but there is no direct correction -- connection there. host: west virginia, democrats line. hi, george. caller: the great state of west virginia, democratic state. what i think about this is the democrats in washington, d.c. must be sleeping too long because they do not understand what this is all about. this is to give the president sovereignty to negotiate trade deals and everything with other countries to open up trade and everything. it is not a trade deal that is on the table right now. this is to give the president
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authority for trading and everything. and if you cannot do that, you might as well just shut america down. you have got to have trade throughout the world. these democrats want to be all thrown out of washington and everybody replaced with some new blood because they do not seem to know what they are doing. mrs. pelosi is the leader. she should have been gone a long time ago. host: what is the relationship now between the president and nancy pelosi? guest: i think it was a lot warmer last friday. she went to the floor and rallied the democrats against the president's position. she wants this thing renegotiated, the legislation to work in some of the issues labor once and democrats
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want. right now, those kinds of restrictions are not in there. host: your comments on the floor on friday, she also talked about the democratic priorities of the deadline, the highway trust fund and things like that, urging presidential action on things like that. how serious can the president get after this defeat on friday? how can he be effective in moving forward issues like that whether it is the highway trust fund or negotiating a spending deal with republicans? what does that look like in the months ahead? guest: on the highway trust fund in particular come the fight is not between democrats on the hill in the white house. it is a get -- about democrats and republicans on the hill. the argument is how you raise money for it. besides the it is just lane expiring and legislation is
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needed to keep it going, the long-term business model for the trust fund probably is not sustainable because it is based on a per gallon tax and not only are cars getting more efficient do not even run on gasoline, or diesel fuel for that matter, the funding is going down. the price was frozen decades ago per gallon. the cost of building roads keeps going up, so until you could get republicans to sign onto revenue raising, you will not make a lot of progress on that bill. host: good morning to greg tennessee, republican line. caller: i find it truly amazing
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y'all can sit around and talk about this. y'all know what happened with nasa. everybody knows it was not good. i have never met an american that would even consider what y'all -- it is really a treaty to go into all types of things like 2000 words or something. this is one of those things they got the big month cento and all of that, and the world leaders and people that don't count, will guess what? i think the americans need to wake up. y'all realize in america this eight nothing about us getting anything good. it is about getting the border's wider and connecting canada america, and mexico. we got internet too y'all. host: trade being a political
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issue, certainly members facing election. guest: absolutely. none of this would probably take effect before the next election but it is certainly a point that could be used in commercials and social media and everything else . it is a tricky issue because it is not as simple as all of that. long-term implications are if the u.s. does not sign on to this trade -- we're talking about transpacific partnership right now the countries in the pacific will make their own pact between each other. the business argument is that the u.s. will be on the sidelines while the rest of the world is doing better economically. host: back to the other business on capitol hill, stemming pills, the houses is about halfway through their work of annual
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spending bills. the president has threatened a veto on a number of those measures as they make their way through the house. looking forward to the house completing their work in the senate, what has to happen to get an annual spending package done? guest: there will have to be a deal. individual packages are coming out of the house. on the domestic side, sequestration levels. on defense, there is a huge loophole for the overseas operations. if you are a democrat, your argument is it should be across the board. that is the way the sequestration law is set up. host: that goes back to the budget control act, 2011. guest: democrats up to and including obama, are against these bills cutting domestic
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programs while spending more on defense. from where i sit, it looks like we're heading into another september 30 showdown on whatever those have not been passed by then, and it will have to be a big package, and we will raise the specter of government shutdown again. that is what it looks like right now. host: the issues and heading congress, we are talking to steve komarow, the vice president and his director of cq roll call. we are talking to james, good morning. you're on the air, go ahead. one more time. caller: hello? all right here yes. -- all right. host: pete in illinois republican line. caller: yes. how are you doing this morning? i am concerned -- i am against
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it, first of all. it is too secret. things should be more open if we will have anything this egg. second of all, there is not enough tough language on manipulation that all of these countries will be allowed to do. third of all, the sovereignty of our laws of the united states, just look at the country of origin the just got overturn. this is the beginning of what will happen. host: the very last thing he said about the country of origin, the law that passed in the house last week, labeling of meat pork, and chicken, it passed in the house that seemed to get a number of republicans against the measure as well. we heard the bill talked about in the trade debate. guest: this is definitely one of
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the issues in the trade debate, sectors of the economy that obviously benefit from it. it is u.s. companies whether they label it or not. they are fighting against this. it is one of many issues. it also has to do with environmental regulations in many different countries, which democrats are concerned about. it is one of many competition issues. the viewer also mentioned currency manipulation issue. the biggest concern there is china, but china is not part of this pact. that issue will remain regardless of how congress votes on it. host: the house passed that piece of currency manipulation. we heard members talking about
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having to read this trade deal in a secret and secure room. why is that? guest: it is one of the big criticisms. the trade negotiations are done in secret. it is a complicated chess game. some pieces of it almost never get daylight on them. it is a system anybody could take shots at, but negotiators say it is a -- the only way to get a deal done and they compare it to the way legislation gets done sometimes on capitol hill. a little bit of close room action we do not understand. keep in mind the current vote is not on the deal itself. these things are not the same as a treaty. this is actually the key part of the congressional input right now. that is why it is so hard-fought. host: as the treaty comes down,
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the proposal is the president would presented to congress, they would get to debate it, it is just a -- an up or down vote or no additional input. steve komarow is our guest, news director with cq roll call and vice president for cq roll call. your comments, here is 1 -- one -- mark. caller: your guests just cleared up one question i had. what i read over the weekend on twitter, and it might have been from roll call and some others i guess it is from others, the thing that concerns me is that, with the pacific trade, there
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are provisions in there were the uss to give up its sovereignty that what happens is when there are differences that happened to be between corporations and countries, countries can be sued by corporations, and it just seems like there is an erosion of u.s. sovereignty, so rather than exporting u.s. capitalistic practices, it seems like what it is doing is eroding a belief to u.s. sovereignty with regard to protecting its standards in the world. the other thing real quick if i may, the whole idea behind this trade package, you know, the united states is not where it was 100 years ago. we have a large population. i am not sure we need to expand these trade tax in order to have economies of efficiency. the u.s. is a large enough economy on its own for that. a lot of people in the middle us lose jobs and cannot go out to get these high-tech jobs that
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bill clinton talked about when he originally did nasa. -- nasta. not everybody will be a stem star and what do you do with people like that in the united states? guest: he hit on many of the core arguments here. if the issues cheap labor overseas, that hurts the kind of workers he is talking about. it has become a little bit less than that because of the high-tech nature of a lot of the imports, but there is no question the u.s. has its standards and other countries mostly more regulated than the u.s., have theirs, and they are trying to cut there is that going between. and the u.s. does have to sign on to an international pack that does not always follow formal practices here.
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host: that caller mentioned seeing some of the news on the weekend. how much has twitter changed what you do at cq roll call? guest: it is interesting. we tweet and everybody does these days. it is a fast way of getting out information. u.s. c-span monitor all the tweets from the c-span office, from mitch mcconnell's office. it is a lively debate going on at twitter all the time. host: you as an editor, is there a process where you can say we need to pull back that tweet and look at this because you do not obviously gets a look over every tweet all of your reporters are getting out, but you lose editorial control, don't you? guest: a little bit. we have high standards for these
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sorts of things. people know the personal tweets are different than company tweets. if you look at our cq tweets, people will tag that having to do with legislation and policy on capitol hill. i think there is a good recognition. we do have a central desk that handles a lot of our tweeting telling folks out there what is going on. people are not always able to sit down and collect news the way it was traditionally done here at are tipping people off this story came out, you ought to look at it on your mobile and on your screen as soon as you get a chance and get caught up. host: let's hear from michael in north carolina, democrats line. caller: trade agreements i
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would like to make a point that what is my finding is that this is a large consolidation of power from europe, canada, north america -- north america, and the east working together to rights and everything else. i found it has hurt a lot of countries, and it is all about exploiting minimal labor getting around environmental controls and the end result is low quality. if you look at the quality of the goods, it is terrible and no are near as good as it was in the 1960's or thend as
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a result, we do not even have a manufacturing base in this country that is large enough big enough to protect this if we had another scenario like world war ii. it is a lose lose for the american middle-class and the lower working-class. the only one to gain ivies trade agreements are the top corporate people and the elites who have the money and own the large amounts of stocks for these organizations that are seeking these agreements. host: thank you. we talked a little bit about the president's trip to capitol hill. had the influence of labor been waning a bit on capitol hill? how much was it a part of the calculation friday? guest: i think this is a rare instance where labor has had an impact lately. influence has been waning over the years and a lot of that is tied to elections, where you have not seen a big swing of
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votes through the labor concerns. this was an opportunity for labor to try to reassert itself. host: the president's's labor secretary was asked on a program whether the administration had a plan b if the package does not passed this week. here's what he said. >> i do not think we need a path . there are so many different pathways. i am confident we will move forward in this. the reason is this is something that is very important. america needs to set the rules in the global economy and that is why the president has been fighting for this. every day he wakes up and his northstar is look i do to help the american worker and the american family. that is what he has been doing since the day he got in office, whether it was the recovery act, the affordable care act, the bailout, and this is no different.
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we need to write the rules of the global economy. the world is watching us right now. the president strongly believes and i agree, this is the most progressive trade promotion authority we have ever given. host: the secretary was talking about the possible plan b for trade. what about for the health care plan? the supreme court will have a decision on a subsidies and the republicans have been asked a number of times about potential plan b or accepts in case the court rules against the administration. are there any legislative scenarios possible should that happen? guest: we would like to know what they are. people talk about, there really is not a "republican" answer. most want to take away the subsidies. in the short term, there would
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be huge pressure to do something because you have got 34 states that will lose the ability to do subsidies, and that means people's health care bills, the subsidize will go up and double and triple in a lot of cases. the question is how do you save the parts of the aca that people like, things like, keep your kid on your insurance until he is 26, having no pre-existing condition kick out for your policies and that sort of thing. all of those things cost money and if you cannot have this subsidy in getting young people into the system, it will be a tough thing to do. host: a couple of comments on twitter. this is maria, we will know more about where our dog treats come throughout -- come from then meats, chicken, and pork.
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on trade, the question is -- do you have an answer for the cyber security? host: i don't have an answer on that one. i just do not remember why they attached it. host: let's hear from florida. valerie is on our democrats line. hi, valerie. go ahead. caller: i watched the vote on friday, and my observation was more republicans voted against the first part of this trade bill than democrats. why are they said -- why is paul ryan saying that president obama has to get his act together and draw more democrats? for me, it seems like poor ryan has a lot of work to do. i would also like to know if
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there were any who voted on his first part of the bill? is there a way to find out which republicans in which democrats voted for and against it? host: that information is available online. you can go to congressional record and find that online. steve is doing our job here for us and bringing us this piece. she asked about where the votes were on the trade assistance. let's take a look. republicans voting no were 158. keep in mind they have a majority in the house spirit 158 did vote against that it 144 democrats voted against it and 86 republicans in favor. 40 democrats in favor. it would need to be a big turnaround. guest: huge.
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the bill was divided into sections. all of them have to be approved by the house in order for the package to be deemed approved. the senate is already done here. the democrats voted 144 to 40 against the bill and this section of the bill, the trade adjustment assistance, federal money, help people who were impacted by the trade. and the fact that this trade pact will hurt some industries for example. this is a traditionally democratic program. a lot of democrats on the hill would say the assistance package is inadequate. but to vote en masse against it is not a way forward for the democrats on this because republicans are never going to vote for this. they are against this kind of assistance. so obama really has to get the democrats's long around on this
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if he is going to make it. host: in "the wall street journal." they write that he still expected congress to find a way to pass legislation extending mr. obama's trade and negotiating powers as the u.s. tries to wrap up a sweeping deal with other countries around the pacific. other leaders said the burden would rest, the president to shore up support for his agenda after democrats defected last week despite a burst of late minute lobbying by mr. obama p are the democrats are skeptical of how the specific trade deals be negotiated as well as potential repercussions for u.s. workers next sunday. they saw little reason to move their opposition through a package of trade measures at the house. procedurally since the speaker called for the revote, that has to happen by sometime tuesday, i guess. guest: there is always another rule where you can fight things a little bit, but that is the expectation.
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the debate changes slightly in the sense that everything else is done except trade adjustment assistance p or i'm sure an committing used for democrats will be, the only thing your voting on today is whether or not to give people, especially workers, the assistance they need because of the impact of the upcoming trade deal. if you isolate the argument that way, it might make sense for some democrats, but they are keenly aware that the way the rules work, they kill the whole deal -- the whole bill if they do not vote for this. you still vote no. guest:-- host: shelby, indiana. caller: you hit on mike question, what my concern was, the trade adjustment. why do they need the assistance? why are they losing their jobs? eventually, the benefits will run out, just like we have had
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in the past, where people have to go on welfare and food stamps. i am really glad to see the democrats and some of the republicans voted it down, that they are thinking of the american people and our economy. thank you. host: thank you. here is robert in california, on our republican line. independent line, i am sorry robert. caller: thanks. earlier, a caller expressed a concern over currency minute galatian. you also neglected to mention japan. on the other end when it comes to how we vote on these bills and in what order, i am curious why we are on trade promotion authority before we even know what the trade bill is that we
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will be voting on, or if they will even allow that to be known. if it is going to be done in secret, you will have all this animosity and apprehension from the general public, at least. how are we supposed to call our representatives and let them know how we would like them to vote? that would be my question. guest: i think the viewer hits on a point that makes it difficult for many members of congress, the fact is they're voting on something that gives the president authority, but they do not see the final package at that time, and it could come back and hurt them. i think on nafta, i wonder if some of the people who worked in the favor of it are now being hurt by the repercussions of it? host: we talked about domestic considerations, but in a number of articles, in the faith --
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face of a rising china, and the south pacific in general in that region that this measure, the transpacific partnership is seen as an essential piece of president obama's foreign policy. guest: i think his policy has been to rally other countries near china to be a counterweight to china's growing strength. this has been to get them more economically integrated. host: we go to can in knoxville, tennessee, good morning. caller: i have a couple questions or have you read the treaty? guest: we cannot. host: it is fairly secret location. caller: how are you answering these questions correctly if you have never read it?
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and does this allow companies to import their labor forces into the united states? guest: this does not get rid of immigration laws, if that is what you mean. there is certainly a lively debate on immigration also going on on capitol hill. we have not seen that turned to legislation lately, but the companies are pressing very hard for an expansion of the program, especially for high-tech workers. you have people from overseas who will come in and train at u.s. universities, u.s. companies, and leave the company and take your skills away. that is the argument for having more visas for folks like that. certainly, the debate you're having these tedious things conflated -- these two things conflated. it is hard to separate out from other international relations
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issues. host: looking at the changes in leadership committee, on the changing committee leadership and also the majority leaderthe new leadership in the house, how are things going? how is the house being managed? guest: we certainly had issues even this one with the leadership who they were embarrassed along with a president who bring up a bill and have it fail. we have an aggressive new committee chairman trying to push bills forward. on the house schedule this week, the epa budget well, up. it is the first time and i think, six years, that it is actually a separate bill moving ahead as rapidly as it does. these things tend to get wrapped into those crs or from the bus
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-- cromnibus. host: is is another thing the white house will oppose for domestic funding being lower than they want? guest: yesterday is almost all the domestic bills are getting veto threats or statements of oppositions. host: juanita is in cincinnati, democrat line. caller: good morning to you and your guest. i was -- i am retired and i think all the people covering this needs a history lesson. we have been through this life -- we have been through this twice in the 1970's, when americans lost jobs. we went through eight trucking craze. the railroads were decimated. my father was decimated when be railroads were being destroyed. now we have a second phase with nafta.
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i think a lot of journalists are missing the problem -- i have not abandoned president obama and have no intention to, but how can you grant authority to something that you do not know what it is he is giving authority to? as a democrat and american, i do not trust wedges -- what is coming out of congress now. i am my family have had to live through it twice. the third time will be the charm. congress is going to have to do a better job of convincing us why we need to take this bill on. host: your comments also reflected in this tweet, no one has explained to me how this trait deal will create met in jobs when non-have done so in the past. and another common says excellent point. on the other side, we are a
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large enough economy to have competition within as well as efficiency. rigid from lake placid, florida independent line. caller: good morning. it would be crazy to pass the trade bill. we have 93 million workers out of a population of 320 million looking for jobs. we know that after hurricane sandy, 80% of the repair work and the new work was done by illegal workers. this is not going to help put americans to work. the middle-class dropped over the last six years under the obama administration from $44,000, i believe it was -- in two different articles -- dr. $42,000 -- host: we will let you have the
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last word on that. steven komarow talking about trade in congress. what is the second-biggest story cq roll call will follow? guest: we are preparing for the big court decision. the defense bill coming up on the hill. we are also watching the export-import bank which has echoes of this debate on the trade bill. that authority expires at the end of the month, i believe. that is one that shows the fissures in the republican party. you have great suspicion among the rand paul wing of the party to what has been a traditionally republican-supported program. it is the argument that in the international arena, you cannot be naive. there are more countries that have special financing, which this bank provides, and other things to help you compete. host: steven komarow
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>> house of representatives back into in 10 minutes. the vote on two bills voted today. one to name a highway in texas, the other, a resolution calling on the iranian government to release three u.s. citizens held in iran. later this week, the house could vote on trade legislation. last week, the house rejected the fast track trade promotion authority and provide assistance to workers. house majority kevin mccarthy, another vote on the trade pack acknowledge is possible tomorrow. so the house back in a few
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minutes. not to deal with the trade package but naming the highway in texas and calling on iran to release the americans its holding. live with the house of representatives here at 6:30. district maps, a followedout map of capitol hill and a look at congressional committees, the president's cabinet. order your copy today $13.95 through the c-span online store. >> jeb bush announced today he is running for president. he made the announcement at miami-dade college.
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it's nobody's turn but everybody's test. for more, we spoke earlier with a scholar of the presidency from the university of virginia. >> the biggest challenge for any presidential candidate is to get beyond the name recognition and talk about your biography.
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>> and to separate himself out from the policies of his father and his brother that might not be so popular. >> how does he do that and how does he get beyond the bush brand? >> this is also a problem for dynasties, the name brand is good but people can grow weary of that brand. he has to be his own man and present his own personality and comfortable in his own skin and do what he has done in his campaign video and focus on the policies while he was a popular governor in key terms. crucial state in the electoral college. >> yesterday george will said jeb bush was and is a conservative. he was a conservative governor
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for eight years in florida and yet the party seems to be moving to the right and many people say he is more moderate. why is that? >> he does have a problem as do national candidates. we know that caucuses and primaries in the state bring out the party faithful and bring out the true believers and they tend to be more stream then the germ electorate. so in bush's case, he governed as a conservative in florida. he would seem to be conservative enough, but we have to remember that the intervening factor between when his father and brother was president and that is the tea party. the reaction to obama and obamacare. and things have changesed in the republican party and making him not as the conservative. there's also the fact that his
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father bush 41 was a traditional republican of the northeast and northeastern roots and that was more moderate and people tend to associate the bush name with that brand of conservative tism rather than reagan or even his brother's compassion nature conservativism but he is trying to distance himself. you have a father and brother president and you know how the system operates getting into office. the problem is that bag acknowledge that comes with those names and their policies. >> both bush presidencies had to deal with, a struggling economy and his invasion in iraq, which many would say was far more successful than number 4 and the economy he left for barack
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obama. on these two big issues iraq and the economy, what does jeb bush need to do to prove he is his own person? >> sadly failed the test, at least the first test and call it a quiz on iraq. when he was asked about iraq, he said that he would do the same thing that his brother did. and had to back off. he loves his father and loves his brother, but he will have to create distance between his brother and that very unpopular war in iraq. on the economy, he's going to say what his father said to begin with and then follow through on, read my lips, no new taxes. what george bush did follow through is lowering the taxes on the middle class and that is part and parcel of what will be a platform.
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>> barbara perry is from the university of virginia and doing oral histories on 41 and 3, what stands out, what have you learned? >> this is a family business. politics and presidential politics, in particular, that is the bush family brand and the bush family business and it's not just nature, nurture it's a combination of both, it's i believe in their d.n.a. and what they have grown up with and in their blood and daily thinking of the world in political terms and that is what we have learned from the bush 41 and bush 4 history projects. >> located on the campus of university of virginia in charlottesville, thanks for being with us. >> we love the work that you do at c-span. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2015] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> shortly when the house votes
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we will show you as much as we can and show you on c-span 2 at 8:30. another campaign announcement, donald trump announces whether he plans to run for president as a republican. we'll have that live from new york city. house due back in a moment or two. a couple of bills tonight. one would name a highway in texas after a vietnam vet the other, resolution calling on the iranian government to release three citizens being held in iran. behind bars on what the chairman of the foreign affairs committee called trumped up charges. no vote today on the trade bill. we have heard from the majority leader that should or could we
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should say could come up later this week. house due back in a moment. our live coverage on the house on c-span. the senate working on working defense authorization. live to the floor of the house right now. the clerk will report the title of the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 233, resolution expressing the sense of the house of representatives that iran should immediately release its reunite -- its hold, as well as provide all known information on any united states citizens
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that have disappeared within its borders. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and agree to the resolution. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 391, the nays are zero. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are assist pended. the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is vote on the motion of the motion by
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mr. graves on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk: h.r. 2559 medal of honor memorial highway in the state of texas. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the ruse and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 398, the nays are zero. 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i present a privileged report for printing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk report the title. the clerk: h.r. 2772, report to accompany h.r. 2772, a bill making appropriations for the department of state foreign operations and related programs for the fiscal year ending september 30, 2016, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to union calendar and ordered printed. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 21, points of order are
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reserved. the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. the gentlewoman is correct. the house will be in order. the house will be in order. members will move their conversations off the floor.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to congratulate the eden prairie high school girls la crosse team for clinching the minnesota state championship. mr. paulsen: winning title was no easy task for the eagles as it took back-to-back overtime wins in both the semifinals and finals before they were crowned champions. in the finals it even took a second overtime for junior kelly wolf tossed in the winning goal with just over 1:00 left to deliver the title to eden prairie. mr. speaker, in order to be the
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high enough level to win a state championship, these student athletes must devote countless hours, honing their athletic skills while still exceling in the classroom and juggling family and social responsibilities. parents, family, friends and fans and the entire eden prairie community is very proud of these high school athletes. once again, congratulations to the eden prairie girls la crosse team on a job well done. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the house will be in order. members please remove your conversations from the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? without objection the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> it's my great pleasure to congratulate not one but two pennsylvania state champion baseball teams from pennsylvania's third congressional district. the high lancers and the knock high knights capped off historic seasons last week to take home the p. -- p.i.
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double-a and triple-a champions. the first state title in any sport for the knock knights. it takes a lot of special people and a lot of hard work to hold a champion. so i offer a sincere thank you to the players, to their families and to lancer coach mike kirkwood and knight coach george bradley for being not just a championship to your communities, but just as importantly, the pride that comes with it. last week your baseball teams earned a special place in the long and storied history of western pennsylvania student athletics. jerry kelly because of it i'm very proud to -- mr. kelly: because of it i'm very proud to say go lancers and go knights. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize susan gibson perry and carrie houston
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schultz, both recipients of the annual yellow dog award. this award is presented by the pen brad oil museum in custer city, pennsylvania honoring their dedication preserving the history of the bradford oil field. the bradford oil field was the world's first billion-dollar oil field and is today the pen brad oil museum, it preserves philosophy and the spirit of the historic oil community. mr. speaker they have strong ties to the oil industry, each dating back five generations. susan recalls learning about the oil industry from her father and uncle. in 1995 she began work with the pen brad oil museum and eventually served as president from 2003 to 2014. she originally came to the museum for research purposes but began working at the museum in 2000 and spent 10 years serving the museum in various roles. mr. speaker, it's my honor to congratulate these two outstanding women and i thank them for their years of dedicated service and contributions to the pennsylvania oil industry and the bradford community. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield
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back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? ms. jackson lee: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. jackson lee: thank you very much mr. speaker. before leaving my district, i had the great excitement of presiding over or introducing a new medical center to the acres home community and to the community of houston, the u.m.c. center. organized by committed and dedicated doctors, this facility is formally the doctor's hospital on tidwell in thes who iric -- historic acres home community. but the real value and significance are two things. one americans need access to good heament care. and with the affordable care act we have been able to sizeably bring down the 25% of texans who were uninsured. we've been able to expand with community health clinics and for those states who have
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accepted the expanded medicaid which includes ohio under governor kasich, a former member of this body, they have seen, and as well the state of kentucky, they have seen a sizable dent in those who are uninsured. i want to thank those doctors working with me, working with the texas department of health u.s. department of health, recognizing that an inner city hospital, a hospital dealing with those aged populations and children and young families, is valuable to save. we need to save riverside hospital. i want to congratulate those doctors and we will work together to be able to provide good health care for all the community. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek recognition? ms. foxx: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. over the last few weeks, many families have proudly watched as their sons and daughters received their high school palomas at ceremonies across
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north carolina. on saturday i cheered as my grandson kenan walked across that stage and graduated from wautoga high school. these new graduates have been blessed with some wonderful teachers. they've learned a great gee -- they've learned a great deal lessons in math science, history and literature. but they've also learned lessons in self-discipline, compassion, patience and understanding. this learning didn't all take place in the classroom. much of it was learned at home with their family, out with their friends, on the football field, during summer jobs and even in brief interactions with unexpected people. the choices ahead of them are many and the road to success will have its detours, but they can be anything they want to be by meeting every challenge with integrity and determination. class of 2015, set your goals and find your dreams. congratulations. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentlewoman has expired.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. lamalfa: thank you, mr. speaker. today we celebrate the anniversary of the magna carta a cornerstone of our country's founding. 00 years to the day following the rebel barons who would no longer accept the tyrannical abuses, king john placed his seal on this document, saying that every person, peasant or nobleman, is governed by law. it can be no better represented an the protections guaranteed in the fifth amendment of our constitution, state nothing person shall be denied life, liberty or property without due
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process of law. i rise to honor 800 years of magna carta and to honor those who made sacrifices to protect our freedoms. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from utah seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise to hope that we pause and thank the men and women who serve in our armed services. mr. chaffetz: every day men and women serve our nation, they do so at the risk of their own lives. they leave behind brothers and sisters and mothers and fathers and kids and they serve who knows where. they don't know where they're going to serve but they know they lowe the united states of america and they're willing to put their lives on the line. that's happened for generations, millions have answered the call to serve. the least we can do as a nation
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is be gratele, give pause give prayer, and give thank it is these men and women who will serve us in the future and who have served us in the past. may god bless them and may god bless the united states of america. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks and be allowed to include extraneous materials. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise in search of an answer to a simple question. assistant secretary sara saldana, director of i.c.e., appeared before the house homeland security subcommittee on april 15. i serve on the subcommittee and questioned the assistant secretary about president obama's comment he is made in february of this year he said, if somebody is working for i.c.e. and there's a policy and they don't follow a policy, there's going to be consequences to it. he was talking about i.c.e. agents following his guidelines.
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i use this opportunity to tell the assistant secretary, if i had instructions that were not in keeping we this the law, i would expect employees to follow the law. she interrupted to say that's where you and i have a fundamental disagreement. america was founded on the principal of law. the problems at i.c.e. run deep but i think they start at the top. my colleagues and i felt we needed to follow up, we followed up with a letter asking for clarification. we asked for a response by june 5, yet 31 days since the request, 10 days since the deadline, we have not seen a response from the assistant secretary. this should be deeply troubling to all of this house. i yield the floor. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition?
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without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. tonko: thank you, mr. speaker. the house faces yet another deadline at the this month for an agency that reduces the keff sit and has supported 1.3 million jobs since 2009 that agency is the export-import bank. in my district alone ex-im that is supported a total export of more than $2.4 billion and more than half of the companies that work with them are local small businesses. from new york apple sales to imperial pools businesses in new york's capital region and across the region ha benefited greatly from the work of the export-import bank. there's no reason it should fall victim to the same culture of politics and brinksmanship that cloaked this body for the past few years. 1,053 organizations including
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the capital region chambers of congress have urged the republican house leaders to renew ex-im. a majority of this house, including 180 of my democratic colleagues have expressed support to renew ex-im. all we need now is a vote. our small businesses, our workers and our taxpayers deserve it. let's make it happen. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expire. the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absense requested for mr. rodney davis of illinois for today, mr. kelly of mississippi for today through june 26, and mr. poe of texas for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the requests are granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 6, 2015, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. payne is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the
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minority leader. mr. payne: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members be given five days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. payne: thank you. , mr. let me begin by thanking the -- mr. speaker, let me begin by thanking the members of the congressional black caucus who joined me here tonight. the topic tonight is, the missing black male. tonight as a caucus we will address the issues affecting black male including incarceration health, the increasing suicide rate among black youth and the missing black male in our society. it was recently reported by "the new york times" that 1.5 million african-american men are missing. what do we mean when we say 1.5 million black men are missing? as we speak, hundreds of thousands of black men are sitting in prisons throughout
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this nation. others have died from homicide. the leading cause of death for young black men. and from diseases that disproportionately impact african-american males. and others, like freddy gray, michael brown tamir rice and eric garner, they are no longer with us as well. because of excessive force by police that have cut their lives short. it is clear that our law enforcement system and criminal justice system aren't working for african-americans and other minorities. but it is also clear that we need a new approach in other areas, include regular deucing health disparities among african-american men and boys. tonight, we'll diagnose the problem behind america's 1.5 million missing african-american
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men and help identify solutions to this national problem. while african-americans make up 14% of the u.s. population, they comprise 38% of those in u.s. prison population an 60% of those in solitary confinement. in 2010, african-american men were six times more likely as white men to be incarcerated in federal, state, and local jails. so mr. speaker, this is an issue that is plaguing the african-american community and we a disproportionate number of african-american men incarcerated in this nation. we're trying to figure out why 14% of the population and 60% incars -- we're trying to figure out why, 14% of the population and 60% incarcerated. it doesn't add up.
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right now mr. speaker, i'd like to have the opportunity to introduce the chame of the congressional black -- the chairman of the congressional black caucus who has allowed me to anchor this hour it is my pleasure to introduce the gentleman from north carolina, mr. g.k. butterfield. mr. butterfield: let me begin by thanking you, mr. payne, for your leadership and your willingness to lead this one hour not only tonight but you've agreed to do it throughout the year. thank you for your leadership and all that you do, not only for the people of the state of new jersey but for what you do for america. statistic. for every 100 african-american women there are only 83 african-american men. this gap equals 1.5 million black men essentially missing from everyday life in america. these numbers are simply
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staggering. the fact that black men have long been more likely to be locked up and more likely to die is a problem. compounded with deep disparities that can't to impact the opportunities afforded to african-american males, the gender gap leaves, as reported many households without enough men to be fathers and husbands within the community. the statistics show that most african-americans live in places with a significant shortage of african-american men. while most whites live in places with roughly -- with rough parity between white men and white women. these two leading causes of this gap are incarceration and early deaths, with homicide being the leading cause of death for young african-american males. from heart disease to respiratory disease and accidents, more often than other demographic group, including african-american women. these -- this gender gap does not exist in childhood, as there
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are roughly as many african-american boys as there are african-american girls. yet as they grow up, as they grow up, an imbalance begins to appear during their teenage years and persists through adulthood. we now see an increasing number of suicides. yes, suicides by young african-american males, while the rate for white children has declined. while any increase is problematic we have to wonder what is happening. what is happening with our african-american youth that has led to this staggering increase? the c.b.c. is committed to reducing the school to prison pipeline so that our kids aren't unfairly profiled and placed in the criminal justice system. we are committed to ensuring funding for summer jobs, summer job programs and job training programs so that our youth have opportunities to develop their skills instead of having idle
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time during the summer months. the c.b.c. is committed to increasing resources for families and increasing family engagement. we must support programs and nichetives that will help us provide opportunities for young african-american men. again, mr. payne, i thank you for your leadership thank you for yielding time. mr. payne: i'd like to thank the chairman, mr. speaker, for gracing us with his comments and demonstrating true leadership in the congressional black caucus. next, mr. speaker we have a distinguished member of this caucus, she hails from houston, texas, and has always been on the right side of these issues in bringing light to them. i'd ask the gentlelady from houston texas representative
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sheila jackson lee, to take the mic. ms. jackson lee: let me thank the manager of this hour, mr. payne, and all of my colleagues, and my chairman, who has just spoken and set the tone very eloquently and with dweep conviction, having serve -- and with deep conviction, having served on the supreme court of the state of south carolina, mr. butterfield understands issues of justice and i applaud him for taking this up as well. the gentleman from new jersey and the gentleman from louisiana let me thank them for the words they will see. we will work as a team in the respect i committees we are on to be able to bring this issue to a productive solution. i've always said as a member of this judiciary committee for a number of years now serving on
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the prime subcommittee, that we must breathe life into change and as legislators we must come to a point where we bring legislation for final signature by the president of the united states of america. so i thank mr. payne for giving us this opportunity. let me rush quickly through my remarks because one could be here for a very long time. as i do so, let me take note that this is the 150th year commemoration of the 13th amendment and it is also -- that is the freeing of individuals from slavery. it is the 150th year also, the commemoration of juneteenth. that is of course a regional holiday that the nation celebrates which is the acknowledgment that the slaves were freed pursuant to the emancipation proclamation issued in 1863, texans who will celebrate this on june 9 and many others as i know that texans and others follow, travel
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throughout the nation, juneteenth and i say that because it is a question of freedom. . and when we have the ability to save lives that is a question of freedom. i want to thank "the new york times" for writing about this research and i want hold it this up. rise by suicide by black children surprises the researchers. researchers did not become predisposed to get this answer but they got this answer and the opening sentence says the suicide rate among black children has nearly doubled since the early 1990's. they did not expect this to come forward. but it contributes to the story in "the new york times" about 1.5 million men are missing. in new york almost 120,000 black men between ages 25 and 54 missing from everyday life. chicago 45,000. and more than 30,000 are missing in philadelphia. across the south, from north charleston, south carolina,
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georgia, alabama mississippi and up into ferguson, hundreds of thousands more are missing. african-american men have long been likely to be locked up -- more likely to die young. in a city with at least 10,000 black residents that has the single largest population of missing men, ferguson, missouri. where fatal police shooting catapulted this question to the national attention. incarceration and early deaths are overwhelming. but the 1.5 million missing men from 25 to 54, demographics called the prime age years, higher imprison rates account for almost 600,000. let me say that again. higher imprisonment rates account for 600,000. almost one in 12 black men in this age group are behind bars compared to one in 69 nonblack men in the same age group. whenever we talk about the shootings in south carolina, ohio ferguson, i hear people saying, what about
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black-on-black crime? as if we as african-americans run away from facts. we do not. but we recognize that the fight to preserve lives in the african-american community are societal and holistic. it deals with education and job opportunities and health care. and mental health care. and it calls upon the nation to respond. but it does not put aside what we have faced over the years, by killings of black men, even from the time of slavery and reconstruction, into the 1900's, all through the time of segregation, that we found that they were the -- in the eye of the storm. so let's not distract or detour from the crisis of incarceration and the crisis of what happens in the african-american community and the justice system, by suggesting that any of us are ignoring black-on-black crime. i am glad that the congressional black -- i am
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glad that the congressional black caucus wants to look at the holistic issue of how do you sthove problem? it does not take the attacking of the black community, of ignoring the fact that crime is perpetrate there had. i think everyone knows that perpetration of crime or perpetrating crime impacts your neighbor, impacts where you live. just as it does in incidences dealing with white crime or white-on-white crime or hispanic or asian. people usually engage with those who are familiar. so i am looking to work with this very august body talk to about how we can stop the tide of suicide and the incarceration of our young people. let me cite these examples as i come to a close. let me just give you an example of kevin mchail, small wood jones was on a dean list student on a full academic scholarship to one of the most respected historically black colleges in the country. prior to enrolling in atlanta's morehouse college in the fall
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of 2006, he was a football star and upcoming home coming king at his washington, d.c., area high school. he dabbled in photography mentoring at-risk youth in his free time. last winter he was planning an elaborate birthday celebration. but -- and he was preparing to accept a prestigious summer internship. he never made it to either. february 23, 2008, less than two weeks before his 20th birthday, he shot himself in the head with his mother's gun on the deck of a suburban atlanta farm house. that she brought to live closer to him -- bought to live closer to him. this statement is hurting. it's hurting the family. but it means we must collectively come together to address the question of the pain, of the disparity treatment of the disparate treatment in education and to get to the source of mr. smallwood joan's pain so we can find a solution. i realize that criminal justice is not the answer to all. but it is a side parallel
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effort that we must correct in order to give dignity to those who may have detoured but yet do not need to be condemned for life. i intend to introduce a number of legislative initiatives, besides those who are ongoing, as we're discussing, the mandatory minimums, to focus on the criminal justice side of dealing with juveniles. bail reform and solitary confinement, most people don't realize that when these young men are incarcerated, rather than giving them an opportunity rather than promoting the promise act of our colleague, mr. scott, and giving alternatives to incarceration, but more importantly to people's lives we throw them in jail. and many of us know the tragic story of the 16-year-old that was in solitary confinement for three years, was ultimately released and commit sued side. so we look forward to our colleagues joining in this legislation, the effective speedy trial bail reform and solitary confinement safeguards for juvenile acts of 2015, to alter the holding of juveniles
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that they come out whole and ready to be rehabilitated and to be welcomed into society. the nonviolent offenders act, which will diminish the amount of time that african-american men serve in a federal prison system that does not have parole. and then we want to introduce the raise act, establish a better path for young offenders act, to ensure that there is a way for judges, even though juveniles are treated differently to give a alternative assessment in giving them -- or sentencing them when they run afoul of the law. and mind you that they are in juvenile courts for status offenses. for truancy and others. this young man was in -- incarcerated for taking a knapsack and he insisted he did not take it. this is why he was still there. he did not take it. but he couldn't get to trial. how horrible a life, three years of solitary confinement. so mr. payne, let me thank you for leading forward on this
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august day and time this year of commemorating the 150th year of the 13th amendment, when we were declared free, meaning the ancestors -- african-american slaves, it should be a telling moment that this is also the year, 50th year of the commemoration of the 1965 voting rights act. this should be the year that we restore those votes rights to individuals who have detoured. we should restore section five, we should preach freedom, we should encourage those who want to advocate for fixing the criminal justice system, which can incarcerate and ensleave and -- enslave and as well deny freedom. this is a time we can join together in the congressional black can you cuss and free people in the right way -- caucus and free people in the right way and put only this a pathway to contributing to this great country. they are worthy and they have the talent, the stardom to contribute. i look forward to working with all of you for that journey and
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those results. with that i yield back. mr. payne: i thank the gentlelady from houston who always brings clarity to these issues and is a great contributor to the conscience of this congress. mr. speaker, the gentlelady brings up a lot of good points. in reference to incarceration and speaking about the young 16-year-old boy who spent that much time in solitary confinement and comes out and ends up committing suicide. what we found in this country, as they have broken down the mental health institutions over the years that what we're doing in this country is warehousing people that have mental health issues in prisons. and it is a way to warehouse and get the problem out of the
quote
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way so we don't see it, but a lot of people that are in prison these days have mental health issues and should be dealt with from that perspective as opposed to incarceration. it's my honor and privilege to ask my colleague from new jersey the honorable bonnie watson coleman, who is known in new jersey for her work around criminal justice in the state legislature and has joined us this year in the 114th congress for her remarks with respect to tonight's topic. mrs. watson coleman: waths thank you very much. i thank the gentleman from new jersey for yielding and giving me the opportunity to lend my voice to what i think is a crisis that we are experiencing. as my colleagues before me have pointed out, particularly representative sheila jackson lee, we are in the midst of an american crisis. shaking the very foundation of
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the black community. the word crisis should motivate to us act now. crisis describes a need for immediate action. crisis calls for an immediate infusion of resources. crisis requires a meeting of minds to find answers. if thousands of people disappeared in the prime of their lives, their friends, their families, their co-workers, having no idea where they went, we'd be calling that a crisis. yet for years our young black men have disappeared from their homes, their communities and everything that would have been their lives. violence has taken them. violence that we could have avoided with stronger schools, to give youth the outlet that they need, better jobs and job training to prepare these men to be supporters of strong families. prisons have taken these men. prisons that we support through a legal system that dehumanizes men of color and enforces policies that all but ensure
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these men will enter an endless cycle of recidivism. where authorize than -- where more than 67% of them will come back into the communities with no preparation, no assistance whatsoever in becoming whole and healthy in their communities. this is a nation that is quick to see these black men as a problem. and this is a nation that seems to continue to ignore. and to see the slow, steady disappearance of 1.5 1.5 million black men. this is devastating to our families and to our whole communities. it is past time that we see this for the crisis that it is and invest the resources and intellectual power that will end it. and save our men and our families and our communities. this is a very witty african-american comic who refers to the crisis with black
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men and the need to get them on the endangered species list because when we recognize that a species is endangered, we place value on that species. we place resources in that, every opportunity to ensure that they continue that they thrive, and that they live in the habitats that are healthy for them. this is a situation of an endangered species. this is indeed a crisis. and so i thank my colleagues for drawing attention to this issue and i yield back. thank you mr. payne. mr. payne: i'd like to thank my colleague from the garden state of new jersey. she has come to the congress and hit the ground running. as a great legislator that she was in new jersey, she's doing a magnificent job here in the halls of congress.
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mr. speaker, we touched on many different topics, many different issues and it is just really a difficult circumstance that these individuals face, you know, tremendous barriers to re-entering society and pursuing education and gameful employment. when these men are -- gainful employment. when these men are incarcerated, their children suffer too. nearly two million children grow up in homes where one parent is in jail. of course lowering the incarceration rates means we need to reevaluate the war on drugs. one out of every three african-american men will be incarcerated at some point in their lives. most of these arrests are drug-related. according to the national urban league, mandatory minimums and
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disparities in crack cocaine sensening incarcerates countless african-americans for an inhumane length of time and have made the u.s. the world leader in prison populations. now, is that something that this country wants to be known for? this has created a modern-day cavet system in america -- caste system in america. the incarceration of african-americans convict ed of drug offenses is 10 times greater than that of white american, even though while americans engage in drug offenses at higher rates. we need to focus on rehabilitating drug users instead of incarcerating them and making it nearly impossible to re-enter society. . mr. speaker with that i'd like to introduce the hero from last week's game between the
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republicans and the democrats, where he pitched a magnificent game and once again, we were victorious, and i don't believe we've lost since he's arrived in congress. the honorable gentleman from new orleans the honorable cedric richmond, also known as the franchise. mr. richmond: but i can't use this podium. thank you mr. speaker. thank the gentleman from new jersey for hosting our hour tonight congressman donald payne who, the hold adage is, a chip off the old block. his father was an outstanding congressman from the district who did a lot for you are man -- urban cities and i see that congressman payne, although in his second term has taken up the banner and is filling his
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father's footsteps quite adequately. tonight we're talking about the missing black male. the good news and the bad news is that i found him. and we know -- i found them. we know where they are. they're in prisons, incourse rated. they're in cemeteries. and they're in unemployment lines. we know where they're not. they're not in the homes, they're not providing leadership and mentoring to our young african-american male children. and the question tonight and i think that why we're here, why we're talking about it, is if you can't talk about the problem you can't identify it, then you'll never get to a solution. i come from an area and i was raised by parents who always told me that, you can achieve anything you want to achieve and they gave me the nurturing and
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support and the push up when i needed it and they gave me the swift kick in the rump when i needed that also. that's where we are. i had prepared remarks and i will defer to congressman payne, the gentleman from new jersey, on how he wants to go but i think there are things that we can learn and i think that there are things that we should focus on when we talk about the school to prison pipeline, we talk about youth summer employment, you know, it's amazing that we never, ever talk about it but some of the kids and some of our neighborhoods should get the congressional gold medal for just showing up at school every day because what they go through when they get home from school and all night when it's time to come to school again is conditions we shouldn't have children living in. the good muse is that we can overcome all of that. from doing criminal justice reform to providing another chance for kids and for parents
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who are incarcerated because i had a juvenile court judge a long time ago to write an essay and tell me a story about the fact that there are so many parents that are in jail but the children are doing the time. and we have to make sure that children are not paying for the sins of their parents. and that's where society will come in. that's why i thank the gentleman for having tissue i have more stuff, it's how you would like to go forward, mr. congressman. mr. payne: i think the gentleman is doing a great job in laying out the case so if you'd like to continue. mr. richmond: i think it's worthwhile to probably go into a little bit of my story which is a little bit different from your story. i think it's important for kids around the country and some of our colleagues to know it.
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my mother is from the poorest place in america. she had 15 brothers and sisters. my grandmother was a housekeeper. so the family pulled together to take care of the 15 children. my morphinished high school, she went to college southern university. my father on the other hand mitigating circumstance grandfather owned a funeral home, owned a farm, was very well to do my mother went to southern university, sharing a jacket with her sister. my father went to southern university with a brand new car because my grandfather didn't want him walking around his college campus with a bad heart. they meet they get married, they have two boys, and i'm the youngest. but my father died while i was -- when i was 7 years old, of a heart attack while i was home. i don't say that to say i grew up without a father figure and times were hard because, you know, i missed my father, i missed out on the love and
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nurturing, but i had a mother who was there every step of the way as a public schoolteacher. then i had a grandfather and two grandmothers who stepped in to also give me guidance. but one of the biggest factors in me develop duoing into what i am today -- developing into what i am today is the fact that i lived across the street from a public playground that was well funded. so my mother who was a teacher and my grandfather and grandmother who lived in mississippi and my other grandmother who lived in lake providence, the message was the same. go home from school, do your homework, and then go across the street to the playground so that you can participate in organized sports. and that became very, very important because those men that coached me were role models. they didn't know it and i didn't know it. but i can remember say -- them say, cedric, you're too talented, you need to be a little more serious. you need to get focused.
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they would do the same thing my parents would do, give me a push when i needed it, and give me a swift kick in the butt when i needed it. and they led me to do and push myself to achieve things i never thought i could achieve. but we don't have that anymore. we have decimated the funding for after school programs. we have decimated the funding for recreation in our urban cities. we have decimateded the funding for public schools and the at elect -- athletics and extracurricular activities that go along with them. i'm not sure about your life, congressman payne, but those activities exposed kids to things they never thought that they would ever, ever realize, and exposure is very very good when a mind is developing. i don't know if you had those same experiences when you were growing up. mr. payne: well, mr. richmond, let me just say that, and we've discussed it in private before
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that i am the product of a very blessed circumstance in my life. my mother died when i was 4 and my father raised us, my sister and i, and all the things you talk about benefiting from, i have benefited from but i've never lost the sight and was taught that there but for the grace of god go i. so i have had circumstances in my life where i've been stopped by the police and have been told by that officer using the n-word, that if i did not find my license, they would throw me so far under the jail they would never find me. well, i was able to find my license after that, and showed it to the police officer, and lo and behold, i become a human being again.
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because you see my father was a councilman in that town. but prior to me showing my identification there was the potential of someone never seeing me again because the police officer decided that that should be my fate. so now this police officer becomes nurturing and is parental and he's asking me, well, don't you know you could get hurt by doing that? i had made a u-turn somewhere as a youngster i shouldn't have. but does my life have to end because i made a u-turn that i'm thrown so far under the jail they'll never find me? until i become a human being because my father is a councilman in that city and now there's a concern for my well-being? no. what about the 1.5 million black males that don't have that recognition that we have? that's why i do what i do every day. to make sure that in this nation, the greatest country in
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the world, every man playing by the rules, doing what he's supposed to do, has that equal opportunity and the men that need that kick in the rump, that extra push get that. so my story is a little different, although it sounds the same. my father lost his mother at a very early age. he was 8. and the family got together to buy a house, some aunts and uncles and grandparents, so they could bring my father and his siblings in so they wouldn't get bounced around anymore like they were. i truly believe that's the reason my father never gave my sister and i up because of what he went through as a child and his experiences. so we've been very fortunate. but your articulation to your experience and us understanding that we have an obligation of
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being as fortunate as we have and to have this bully pulpit, that it is our obligation to speak out against the injustices that these 1357b9 million missing black men face every single day. mr. richmond: congressman, i will tell you, except i won't go into my -- any incident i've had with law enforcement let's just stipulate and agree that there have been many. and each one has made me a better person, some of which were warranted, some of which were unwarranted. but i will say we've raised an interesting question, and your last comment, i think, when you describe your story with your parents,ic show how separate all of these issues are but then how whole they are at the same time. because one of the things that many people don't talk about, and i wish our colleagues on the
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other side of the aisle, where we could stop talking at one another and talk to one another, the issue of parental leave is so important because as a bus driver once told our leader, that every day she sees a parent coming to put their kid on the bus, with tears in their eyes because they know that that child is sick and they should be home with that child but they absolutely cannot lose a day's pay because they won't be able to feed that kid or pay the rent or pay to keep the lights on at the end of the month. those are very real circumstances. and you have to believe that we as americans as the united states of america, as the greatest country on earth the exceptional country that we are, that we're better than that. we're better than making a parent put their kid on that school bus going to school sick
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because they can't afford to lose a day's work. let me give you statistics in louisiana. i don't want people to get the impression that it's just urban or just single parent families this ejesuit community in loy owe in a -- the jesuit community in loyola university did a study. one out of three two-parent households in louisiana is economically insecure. four out of five single parent households that's 80% of the single parent households in louisiana, are economically insecure. we have to we have to do better than that. raise the minimum wage raises 14 million people out of poverty the day the president signs the law. those things are important. what do those things have to do with the african-american male? well the young african-american male has too often has just a single mother raising that family. we have to make sure they have
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the means and ability to make sure that that kid can eat every day. because you absolutely cannot learn in school if you're hungry. and if you've had a night where you're sleeping in a car or don't have heat and all of those things. i think as a congress we ought to come together and look at those very specific issues. mr. payne: the gentleman is absolutely correct. it reminds me of another story of some of those households where the circumstances are unfathomable. my sister is a kindergarten teacher 25 years, i don't know if she'd like me telling you the length of time but she had a child in one of her classes several years ago and the child would sleep all through class. and you know, once or twice she let it go but it became a persistent pattern. and so she calls the parents and
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finds out that the reason that the child slept in school was, it was the only safe place to sleep because, in the evening, the rodents that came out of the walls would bite them at night and they would stay up most of the night trying to keep this circumstance off of them, so when the child got to school it was the only place that they could rest. in this country that is unacceptable. and circumstances like that. how does that child get ahead. they are falling behind already. and this is kindergarten. the deck is stacked against a lot of these children when they show up to school. head start and these programs,
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have shown and demonstrated the upper mobility they have given generations of children that need this type of service. but yet our colleagues continue to thwart efforts to increase programs we know that work. really just kind of just dismiss any of these social programs that have been instituted, have any benefit. that's not true. it is just not true. so we need to continue to bring these stories up and explain to people why we fight every single day for these issues. and the whole issue once begin around mental health issues, people walking the streets that need help and ends up doing something that they are really unable to control and end up
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incarcerated. how does that help them? how does that help the circumstance in this country? just hiding the issue? just lock it up? it is absolutely unconscionable in this country that we still act as if we are in the 1800's in this day and age. mr. richmond: i'm glad you brought up the monetary aspect. i get numbers. and i get the concern that we have about the budget, the deficit and the national department debt. but the other thing that i know from my basic accounting classes, we shouldn't talk about spending as the only criteria as we judge things. the conversation in d.c. should be about return on vesm.
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anything that gives us a greater one-to-one return, we can use greater than one to pay down the deficit. let me give you the example. you use head start. nine to one return on every dollar thaw spend. now, i'm not chairman of ways and means and not on the budget committee but in my household, nine is greater than one. if you get $9 back, you could do greater things. and reducing the debt. spend another $5 on other programs that would kids and reduce crime and less people incarcerated and less victims of crime. when we start evaluating the programs that wrer's talking about, that's what we need to
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focus on. in louisiana when i was in the ledgestur, we paid $9,000 tom educate each kid and spending about $45,000 a year to incarcerate a juvenile. now in my public school education, that $45,000 is far greater than that $9,000 and doesn't make science. as we talk about the $6 billion that we spend on incarcerating juveniles in this country we have 70,000 juveniles that are in jail. $6 billion. we could spend that to make the country safer and help them reach their potential. and i'm glad we are having this conversation because it's not about complaining about the
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problem but figuring out a way to solve the problem and trying to solve this problem, because hey, victims of crime are victims of crime and should do everything we can to reduce this number. but we need to get back to what i thought makes this country the greatest country on earth. we care and love our neighbors and want to see them do well. and invest in those things and let's do the things we know we can do. if anybody is interested in having that conversation, both of us in the entire black caucus, we are willing to engage in that conversation and not about spending money but it is about where you get a return and helping families being a family unit to nurture and push kids to achieve everything they can and
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a swift kick in the butt when they need it. i thank you for allowing me to participate in this special hour order to talk about an amazing but not an amazing problem but incredible problem and the fact that we have the leadership to solve that problem and i yield back. mr. payne: i thank the gentleman from louisiana for his remarks and appreciate him being involved in tonight's special order. i'm not surprised that he would be here on such and important topic. he has demonstrated numerous times his commitment to young people and their aspirations and motivating them to do the right thing and be successful as he has been. yet, one thing that comes to my
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mind, mr. speaker, as we talk about these issues what is it that we find these 1.5 million men missing? they are human beings. they are american. what is the difference about these 1.5 that they are african-american? does it go back in our history of 300 years? does it have something to do with us as a race? i just wonder sometimes what is the difference, but i won't go there. mr. speaker, in closing, i would like to thank the member members
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of the black cause cuss to sharing their participation. it was greatly appreciated. every monday night in this house , we have remarkable opportunity to speak about the important work of the c.b.c. to advance full equality and justice for african-americans in all communities in this nation. one of the most significant chammings that our communities face is that of the missing black male. once again, to quote the "new york times," more than one out of every six black men today should be between 25 and 5 years old, have disappeared from daily life. many of these men are incarcerated. others have died from homicide and from disease and diss
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proportionately affects african-american males sm the quonquens ceases are severe. not just for themselves but for the entire society. strong communities lay the strong foundation, but when our criminal justice system we make it incommittee creasingly difficult for them to become productive members of society. we need to hold them accountable by focusing on nonviolent criminals. and if we are truly to make our communities more secure we need to look at health disparities. they are a burdenen to african-american communities. they suffer from a number of diseases including colon rectal cancer at higher rates than their white counterparts.
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part of the problem has to do with stigmas and this is an area which i have been working hard to address. along those lines, we need to eliminate the significance mas of mental health and make sure they have the resource he they need. they shouldn't feel isolated and have no where to turn. it is clear we aren't doing enough as a society to get them the health they need. we should be seeking -- should be seeing an uptick in african- american boys dying from suicide. we shouldn't be seeing an uptimbing in that. for these young boys and others we need to listen and need to encourage them not to be afraid to seek help. the problem of the missing black
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male isn't going to be resolved overnight. but closing the goal is a need we need to aspire to. with that. i kneeled back the balance of my time. mr. speaker, i would like to have the remarks of my co-anchor , ronin kelly, put into the record. yoifment. under the speaker's announced policy of january 6, 2015, the gentleman from north, mr. walker is recognized as the designee. mr. walker: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on the topic of my special order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. walker: tonight is a night
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about accountability and taking responsibility. many of my colleagues were sent by districts, people who wanted to hold this government accountable in the areas of fiscal and social arena. i think back today that was unplanned, on june 125, 1775, 240 years ago this very day, george washington accepted the position as commander in chief of the continental army. washington was serving in the second snenl congress when his peers voted to hand him the reins. about hundred paces from where i'm standing standing in the capitol's rontonda is how the america was birthed into.
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of all those paintings in the rontonda. i'm intrigued by untrum ball's work on washington submitting his ress nation in 1783. through struggles and severe setbacks, more than eight years after accepting the position. while some of these paintings depict those of conquests and discoveries, this captures the great work of washington. congress had granted washington the powers equivalent to a dictator. yet, the humility than which is tom of washington understood that it must be held accountable by the people. his resignation that day stated this, i re-sign the appointment i accepted with distance or lack of self-confidence in my own abilities to accomplish so
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arduous a task which was superseded by the cause the support of the supreme power of the union and the patronage of heff an. a citizen-ruled government had a chance to do something, to be something. something exceptional. 240 years ago today, washington laid the cornstone of freedom through accountability to the people with a unique blessing from the divine power of heffven. that's why we have assembled to talk about what washington's vision was a government that would hold federal government and this administration accountable. tonight, i would like to introduce the chairman of the house and oversight committee the committee i'm privileged to
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served with i yield to the chairman, mr. chafe et cetera. chafechafe this topic is one of the most important to our nation. it is key to the foundation of our nation and the gentleman is right. if you go back and read that address that washington gave, it is one of the most inspirational piece hes because he had the power and respect and power of the people but he did one of the most admirable things, and he gave it up. because he new the power didn't reside in the president and didn't reside in him as a individual. he understood that the power stood with the people. . .
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it's truly a privilege and honor to be a citizen in this country. he,en back a couple -- hearken back a couple hundred years ago to those people who blazed new trails, and said this nation would be inspired by god, we weren't bashful about recognizing that god played a role in our lives and the pour of prayer was an important part of our nation. also incumbent on that was that every man, woman, and child every able bodied person do their part. that we all had accountability and responsibility, not only to take care of ourselves but to also do what we can to help foster a greater community. this was a new idea. it wasn't that way across the world. there were dictators and there were others that really wanted to rule and control people. but the inspiration that our founders had and the foundation of our nation was rooted in this
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idea that the people, the people have the power. so fast forward now to those who serve, whether their serve in the armed services, whether they serve in the federal government or the state government or wherever they might serve, it should be a recognition that we served the american people -- that we serve the american people that we serve them. and so as we look at all the issues that face us whether we're going to spend money whether we should pass this bill or not, let's remember a couple of things. because -- and i would mention that to the -- this to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. walker, because i know he know this is and i know it and i want my kids to know it, that as we look at things we do in congress as we look at the men and women who serve our nation, most do it in a very admirable way. they're patriotic, they're hardworking, they care about this nation. we have some that don't really meet that standard.
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and it is probably most fair, most humane, most decent that we hold people to a high standard. one of the things i want my kids to understand about government, about life in general, is that when they talk about the government, and they talk about the federal government it's really interesting, we'll have this happen in our committee from time to time, we'll say, well, whose money is it? and they'll say, well it's the government's money. no it's not. it's the people's money. see, every time we decide to spend money in congress, what we're really deciding is, should we pull money out of some -- out of somebody's pocket, should we pull money out of your wallet, take it other here and hand it to somebody else? there's some worthwhile causes to do that, right? there's some worthwhile things to do. the protection of our nation nation, for the armed service, i buy that, i get that.
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but we are spending far too much money on too many things. we can't be all things to all people system of going back to my original premise here as i try to teach my own kids and try to remember myself we have to be exceptionally responsible stewards of these assets and resources that aren't ours. they're an individual's. for you see, at the heart of this is something that i think president washington understood, that the most powerful thing upon our nation is the power of the people and it's their own self-determination that should rule the day. you limit their self-determination, the more you regulate them, and the more you pull that money directly out of their pockets and give it to somebody else. there's room for regulation, there's room for certain things in the public good but i tell
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you, most of what happens, most of what goes on in washington it's far too much. it's excessive. and we have to remember at its core that accountability and responsibility for those of us fortunate enough to serve in a public role is imperative but it's also imperative that each individual takes on themselves their own accountability and their own responsibility. as able body men and women, children, got to pull your own weight. you've got to carry your own bucket. you've got to do what you've got to do not only to help yourself but to help your community and friends and loved ones as well. that's the heart of what i think the gentleman from north carolina, mr. walker, brings to this body. i know he cares about it passionately. it's what we are talking about here tonight. last host of examples where we're not holding people accountable and we're trying to change that. i hope we're able to talk about that. but for the moment i would say
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to the gentleman, thank you for allowing me to participate. with that, i yield back. thank you. mr. walker: thank you mr. chairman. we are going to talk about some specific egregious behavior. wasn't long i was here and serving with chairman chaffetz on the house oversight that we were requested to meet with the inspector general of the e.p.a. it was in that moment only weeks after i arrived that here we have an inspector general, gentleman appointed by the president who had reached out to us in his tireless efforts to even so much to get the e.p.a. to respond. the arrogance that stem from the the agency has been grossly misused and abused. it's my privilege tonight to acknowledge one of my north carolina colleagues to talk specifically more about the environmental protection agency and with that, i yield to the fine colleague from the
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charlotte area mr. richard hudson. mr. hudson: i thank my colleague, mr. walker, for yielding the time and thank you for your strong leadership here in congress. often a new member of congress comes to town and spends a little bit of time learning the ropes maybe sitting in the back row and observing, that's not true of mark walker. mark walker has quickly become a leader in congress and particularly on the issues such as this. tonight the people's night government accountability is the topic. i thank the gentleman for bringing up the issue of the e.p.a. we had a hearing friday in the energy and commerce committee, on which i serve in which we had the acting assistant administrator who oversees the clean air act. we're looking at this new proposed rule that the e.p.a. has put out. having to do with ground level ozone. now in 2008, e.p.a. issued a rule that brought the levels of ground level ozone down to 75
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parts per billion. based on that number, many counties in north carolina and across this country were out of attainment. everyone wants clean air. everyone wants clean water. even those of white house are concerned about jobs know that if you don't have clean air and clean water, you can't attract industry your can't have businesses grow in your community. but you have to look at the real science and you have to look at the real numbers and the truth is since 1980, we've cut ground level ozone levels 30% in this country. we've done a tremendous job. that's been driven by industry. and this new rule was issued in 2008, but the instructions, the -- the instructions to states weren't issued until march of this year. march of this year, the e.p.a. finally told states how to comply with the new levels of 75 parts per million. now they come out with a new rule that says we're going to drop that to 65 million or maybe 60 million. every county in north carolina
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except one county in western north carolina would be out of attainment. so what does that mean? that means you can't have a road project, can't build a new home it means you can't add any jobs to any existing industry. it means you can't bring any new industry into the state. and they're doing this at a time when we haven't implemented the old rule. when we've already cut ground level ozone 30%. and so what i would say is, let's wait and look at the science. let's look at the real health impacts. let's see what the results of the current regulations are before we rush out with some new regulations which we're told could cost as much as 270,000 jobs in north carolina. i've seen the figure of 1.3 billion jobs in the country. million jobs. 1.3 million jobs. before we bring on this cost, before we threaten these jobsing before we basically shut down
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all growth and development, let's take a look at the actual science. so this is just one example of one agency that is overreaching. we've got other examples. you've got the i.r.s. using the dog ate my homework excuse duck responsibility. you've got the department of veterans' affairs failing to provide adequate care for our heroes. when you establish the -- when he established the v.a. president lincoln promised our nation would take care of the men in uniform and their families who served our country. it's an understatement to say that today the v.a. is failing and falling extremely short of that promise president lincoln made. our soldier, sailors airmen and marines have endured traumatic experiences on the battlefield and should not have to can't to fight to receive proper care when they return home. make no mistake, there are many good and dedicated people of v.a. -- at v.a. medical facilities across the country that do a tremendous job every day caring for our veterans. many of those working at v.a.
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facilities are veterans themselves. the problem is the bureaucracy has gotten so massive that the resources are wasted and quality of care delivered to veterans has decreased this culture of unaccountability has led to long wait times, 10,000 disability claims still in backlog and millions of tax dollars wasted. our veterans are being ignored and tragically new york some cases, left to die. it was george washington who has been talked about my colleague mr. walker mentioned the anniversary of him resigning his commission. george washington said the willingness with which our young people are likely to serve in any war, no matter how justified, shall be directly proportional to how they perceive the veterans of earlier wars treated and appreciated by their nation. mr. speaker, i know we will continue our efforts to reshape the culture at the v.a. but it's tight time -- high time this administration take responsibility and joins those of white house want to give veterans a choice. every veteran should have the choice to go to any doctor of
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their choosing and the v.a. should not have to pre-approve it and the v.a. should pay for that medical care. that's the propozzal i've talked about, i think -- proposal i've talked about, i think that's the way to end these wait times and bring down these backlogs. i call on the administration to work with us. it's time for the people to have accountability from the government. it's time for veterans to have accountability from the v.a. they put everything on the line for our country, for our freedom. it's time for taos do the same. god bless our veterans and their families. it's time to get to work. with that, mr. speaker, i will yield back to my colleague, mr. walker. mr. walker: thank you, representative hudson, for the passionate remarks on our veterans. it is a shame the abuse we see sometimes in the veterans but there's probably been no greater abuse than that of our own internal revenue system. with 75,000 pages 8,000 pages that have been added to under
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this administration we can see why abuse and corruption exists. what better person to speak on that than an economics professor a new member of congress from virginia, congressman dave brat. i yield time to mr. brat. mr. brat: thank you mr. speaker. thank you, mr. speaker. -- mr. walker. earlier this month, more details emerged about the i.r.s.'s targeting of conservative groups, where the agency tried to extort information on doe no, find out what members talked about at their meetings and probe into what members did in their very free time. we learned this month that the i.r.s. had set up yet another roadblock to prevent congress and the american people from getting to the bottom of this scandal. the i.r.s. established a team of hundreds of lawyers to redact information from the documents congress had requested for its investigations.
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this obstruction makes me extremely concerned for every american who voices political beliefs that don't agree with this administration's, whether they are conservative, liberal, green religious, or agnostic. i'm grateful for the organization in my own district that exposed this scandal to the american people. the richmond tea party was the first in the country to go public with the i.r.s.'s abuse. once it was exposed, conservative groups from all over the country came forward and revealed that they were victims of the same i.r.s. tactics. the i.r.s. specifically targeted groups with tea party and patriot in their names because of their political positions. the i.r.s. targeted them for increased scrutiny and it delayed processing their applications for nonprofit status. let me go over that again, just real slowly so the american people understand what's going on here. the tea party group the tea
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stands for taxed enough already. they are being targeted by the very government agency tasked with ensuring fairness in our tax revenue collection system. the irony could not be clearer. the the groups were subjected to questioning. the i.r.s. demanded resumes, list of donors to determine if their speech was acceptable to the big brother government. the agency asked for every board immediating and positions they took on certain issues. on april 15, 2009, thousands of the people of virginia stood together. and president obama's promise to fundamentally transform america.
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people became engaged. many for the first time. afterward, i.r.s. targeting broke, people stopped getting to meetings. it has been two years since the justice department opened its investigation and two years of waiting as nothing ever seems to happen. the i.r.s. has tried to cover its tracks and lied to congress about its secreted program. documents submitted by congress remain unfulfilled. the i.r.s. claimed it lost emails. since then the inspector general recovered 6,000 of them. and were located where anyone would expect, in the i.r.s. data back yutch facility. congress held lerner in contempt
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after she claimed she didn't know anything about it. yet the obama just tries department the justice department, has never prosecuted her. this all creates the potential that we could see a repeat of this very same behavior in the futetr. we need this president and this administration to live up to their promise of transparency, rather than their practice of obstruction and we in congress can end this mistreatment of our citizens bypassing a fair tax or flat tax. it would treat citizens more equally and take away the power to discriminate against americans. ladies and gentlemen, the right to express your political views is so critical to the foundation
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of a free society, that it's enshiped in our first amendment, the first amendment. our very freedoms and the constitutional form of government depend on the ability of all americans to freely exercise that right. that's why it is incumbent upon this congress to put forth every effort to protect that precious right and withhold those infringe upon it accountable. thank you. i yield back. thank you, mr. walker. mr. walker: thank you, congressman. i appreciate you shedding light. you know, this administration from the very beginning went a long way in promising transparency and accountability. in fact it was president obama himself who expressed, and i quote, my administration is committed to creating an
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unprecedented level of openness in government. in the same speech he went on to say, transparency promotes accountability and provides information for citizens about what their government is doing. information maintained by the federal government is a national asset. president obama, said my administration will take appropriate action consistent with law and policy to disclose information that the public can credirect examinationly find and use. well, that's what he said, but it's been the exact opposite for the department of justice. we have heard about fast and furious. i want to talk about tonight is operation choke point and here to do is one of the strong conservatives in all of
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congress, mr. mulvaney. mr. mulvaney: thank you tore doing this. i think it is designated as the people's night. but i think that we don't. it's good to be talk to talk br things that affect the people. and things that affect the people back where i live is operation choke point. people use pawn shots and go to a buy ammunition. and what has happened in the last year and a half, they are losing the ability to do that. and acknowledge this isn't some right-wing sppssi but acknowledged by the department of justice. they set out to attack legal
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businesses. businesses that were perfectly legal and permitted under the law but in disfavor with this administration. and instead of trying to drive those businesses outs of businesses out of the law, they used the regulatory environment and instead of going after those businesses, this administration went after their banks and said, look, we know that this pawn shop is an illegal business and we know you have done business with them for a long time but we can make it difficult if you continue to bank this pawn shop. your life would be easier if you didn't bank this pawn shop. and time and again, mr. speaker what we found, was the small businesses women-owned businesses in my district, losing their banking relationships, the banks that
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had 25-year relationships said we can't bank you anymore and difficult to do. women-oipped business pawn shop in my district, tried to expand the business so the business is big enough to give to both of her sons. she wanted the business to be big enough. and had more than a 20-year relationship and she was too hot to handle. not only could they give her a loan but pulled back on the services they provided. large financial concern, payday lending and you may not like payday lending, but people use it and people need it. when i was in the state legislature and had hearing and one of the witnesses that poe before me in the senate was an
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employee in the local credit unions. and i said you are hear to talk about in favor of the payday lending. she said yeah. i said why are you here? she said everyone knows who i am. if i go to my local bank, everybody is going to know about. she needed that particular service. folks need this service. it may not be the proudest thing we do as a nation but people need it. and this company in greenville, south carolina had a 0-year banking relationship and the bank came in and said we are under a great deal of pressure and have to pull our relationships with you. maybe five% and this large employer in my district is
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struggling to find financial is services. it is so offensive that the d.o.j. acknowledged that it was wrong and agreed to stop the program, the fdic agreed to stop as well. when the letter went out, we are hearing stories to this day that it is still going on. my dad told me about a year ago wife been here three years at the time, he said you want to know the difference between government? he said when i was your age you might not like what the government did but it didn't occur to us to be afraid of the government or might be targeted for wra we believe or what we think or do for a living because that's what's different now.
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people are afraid of their government. if you are home tonight and watching this and running out to an ammunition store in union, south carolina, you are afraid that the government is going to put you out of business. and that is a dramatic change mr. speaker, and not a change for the better. men and women who come here tonight, like mr. walker, can tell people, we think it's wrong, too and heard what they had to say back home and they are not alone and men and women here in washington who are outraged and dedicated to making sure that when our time is done, they won't have to fear our government nime. i yield back and i thank the gentleman from north carolina for setting up this hearing.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: i send a privileged report. the speaker pro tempore: clerk will report the title. the clerk: house resolution 315, resolution for providing of the bill to authorize appropriations for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the united states government, the community management klt and the central intelligence agency retirement and disability system and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. mr. walker: walk we talk about accountability. think of great leaders here in the congress, people who have reached out as meantors and can think of no one who has more respect than our colleague, mr.
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mark medoogs and i yield time to him. immediate mr. meadows: i thank the the gentleman from north carolina for his leadership and being the voice of the american people. i rise today tore really highlight what so many americans have a hard time understanding, and that is why we, as the american people can continue to allow a government to overreach its true authority and not be reined, mr. speaker. i want to highlight a few things. before i do that it's important to talk about the federal workers here that work for the american people the vast majority of which i would say almost 99% of which are
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dedicated public servants that each and every depay give their utmost for their fellow man, truly to serve this great country. this night, i rise tore really highlight some of those who give the federal workers a bad name. and for many of us, they also give us a reason to pause and say, wait a minute. how can that happen in this great land? so tonight i feel like it's important that we identify some of these workers who truly have displaced the trust of the american people. they have taken federal tax dollars and have taken a federal salary and yet what we find is, they have not upheld their
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constitutional duty to do what is right on behalf of the american people. we know one example is with the e.p.a. the gentleman who worked to define the clean air act, we found that over time he was not even showing up for work, that he would continue to be paid for years and years and years that he was paid wute showing up. now, certainly his colleagues would have to know there was an empty cubicle. yet for over a decade, an e.p.a. employee who present tended to be an c.i.a. agent. he wasn't showing up for work. indeed what he was continuing to do is pretend like he was an employee of the federal government, but not showing up.
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my question is really more about accountability, mr. speaker. where was the management team? where was the accountability. where was the management? let me tell you where think were. . . this employee decides they're going to retire. they give him a great retirement party. he retires, and he says, but wait just a minute. you need to continue to pay me because i'm still working for the c.i.a. now, the sad part about it is, they continued to pay him for another 18 months. mr. speaker, i don't know about you but that is just hard to believe it's the thing that novels are made of. but yet this is not fictitious. it's the truth. we've got other e.p.a. employees that are there watching porn on
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their government computer over six hours a day for four years. where's the oversight there? yet when people are willing to blow the whistle and say, this is not right with some of my colleagues, what do they meet with? we heard in a hearing just this last week that a whistleblower for the department of homeland security and their eb-5 program was punished because she dared to speak up. mr. speaker, i think it's time that the american people start to hold the management of federal workers accountability because they're entrusted with that trust that needs to be carried out each and every day. so tonight i'm here to call out mr. mallorcas who recently an i.g. report identified him as
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doing special favors for political operator -- operatives allegedly the governor of virginia. allegedly the brother of our former secretary of state. what the american people will not stand for, mr. speaker is a double standard. if political favors are going to be given out, the people who give them out should be held accountable. i appreciate the gentleman from north carolina his leadership, because not only is his service on oversight and government reform designed to make sure we get to the truth of it, but he is unrelenting in his willingness to go after those who live by a double standard. so with that, mr. speaker, i yield back and i thank the gentleman from north carolina. >> thank you congressman meadows. appreciate your words tonight. mr. walker: a lot of interest these days in the growing list of candidates that we have
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running for the 2016 presidential election. one of the things that drove me to make a decision on running for congress to begin with is the great abuses that we have in some of these particular agencies. three years ago none were more glaring than the state department and the actions taken by then-secretary of state hillary clinton. to this day, i can't understand why she could look and even hug a family and tell them point-blank that this was about a video. nine days later, our president followed up with pretty much the same inaccurate jargon. my friend tonight who is going to talk some about her work and her time a great conservative from the state of colorado my privilege to yield time to representative ken buck.
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mr. buck: many of us know today marks an important anniversary in world history. 800 years ago, following a populist revolution led by courageous english bay rons -- barons demanding protection from overreach, king john signed the magna carta. this grand charter marked the first time that all people even kings, were gnched by law and all people would enjoy due process and equal standing under the law. it inspires our founding fathers to demand liberty. many magna carta principles were repeated again in our constitution. it started one of our base exfounding principle the rule of law. president obama is working to fundamentally transform our laws
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without consent granting citizenship to legal immigrants making recess appointments to the nlrb when the senate is not in recess and changing the health care law without an act of congress. the i.r.s. ignored the rule of law by targeting and harassing individuals based on their political beliefs, and who could forget the a.t.f.'s fast and furious program which allowed u.s. weapons to be walked across the u.s.-mexico border in hopes of catching mexican drug lords but ended with the tragic murder of u.s. border patrol agent ryan terry. it is time to prevent future would-be monarchs from being elected and further eroding our proud tradition for the rule of law. while the clinton family has been known to play by their own set of rules and has a laundry list of scandal that goes back decades, i am squarely focused on who dishonest and dubious
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scandals hillary clinton was involved in serving as secretary of state. she used her position of power to create her own set of rules using a personal email account for official state department business. she continued to do so even after issuing a memo calling on staff to use official government email accounts. secretary clinton ignored the rule of law when she deleted over 30,000 state department emails from a personal server located in the basement of her georgetown mansion. what makes it work is she deleted these emails even as congress called for her to release them. serving -- storing these emails on a private server violates federal records law. delighting them also violates the law. what is she hiding in these deleted emails? did she consider what might happen if these emails fell into the wrong hands? would she even know if her
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server had been breached? secretary clinton proudly stated in a march 10 press conference i fully complied with every rule i was governed by. americans will never know because she ignored the rule of law. by exclusively using a personal email account to conduct state department business she put the state department at great risk for her personal convenience. the secretary of state is also not allowed to conduct and store official state business on a private, unsecured server. if any other hard working american conducted their business this way they would be out of a job and most likely in jail. this brings me to the clinton family's next scandal. while hillary clinton served as secretary of state, the clinton family foundation continued to accept millions of dollars in donations from foreign governments. all told, seven foreign nations including kuwait, qatar, oman and algeria donated money to the clinton foundation in the time
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she was secretary of state. these cricks raise questions about secretary clinton's independence and ethical judgment. but when some of the $1 million in donations came from saudi arabia, the united ashe emirates, it raises questions about whether these nations were hoping to gain better diplomatic ties to the united states through donations to the clinton foundation. when the secretary of state is playing fast and loose with the rule of law ignoring a memorandum of understanding with the white house regarding a questionable donation with the -- from the algerian government it's difficult to trust her judgment or her word when she claims not to have broken any laws. the rule of law has been a core principle since our founding. brave men and women have fought and died to protect the liberty we hold so dear. this is why i find it especially tragic that secretary clinton blatantly ignored the rule of law. the magna carta's great anniversary is a great
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opportunity to remember those who secured the rule of law. we must restore this key principle and stop the attacks on our founding principles. it's our job to safeguard those principles and protect the america we know and love for generations to come. i yield back. mr. walker: with that, it's my privilege to introduce my colleague, former fellow minister congressman jody heist. -- hice. mr. hice: i thank the gentleman from north carolina mr. speaker i continue to be just atound -- astounded at the lack of accountability and transparency surrounding the scandal with the i.r.s. as it relates to conservative groups and the targeting that the i.r.s. had toward those groups. it is absolutely unacceptable that we've waited now for over two years to get answers to this scandal and the targeting of conservative groups and right at the epicenter of all of that is
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lois lerner. we requested emails from two years ago and only right now, two years later, are some of these requests for emails coming to light. these document the communications requested, should have been brought forth long ago. in fact, we're at the time now in this investigation, we're at the point now that i believe we need to seriously question the process by which congress' requests for information from the i.r.s. is even being handled by the i.r.s. one example mr. speaker, in oversight and government reform committee where i have the distinct honor of serving, it came to light in that committee that the i.r.s. actually formed a special project team in order to deal with the lois lerner investigation. according to testimony by ms. mary howard, the director of privacy, the government liaison and disclosure for the i.r.s.,
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according to her testimony all congressional subpoenas, requests for information freedom of information act requests, and other investigation requests were directed to this special group, this special project team, rather than going through the normal process of investigations that other, similar investigations might go through. according to her testimony mr. speaker these requests were handled primarily by the i.r.s. commissioner and the i.r.s. office of chief counsel rather than the normal process. in other words this special project team handled the issue with lois lerner differently than they handle other, similar investigations. ms. howard's testimony further revealed that the i.r.s. on numerous occasions went away from the standard way of dealing with freedom of information requests and if her testimony is
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true the handling of the foia request not only for ms. lois lerner but other 501-c-3 and c-4 organizations may have gone beyond what is even permissible under the freedom of information act. following her testimony chairman chaffetz and jordan sent a letter to the i.r.s. commissioner john koskinen requesting more information so the oversight committee could better understand the process they used in dealing with ms. lois lerner. i'm told even as recently as this past friday that the letter received back from the i.r.s. is totally inadequate, it does not answer the questions, and here we are still years removed from it. mr. speaker, it is extremely frustrating that now two years later, we're still dealing with this issue. it's us from rating -- frustrating that an oversight and government reform committee, we're still dealing with the
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deplorable activities of how the i.r.s. has been handling this. it is up to congress, we must continue pushing forward for increased accountability and transparency in all areas of our government, particularly as it relates to this with the i.r.s. i want to thank the speaker and the gentleman from north carolina and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: thank you congressman -- mr. walker: thank you congressman hice. one of our sharpest new members from the state of texas district attorney, who we asked specifically to come out and share some thoughts tonight speaskly about some of the continued abuses. with that, i yield time to the congressman from texas mr. john ratcliffe. mr. ratcliffe: i thank the gentleman for yielding time this evening. mr. speaker, a most fundamental principle of our criminal justice system is that we are innocent until proven guilty. operation chokepoint turns that
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most sacred tenet on its head. when president obama and his administration uses agencies to target businesses without due process, without any public debate and when he bases his attacks not on the rule of law but on his own political bheefs -- beliefs that is a tragic breakdown of the system of checks and balances and separation of powers our founding fathers deliberately designed. operation chokepoint is just flat wrong. folks across the fourth congressional district of texas in cities and towns like bonham and denson and sulfur springs, tex ar ka in a and sherman just want to -- texarkana, and sherman just want to run their businesses without fear of persecution from a president who has overstepped his bounds time and time again. many texans i represent are concerned about operation chokepoint, an initiative
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pressuring banks and others in the financial industry to deny access to financial services, to businesses like gun sellers and coal producers. my constituents see this operation for what it really is a blunt weapon that targets and stig in atizes entire industries that the obama administration dislikes instead of an honest effort to get rid of actual bad actors and lawbreakers. sadly, as a direct result of operation choke point legitimate businesses in texas and across the country have been forced to close simply because the president and his activist bureaucrats have a political agenda and they don't like what these businesses are selling. . when you target your own citizens as political enemies, that's the way that third world governments operate. not the greatest country the world has ever seen. mr. speaker this is the united states of america and our government should never go after its o