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tv   U.S. House of Representatives 10052017  CSPAN  October 5, 2017 9:00am-12:25pm EDT

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advanced, modern fishing boat something ecologically correct, in order to match the sun will -- in order to match sustainable resources. fleet that is 40 years out of sync. i wish c-span will take a close look at this. it does directly affect the nation. host: always appreciate suggestions. we have to leave it there. we take you there for gavel to gavel coverage. chaplain, reverend time, jesuit conference, washington, d.c. the chaplain: let us pray. god of all consolation from whom human sadness is never
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hidden, we turn to you to be our strength this day. the palmist proclaims you are close to the brokenhearted and that you saved those crushed in spirit. we pray that you lift the spirit of our nation this day and guide those who represent and lead your people. help our leaders to find good council and give -- good counsel and give ear to your holy words. the book of proverbs teaches us that for lack of counsel the nation fails, security lies with many advisors. help all who advise, guide, and help to direct our government, to do so with selfless care. may they put the needs of other before their own cares and lift the burdens of those who suffer most. mend our leaders' discerning minds and hearts so that your will be done today eafer every day with which you bless us.
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we pray this with great faith and hope. amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, i demand a vote on the speaker's approval. the speaker: the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the aye vs. t the journal stands approved. mr. thompson: mr. speaker. the speaker: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order a quorum is not present. the speaker: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from california, mr. peters. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
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the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize the peritechnical institute for receiving the accrediting commission of career schools and colleges 2017 school of excellence award. peri tech has continually provided high quality education and technical training for students in the if yack ma valley of central washington. this award is well deserved. mr. newhouse: on top of that i would like to recognize tyler who received the commission's 2017 outstanding graduate award. tyler graduated in december, 2016, with a certificate in information technology and communication systems.
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tyler has cerebral palsy and has overcome many challenges to obtain his certificate. he has served as a role model and leader among his classmates. applying the resources and guidance he received at perry tech, tyler is currently employed with a telecommunications service provider where he's succeeding in advancing his career goals. his achievements are commendable and i wish him the best in his future endeavors. please join me in congratulating peritechnical institute on their achievements as they continue to provide excellent education and job training to equip students just like tyler. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? without objection. >> mr. speaker, our tax system is broken and in need of desperate reform. we need a simpler tax code that's fiscally responsible, makes america businesses more
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competitive, and allows working families to prosper in the 21st century economy. but the ryan-mcconnell tax proposal would do the opposite and fails on the promise made by president trump to boost the middle class. middle class families would see an average tax increase of $1,290 per year, that's a 380% increase for an average family of four. a new analysis from the nonpartisan tax policy center says the proposal would add $5.6 trillion to the national debt. a 27% increase from the current debt, which is already too high. mr. peters: under this proposal the increased deficit also far outweigh the benefits of reductions and economic growth and hardworking americans will both suffer. instead we need forward-looking policies that are fiscally responsible and create opportunities for families and businesses in today's economy that will only come from bipartisan negotiations where we can work together to create the best possible tax conditions for americans.
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thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. e speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. thompson without objection. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, is october national arm to school month. when we celebrate school education, school gardens, and lunch trays filled with healthin greedants. farm to school brings morkt for. and transporting food it long distances is lessened. 180 days a year children eat a school lunch f it can taste
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great and support the local community, everybody wins. in the early 1990's there were merely a few farms to school programs, today there are thousands. mr. speaker, as chairman of the nutrition subcommittee, it is encouraging to see this program grow and our school children's diets improving. a long time love of healthy locally grown food from your local farmer is something we can all support. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from north carolina seek recognition? without objection. >> thank you, mr. speaker. 585, the number of people injured and murder in las vegas sunday. ms. adams: 477, the number of days since the previous deadly mass shooting in orlando. 521 the number of mass shootings since orlando. 91, the average number ms. adams: 477, the number of k
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violence every day. of americans 69, the number of homicides in in 2017. zero, the number of actions taken by congress to address the gun violence epidemic in our country. when is enough in 2017. zero, the number enough? what's it congress to end the gun violence? i urge my colleagues to stop wasting time. demand a joint select committee is established to combat gun violence and the bipartisan king-thompson bill is brought to the floor for a vote. it's time we had the moral courage to act. our nation can't wait and they shouldn't. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? going to take for without objection. mr. fitzpatrick: mr. speaker, i rise today in recognition of a brave young man from bucks county, pennsylvania. matt ruben. a resident of north hampton, his attitude and balanced energy make him a promising
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young leader in our community. this is even more notable due to the challenges he face from type one diabetes. despite these obstacles, brett has never let his illness define him or hold him back. more amazing, mr. speaker, desire channeled his to cure this illness and help others. partnering desire to cure this illness and help others. partnering with the juvenile diabetes research foundation, brett and his mother have dollars to nds of combat type 1 diabetes. participating in foundation walks, the rubens joined a close knit group of family and friends and they call themselves brett's bend. fitting honoring a teenager who marches to his own beat and steals the show wherever he goes. it's my honor to recognize hifment i know his future will be bright and type one diabetes will never interfere with his ambitions or aspirations. mr. speaker, i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution chair d rule 18, the
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declares the house in the committee of the whole house ch declares the house in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of house concurrent resolution 71. will the gentleman from idaho, mr. simpson, kindly take the chair. the chair: the house is in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of house 71 which resolution the clerk will report by title. the clerk: concurrent resolution establishing the congressional budget for the united states government for fiscal year 2018, and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2019 through 2027. the chair: when the committee of the whole rose wednesday, october 4, 2017, amendment number 2 printed in house report 115-339 offered by the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, had been disposed of. it is now in or order to consider amendment number 3.
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for what purpose does the ntleman from california seek recognition? recognition? mr. mcclintock: i have a mefpblgt the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 3 in nature of a substitute inted in house report number 115-339, offered by mr. mcclintock of california. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 553, the gentleman from california, mr. mcclintok, and a member opposed, each will control 15 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from 115-339, mcclintock: i yield my 3 1/2 minutes. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. california. mr. mr. mcclintock: i'm pleased to present the republican study committee's budget. this proposal combines savings proposed by the congressional budget office, many r.s.c. members, and public policy think tanks including the heritage foundation, citizens against government waste, and the national taxpayers union. it's based on a simple principle that government should spend money as families spend what they have left after they paid their taxes. by restraining the growth of
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spending and refocusing resources on core governmental responsibilities, adopting commonsense reforms, and placing medicare and social security back on a sound financial footing, we believe there is still time to save this country from financial and economic ruin, but time is running out. on our current course, the congressional budget office warns that within four years our deficits will balloon to $1 trillion annually, adding about $8,000 a year to an average family's debt that they'll have to pay off in future taxes. two years after that, interest on the national debt will reach $654 billion. that's more than we currently spend on the entire defense establishment. let me repeat that so it sinks in. six years from now we will spend more than our current defense budget accomplishing nothing but renting the money that we have already borrowed and spent. three years later, medicare
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will collapse. six years after that, if we get that far, social security runs out of money. this approaching crisis can be described with just three numbers. 26, 35, 49. once you understand those three numbers, 26, 35, 49 you can plainly see the root of our problems. 26% is the combined population in inflation growth over the past 10 years. 35% is the growth in federal revenue. so clearly this is not a revenue problem. the problem is that third number, 49% is the growth in spending. nearly twice the rate of inflation and population combined. we're about to hear about draconian cuts from the opposition. let me emphasize, the r.s.c. to grow the es federal government every year. i repeat, the r.s.c. budget
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spends more every year. over the decade we provide for more than $1 trillion of government growth. only in washington can that be described as a cut. to grow the federal government every year. i the r.s.c. budget merely restrains the growth of spending over the next decade to give families the time and room to catch up. by doing so, we can arrest the ruinous spiral of debt and interest costs that now threaten the very solvency of our nation. this budget gores a lot of sake considered as read cows because we want to point out the wide range of savings available to achieve. but i would ask the opponents of this budget to consider one thing as we race toward the looming fiscal crisis four years down the road. you cannot provide for the common defense or promote the general welfare or do all of other things our government's called upon to do if you cannot pay for them. our mountainous debt driven buyout of control spending -- by out-of-control spending. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kentucky claim time in opposition? mr. yarmuth: i rise to claim
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time in opposition. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for 15 minutes. mr. yarmuth: i'm going to cut to the chase. the republican study committee budget is so extreme it cannot be taken seriously. . it cuts spending by $10 trillion over 10 years which is $4 trillion more than the already irresponsible spending cuts in chairman black's budget. to its credit, the r.s.c. tells us where those cuts will come from rather than leaving large amounts unspecified or using magic asterisks or phony economic assumptions to reduce spending. it cuts social security, medicare and medicaid. it cuts programs that ensure basic living standards, protect the environment and help families afford college. for 2018, the r.s.c. budget matches the president's level for defense, including war funding, but for nondefense discretionary spending, the r.s.c. budgets provides $394
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billion, $24% below the austerity cap. there's no way this house or any house would approve an appropriations bill that inflicted a 24% cut on all government operations. if just two programs, veterans' programs and n.i.h. funding were excluded from those cuts, everything else would be cut by more than 55%. so, yes, this budget claims to reach balance, but it would achieve it by making cuts that would be catastrophic. not even congress is that self-destructive. i would contend that the two republican budgets actually show how dismissing the notion that revenues must be part of any solution to restrain deficits and debt compounded with the flawed notion that balance must be achieved in the short term will inflict intolerable hardship on the american people. while totally unintentional, they make a pretty compelling case that for congress to fund
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the federal programs and investments that the american people want and expect, raising revenues has to be part of the equation. when one of the things that amuses me in a very kind of dark way is that i remember so well in 2010 where republicans actually rode to victory in the house by claiming that we were going -- we democrats were going to cut $750 billion out of medicare. that wasn't true but they claimed it, and now in this republican study committee budget they double down on that. not exactly double but they are going to cut it by over $900 billion. i don't think the senior and disabled population would feel very good about that. i would thank my colleagues for bringing that important issue to the debate. and with that i'll reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. mcclintock: thank you, mr. chairman. i now am pleased to yield to the chairman of the republican
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study committee, the honorable mark walker of north carolina, for three minutes. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. walker: thank you, mr. speaker. $22.2 trillion. our national debt is more than $22.2 trillion. let's put it this way. each american's share of the national debt is $62,000. from the retiree in north carolina who has already done so much to serve the country, to the newborn child in new york with so much potential, $62,000. in fact, it's more than the median american family brings home in an entire year. our debt continues to mount even as federal reserves reach record highs. this leads to an undeniable conclusion even from captain obvious. the federal government has a spending problem. the growing federal government has significant negative consequences for the country and its people. the large federal debt reduces investment, productivity and wages while federal interventions in the economy reduce the incentive to work,
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resulting in a shrinking labor market. the debt can have dangerous implications for our national security. recently causing a bipartisan leading national security officials to write, our long-term debt is the single greatest threat to our national security. most fundamentally, when the federal government is too big and too intrusive, it interferes with our unalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 11 months ago, the american people voted to give republicans unified control of government. now it is time to follow through and implement the policy agenda that congress and the president were elected on. as the calendar moves into fall, the grade of the 115th congress will be delivered on whether we can reform our inefficient tax code. this process starts with a budget. along with repealing obamacare and securing our border, the republican study committee budget allows us to fill these promises and more. this fiscal year 2018 r.s.c.
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budget ensures a strong national security, a robust economic growth, equal opportunity for all, a sustainable social safety net and a return to constitutionally limited government, all with the goal of securing america's future economy. instead of a future of high debt and low growth, the r.s.c. budget proposes a positive blueprint for success and opportunity. our budget focuses on pro-growth and pro-family policies that will boost america's economy and will provide a strong fiscal foundation for generations to come. mr. chairman, in closing, i'd like to thank my friend, mr. mcclintock, for his leadership of this r.s.c. task force as well as the members, all the members of the republican study committee who participated in this effort. with this budget we have accomplished our goals of detailing the variety of bold policy solutions as well as helping to influence the balanced budget offered by my friend, chairwoman black.
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to have reconciliation targets as the r.s.c. budget does. so that we can begin the central task of implementing these policies into law. my fellow members, when will our debt matter? next year, the year after? in six years we're projected to spend more than $650 billion on interest alone on our debt. what will it take for our friends on the left to stop hijacking the american dream for our children and grandchildren? is it not a moral injustice to leave this level of debt to the next generation? mr. speaker, we've been making this argument in the house for years. today it's time to make a difference. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: thank you, mr. chairman. you know, it's fascinating to have this debate and speaking in such high principled ways about the needs to reduce deficit and debt and i don't think any democrat would argue that we need to do something to
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reduce deficits and debt, that we face a very, very dire long-term fiscal future. but we also lose sight of the facts that the american people expects something from their government. they expect our government to keep them safe, but they also expect their government to protect their drinking water, protect their air, to make sure that the food they eat is not dangerous, to provide law enforcement, to help local law enforcement, to do many, many things. this budget, as well as chairman black's committee budget, would decimate all of those services that the american people expect from the federal government. i think only about what's going on right now with houston and florida and puerto rico and the virgin islands, and the
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enormous cost that the federal government is going to have to bear to help restore those communities and those territories to some degree of normalcy. that's what they expect the american government to do. these budgets would make that all but impossible. so we look at it both ways, and later we will propoet the democratic alternative -- propose the democratic alternative that actually makes those kinds of investments, that makes sure the notion of american security is not just a huge military but is a foundation of investment and human capital and research and infrastructure that will allow this economy to grow. and we do it with keeping debt same percentage of the economy as it is now, because we are willing to raise revenues. on the other hand, republican budgets, both the study committee budget and the chairman's budget, anticipate enormous tax cuts for the wealthiest americans and corporations.
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tax cuts that have been proven to do exactly the opposite of what many on the other side claim they do, which is to stimulate economic growth. we will hear claims that, yes, we can cut taxes by $2 trillion or $3 trillion over 10 years paid but ill be history tells us and virtually all the economists in the country and goldman sach, steve mnuchin's previous employer, says that the tax cuts outlined last week would maybe create an additional .2% of growth in the economy. c.b.o., the federal reserve, they say tax cuts don't pay for themselves. even bruce bartlett, the author omics" saying that tax cuts pay for themselves is nonsense.
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he actually said bull, which is half of what he said, but you get the idea. so this is not easy. nd we can speak and in the darkest terms how we're imposing this debt on our grandchildren and try to use emotional arguments, but the fact is we're dealing with a very realistic, pragmatic dilemma and that is how to do what the american people expect us to do without making the future impossible. t's not done by the republican budgets. we think it's helped along by the democratic alternative, and we look forward to having that debate just a little bit later this morning. so with that, mr. chairman, i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from california. mr. mcclintock: i would remind my friend from kentucky that ronald reagan reduced the federal income tax rate from 70% down to 28% and income tax
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revenues doubled. he's correct we expect things from our government. we've seen a 49% increase in spending in the last decade. have we seen a 49% increase in the quality of education or 49% increase in our infrastructure or our defense capability? what we've seen is a 49% increase in bureaucracy and government, and i would remind him when we squander the people's money we rob them of the means to meet the disasters and unforeseen circumstances that confront our country. i'm now pleased to yield 2 1/2 minutes to my friend and former chairman of the republican study committee, bill flores of texas. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. flores: mr. chairman, i thank the gentleman for yielding time to me. i also want to go off script a little bit and echo the comments he was making. he talked about the reagan tax cuts and what they did to stimulate the economy and to grow tax revenues and allow hardworking american families keep more of their paychecks.
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i'd also go on to remind the gentleman from kentucky to disabuse him of the notion about the stuff that's going on. i mean, his views of tax reform, and remind him that president john f. kennedy, a democrat, reduced the top marginal rates from 93% to 70%. the economy grew. more jobs were created and more revenue was created to the federal government. mr. chairman, the federal government doesn't have a revenue problem. it has a spending problem and that's what we tackle with the republican study committee budget. and i want to thank mr. mcclintock for his incredible and insightful leadership in generating the f.y. 2018 r.s.c. budget that we're now considering. the house budget committee's budget proposals continue to benefit from the framework of the r.s.c. budget by including meaningful, enforceable reconciliation targets, as our budget does. the house budget will begin the essential task of implementing these policies into law. other instances where the
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r.s.c.-led budget proposals historically have wound up being adopted by -- into the larger house budget include the following -- first, balancing the budget within a 10-year budget window. two, including policies to ensure the solvency of entitlement programs such as social security and medicare and also medicaid. number three, providing the necessary funding and resources for robust national security. number four, fully repealing obamacare. number five, establishing a pathway to pro-growth tax reform that will jump-start our economy and help hardworking american families take home more of their paychecks. i was humbled to serve as the chairman of the r.s.c. during the 114th congress, and at that time we generated a new budget for fiscal 2017 called the blueprint for a balanced budget 2.0. it was written and released in the spring of 2016. like the current r.s.c. budget, it provided a robust agenda of
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conservative policies to show the american people our vision for this nation. in the heritage -- excuse me -- in the tradition of the heritage foundation's 1980 mandate for leadership that provided a policy agenda for the incoming reagan administration, our blueprint r a balanced budget 2.0 -- for the new president and his administration set forth an agenda for governing in 2017. by all accounts, the r.s.c. budget has proven successful in achieving this goal with president trump facing many of the policies for his fiscal 2018 budget request on the r.s.c.'s fiscal 2017 budget. i'm pleased to see many r.s.c.-led proposals, including both the president's budget and the house budget we will consider later today. in the coming years i look forward to continuing to see the r.s.c. putting forth and leading on many conservative sound policy ideas for our budgetary process. mr. chairman, i ask that my
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colleagues vote yes on the r.s.c. budget. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: i feel like i have to be paul harvey and feel like i have to tell the rest of the story. what mr. mcclintock said was true about the initial phases of the reagan administration. at the end of the reagan administration the national debt had almost tripled and he had been forced to raise taxes a couple times in the interim. so, again, we can argue about how positive taxes were in -- cutting taxes were in the reagan administration but the end result wasn't particularly good for the american economy. . with that i yield three minutes to the gentlelady from illinois, distinguished member of the budget committee, ms. schakowsky. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for three minutes. ms. schakowsky: i thank ranking member yarmuth for yielding. who wins in the republican budget? same old, same old. millionaires, billionaires, large corporations. the republican budget paves the
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way for their plan, which gives 80% of its tax cuts to the top 1% of americans. while 30% of middle class households making between $50,000 and $150,000 a year would actually see a tax increase. this according to the nonpartisan tax policy center. it slashes $1.5 trillion from medicare and medicaid. even worse than trumpcare. and it ends the guarantee of chair benefits for american seniors. it attacks women's health by defunding, of course, planned parenthood, once again. it slashes snap. nap, the food stamp program by $154 billion. taking nutrition assistance away from up to seven million households. did you really come to congress to take food out of the mouths of hungry children?
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now we're considering the republican study committee budget which includes even deeper cuts for children and families and seniors while giving tax cuts to the wealthy. my democratic colleagues and i offer a better deal for america. the united states is the richest country in the world, at the richest time in history. we can have quality health care, affordable childcare, debt-free college, secure retirement, and world class infrastructure, but not if we give massive tax cuts to the and iest individuals corporations. so i courage my colleagues to reject the r.s.c. budget. reject the republican budget. and support the democratic alternative. americans deserve a budget that and our middle class and corporations. so i courage my our future. i wanted to read just one paragraph from a letter from planned parenthood that says, the house budget resolution
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proposes cuts that invests in would be disastrous for women, men, and young people. planned parenthood sees every day. it sacrifices access to health care, repealing the affordable care act, gutting medicaid, and proposing even deeper cuts to low-income, nondefense screagsary spending. it undermines access to -- spending. ry it undermines access to critical reproductive health care, and no co-pay birth control for millions of women. it the women of america are watching. this budget is a particular disaster for them. for us. thank you. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from california. mr. mcclintock: i'm now pleased to yield 2 1/2 minutes to my colleague from alabama, the honorable gary palmer. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. palmer: article 1, section 9 of the constitution grants congress the power of the
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purpose. this assigns the role of the final arbiter of the use of public funds. despite the clear declaration of power, the office of management and budget estimates that agencies collected over $513 in fines, fees, and penalties in fiscal year 2017. allowing agencies to have slush funds outside the normal appropriations process is a recipe for bad acting. the r.s.c. budget calls for implementing the agency accountability act which directs all fines, fees, and settlements go to the treshry. making them subject to the normal appropriations process. this would end agency's ability to operate independently and outside of the oversight of congress. more importantly, it would allow congress to fully account for how much money the vernment actually collects and where that money is coming from. i'm also pleased that the r.s.c. budget does what is increasingly becoming an impossible task. it balances the budget. while all the while prioritizing defense spending
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to keep this country secure. the budget sets forth the bold ideas necessary to put the country back on a path of fiscal responsibility. the congressional budget office reports that if we stay on the current irresponsible fiscal path we're on, by 2047, in 30 years, our debt to g.d.p. will be 150%. stated more simply, our debt will be 50% greater than our entire gross domestic product. we must put our nation back on a path to fiscal responsibility anti-r.s.c. budget does that. exactly that. as former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, michael munen warned our national debt is the greatest threat to our national security. by putting our nation on a sensible fiscal path of balancing the bunt, we reduce the extremely heavy burden that a bloated federal government places on america's working families. allowing them to prosper and making the government less intrusive in their lives. i would also like to add
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extemporaneously in regard to he -- what we're doing on snap benefits. what we're benefits. what we're doing is imposing work requirements on able-bodied adults with no hildren. i want to repeat able-bodied adults with no children. i think most americans agree if i some work. they are getting payments from the federal government, they ought at least do again i thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from contract c mr. yarmuth: mr. chairman, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from vermont, distinguished member of the energy and commerce committee, mr. wull much. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. welch: i thank the gentleman. i want to state to my colleagues on this budget there are two fundamental assumptions you are making that need to be challenged. one, you are saying we have a spending problem not a revenue problem. is spending on
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domestic priorities and defense at a level that existed when -- the president of the united states was dwight d. eisenhower. that was before medicaid and medicare. is spending on domestic priorities and defense at a we have a significant issue about how we're going to meet the needs of the people of this country, both on defense where we need some help, but definitely on the domestic side as well. the second assumption that you are making, it's an assertion made over and over again, is that tax cuts will pay for themselves. that's the theology of your budget. themselves. for not go to zero? it will all be rich. that's essentially what's being said here. not go to zero? it will all be rich. that's essentially what's being said here. but the tax cuts are always at the high end of the income spectrum, which is exacerbating inequality and creating a problem for us to meet essential needs in this country. so, this question of tax cuts paying for themselves in fiscal responsibility, let's have a little bit of history here.
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this was the theology of george bush when he passed the tax cuts when he became president. they did not pay for themselves. we went from the clinton era surpluses to the bush era deficits, and in another fiscally, grossly irresponsible move, he put the war on the credit card. the war was on the credit card. we had unfade for tax cuts and unfade for war. this is not just fiscal responsibility, this is governmental personal, congress aol, -- congressional, irresponsibility. you have to pay for things. whether it's the war or food stamps or any program you want to peck, to have pay for t if you don't pay for it by the magic asteriskic of saying the tax cuts we proposed we're going to spend by cutting taxes, we going into a war we don't pay for, $1 trillion, it doesn't work. and that is why we're in this path that is very dangerous
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with respect to the long-term debt. i believe in that. we've got to pay our bills. when we had the majority, we had a doctrine that said, pay as you go. if any democrat, the budget chair, or me wanted to propose some spending, you either had to come up with the revenue or had to cut somewhere else. i believe in that. i don't believe in unpaid for tax cuts paying for themselves. i don't believe that we're -- war spending pays for itself and we can put it on the credit card. now, we've got some problems and challenges in this country. we've got an opportunity .roblem kids going to school many get out with a debt the size of a mortgage. we've got an inequality problem. it's never been worse. this goes kids going to school back to th depression when we had this divide between what hardworking people made and what the top 1%
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made. we've got a health care affordability problem. you don't solve that by slashing access to health care and throwing 24 million people off of health care. we've got a infrastructure problem that we're totally negligenting. it is not addressed in this budget. we've got a dreamer problem. how is it that in this congress we're literally not allowing 800,000 young people who came here through no fault of their own, not voluntarily, and we're going to give them the hook and deport them. it's outrageous. we've got a rural america problem. rural america has been left behind. the inequality in this country is really hitting hard on rural america. parts of vermont. all parts of this country. there is nothing in this budget that says we're going to give hope to rural america by investing in them. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from california. the gentleman from california has two minutes remaining.
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the gentleman from kentucky has 30 seconds. mr. mcclintock: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the speaker of the house of representatives. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. the speaker: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the chair: without objection. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to urge the whole house to support this republican budget. h.con.res. 71. let me just say a few things. first, this is a budget that reflects our first principles. freedom. free enterprise. a government accountable to the eople it serves. it's a budget that will help grow our economy and a budget that will help rein in our debt. it strengthens our national defense. it supports our men and women in uniform. it eliminates mindless, endless spending, and maximizes americans' tax dollars. it reforms medicaid. it strengthens medicare. this is a budget that keeps responsibilities towards children and grandchildren. remember, we have a responsibility here each and
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every generation, each and every member leave the country better off to your kids and grandkids can prosper. is american legacy seriously at risk because of our growing deteriorating budget situation. because of the coming debt crisis. this budget tackles that. there is one more thing this budget does that's so important. it paves the way seriously at risk because of our growing deteriorating budget situation. for historic tax reform. it unlocks the reconciliation process. we need to pass this budget so we can deliver real relief for milled income families across this country. we need to pass this budget for the people who are living paycheck to paycheck in america , who are trying to juggle it all. they are looking to get upped a hopelessly broken tax code. we haven't reform this tax system since 1986. we need to pass this budget for tax so that we can help bring more bs, fairer taxes, and bigger
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paychecks for people across this country. the time for this is now. and the opportunity, it's right in front of us. i want paychecks for people across to chairman black for her commitment to this vision. want to want to especially com the members of the budget committee for their steadfast commitment to this vision. we would not be in a position today to pass this budget without her tireless leadership and the leadership of her members of the committee. it's so encouraging that the senate has passed their budget out of committee. they are on the track, too. that means we look forward to working with the senate to take the next step. we have an opportunity to make right by our fellow countrymen. we have an opportunity to make right by the people we represent. e have an opportunity to actually restore prosperity in this country. we haven't seen the kind of potential economic potential in this country in at least a decade. we can fix that this year.
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we know a debt crisis is coming. so we can stop that and fix this and make them better off. that's what this budget paves the way for. that is why i urge all of my colleagues to support this budget. i thank the chair for her steadfast support. i thank the members for getting us where we're today and i really look forward to the day when we can look at this moment as when we got the country on the right track. thank you. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yar putt: -- mr. yarmuth: in closing i like to say we need to cut cut right to the chase. the republican committee budget or republican study committee budget could pass this house, not the congress. this is all about moving the ball forward so we can push through a massive tax cut to the wealthiest americans with 51 votes in the senate. that's what this day is b that's what this process is about. i urge my colleagues to reject both the republican committee budget and republican study
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committee budget. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from california. mr. mcclintock: i have letters of support of the r.s.c. budget from the committee on responsible federal budgets. council for citizens against government waste. freedomworks that i would like to enter into the record. the chair: those will be covered under general leave. mr. mcclintock: just a few steps from this hall thomas jefferson gave his first inaugural address. he asked what more do we need to maintain a happy and prosperous society? still one thing more, fellow citizens, a wise and frugal government. we shall restrain men from injuring one another, which will leave them otherwise free to search for improvement and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. this is the sum of good government. . we have it in our power to restore that rise and frugal government and the moment we
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summon the political will to do so. the republican study committee seeks that shining city on a hill and today offers this map to get us there. the chair: the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from california. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the gentleman from california. mr. mcclintock: i ask for a roll call. the chair: a roll call vote is requested. those in support of taking this vote by a roll call will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 139. the nays are 281. he amendment is not adopted. he house will be in order. members, please take seats.
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members, please clear the aisles so that we can proceed. he committee will be in order. it is now in order to consider amendment number 4 printed in house report number 115-339. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. yarmuth: i have an amendment at the desk. the chair: the clerk will designate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 4 in the nature of a substitute printed in house report number 115-339, offered by mr. yarmuth of kentucky. the chair: pursuant to house resolution 553, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. yarmuth, and a member opposed each will control 15 minutes of the the chair recognizes the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: mr. chairman --
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the chair: the gentleman will suspend. members, please take conversations off the floor. the gentleman from contract c mr. yarmuth: mr. chairman, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman virginia tech. mr. yarmuth: thank you, mr. chairman. democrats and republicans are looking at the same challenges facing our country and american families -- education, mchealth care, and housing costs have all increased while wages stay stagnant. it used to be that the two parties would debate different strategies to address the problems facing the american people. sadly those times are behind us. in giving millionaires, including the majority of this congress, the president, and wealthy donors a giant tax cut, the republican budget does not even pretend to address the problems facing the american people. not only does it ignore working
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families, it increases their challenges. the democratic budget alternative in stark contrast to the republican budget begins to address the real challenges our country faces now and in the long term. we're less than a decade from the worst economic crisis in most of our lifetimes, and we have a chance to rebound in a way that builds a foundation for our country to thrive for generations. but we have to seize that opportunity. . rather than giving resources to people that have them, we need programs that grow our economy, provide good-paying jobs and real security in retirement. rather than sending thank you notes to the corporations that bank roll campaigns, we have an opportunity to make vital public investments that lead to a brighter future, rebuilding roads, bridges and other critical infrastructure, all of which lead to good jobs now and
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in the long run. rather than giving the president a multimillion dollar refund on taxes he refuses to disclose, we can invest in retirement security for seniors who didn't invest millions. young people don't have to grow up wealthy to have a shot at earning it in their future careers. instead of taking health care away from people, strange emergency rooms and making americans sicker, we have an opportunity to continue investing in affordable, quality health care for all of us. finally, eliminating a great burden on american families, a burden that no other developed nation shares. this budget is an opportunity for our country to invest in our future, and if we adopt the republican budget plan, we will have squandered it. democrats believe in a government that prioritizes american families, and they should be the priorities of this congress. i therefore urge my colleagues to oppose the republican budget and support the alternative --
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democratic alternative. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlelady rise? mrs. black: i claim time in opposition. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for 15 minutes. mrs. black: i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to this budget substitute which is put simply an abdication of our fiscal responsibility as a governing body. our country is $20 trillion in dead with $9 trillion added to the national debt during the obama years. we have the responsibility to our children and our grandchildren to stop this congress' addiction to spending. it's a responsibility that i take seriously. it's a responsibility that the members of my committee takes seriously and it's a responsibility that republicans in the house take seriously. clearly it's not a responsibility that our friends across the aisle take seriously. our budget works to end the addiction to spending that has
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dominated washington for far too long. the house budget, passed out in july, begins to address our spending addiction by balancing the budget over 10 years so we can start paying down our national debt and it addresses mandatory spending in a significant way for the first time since 1997. this budget substitute does quite the opposite. the democrats' budget raises taxes by $2.7 trillion, which would be the largest tax increase in u.s. history. it increases spending by $6.2 trillion compared to the budget passed by my committee. and it never balances. $852 deficit in 2027 of billion. what we hear from the other side of the aisle is what we see in this budget is simply more of the same, more spending, more tax increases and more debt. i don't think that's acceptable, and neither do the american people. since we began this budget
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debate yesterday, my counterparts on the other side of the aisle have had -- have been throwing out misleading numbers about our budget and our tax reform effort in order to hide the fact that they offer no new solutions to the most pressing problems of our country. here's a number they should keep in mind while they squss this fiscal irresponsible substitute. debt for every person $63,000. every man, woman and even child in our country has a $63,000 weight hanging over their heads. our budget takes real steps to fix this crisis. this budget substitute does not. honestly, it's as simple as that. i urge my colleagues to reject this democrat substitute, and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, a distinguished member of the budget committee, mr. jeffries.
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the chair: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. jeffries: once again, house republicans are determined to visit cruel and unusual punishment upon the american people to have a budget that's regretful and reprehensible. it is a budget that hurts the working class, the sick, the afflicted, veterans and rural america. it's a budget that will eradicate the social safety net, end medicare as we know it, rip away health insurance from 23 million americans and impose billions and billions of dollars in life-altering debt on younger americans. it's outrageous that this is all being done to enact tax cuts for the wealthy and the well-off, tax cuts for the privileged few, tax cuts for special interests here in
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washington, d.c. this parade of horribles is being jammed down the throats of this country so that everyday americans can subsidize the lifestyles of the rich and shameless. we deserve better. the democratic budget will invest in transportation and infrastructure, invest in education and job training, invest in the social safety net, invest in research and development, invest in affordable housing and invest in the well-being of everyday americans. the republican budget bugt is a raw deal. the democratic budget is a better deal focused on better jobs, better wages and a better future. it is worthy of our support. i yield back. the chair: the chair will rise informally -- the committee ill rise informally.
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the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker, i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has passed h.r. 1117, to require the administrator of federal emergency management agency to submit a report regarding certain plans regarding assistance to grantees during the response to an emergency or disaster. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. the committee will resume its sitting. the chair: the committee will be in order. for what purpose does -- the gentlelady from tennessee. mrs. black: thank you, mr. chairman. i now have the pleasure to yield two minutes to the distinguished gentleman from florida, mr. rooney.
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the chair: the gentleman from florida is recognized for two minutes. mr. rooney: thank you, madam chairman. the cruel and unusual punishment is the democratic proposed substitute. the raw deal is the democrat proposed substitute amendment which increases spending to $6.2 trillion over our budget. this raises taxes, yours, $2.7 trillion, the largest tax increase in american history. at a time when we're drowning in debt and stagnant wage growth. it requires a one-to-one match of defense and nondefense discretionary spending at a time when we can't keep our f-18's flying and we have planes crashing around the country for lack of maintenance. this is unconscionable. this budget never balances. it will leave us with a $852 billion deficit by fiscal year 2027. it expands obamacare, the most disastrous and heinous trick played on the american people that i can remember. and it prioritizes amnesty over
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security. we're never going to get our country straight and preserve our sovereignty if we done dont protect our security. on the other -- don't protect our security. on the other hand, the republican budget offers to put a work requirement for able-bodied adults with no dependent children in welfare. talking about the horrible condition of our labor force and how drastically important this sand how much it will improve the opportunities for people to rise out of poverty, we have got three 25 to 50-year-old males collecting benefits for every one that's unemployed. the unemployed rate is 4.7%. that makes the total 20%. it's almost over five million people. we owe them a moral obligation to offer them an opportunity to rise out of poverty through work. that's what the republican budget does. thank you. i yield my time. the chair: the gentleman's request will be covered under general leave.
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the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: mr. chairman, i now yield two minutes to the gentleman from tennessee, a distinguished member of the transportation and infrastructure committee, mr. cohen. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. cohen: thank you, sir. the other day a young man in my neighborhood came over and asked me to try to teach him how to drive a car and i told him, son, it's real easy to drive a car. it's like these budget proposals you'll see in congress. if you want to go forward and do things down the road, you put the car in d like democrat for drive and your car will go forward. but if you want to go backwards and go reverse back to the 1950's, you put it in r like a republican. and he learned quick and that's what these budgets are about. if you want to go forward you go with the democratic budget. forward on building highways, school construction, broadband extension, research. research on the deadly diseases that are killing each and every one of us in our children,
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research the national institutes of health that are cut by this budget. there's nothing more important that can be in this budget than moneys for the national institutes of health and yet they're being cut. cancer, alzheimer's, aids, stroke, diabetes, all going to come at us and our relatives and some will say and i said this one time before and mr. kingston on the other side well, our children and grandchildren will have to pay for it. who do you think will get the cures and treatment? our children and grandchildren and generations to come. and they cut research. they cut opportunities for america. and you talk about taxes and the debt. the republican plan gives billionaires the biggest cuts in history. over $50 billion with us tate tax elimination for people -- estate tax elimination for people like the koch brothers and the waledons and that money will never come back. the alternative minimum tax is eliminated. that is the only thing that trump paid taxes. if it weren't for that he
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wouldn't have paid anything. we are talking about millions for tax cuts. that's ok if it gives money to those that had it. franklin roosevelt is right. you judge by a society not for those what it does for those who have in abundance but for those who have the least. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady from tennessee. mrs. black: thank you, mr. chairman. i do want to say to my good friend and colleague from tennessee that i think the d stands debt for democrats and r stands for republicans and recovery. with that i have the honor to yield two minutes to the distinguished member of the budget committee and the appropriations committee from arkansas, mr. womack. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. womack: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you to the distinguished chair of the budget committee for her outstanding work. my friend from tennessee talks about driving forward. i think we need to pump the brakes. you're rifing right off a cliff -- you're driving right off a
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cliff with this budget. i rise in opposition, mr. chairman. it's my strong belief that our nation has a debt crisis on its hand. and i'm astonished by how many people on the other side of the aisle, mr. chairman, just refuse to acknowledge the problem. it's as if the problem doesn't exist. under their plan taxes are going to be raised nearly $3 trillion. we're going to continue to raise spending to the tune of over $6 trillion. we'll have a meager $2.6 billion in deficit reduction. by the way, compared to our budget that does well over $6 trillion in deficit reduction. our nation is $20 trillion in debt, and it is a complete absurdity to think we can begin to relinquish this process if
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we enacted such a burdensome budgetary proposal that is being offered by our friends on the other side of the aisle. this budget would also diminish our national security apparatus. it would end the global war on terrorism fund by 2019. let's go ahead and telegraph that we are going to end the global war on terrorism fund by 2019. the only people that i know that would support that would be our adversaries. it seeks to promote the collapsing of the affordable care act by keeping those burdensome mandates in place. and this resolution before us right now refuses to do anything about the runaway entitlement programs that are the primary drivers of the deficit and debt in this country. mr. chairman, their budget just will never balance. never. never. may i have 30 more seconds? mrs. black: i yield 30 more seconds for the gentleman. mr. womack: it will give no
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reconciliation instructions so we can finally get control and protect for long-term sustainability the social safety net program that many depend on. the bottom line is you either acknowledge we have a deficit and a debt crisis or you do not. and if you believe, as i do, you'll refuse this budget and you'll support ours. i yield back my time. . the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from minnesota, a distinguished member of the agriculture committee, mr. nolan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. nolan: mr. chairman, members of the committee, i rise in support of the democratic budget alternative and in opposition to the republican budget that has been proposed. it's been often said that gracious living and good politics is all about grant tude. -- gratitude. paying something forward is how you show your gratitude. quite frankly the simple truth
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about this republican budget is that it rolls back a century of progress. it sets the stage for the dismantling of social security, which lifted more people out of poverty than anything. and for private -- secretary ryan's plan to turn it over to wall street. it turns medicare, sets the stage for turning medicare over to the insurance industry. medicare, that provided our elderly with insurance and life opportunities that heretofore had not existed. this century of progress that this budget rolls back includes clean air and water. it includes healthy safe working places and conditions. it includes an opportunity society that invests in our people. and guess what? in a little over a century, we doubled life expectancies, wow. what a marvelous accomplishment. we created the best and biggest
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middle class in the miss -- in the history of world. we became add nole for the worrell. jobs with living wages and health care benefits and pension benefits. this republican budget proposes to roll back that entire century of progress. it is nothing about paying it forward. nothing about paying things back. it's about rolling back a century of progress, and we cannot let that happen. that's what the democratic budget is all about. investing in people. investing in infrastructure. investing in america. and investing in people's jobs and living wages and in their benefits. and that's how you show your gratitude. and we got a lot to be grateful for. let's vote and enact this democratic budget proposal which invests in america, which invests in people, which invests in opportunities. that's what this debate is really all about. thank you, mr. chairman. the chair: the gentlelady from tennessee. mrs. black: thank you, mr.
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chairman. it is now my honor to yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from ohio, mr. johnson, who is a member of the budget committee. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. johnson: thank you, madam chair, for the time. mr. speaker, thank you. you know, i saw recently and i remember ronald reagan said something when he finally got his tax reform package done back in 1986. why it took so long and why it was sody. at the end of the day he said you know the lawmakers and the policymakers forgot one important factor in their calculations. that brought us to this point. they forgot to include what the american people have to say about this. and that's what's happening here today. the american people have told us they want economic growth. they want opportunities for their kids and their families. a better quality of life.
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they want washington to live within its means. and stop taking more and more and more from them out of their paychecks. so let's do a little bit of comparison. let's look at my colleagues, the democrat budget. it raises taxes by $2.7 trillion compared to the c.b.o. january baseline. that's three point almost eight trillion more than revenue levels in our house republican budget. it increases spending by $6.2 trillion compared to the republican budget. over that 10-year period. it increases the debt held by four blic, by 3.9, almost trillion relative to the house republican budget. and what's important, mr. speaker, it never balances.
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there is not even an attempt to balance. not to mention that there are no reconciliation instructions that would give us an opportunity to deal with health care and other economic growth reforms. mr. chairman, this is not a responsible budget that's being offered by our colleagues on the other side. i urge my colleagues to oppose it and to support the house republican budget later today. with that i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: mr. chairman, i now yield three minutes to the ntlelady from texas, distinguished member of the budget committee, ms. jackson lee. the chair: the gentlelady from texas is recognized for three minutes. ms. jackson lee: thank you so member of the very much. i want to thank the gentleman from kentucky for his astute analysis on what the american people really want.
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i thank the manager, the chairwoman of this bill. and i acknowledge the position that they take. but what america really wants is for washington, for america, for the government to stand by hem in their time of need. i'm very grateful to be part of a party that is not about politics but is about values. we're the better choice party. we off a better deal on this project that we have worked so hard on called the american budget. the american budget in contrast to our friends on the other side of the aisle recognizes as i visited the national institute for health that 80% of their budget that we're going to lose goes for research and researchers. looking those researchers in the eyes when they explain the research in medical science to
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help save lives and to know budget cuts blican the n.i.h., centers for disease control, and takes up the trumpcare that cuts budget cuts the trillions in medicaid and $500 billion in medicare. that is the story of this bill. and then as my good friend from tennessee indicated, mr. colon, we invest in infrastructure and we r.on -- mr. cohen, invest in infrastructure. do we realize how many jobs go -- unable to find individuals in this country? hundreds of thousands because of the lack of training. so if my friends want growth, you know how you get growth? you invest in the american people. or you tell the american people when tragedy strikes whether 's the virgin islands or
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puerto rico or florida or texas or tragically in nevada that you will stand by them. you provide them with the infrastructure to be able to overcome. not the republican budget. because the republican budget is giving trillions in tax cuts and the distribution of those moneys will not see the front door of low-income, moderate income, middle class working americans. that is a distinction between the democratic budget. it increases opportunity through a higher minimum wage. it believes in equal pay for equal work. t knows that immigration reform will bring in billions of dollars. it will create opportunity for work. then, of course, we know that the democratic budget strengthens our health care. and it provides her reform will bring in billions s security, her medicare will not be in jeopardy. the medicare trust fund will not lose with a republican budget and trillions of dollars of tax cuts, her life as she
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continues to seek some balance of good life will be lost. we're the right direction. we're for the american people. we're standing by the american people with the democratic budget. i ask my colleagues to vote for the democratic alternative. the chair: the gentlelady fromtown tfpblet mrs. black: thank you, mr. chairman. m honored to yield two minutes to the distinguished lady from north carolina, the chairman of the education committee, ms. foxx. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for two minutes. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my colleague from tennessee, the chair of the budget committee, for the wonderful work she's done on bringing us to this position. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to this substitute amendment. as chair of the education work force committee, my priority this congress is to ensure that our policies promote a climate from tennessee, the creation th economic of job growth, sound fiscal policy, and a global economic competitiveness. of budget helps achieve all
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these priorities by laying the foundation for robust and comprehensive simplification of our burdensome tax code. of these priorities by laying the the democrat substitute not only fails to do so, but would decimate america's work force. our budget reforms our broken tax code so it works for every american at every income level, regardless of where they live or how much money they earn. the top u.s. tax rate for individuals has been as high as 90% and as low as 28%. at the same time, income tax revenue has remained fairly steady despite these sharp rate swings. it turns out that the biggest is r of federal revenue not higher tax rates but economic growth. in fact, the sizable majority of economists point out that a broad base and low is not higher tax rates but economic growth. are key in a tax system rates that fosters economic growth and competitiveness.
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legislators on both sides of the aisle agree on this basic principle and history has shown it to be true. instead of raising taxes, we should embrace the policies contained in this budget resolution that encourages economic growth like reducing regulatory burdens, welfare reform, and comprehensive tax reform for all individuals, not just a select few. you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. you, mr. speaker. i the gentlelady from tennessee. mrs. black: thank you, mr. chairman. it's now my honor to yield two minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, a member of our budget committee, mr. sanford. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two meant. mr. sanford: i thank the gentleman. i rise as well in opposition to the substitute amendment. i do so because i'm struck by the ways in which you can, at times, agree on the diagnosis but disagree on the cure.
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i think we all agree, republicans and democrats alike, we have a real problem with the way wages have stagnated in the last 30 years. a lot of my democratic colleagues are nailing it in terms that have diagnosis. the question is a cure. the question there is, can we fix that problem by raising taxes by $2.7 trillion? can we fix that problem by increasing spending by $6.2 trillion? can we fix that problem by increasing the debt by $3.9 trillion? and in essence having a budget that never balances. i would argue no and i would say instead what we have to look at is the basics which we have been dancing around which is the mathematic formula which says savings drives investment which drives productivity gain which ultimately impact standard of living or wages. what we don't focus on enough is this notion of the investment, part of investment. if we want to increase in the productivity, you got to increase investment. in fairness to my democratic colleagues, part of that is
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public investment, but the other part is private. what my colleague from virginia was just getting at a moment ago was for 50 years regardless of tax rate, 90 or 28% the take to government has been about 18% to g.d.p. very consistently. what i would argue is we need more public investment. but we also need private investment to go with it. if we don't watch out what is being contemplated with this democratic substitute, is a process that will ultimately crowd out that much more in the way of private investment so key to increasing productivity. with that i yield back. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from kentucky has 3 1/2 minutes remaining. the gentlelady from tennessee has one and a quarter minutes remaining. mrs. black: i have no more speakers. i reserve. the chair: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from kentucky. mr. yarmuth: thank you, mr. chairman. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the chair: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. yarmuth: mr. chairman, in closing it's clear we have a very different budget and very different understanding of the challenges facing our country. we see that so many americans are working harder and longer and can't remember the last time they got a raise. we know families are worried about how to pay for college. or if their parents' retirement is secure. or if they will ever be able to afford to stop working. we know that trillions of dollars in tax cuts for millionaires and large corporations will turn these fears of hardworking american families into reality. just a few minutes ago my republican colleague from ohio talked about what the american people want. many of those things we agree, but i know one thing the american people don't want, they don't want massive tax cuts for the top 1%. of americans. the democratic budget rejects tax cuts for the wealthy. we invest in programs that will grow our economy, create good-paying jobs, and provide real support for working
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families and real security in etirement. we make education and childcare more affordable, and we support policies to help every american get the health care that they need. those are the priorities of our budget and they are the priorities of the american people. i therefore urge my colleagues to support the democratic alternative and i yield back the balance of my time. . the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlelady from tennessee. mrs. black: thank you, mr. chairman. i look in my children's and grandchildren's eyes and say, ight now you owe $63,000 for your part of the debt of this country. what we're doing in congress right now, if we were to vote on and accept this amendment, we would be increasing that burden on our children and grandchildren and i for one cannot do that. we have to be responsible.
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we have to look how we can in this country get back to the place, as already been said, that we ask families and businesses to do and that is to live within their means. and so i would urge a no vote on this amendment, and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman from kentucky. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. yarmuth: i request a roll call vote. the chair: a roll call is requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 156. the nays are 268. this amendment is not adopted. he committee will be in order. the committee will be in order. please take your conversations
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off the floor. pursuant to the rule, it is now in order to consider a final period of general debate which shall not 10 minutes equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on the budget. the gentlewoman from tennessee, mrs. black, and the gentleman from kentucky, mr. yarmuth, each will control about five minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from tennessee. mrs. black: thank you, madam chair. i now yield two minutes of my time zwroo. alabama, a member of our budget committee, mr. palmer. the chair: the gentleman virginia tech for two minutes. -- the the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. thank you, madam chairman. i appreciate the hard work the
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budget committee has put forth to produce a budget that prioritizes our national defense and sets forth bold policy reforms that will get this country back on track to fiscal responsibility. specifically i'm pleased to see that this budget commits to reducing the substantial amount of improper payments throughout the federal government. the government accountability ffice estimates there were $144 billion, i want to emphasize, $144 billion in improper payments in 2016 alone. and that's not even a complete estimate. in fact, 18 federal programs did not report their improper payments so the total is undoubtedly higher. to make matters worse, since 2013, the amount we have been incorrectly sending out has been trending upwards. instead of reducing our fraudulent payments, the rate at which we pay them out has been increasing. since 2003, there's been a
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total of $1.2 trillion in improper payments. let me repeat. that is $1.2 trillion plus interest. the chair: the committee is not in order. the chair: the house is not in order. the gentleman is recognized. mr. palmer: thank you, madam chairman. since 2003, there's been a total of $1.2 trillion in improper payments. let me repeat. $1.2 trillion plus interest. because we have been running deficits over that time frame, we have literally had to borrow that money to send it to those who would not have received it. this is unacceptable. as you can see from this chart, this is -- this represents improper payments for 2016 alone. money borrowed that we pay interest on to send to people who are not supposed to get it. we are borrowing money and adding to our debt through improper payments. this budget for the first time
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sets forth a bold strategy for cutting these payments in half over the budget window, saving us $700 billion over our 10-year window. while i hope in the near future we can zero these payments out, i am thrilled to see that we are beginning to tackle a problem that is putting an additional strain on this country's fiscal problems. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on this budget. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman from tennessee reserves. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. yarmuth: i yield myself four minutes. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. yarmuth: madam chairwoman, i suppose i should be saying thank you. i will get a huge tax cut under the republican tax cut plan. as will the majority of those people sitting here. the majority of our colleagues in congress. who are, like me, fortunate enough to be millionaires already. but forgive me if i'm in no mood to say thank you because i was elected not just to represent
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millionaires, but to represent -- the chair: the gentleman will suspend. the committee is not in order. take your conversations, please, off the floor. the gentleman is recognized. mr. yarmuth: thank you. i was elected not just to represent millionaires, but to represent aspiring millionaires, working families, seniors, veterans, and for all of them, for anyone who isn't already a millionaire, this budget is a slap in the face. with all of the problems facing our country right now, all the people struggling to get ahead, it is unfathomable to me that this congress could look at people like me and say, hey, that guy, let's give him more money. in fact, let's give all millionaires hundreds of thousands of dollars in tax cuts . and really i'm small potatoes. president trump according to his financial disclosure will get hundreds of millions of dollars in tax cuts. where's all that money coming from? if you're listening to this and you're not a millionaire, probably from you. to pay for our own tax cuts and
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the tax cuts for wealthy donors, republicans are going to increase taxes on 45% of american families with children, and that's just the start. seniors, people with disabilities, and low-income families will see their health care cut. poor seniors will lose benefits that help them keep food on the table and their homes heated in the winter. veterans' benefits, meals for hungry schoolchildren, programs that make education affordable and job training available. investments that generate economic growth and create good-paying jobs are all at risk in this budget. they are also cutting corporate tax rates, which we will be paying for by plunging our nation into deeper and deeper debt, giving multinational giants another advantage over small and midsized businesses in the name of perpetuating the myth of supply side economics. supply side failed. they renamed it trickle-down. but nothing trickled down. now it's job creators. and when that fails, maybe they'll call it i get mine now,
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you get yours later maybe. but whatever they name it, it's a sham. this plan is a hoax on the american people and it will make most people's lives more difficult. so forgive me if i'm in no mood to say thank you for the extra money in my pocket. with millions of americans struggling and scraping to get ahead, wand my tax cut increasing their challenge -- and with my tax cut increasing their challenges, i cannot begin to justify my extra money and quite frankly i cannot fathom how my republican colleagues are able to justify theirs. with this budget republicans aren't just passing the buck, they're pocketing it. with that, i strongly urge my colleagues to vote no on the republican budget. and i have the great honor of yielding one minute to the distinguished minority leader, ms. pelosi. the chair: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. pelosi: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i thank him for his great leadership as the ranking member on the budget committee in the
quote
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house and i thank all of the members of the budget committee for their great work. to make this budget that we -- that was proposed earlier, the yarmuth budget, a statement of our values. and that's exactly what a budget should be. a federal budget should be a statement of our national values. what is important to us as a country -- >> madam speaker, the house is not in order. ms. pelosi: thank you. the chair: the committee will be in order. ms. pelosi: thank you, madam speaker. the chair: please take your conversations off the floor. the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. pelosi: thank you, madam speaker. i'll say it again. our federal budget should be a statement of our national values. what is important to us as nation should be reflected in the priorities that we place into that budget. and i just can't -- this budget that is before us, proposed by the republicans, is just the opposite of that. it is accompanied by the tax proposal that they put, one of the biggest transfers of wealth,
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to the wealthiest people in our country, in our country's history. every time they do it they make it worse. i'll let you be the judge. is it a statement of our national values to cut $1 rillion from medicaid? to take medicaid down a bad path in order to give tax cuts to the richest people in our country? is it a statement of our values to take a half a trillion dollars out of medicare to give a tax cut to the wealthiest people in our country? our distinguished ranking member has listed some of the things that would be cut if we went down this unfortunate path posed by our colleagues on the other side. this is a budget, their budget, that steals from the middle class. steals hundreds of billions of dollars from critical
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job-creating, wage-increasing invest -- investments in infrastructure, job training and clean energy. it harms veterans, it cuts education, it abandons rural america. as it guts education. this is really a mystery to me. because when you cut education, with stiff competition, this is one of the worst budget decisions that you have made. because nothing brings more money to the treasury than investing in education. early childhood, k-12, higher education, postgrad, lifetime learning for our workers. that is how you grow the economy. that is how you bring money to the treasury. not by cutting it in order to give tax cuts to the wealthiest people in our country. is it a statement of values to cut that education so that you have a tax cut that benefits 80% -- i know you don't want the
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public to hear this. and i can understand why. the chair: the gentleman's correct. the house is not in order. the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. pelosi: how could it be a statement of the values of the american people to cut education of our children in order to have a tax cut, 80% of it benefits the top 1% of people in our country? it's just not right. and as they do that, the deficit hawks which seem to be an engdange -- endangered species on the republican side of the aisle these days, are adding over $2 trillion, close to 2ds.4 trillion, to the deaf -- $2.4 trillion, to the deficit. not counting debt service, interest on that national debt. then they say, oh, that's ok we need to increase the national debt by trillions of dollars so that we can give tax cuts.
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where do the tax cuts go? $2.6 trillion to corporate america. and guess what happens to the middle class? $4.-- $470 billion in tax increases to the middle class. about a half a trillion dollars in increases to the middle class. $2.5 trillion in tax cuts to corporate america. again, adding so much to the deficit. now, they say, oh, trickle-down economics, it's going to pay its own way. we'll get that money back. not so. never happens. nonsense. but don't take it from me. no less a figure than bruce bartlett who works for congressman jack, a real supporter of supply-side economics, and as was said, supply-side turned into trickle-down, etc. as a proponent of supply-side
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economics he said, we never said it would pay for itself. e just advocated an economic approach. but anyone who says, and this is his quote, that as a whole supply-side dynamic scoring pays for itself -- part of this argument -- is all nonsense. it's not true. he went on to say that it was -- you finish the -- bull -- you finish the sentence. so here we are at a place where we can increase the deficit, decrease job creation, hurt the middle class, benefit the top 1% , add to the deficit -- the national debt in historic proportions that would be very hard to come back from, deficit hawks, if any of you exist over there. instead we have an opportunity today for a better deal for the
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american people. etter jobs, better pay, better wages, better future. where we lower costs for america's working families and middle class families and where we prepare them with the tools for the economy of the 21st century. so i thank the gentleman, the distinguished gentleman from kentucky, the chair of the bourbon caucus, for his great leadership. and bringing a better budget that is a statement of our national values, that supports american workers with responsible tax reform, calls for parity between defense and nondefense, defends and strengthens a.c.a., and protects medicare. every time the republicans come to the floor and try to stack the deck even further for their wealthy friends, we have to have this conversation. democrats will fight, these tax
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cuts and this unfortunate, deceptive budget that they have on the floor. i urge my colleagues to start by voting no today and continue to ght with -- the conversation with the american people to fight this unfortunate path they want to take us down. the road to ruin. i urge a no vote and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. mr. yarmuth: i yield back. the chair: the gentlewoman from tennessee is recognized. mrs. black: thank you, madam chairman. i'm going to be brief in my closing comments. but i do want to ask my colleagues to consider this. are we proud of a country where we're leading our children and grandchildren in further and further debt? during our discussion in this chamber, we shared our ideas for building a better america. an america that we would be proud to entrust to future
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generations. >> order. the chair: the committee is not in order. the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. black: during our discussion in this chamber, we have shared our ideas for building a better america. an america that we can be proud of to entrust to future generations. and while it requires cronlting real challenges along the road -- confronting real challenges along the road ahead, it is undoubtedly worth the journaly. first it forces the federal government to live within its means, just like hardworking americans and small businesses do on a daily basis. second, our budget identifies wasteful spending and finds much-needed savings and reforms for unsustainable mandtory spending. in fact, our committee has put forward the largest reform package for mandatory programs that has been seen in 20 years. third, our budget calls for a robust funding of our military, ensuring the resources that will allow us to be ready and protect our mainland. it also starts the process of restoring our military
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readiness, which suffered dramatically during the obama administration. and finally, our budget is the golden key that unlocks pro-growth tax reform and takes us one step further to the great ideas unveiled in the framework last week. without question, our budget plan reflects american values and shared priorities. i urge my colleagues to join me in their support of a win for all americans, because doing so will begin to ensure a biter -- brighter and better future for future generations to come and i urge a yes vote. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: all time for general debate has expired. pursuant to house resolution 553, the committee rises. the speaker pro tempore: madam
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chairman. the chair: mr. speaker, the committee of the whole house on the state of the union has had under consideration house concurrent resolution 71, and pursuant to house resolution 553, i report the concurrent esolution back to the house. the speaker pro tempore: the chair of the committee of the whole house on the state of the union reports that the committee has had under consideration house concurrent resolution 71 and pursuant to house resolution 553, reports the concurrent resolution back o the house. under the rule, the previous question is ordered. the question is on the adoption of the concurrent resolution under clause 10 of rule 20, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. under the rule, the pursuant to clause 8 of rule 15-minute vote will be
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followed by a five-minute vote on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal, if ordered. this is a 15-minute vote. 15-mi followed by a five-minute [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 219 and the nays are 206. the concurrent resolution is agreed. o -- is agreed to. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is growing to the speaker's approval -- agreeing to the speaker's approval the journal which the chair will put de novo. the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it and the journal stands approved as read.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? hoyer highway i ask unanimous con -- mr. hoyer: i ask unanimous consent to speak out of order for inquiring of the majority leader the schedule of the week to come. i yield to my friend from california. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. and i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mccarthy: mr. speaker, on monday no votes are expect in the house on account of columbus day. on tuesday the house will meet at noon for morning hour and 2:00 p.m. for legislative business. votes will be postponed until 6:30. on wednesday and thursday the
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house will meet at 10:00 a.m. for morning hour and noon for legislative business. on friday the house will meet at 9:00 a.m. for legislative business. last votes of the week are expected no later than 3:00 p.m. mr. speaker, the house will consider a number of suspensions next week, a complete list of which will be announced by close of business tomorrow. in addition the house will nsider s. 585, the dr. chris kirkpatrick whistleblower protection act sponsored by senator ronald johnson. dr. kirkpatrick was a psychologist who was fired from the v.a. medical center where he worked after raising concerns about patients' medications. he committed suicide the day he was fired. this bill will enhance whistleblower protections while ensuring supervisors who retaliate against whistleblowers are punished. i look forward to the house passing this bill and continuing our work to fundamentally change the culture of the v.a. mr. speaker, i also expect the house to make a motion to go to
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conference on the national defense authorization act. finally, mr. speaker, i expect the house to consider an additional supplemental package to assist the ongoing recovery efforts following hurricanes harvey, irma and maria. with that, i yield to my friend. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for his comments. i would ask him, mr. speaker, will the supplemental that the gentleman mentioned, which is, as i understand, approximately $29 billion, which will take care of forest fires in the west , $16 billion as i understand it in debt relief, which will raise the borrowing level for fema, and then of course money directly for the victims of the hurricanes. can the gentleman tell me whether or not there will be any , what i would call extraneous mats that are might be
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controversial, or will this be a straight supplemental without controversy? we all want to make sure that we have the resources to help. i yield to my friend. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the gentleman is correct. the white house has sent up a supplemental and i do not believe this will be the last. of the supplementals. based on the damage that has been done from the numerous hurricanes. but, yes there will be more money for -- but, yes, there will be more money for disaster are relief fund for texas, puerto rico, florida and the virgin islands. the west had devastating forest fires. there's roughly 57 -- $577 million there. and the national flood insurance program has hit a ceiling. and to deal wall the flooding that's begun -- deal with all the flooding that's gone on, we have to deal with that as well. the appropriations committee just received that last night. they're working through it now. i don't intend on seeing other things with it. and i look forward to the member working with me on that to make sure we get it right from what
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the president has asked. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman and i thank you for your thoughts that there will not be anything in there that would make it a partisan bill. because i think, as the president sent it down, it's obviously something we need to do and ought to do quickly and in a bipartisan way. mr. leader, we've talked about the dream act. another week has gone by and therefore the six-month deadline is closer. and the president has urged us to pass legislation. can the gentleman tell me what the expectations are to address the dream act? as you know, michelle lujan grisham, the chair of the congressional hispanic caucus, has filed a disparage petition on the -- discharge petition on the bill sponsorered by ms. roybal-allard and ms. il-- ms. ros-lehtinen. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. yes, we are dealing with the daca situation and the situation along the border. as you know, the speaker has put
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together a task force. they have met numerous times. i had dinner with the president just this week dealing with this issue. and you and i have talked as well. i think the best way to solve this problem and make sure we get to the root cause, we have to secure the border, we have to deal with daca. and more importantly, i think we do it in a manner that we're all working together. i am one, as you know, not a fan of the discharge petition. and i think the best way to handle this is continuing to work through the manner of the committees and on your side of the aisle as well to solve this problem. and the president gave us six months. i'd like to get this done before then. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for his answer. let me, if i might, mr. speaker, simply suggest to the gentleman, we certainly understand and this side agrees we want to have secure borders. there is obviously a disagreement on the president's proposal of a wall. i think frankly on your side as
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well as on my side of the aisle. and i would hope that we would not in effect hold hostage the 800,000 students and workers, young people brought here as children, know no other country. in my discussions with mr. ryan and his public comments have indicated he is sympathetic to making sure that we address that issue. he urged, as you know, president trump not to rescind daca. the president did anyway. and i'm hopeful that we can deal with the dreamers, which i think certainly has very robust support on both sides of the aisle, in my view, mr. majority leader. i hope we can deal with that without clouding it with an issue, i.e. the wall, not security. security i think we can reach agreement on. but i'm hopeful that we can do that. the dreamers are extraordinarily
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anxious. i presume you have met with some of the dreamers. they're really very impressive people. and are enhancing our communities and our country. so i would hope that we could do that and i look forward to talking to you personally about how we move forward and hopefully move quickly. i would like to have done it by next week. as you know, i said it would be nice to do it in this work period. to lay at rest the anxiety of the 800,000-plus people who will be affected. but if we can't do that, certainly i would hope that we can do it shortly after we get back, after the next district work period. i yield to my friend, if he wants to say anything. if not, i'll yield back. i yield back the balance of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. mccarthy: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today it adjourn to meet at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow and further, when the house
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adjourns on that day, it adjourn to meet on tuesday next, when it shall convene at noon for morning hour debate and 2:00 p.m. for legislative business. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the chair will now entertain requests the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> it is breast cancer awareness month and every day nearly 1,000 women in this country receive a life-changing diagnosis that they'll be affected by breast cancer. one in eight women in our country will face breast cancer. breast cancer has a devastating effect on our families, taking away wives, mother, aunt, uncles, sisters, and daughters. mr. gaetz: i wish i was a brilliant scientist and could
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develop a cure, i wish i was a magician who could wave a magic wand and cure breast cancer. but i'm just a member of congress. there are things members of congress can do to make breast cancer less likely, less deadly and less painful. cannabis has shown promise in research for decades this research came to true in addition 2007 when a doctor showed that cannabis related compounds helped fight ma anything lant forms of breast cancer. other research has confirmed and built on his findings. there's conclusive research that shows that cannabis related compounds have anti-tumor properties. yet despite the findings, scientists are going too slow, it is time for cannabis research to begin and we should declassify it as a schedule one drug. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington seek reck snigs? -- recognition? without objection the gentlewoman is recognized for
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one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this week congressman adam smith and i introduced the dignity for detained immigrants act this legislation is critical to dismantle president trump's mass deportation machine to protect families and restore justice and due process to our broken immigration system. ms. jayapal: our detention system brings huge profits for large, preist corporations, about 38,000 people are detained every single day at a cost to taxpayers of over $2,000 a year. 24 bill is about two things, dignity and justice. for families, pregnant women, people with serious illnesses, survivors of torture and violence. it's unconscionable we're detaining these people, sometimes for months or years. congress can't afford to sit on the sidelines anymore. it's time to make clear that locking people up without due process is not only unconstitutional, it's un-american.
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at a time when net migration is zero, when dreamers are at risk of losing their daca status, and the world reels from unprecedented numbers of refugees fleeing for their live well, must act with compassion. i urge my colleagues to pass the dignity for detained immigrants act and i thank the over 55 co-sponsors that have already come on to this piece of legislation. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? without objection the gentleman s recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, within minutes of the tragic shooting in las vegas, democrats and the liberal media called for more gun control measures. a recent "washington post" op-ed describes how one gun control advocate researched restrict i gun control laws in australia and great britain only to find
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that they do not reduce mass shootings or gun-related crimes. mr. smith: she said, quote, the case for the gun control lobbies i -- policies i lobbied for crumbled. but i can't endorse policies whose only selling point is that gun owners hate them, that seem as if they were drafted by people who have only encountered guns on television. this research concluded that more lives would be shaved by focusing on individuals instead of guns. we should make sure background checks work as intended and prevent those with mental health issues from obtaining guns. this will do some good as gun d to meaningless limitations. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rise? without objection, the gentleman is recognize for one minute. -- is recognized for one minute.
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>> i rise today to urge the swift re-authorization of the children's health insurance program. chip helps families provide care for their children. throughout our nation it covers nine million children and pregnant women. in california it covers two million and in my district half of the kids get their health care from medicaid or chip. chip was implemented over 20 years ago. championed by two senators on opposite sides of the political spectrum. orrin hatch and ted kennedy. mr. panetta: it has continued to receive strong bipartisan support. because of inaction by the house of representatives, by the -- because of the distractions by this administration, millions of our children may be denied coverage. they may not get to see doctors for checkups. with the upcoming flu season, they may not get care when they're sick, and children with allergies may not have act stose life-saving services.
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if congress doesn't step up to fix this mistake before it's too late, children will pay the price for our inaction. congress must take action to come together to pass chip and to make sure that millions of kids continue to depend on us for this health care. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek reck? -- seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> this week, i sit as chairman of the subcommittee on island affairs that deals directly with the jurisdiction of puerto rico, virgin islands and other territories of the u.s. mr. lamalfa: we had a very good briefing this week led by jenniffer gonzalez-colon and stacey plaskett. it was very important information as we all know the difficult situation especially we're seeing so much in puerto rico as well as the virgin
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islands. president trump visiting puerto rico this week. help son the way. indeed it has been on the way and we need to just keep pushing and pushing to rebuild infrastructure and push out into the islands where the need is still felt. so we know, we see, we're aware. we'll keep working to achieve positive results in the short term as well as we look at the situation with puerto rico and the difficulty with prepa, the power company and other issues we'll address as a committee in order to have a long-term, positive solution for the u.s. citizens, american citizens of puerto rico and what they need. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? without objection the gentlewoman is recognized for ne minute. ms. jackson lee: mr. speaker, many of us will be going home to our districts, facing constituents who will be asking
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the question, why? it really is painful when fellow americans lose their lives. it is painful as we watch our soldiers go off into battle and many of them do not come home. in any other way but as a fallen soldier. this past week, americans who were not in battle but were enjoying the life and the by aty of this nation fell murderous actor. i think we will have to go home and comfort our constituents and we will also tell them what we are going do. and i don't know why we have to climb this high mountain, a high mountain of understanding that laws can make a difference, not the end -- not end all violence but make a difference. legislation that says that guns have to be locked saves the
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lives of children. gun legislation that deals with banning armor-piercing bullets that would harm and injure our first responders. and then to get rid of the kits that this murderous individual utilized to make a semiautomatic an automatic. mr. speaker, i ask this congress to begin to do work on gun safety that will save american lives. i go home to my district to meet with my constituents and i'm going to tell them that i'm going to do something that makes sense for the american people. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absence requested for mr. murphy of pennsylvania for wednesday, october 4, after k p.m. and for the balance of the week and ms. rosen of nevada for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the requests are granted.
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under the speaker's announced poll of january 3, 2017, the gentleman from virginia, mr. garrett is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. garrett: thank you, mr. speaker. earlier this week the chamber a bill dealing with pain-capable unborn children, and a bill that in its result would cause the united states to join the vast bulk of nations in the world wherein the termination of lives of children were not -- who are not only capable of feeling pain but under what we understand to be the best science may feel more pain because of the density of the nerve tissue as they're in this roughly fifth month of development. i guess four times in the brief time i've been in this build, we have seen the chamber erupt into
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applause, oftentimes over partisan perceived victories. the first time the chamber erupted into applause was when my colleagues across the aisle were giddy with joy when a bill that would have ensured the department of defense didn't spend money to perform transgendered procedures on soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines failed in the form of an amendment. another had to do with health care. another had to do with the return of majority whip steve za lease, that was indeed a bipartisan eruption in applause. and then there was an eruption from this side of the chamber when h.r. 36 passed. there was a recognition that late-term abortion is barbaric and counter to the ideas put forth to the world within the declaration of independence it was written that we hold certain truths to be self-evident, that among those was life. too many people have failed to fwrass the nature of what
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late-term abortion is and yet to grapple with the problem we're required to understand what exactly that problem is. so to look at the other six nations in the world that allow the termination of life after five months, we see nations like vietnam. north korea. china. and the united states. and then to listen to the doctors who have performed these procedures describe in what was literally excruciatingly detail how the procedure is performed. that an instrument is inserted into the youth ulous and probing is done until something is found and the instrument is latched on and then there's pulling and out comes an arm. or a leg. or a piece of a head. or a torso. that unborn child who science tells us can feel pain dies as a result of bleeding to death inside its host.
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that's the nature of these proceed juries. estimates tell us that if the united states joined the vast bulk of the nations on the planet in outlawing late-term abortions somewhere between 14,000 and 20,000 children every year wouldn't experience an unspeakable demise of literally being ripped from their host limb by limb and bleeding to death all whilse in the best estimate of scientists feeling the pain of that death. to put that into terms of virginia's fifth district, that's population of cumberland county, twice every year. roughly. and so there was applause from the members who saw that the united states would join the ranks of the civilized nations in the world who put appropriate value on life, mr. speaker. and disappointment from some on the other side of the aisle, a few brave individuals to be distinguished by departing from the herd and recognizing the
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value an sanctity of life there to and immediate news stories about how h.r. 36 was dead on arrival in the united states senate. mr. speaker, it is my sincere hope that the american people will not let that be the case. i often speak of the history of the fifth district of virginia that gave us great americans like booker t. washington and barbara johns, thomas jefferson, james madison, james monroe, and patrick henry. as i thought about how to best address the need for action in the other chamber, mr. speaker, i determined that there were no better words than those delivered by patrick henry of virginia, slightly amended, on march 23, 1775, in st. john's cathedral as he addressed the second virginia assembly in richmond, virginia. with all credit to the author whom i paraphrase, i would read.
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mr. speaker, no man thinks more highly than i do of the patriotism and abilities of the very worthy people who have served and do serb in the senate. but different people often see the same subject in different lights and therefore i hope it will not be a thought -- it will not be thought disrespectful to those senators if, entertaining as i do, opinions of a character very opposite of many of theirs, i shall speak forth in my sentiments freely and without reserve. this is no time for ceremony. the question before the senate is one of an awful consequence to this country. for my part i consider it nothing less than a question of life or death. and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject, to be the freedom of debate. it is only in this way we can help to a-- hope to aprivate at truth and provide for the great
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responsibility we have to our create or and our country. should i hold back, i shall consider myself guilty of treason and cowardice, an act of disloyalty to our creator who i revere above all earthly kings. it is natural for man to indulge in the illusions of hope. we're apt to shut our eyes against painful truth and listen to the song of the siren until she transforms us into beasts. is this the role of wise people engaged in the struggle for life? are we disposed to be of the number of those who having eyes see not and having ears hear not the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? for my part whatever anguish of spirit it may cause i'm willing to know the whole truth. i have but one lamp by which my feet is
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guided and that is the lamp of experience, of history. i have no way judging the future but by the way. -- but by the past. i wish to know, for what has been the conduct of the abortion industry for the last 44 years, to justify those hopes with which the gentlemen are pleased to solace themselves. and the senate, is that insid white house smile which our petition has been received lately, trust it not sir. it will prove a snare at your feet. suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with the promise of later action. ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with these nearly 60 million lives lost. in this country alone. which cover our waters and darken our lands. is taking an unborn life a work of love and reconciliation? is subjecting to pain a 5-month-old child as no other nation saves -- save six on the
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earth allow to happen? let us not deceive ourselves. these new implements of death and destruction. i ask what means this perpetual delay of voting. what is its purpose? what is the force of inaction? can the gentleman assign another positive motive for it than to assure it never occurs? destruction, no, sir. destruction, they are set to send and perpetuate this loss of life. and in so long pour of -- support of this loss of life, now an opportunity presents itself to vote. and what do we have to oppose? inaction? mr. speaker, we have our voices. shall we try again and again? shall we bring this bill back next year? we've been trying that for 40 years. have we anything new to offer upon the subject? nothing. we've held the subject in every light which it is capable. it's all been to this date in vain. shall we resort to entreaty and supplication? what terms shall we find that have not already been exhausted? let us not, i beseech you, mr.
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speaker, deceive ourselves. we've done everything that we could do. to avert this death that has claimed nearly 60 million lives and 14 to 20 million unborn lives after the age of 5 months in utero every single year. we petitioned, we've sum cated, we've prostrated ourselves and have implored its inner position to arrest the tyrannical hands of the abortion strifment and -- industry. and our petitions have been slighted. our recommend administrations produce additional death and insult. our supplecations have been disregarded and we've been spurned with contempt from the floor of the chamber of the opposing body. in vain these things we may indoing the fond hope of life and justice -- indulge the fond hope of life and justice. if we mean to preserve this fundamental right for which we've been so long arguing, if we mean not basically to abandon this noble struggle which we
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have been so long engaged in, in which we have pledged ourselves to never abandon until the glorious object of our conquest shall be obtained we must hope the american people demand the enate hold a vote. we must hope the american people demand the senate hold a vote. an appeal to democracy and to the lord of hosts is all that is left to us. suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with the promise of later action. ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with the nearly 60 million lives ended. we can be heard numbers across the fruited plane. a vote should be held for or
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against life. let us have it. let us have it. in this vain, sir, tokes ten wait the matter, gentlemen may cry, later, later, next year. but there is no later. the killing has continued for over 40 years. the next scale that sweeps to the north will bring to our ears cries of the yet born. the house has voted. why is the senate idle? what is it that they wish? what would they have? is political victory so dear or a title so sweet as to be purchased at the price of human life? forbid it, almighty god. mr. speaker, i know not what others, what course others may take, but as for me, my hope is that there is a vote. my hope is that we stand for life. i'd yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time.
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the chair lays before the house the following enrolled bill. the clerk: senate 652. an act to amend the public health service act, to re-authorize the program for early detection diagnosis and treatment regarding death and hard of hearing newborns, nfants and young children.
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the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly the house stands adjourned until 10:30 a.m. tomorrow morning.
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