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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  March 20, 2018 11:59am-1:06pm EDT

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corruption and other power iencies by the company in puerto rico. to be congress could play role if it chooses to. ferris, e&e news. david cameron testifies about global security. >> c-span, where history unfolds daily. in 1979 c-span was created as a public service by america's cable television companies, and today we continue to bring you unfiltered coverage of congress, the white house, the supreme court, and public policy events in washington, d.c., and around the country. c-span is brought to you by your cable or satellite provider. >> and the house gaveling back in starting its work today on a measure that would allow terminally ill patients to use experimental drugs that have not been approved by the
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f.d.a., and another that would exempt some financial institutions from requirements in the dodd-frank financial regulation law. the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, dr. michael lewis, roswell street baptist church, marietta, georgia. the chaplain: our father in heaven, we enter into your presence this day with thanksgiving in our the gracious gift of life and the opportunities that you've set before us. we bless you for being our creator and for providing a living relationship of love through your son and our savior, the lord jesus christ. we humble ourselves before you as men and women of the special -- of this special body, whom you've apointed with the responsibility of -- appointed with the responsibility of serving the people of this nation. may you fill the minds of each
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leader with wisdom which is from above. fill each heart with passion for your glory and the greatest good of others. and fill each decision with a guidance of your spirit. my heart is grateful to voice this prayer on this day in our nation's history with fellow citizens. may you unite our hearts to glorify your name. may you bless the cities, communities of our nation with peace. may you bless the united states of america, for i humbly make this prayer in the name of jesus. amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from illinois, mr. schneider. mr. schneider: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to
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the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman from georgia, mr. loudermilk, is recognized for one minute. mr. loudermilk: thank you, mr. speaker. today i have the honor of introducing our guest pastor, dr. michael lewis, from my home district and from the great city of marietta, georgia. dr. lewis graduated in 1996 with a master's of divinity degree from southeastern baptist seminary. in may of 2005 he received an honorary doctorate from liberty university and he has the honor of serving in churches in south carolina, texas, and florida as their pastor. currently dr. lewis serves as paser to of roswell street baptist -- pastor of roswell street baptist church where he
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lives with his wife and their three wonderful daughters. it is my privilege to introduce dr. michael lewis who opened us this morning in prayer. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 further requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. the gentlelady from north carolina is -- for what purpose does the gentlelady from north carolina rise? ms. foxx: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. . ms. foxx: today i rise in honor of women's history month. we honor the taylor blazing women. this -- taylor blazing month. it's important to recognize today's hardworking women in today's work force. these women account for nearly half of the work force while 40% of women are their family's top earners. because of tax reform, the women of america's work force will be able to keep more of
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their hard-earned cash to spend on their families rather than sending it to washington. additionally, working moms and their families will receive double the child tax credit to ensure they have the means to care for their children. mr. speaker, to the naysayers that claim tax reform will only benefit rich men, i say that's categorically false. tax reform already has and will continue to empower the wonderful women in america's work force to make history worth recognizing. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. harrison butker mr. speaker, i rise today -- mr. butterfield: mr. speaker, i rise today to honor jim. jim passed away, mr. speaker, sunday, march 11, at the age of
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77. jim mckennon preached the gospel of jesus christ in eastern north carolina for decades. his ministry inspired and motivated many individuals, both in his home of wilson, north carolina, and elsewhere. ordaned as a minister of the presbyterian church on september 22, 1968, shortly after the assassination of dr. martin luther king jr. and senator robert f. kennedy, jim served congregations throughout north carolina. first as an associate pastor in fayetteville and then senior pastor in charlottes, wilson, where he retired as senior pastor at first presbyterian church. he was a strong pillar in our community and will be missed. he's survived by his wife of 51 long years, louise, and two sons, also presbyterian inisters, tripp, john.
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his beloved four children are john, brandon, rebecca, louise. and two others from oklahoma city. jim was preceded in death by his grandson, james holley mckennon iv, wife, jamie. let it be said, mr. speaker, reverend mckennon made a difference in the world. reverend jim mckennon. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. today i proudly honor the belleville west basketball team for winning the 20184-a state tournament. it was truly a march madness in peoria, as the maroons played in a back and forth game against the dolphins. mr. bost: they held off whitney
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young for a 56-50 victory to take home the championship trophy. this is the first basketball state title in school history. i extend a heart-felt congratulations to the players, coaches, staff, school officials, families and friends who support these young men on this incredible journey. illinois 12th is proud of you. go, maroons. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. ldee: thank you, speaker. this friday marks the eighth anniversary of the affordable care act being signed into law. in this, the richest country in the world, health care should be a basic human right, not a privilege for some. and while the a.c.a. is far from perfect -- we know that -- it made great progress insuring millions and millions of americans -- ensuring millions
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and millions of americans they can have health insurance, making it more affordable, making sure americans with pre-existing conditions were not denied coverage because they were sick or kicked off their coverage because they got sick. unfortunately, though, this house has spent a good deal of the last year or so trying to take back some of those advances that we made, essentially putting more families in the position of having that economic uncertainty of not knowing whether or not their premiums will continue go -- to go up or their co-pays go up or the prescriptions will be unaffordable to them, putting families back in the place where they are essentially one illness away from losing everything they worked for. we should work together because we know there are improvements that are needed to make. we should improve this law and move forward. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from florida seek recognition?
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ms. ros-lehtinen: well, mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized 1. ms. ros-lehtinen: i rise to celebrate best buddies for their run this past weekend. best buddies international was founded in 1989 by one of my constituents, anthony k. shriver, and promotes the idea that every person has a gift and that every person can contribute. this message is emblematic what makes successful and has made best buddies a thriving global organization, serving thousands of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. the best buddies friendship walk allows those who are often excluded because of their differences the opportunity to create one-on-one friendships that last a lifetime. it is that model that's allowed
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best buddies to make extraordinary advancements in the autism community, to increase understanding and acceptance of the disability. i would like to extend my congratulations for a successful best buddies friendship walk, and i'm so delighted to see my constituents giving the gift of friendship to individuals in south florida with intellectual and developmental disabilities. thank you, mr. speaker, for the time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i am pleased to rise today in support of the boots to business program. running a small business requires a wide variety of skills. one day you're the company's accountant. the next day you're researching marketing strategies. many of our service members have the temperament and experience to e sell as small business owners and -- excell
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as small business owners and entrepreneurs but they lack the skills to turn their dreams into reality. mr. schneider: the boots to business program offers them a two-day in-person course. and an eight-week online course. since the program launched in 2013, more than 50,000 service members and spouses have participated, learning how to start and grow businesses and thereby grow our economy. this month i introduced the bipartisan veteran entrepreneurship training act with my friend from iowa, congressman rod blum. the bill would codify the boots to business program. our veterans serve our country with honor. they deserve our support as they transition from military to civilian life. i urge my colleagues to join me on this bipartisan effort. and with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, today i introduced the foreign influence transparency act which requires organizations such as the confucius institute to register under the foreign agents region station act, fara, if they promote the agenda of a foreign country. the goal of this legislation is to increase transparency between foreign governments, universities, and students. americans have the right to know if they are consuming propaganda that's produced by a foreign government. currently fara contains a technicality that allows foreign governments or organizations to push their political agenda under the facade of an academic pursuit. the foreign influence transparency act will clarify the intent and ensure all propaganda by foreign governments at least contains a disclaimer. the act also decreases the monetary threshold of foreign donations that universities are required to disclose. currently universities only report on donations they receive of $250,000 or more
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while organizations such as the confucius institute operate below that level. this results in a lack of disclosure to opportunities and parents. the goal of this legislation is simple and that is to create transparency through disclosure. in conclusion, god bless our troops, and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the life of lou vanderzil, a dedicated educator, a veteran and a devoted father, grandfather and great go and father who passed away last month. lou's lifetime of service included the deployment with the 40th infantry division during the korean war. followed by a half century as a teacher and administrator and 17 years as a riverside school
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board member. as school board president, lou demonstrated his moral courage by insisting that a local high school be named after martin luther king despite a wave of protests and intense opposition. he will be remembered by the riverside community as someone who cared deeply for his students. lou vanderzil, an avid reader, cross word puzzler and traveler and a constant source of wisdom and kindness will be dearly missed by our community. may his memory be the blessing to the family and friends he leaves behind. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. higgins: mr. speaker, louise mcintosh slaughter served the people of rochester and monroe county as well as the city of buffalo in the
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united states congress from 1987 until her untimely death last week. louise slaughter was a champion of progressive causes in the liberal lioness of the united states congress. she knew who she was fighting for and she knew how to fight. for the homeless, the helpless and the voiceless, louise slaughter championed all her causes because her political ethos was to forever defend the dignity of every citizen. she never deviated from that cause and reinforced it each and every day on the floor of this congress, the institution that she loved. she served as chair and ranking member of the rules committee and championed the first $500 million earmark for breast cancer research to the national institutes of health and the violence against women act. these are among a long list of impressive accomplishments that were championed by louise slaughter. her friends and her family will
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miss her but her accomplishments will forever be enshrined on this institution representing the people that she loved in rochester and monroe county. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. sir, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on march 20, 2018, at 11:18 a.m. that the senate passed with an amendment h.r. 3731. appointments, board of visitors of the u.s. military academy. united states holocaust memorial council. with best wished, i am, signed, sincerely, karen l. haas. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house an enrolled bill.
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the clerk: h.r. 215 4 an act to rename the red river valley agricultural research center in fargo, north carolina -- fargo, north dakota, as the edward t. schaefer agricultural research center. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. burgess: mr. speaker, by direction of the committee on rules, i call up house resolution 787 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 133, house resolution 787. resolved, that upon adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to consider in the house the bill h.r. 4566, to amend the dodd-frank wall street reform and consumer protection act to provide relief to nonbanks from certain stress test requirements under such act. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. in lieu of the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on financial services now printed
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in the bill, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of rules committee print 115-65 shall be considered as adopted. the bill, as amended, shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended, are waived. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, and on any further amendment thereto, to final passage without intervening motion except, one, one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on financial services, two, the further amendment printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution, if offered by the member designated in the report, which shall be in order without intervention of any point of order, shall be considered as read, shall be separately debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, and shall not be subject to a demand for a division of the question, and
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three, one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2. upon adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to consider in the house the bill h.r. 5247, to authorize the use of eligible investigational drugs by eligible patients who have been diagnosed with a stage of a disease or condition in which there is reasonable likelihood that death will occur within a matter of months, or with another eligible illness, and for other purposes. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. the bill shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill are waived. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and on any amendment thereto to final passage without intervening motion except, one, one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on energy and commerce, and two, one motion to recommit. section 3. the requirement of clause 6-a of
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rule 13 for a 2/3 vote to consider a report from the committee on rules on the same day it is presented to the house is waived with respect to any resolution reported through the legislative day of march 23, 2018. section 4. it shall be in order at any time on the legislative day of march 22, 2018, or march 23, 2018, for the speaker to entertain motions that the house suspend the rules as though under clause 1 of rule 15. the speaker or his designee shall consult with the minority leader or her designee on the designation of any matter for consideration pursuant to this section. section 5. section 3-a of house resolution 5 is amended by striking "the first session of. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for one hour. mr. burgess: thank you, mr. speaker. for the purposes of debate only, i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from florida, mr. hastings, pending which i yield myself such time as i may
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consume. during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, house resolution 787 provides for the consideration of two important bills whose focus is to empower the people of this nation, by removing governmental obstacles standing in the way of life and prosperity in this country. the first bill, h.r. 4566, the alleviating stress test burdens to help investors act, is a bipartisan effort from the committee on financial services, under chairman hensarling, authored by mr. poliquin from maine. the second piece of legislation the day's rule, h.r. 5247,
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right to try act of 2018, authorizes the use of certain drugs to eligible patients who have been diagnosed with a stage of a disease or a condition for which there is a reasonable likelihood that death will occur in a matter of months. the rule provides for one hour of debate for h.r. 4566, the alleviating stress test burdens to help investors act, equally divided -- divided exeen the chair and ranking members -- between the chair and ranking members. the rule makes one amendment in order, authored by ranking member watters from california. further, the rule provides -- waters from california. further, the rule provides for consideration of one motion to recommit with or without instructions. for h.r. 5247, the right to try act of 2018, the rule provides for one hour of debate equally divided between the chair and the ranking member of the committee on energy and commerce.
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although no amendments to the bill were made in order, the rule does provide for one motion to recommit. mr. speaker, before i speak about the substance of the two bills under consideration in the rule before us today, i do want to take a minute to honor our colleague and the rules committee's ranking member, louise slaughter, who passed away unexpectedly this week. i've known ranking member slaughter since i first joined congress in 2003. and although we spent countless hours debating every issue one can imagine in the rules committee upstairs, often long into the night, when i joined the rules committee in 2013, ranking member slaughter was then the ranking member, but it was under her chairmanship where she ushered through the affordable care act, where my largest memories reside. during the debate for the affordable care act, i went up to the rules committee hearing room with 18 amendments under my
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arm. a small selection of the many ways i felt the law needed to be changed. certain that i would only be able to get through a small portion of those amendments before i was cut off, i began my testimony. to the chairwoman's credit, she let me go on and on and on and despite my being convinced that she was going to gavel me down at any second, she allowed me to finish speaking on all 18 amendments. mr. speaker, it wasn't until i actually became a member of the rules committee several years later that i discovered there is in fact no time limit for members and witnesses to speak. much to the chagrin of many members when we debate the national defense authorization act. ranking member slaughter was always proud of her background as a microbiols and it served her well during her tenure in congress. we dole with sometimes miniscule -- deal with sometimes miniscule
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issues. one moment where i was glad to be able to work with ranking member slaughter was in 2007. she was -- this was right after the democrats took control of the house and ms. slaughter had been pushing for years for legislation that would prohibit the discrimination of employees based ognjen ethic information -- on genetic information. the legislation was forward leaning, long before companies offers d.n.a. testing kits in every pharmacy of the country. indiana fact it was former speaker newt gingrich himself who brought this bill to my attention. the genetic information nondiscrimination act, which i was proud to support, as it moved through the energy and commerce committee, and was eventually signed into law by president bush. i'd also like to mention the staff director for the minority on the rules committee. don has been with the committee for years, even at one point working under chairman dreier and has been with the ranking member of the rules committee through many events in the past years. including the death of her own
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husband, who in fact often sat in the audience of the rules committee and joined ms. slaughter during our late night rules hearings. don is indeed a loyal staffer, himself hailing from rochester, new york, and is a great example of how ms. slaughter's life and passing is affecting so many people. and i do want to thank don for his written remarks that were read into the record of the rules committee last night from the staff perspective on the passing of ranking member slaughter. mr. speaker, at this point i'd like to hold off making further comments on the legislation before us, to allow others to speak, and i will reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, i thank the gentleman, my friend from texas, for yielding me the customary 30 minutes for debate and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, like my friend from texas, i was overcome with sadness about the tragic news of louise's passing.
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who was not only the ranking member of the rules committee, but the first and only woman to have chaired the committee. for 30 years louise poured every ounce of energy she had into serving her constituents in upstate new york. she never hesitated to speak her mind and she never wavered in espousing her beliefs. i will always be truly grateful for the time that i had to serve alongside her. louise was one of my dearest friends in congress. having not only served with her on the rules committee, but also on the commission for security and cooperation in europe. her legacy speaks for itself. she was not just a champion of women's rights. she was a champion of working
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families everywhere. this nation has lost one of our fiercest public servants and her absence will leave an unfillable void. mr. speaker, i offer my deepest condolences to louise's .aughters, megan, amy and emily er seven grandchildren and one great-grandson. as well as to her friends, constituents and congressional staff during this extremely difficult time. her spirit and loving memory will forever live in the halls of congress. she will be dearly missed. mr. speaker, turning to today's rules, this rule brings the number of closed rules for the
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115th congress to 74. in other words, more than 50% of the legislation coming to the rules committee has been closed off from an open and honest debate by my republican friends. at the beginning of this congress, we were told by my republican colleagues that they would run the government in an open manner. they even championed regular order. well, that spirit has clearly been jettisoned in favor of an overly partisan approach to governing. by way of example, one of today's bills, h.r. 5247, was introduced last tuesday, brought to the house floor for a vote on the same day, without the
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committee of jurisdiction holding one single hearing on the bill or members having the opportunity to offer their amendments. not surprisingly, the measure failed to pass under suspension of the rules. what was the response of my friends on the other side of the aisle when the vote failed? did my republican colleagues insist that the energy and commerce committee hold hearings on the measure? did my republican colleagues on the committee of jurisdiction invite experts to speak on what the consequences would be if this bill were to become law? did my republican colleagues work with democrats to come up with a bipartisan solution? no, madam speaker. let me tell you what did happen. . the republican leadership
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ignored the problems with the measure and brought it to the rules committee last night for it to be considered on the house floor today. now, this flies in the face of regular order to ask the entire membership of the people's house to vote on something for which no one can honestly say they know what the unintended consequences would be if this bill were to become law. bad process makes bad bills. and the process we've witnessed this bill -- with this bill can't get much worse. yet, it did get worse when the republican majority blocked the ranking member, mr. pallone's substitute amendment, an amendment that was both germane and had bipartisan support. madam speaker, the republican majority took it a step further
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when they extended the holman rule for the remainder of the 115th congress. my friends on the other side of the aisle are yet again seeking to scapegoat federal employees, make cuts to the federal work force, and politicize the civil service system that was established to professionalize agencies and offices all while ignoring the waste and abuses in the reality show of the trump administration. madam speaker, challenged by the american people to bring up comprehensive gun reform, house leadership instead brings up one bill that hasn't gone through anything resembling regular order and another bill that weakens and undermines a valuable tool that gives financial companies and regulators an opportunity to
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identify and correct problems before they could lead to another financial crisis. , roughly 35,000 people are killed by guns. 7 are shot and killed and more than 13,000 are shot and injured every year. the effects of gun violence extend far beyond those struck by a bullet, gun violence shapes the lives of the millions of children who witness it, no someone who was shot, or live in fear of the next shooting. we have witnessed the effects over the last month with the
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students from marjory stoneman dug plass high school. this -- douglas high school. this weekend hundreds of thousands of students and supporters will dissend on washington, d.c., to demand that the federal government take action to stop the epidemic of mass shootings which have become all too familiar. no less than this morning when i turned on the television, less than an hour and a half away from here, yet another school, yet another shooting. fortunately, it appears, the resource officer there engaged may ooter early on and have caused there to be less damage. although some people were injured and one or two critically. we can no longer ignore what gun violence really is in this country.
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it's an epidemic, but don't take my word for it or the tudents who witnessed 14 teachers nd three brutally killed. they say gun violence is a very public health crisis, a crisis which the republican majority's only answer is to offer thoughts and prayers. and further block any democratic measures to address this crisis and continue to block the centers for disease control and prevention from even researching gun violence. and instead of finally making permanent the status of dreamers in this country as full citizens, the republican majority ignores their calls and the calls of the vast majority of americans and instead brings up one bill that
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undermines a valuable early warning system of our nation's economy and another bill that's gone through a completely closed process. enough is enough. president donald john trump says he wants to fix this problem. the speaker says he wants to fix this problem. we on this side of the aisle clearly want to fix this problem, so let's do it already. and last week when i was managing yet another useless financial regulation, i commented and i asked the american public to respond -- would you rather us stop banks from having stress tests, or would you prefer we deal with the deferred action for children in this country, 800,000 of whom are dreamers, 120 of whom lose their status
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every day? would you preferred we deal with the measure that's on the floor today or that we deal seriously with a variety of sues having to do with gun violence in this society which i described as an epidemic? would you prefer as a priority, america, that we deal with these trivial matters that are going nowhere fast, that we center ourselves and focus those that are vital to the survival, security, and safety of all americans? mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: madam speaker, let me yield myself such time as i might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: madam speaker, it was indeed incredibly disappointing last week when our democratic colleagues did
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not join us in supporting what was a very carefully crafted right to try legislation. look, the president came and talked to us at the beginning of february, and right to try was one of the issues that he highlighted there from the rostrum, from the podium. so it should be to no one's great surprise that this house would indeed take up and work on that issue that the president himself highlighted. right to try was the one piece of legislation that president trump specifically promised to the american people in the state of the union address. so today, i want it to be known that i stand with the president. i stand with thousands of americans with terminal diseases and their families and their friends in getting this important bill passed. since 2014, 37 states, including my home state of texas, have passed a version of a right to try law.
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and through a strong grassroots movement they have accomplished that. today, the house is considering h.r. 5247, the right to try act of 2018, which would improve access to experimental treatments for terminally ill patients and offer them a chance, a second chance, a third chance at life. over the course of the last decade, our nation has achieved unprecedented innovation and scientific breakthroughs. thanks to researchers in our academic institutions and those working in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, american patients have access to innovative treatments. regardless of these achievements, i hear from patients with seriously life-threatening conditions, including my constituents from north texas, who are frustrated with what they see as regulatory barriers from trying and experimenting with new
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therapies when every other avenue has failed. it does seem we are at a crossroads when life-saving treatments, while not yet approved, both exist and remain unavailable to patients. as a physician, i understand that access to investigational drugs and therapies is a deeply personal priority for those seeking treatment for themselves or loved ones with a serious and life-threatening condition. it is crucial to mention the multistakeholder efforts that have gone into improving the original right to try bill. chairman walden of the energy and commerce committee led negotiations with the commissioner of the united states food and drug administration, dr. scott gottlieb, with other stakeholders to ensure this legislation opens the door to innovative, experimental drugs for these patients without necessarily compromising the vital work and the mission of
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the food and drug administration. the product of those negotiations is a bill that strikes the proper balance between ensuring patient safety and granting access to these treatments. i also want to mention that the subcommittee of health did have a hearing in this regard, october 3. we heard from the commissioner of the food and drug administration during that hearing. we heard from a number of patient groups and stakeholders who felt that it was in fact in their best interest for us to advance legislation. currently, the food and drug administration conducts an expanded access program aimed at helping patients who do not qualify for clinical trials to gain access to therapies that the agency has yet to approve. while this program makes a good faith effort to help those patients, right to try would create an alternative pathway for those individuals, allowing them to access eligible
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investigational drugs. the fact is individuals may not qualify for a clinical trial if they do not meet very specific patient inclusion criteria which may include factors such as age, gender, type and stage of disease, previous treatment history, and other medical conditions. there are also many patients for whom participation in a clinical trial is not feasible, especially those who live in rural areas, far from where those academic clinical trial sites exist. most, if not all of the patients with terminal medical condition, fall into one of these categories. this legislation allows those patients to participate in the alternative pathway so long as they are certified by a physician who is in good standing and abides by the rules laid out in the bill. again, we work closely with the food and drug administration to ensure that the new alternative
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pathway does not hinder or conflict with the critically important oversight that that agency conducts. while some people may have reservations about the safety of a new pathway, this bill protects patients from manufacturers mislabeling or misbranding drugs, requires sponsors and manufacturers to report adverse events to the food and drug administration, and provides certain liability protections for parties participating in the new pathway. this alternative pathway would also be limited to individuals who have exhausted all f.d.a. -approved treatment options. additionally, only certain investigational drugs are considered eligible under this legislation. in order to qualify, the drug must have completed a phase 1 clinical trial, must have an active application, be under active development or production by the manufacturer
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and not be the subject of a clinical hold. eligible patients include those suffering from a stage of a disease or condition for which there is reasonable likelihood that death will occur in a matter of months or that would result in significant irreversible morbidity that's likely to lead to premature death. this revised right to try bill also provides certainty to manufacturers in the drug approval process. it's essential we do not create additional hurdles in that process. the legislation clearly states that the secretary of the department of health and human services may not use a clinical outcome associated with the use of an eligible investigational drug to delay or adversely affect the review or the approval of such drug. since the health subcommittee first considered right to try legislation, the bill has passed in the senate and we've
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had many conversations with patients, advocates, the administration, and stakeholders on all sides of this complex topic. that collaborative effort was necessary, and i'm certainly grateful to all who participated in those discussions. madam speaker, this represents months of hard work, thoughtful discussions and decisions, and i believe this legislation is a positive step forward in our shared goal of improving care for american patients. again, this was the one aspect of the president's state of the union address where he asked us specifically to act on this legislation. for these reasons i urge my colleagues to support the rule and the underlying bill. i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: thank you very much, madam speaker. madam speaker, last night in the dialogue ittee, i had ith the author of this
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legislation. and the ranking member, mr. pallone. i indicated to them that i have very strong sympathies regarding persons who are in the apparent somes of death and seeking , and medication can have its advantages and experimental medication can have its advantages. my war he will with the legislation -- quarrel with the legislation is that it didn't go through regular order. with don't understand why all of the experts i introduced into the record in the rules committee last night, a substantial of organizations and individuals who have come forward, and all agree that
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something along the lines of what is being sought ought be undertaken, but it would allow or those persons to have added input into what ultimately may be significant legislation. but my friends on the other side matter,ht ahead on this that i reiterate was brought on uspension last week that failed, and then brought here a night for purposes of rule, along with financial stress legislation. so, it is not that many of us are not sympathetic to the underlying principle that's being offered. a rank process
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and we should not allow legislation to continue to come to the floor of the house of representatives that blocks out a significant number of persons who may have input, that would make the measure be much more salient to a more significant number of people. it's for that reason that i continue to ask the question, what are our priorities here? what's the rush with reference to this matter, while we're ignoring a significant number of other matters that we could be undertaking? and in addition to that, we were supposed to go to the rules committee this afternoon on the omnibus bill, and now evidently there's wrangeling going on a ween the parties and bicameral between the senate and the house and that measure isn't
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ready to come to the floor. and yet we're dealing with something that isn't the highest priority of the moment. i commented last night, anything that will help a person that is facing death is the kind of thing that we would want that person to have an opportunity to deal with. but we have children who have been killed and we have children who are facing the potential for that kind of horror and yet we're doing nothing. so, madam speaker, once again i rise to appeal to my fremmeds on the other side of the aisle -- my friends on the other side of the aisle, please listen to the american people. and do more to help the epidemic of gun violence that has plagued our nation and that the american people are demanding congress to do more. for example, in a recent gallup poll, nearly 2/3 of adults
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wanted stricter laws on the sale of firearms. and according to a recent poll, 75% of respondents said they think gun laws should be stricter. as i indicated earlier, just this morning there are reports of another school shooting just an hour and a half from washington, d.c. in maryland. the american people are begging this body to do something to end this epidemic. so i offer the majority this opportunity. madam speaker, if we defeat the previous question, i'm going to offer an amendment to the rule to bring up four commonsense gun safety bills. safety andthe public second amendment rights protection act. .r. 3464, the background check
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completion act. h.r. 2598, the gun violence restraining order act. nd h.r. 1478, the gun violence research act. these bills would close the dangerous gun show and internet sale background check loopholes, prevent the sale of guns without a completed background check, ensure that people who are a danger to themselves or others can be prevented from possessing a gun, and lift the prohibition on government-sponsored scientist research on the causes of gun violence. madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to incertificate the text of my amendment in the record, along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote on the previous question.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to defeat the previous question so that we can finally do something to address gun violence. and i'm prepared to reserve the balance of my time and through you, madam speaker, would advise my friend from texas that i have no further speakers and i'm prepared to close when he's prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: madam speaker, at this time i would like to yield three minutes to a fellow member of the rules committee, the gentleman from washington, three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for three minutes. >> thank you, madam speaker. i want to thank the good gentleman from texas. mr. newhouse: as well as the good gentleman from florida, mr. hastings. because i want to take just a minute, i think it's appropriate at this time to, during this debate on a rule, to remember ms. louise slaughter. our ranking member of the rules committee.
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a historical position in the fact that she was the very first woman to be the chairman of rules committee. over three decades of service to our nation, through the u.s. congress. and as importantly, or to me, more importantly, someone that i consider a personal friend. louise was an individual that i said yesterday could really make hat -- could transcend between politics and personal relationships. we have some very heated debates. a good example today of a very strong difference of opinions. we can do that. that's our job to do that. but louise also taught us that we can do that without being negative to each other in a personal way. she was great at that. she embodied, she personified the ability to be -- have an
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objection without being objectionable. and i admired that greatly about her. she was a senior member. i was a very junior member. she didn't have to do this. but in many ways she took me under her wing, when i became a member of congress. we served on the rules committee together and i very much relished that relationship that we had. another thing that we had in common, we joined a very exclusive club. one that several other members of this body belong to, and that is those people who have lost their spouses. and when i was going through that very personally difficult me, louise had a similar experience. she was very gracious to me, to be able to help me through that very difficult time. we exchanged books, as many of you have read books by c.s.
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lewis. louise and i had many discussions about some of the things in some of his writings. and in kind of a funny way, as in manipulating me into thinking i was helping her, she was actually having me help myself. through that very challenging time. and i will always be forever grateful to her for doing that. she stood strong, she was a formidable opponent. when she was managing the rule for the democrats on the other side of the floor, it was always a challenging task and you had to be on your game when we were on this side making the debate with her. i count myself very fortunate to have been able to know her, to have been able to work with her, and i join together with all of my colleagues and her family to be able to remember her and honor her memory and will continue to do so as she has
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truly left a large mark on this institution. with that, madam speaker, thank you. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: madam speaker, i would say to my friend from washington, what i said last night. we would do a great service to louise's memory if we would have -- we were to make more open rules here on the house floor. and i will argue for her in that regard. madam speaker, i reserve the balance of my time, and i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is prepared to close. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: madam speaker, i am prepared to listen to the closing argument of the gentleman from florida. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized to close. mr. hastings: thank you very much, madam speaker. before i close, i want to again reiterate the tremendous loss felt in this chamber with the
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passing of our long-time colleague, congresswoman louise mcintosh slaughter. she was a champion of all the issues she cared about and a giant here in the house of representatives. her wisdom will be missed every day. madam speaker, the people's house should be approaching our work in a manner that is fair to all americans. and a manner where the appropriate committee of jurisdiction holds hearings and markups. and a manner where experts in the field are consulted. in a manner where members of both parties have the opportunity to offer amendments and debate the contents of the bill. the process we're witnessing here today is truly a slap in the face to regular order. bill that has zero input from
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members on the energy and commerce committee, or been the subject of any thoughtful on house is suddenly floor for a vote. i respect my friend from texas' view that last year in the senate, and even perhaps since that time, and throughout the country, right to try measures have passed in several states, to some degree. but this particular bill that is on the floor that we are making a rule for has not gone through regular order. and that then disallows a significant number of persons who would have an opportunity to have input to what could be legislation that all sides could agree upon, and our failure to undertake to do that is a disservice, in my view, to the
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institution and to the measure that is being sought to be passed here today. it's not just an affront to normal house procedure. it is down right undemocratic -- and emblematic of the republican majority's inability to govern. renoun to it will their discredit that they are not allowing this house to proceed under regular order. and as i indicated earlier, more than 50% of all of the measures that have come to the rules committee and have ultimately come to the floor of the house of representatives have been under closed rules. which means that members who represent millions of people in america do not have
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opportunities to offer amendments that might make the measure better, or at the very least have their views heard with reference to substantive legislation that is moving through this body. if we continue down this path for the remainder of this session, we will probably break the 100 barrier of closed rules. we have already had more closed of the an the history whole of this country's legislating. that's not fair. and that's basically all we're arguing. and that is to open up the process. let every member have an opportunity for input on behalf of his or her constituents. it is the right thing to do and what has been happening is the dead wrong thing to do. madam speaker, i urge a no vote on the rule and i yield back the balance of my time.
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. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: let me yield myself the balance of the time on our side. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: i would like to insert in the record an article from the "dallas morning news" from october of 2010 titled, this article, i'm not going to read the whole thing, the title is pelosi pulled strings to let dying dallas lawyer try experimental cancer drug. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: this article references events that occurred in 2008. this individual in 2002 was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. by october of 2008, his doctors were telling him that he had just days to live. they also offered a glimmer of hope there. was perhaps one chance of therapy, unploven, -- unproven, that might be helpful to him. a family made inquiries,
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entreaties, but they were not successful until they invoked the then speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who actually helped this lawyer get access to this medication. unfortunately, it was not successful. disease had progressed to a point where the therapy was not helpful. nancye family observed -- figured out a way. how about that? the speaker of the house figured out a way to get this medication to an individual who was dying of a disease, obviously very important, as a large democratic toner, i get that. but the speaker of the house intervened because the clinic where he was being treated felt that they did not have the authority to give him the medication. the company that was manufacturing the medication did not feel that it was in anyone's
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best interest to give the medication. nancy found a way. mr. speaker, today, you can find a way. the president asked us and we're find a way for those millions of americans who are asking for that same chance. so today's rule provides for consideration of two important consumer-driven pieces of legislation. h.r. 4566, by mr. poliquin, will help alleviate some of the regulations that were put in place find a way for those millions under the dodd-frank a h.r. 5247, the right to try bill, which garnered majority bipartisan support last week will give patients who have nowhere else to turn another option to fight the potentially fatal health conditions with which they have been diagnosed. i do want to thank president trump, i want to thank vice president pence for their adership on this issue and
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understand here in this body how important it is to move forward with this patient centered legislation. i urge my colleagues to support today's rule and the two underlying pieces of legislation. with that i yield back the balance of my time. i move the previous question un this body how important it is to move forward with this patient centered legislation. on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields. the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess subject to the call of the chair. washington journal c.
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host: for the first time on washington journal we welcome con -- claudia tenney, a republican from new york's way second district. your district is one of the tossup districts that will be on the front lines in the 2018 elections, how do you feel as a freshman member with that status? do you feel like you are walking around with a target on your back as you get to know your way around capitol hill? >> i'm used to that. i have always been an underdog. 2016i faced a three-way primary and three-way election where my opponents had about $15 million and i had 3 million. i want general election by seven
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