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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  April 12, 2018 11:59am-4:43pm EDT

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this is not a, i think, it's in he an easily buynary situation -- binary situation. with our ally, we can fix most of it, will that make it sufficient? i don't know right now. >> the problem, mr. secretary is the decision to stay in or pull out is ultimately a binary decision. >> right. >> mr. chairman, your deputy, general paul selvick testified in july that based on intelligence, it appears iran is in compliance with the rules laid out in the jcpoa. since that time the iaea continued to affirm iran's compliance. in your assessment and in the assessment of the intelligence community, is -- >> you can see the rest of this house armed services committee hearing on our website at c-span.org. there's a link at the top of the page. the u.s. house is expected to gavel in shortly to debate a balanced budget amendment to the u.s. constitution. it would require that government
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spending not exceed government revenue. requirement for a balanced budget could be waived during times of military conflict or by a three fifths majority vote in the house and senate. live for that debate now to the house floor here on c-span. the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. the chaplain: let us pray. gracious and merciful god, we give you thanks forgiving us another day. you bring forth blessings from just deeds, listen to our prayers for the members of this people's house. give them the wisdom to meditate upon your revelation, your law. help them find confidence in your love, especially in times of difficulty. may their efforts reflect the mindset and gracious manner
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revealed in your loving commands, and may their work contain the depths of justice and the expansive embrace of human goodness that you reveal to your people. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory, amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to clause 1, rule 1, i demand a vote on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. the speaker: the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and i make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker:
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the speaker: further pr seedings on this question will be postponed. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentlewoman from alabama, ms. reby. mrs. roby: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair now asks the house now observe a moment of silence in honor of those who have been killed or wounded in service to our country and all those who serve in their families. the speaker: the chair will now entertain up to 15 requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new york seek
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recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and reth rhett my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized. >> i rise today to bring attention to the urgent crisis facing dairy fample -- farmers across my district, the low price of milk, labor shortages and dwindling access to new markets are some of the many challenges faced by the hardworking family farms in my district. additionally, the margin protection program has failed north country dairy farmers by providing little to no return on our farmers' buy-. in recently i was pleased to support the bipartisan budget act which contains many urgent reforms to this program such as raising catastrophic coverage for the first tier of covered protection for all farmers, reducing premium rates to help farmers buy coverage and waiving costly admfertive fees for underserved farms. ms. stefanik: agriculture is the back bone of our area. in congress i'll keep fighting
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every dito strengthen our family farms for future generations. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the jerusalem yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i house republicans recently voted to add $2.7 trillion to the national debt over the next decade. that is more debt in the shortest period of time by any one political party, the republican party, in american history. your debt will exceed the entire american economy in 10 years. the moral horror of passing this debt on to your kids and grandkids now belongs to you. mr. higgins: you own it they owe it. to now offer a balanced budget amendment is transparently cowardly and egregious. congress does not need a constitutional amendment to do its job honorably. the constitution already gives congress that authority. what's missing is the intestinal
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fortitude to do that which the constitution calls on you to do honorably. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from arkansas seek recognition? without objection the gentleman is recognized for up with -- for ne minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to onor the life of sergeant jack comankok of hot springs, arkansas, for his heroic actions in world war ii. he was a gunner on a bmbing-17 flying fortress named the challenger. on february 3, 1945, the 384th bomb group participated in a mission other berlin. the challenger was hit by flak, damaging punishment pl engines, gas tanks a thnd efuselage but left the crew unharmed on the return journey home the he plane
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began losing at constitute and crash landed in the frigid north sea. they abandoned the aircraft and oarded two life crafts but became separated. one man who stayed in the water egan pushing the raft toward the other. sergeant took his place. shortly afterwards air sea rescue located the crew of the -- that sergeant tissue but sergeant cook had little life left in him and pass aid way on he boat. he gave his life for his fellow man and for this, we remember him more than 70 years later. mr. speaker, i yield back.
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>> mr. speaker, like mr. westerman, i rise today to recognize heroic actions taken by 348th group jack cook of hot springs, arkansas, during a world war ii mission. selflessly he gave his life to save the life of his fellow airmen, including my constituent, first lieutenant edward field a veteran and poet from brooklyn, new york. only one raft was able to fully inflate, leaving two men in the frigid water. after they had spent about 0 minutes in the watter, sergeant cook gave up his spot in the
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raft for lieutenant fields who had become numb. sergeant cook then swam in the freeing -- freezing waters to the other raft chches only partially inflated. unfortunately he died before a british vessel could come and rescue them. in his poem world war ii, lieutenant field honored the incredible sacrifice made by sergeant cook recognizing that his survival is entwined with the -- entwined from the spirit borne of another's sacrifice. it is my honor to commemorate those who honorably served you are country. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition? >> i rise to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise to recognize deputy andrew jenkins of the eaton county sheriff's department for being awarded a congressional badge of bravery.
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he's only the second law enforcement officer from michigan to ever receive this high hon nor. on the evening of december 20, 2016, deputy jenkins was the first emergency responder to a delta township residence which are already in flames. r. walberg: though he had no protective equipment, finding three family members, two only whom were disabled and unable to walk he rescued all three ock pans, carrying the disabled occupants to safety as the fire continued to spread, putting himself in danger. all three residents and deputy jenkins were hospitalize and treated for smoke inhalation and one person was subs kent quently treated at the university of ichigan burn unit. if he had not act sod quickly, three lives may have been lost.
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his heroism and selfish actions that night established why deputy jenkins is so deserve og the co--- of the congressional badge of brafery. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i rise to call attention to a problem. the united states is the only industrialized nation where the number of pregnancy-related deaths is on the rise. this is particularly true for black women who are nearly four times more likely to die from pregnancy complications than white women. additionally, "the new york times" reported yesterday that black infants are more than
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a disparity n, larger than -- now than it was in 18506789 black maternal health week started yesterday. today i stand before congress not only to raise awareness but to encourage my colleagues to take swift action and fund maternal health care clinics in 2019. with that, i yield back. >> for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize dean moyer at washington state university and congratulate him on his retirement. jim graduated from washington state in 1971. and went on to pursue several higher degrees. he is prominently renowned as a plant pathologist having served president of the american
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hyto pathological society. he received the morrison medal before he returned to pullman to serve as the associate dean of research for wsu's college of agriculture, human and natural resource sciences. he testified before the house agriculture committee and has led wsu to be number one in usda research and development expenditures in 2016. jim and i worked closely together since i came to cogget and -- to congress an i'm grateful for all he's done for my alma mater and i urge my colleagues to join me in celebrating his successful career and wish him the best in retirement. go cou fwmbings s. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the
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gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. >> without objection the gentleman is recognized for one inute. >> i rise to recognize mike clancy for his heroic efforts in saving a -year-old boy in panama city beach he responded to drowning call at a hotel to find an unresponsive child. he took action and his quick thinking and response saved young jackson's life. deputy clancy said in his own words that he's not a hero. but to jackson and to his family, he is a hero. deputy clancy attributes his skills to 22 years in the u.s. army and training at the bay county sheriff's office. every day despite great personal risks law enforcement officers across the country put on their uniforms and carry out their duties to protect and serve. thank you, deputy clancy and to all of you who wear the badge, your actions reflect great
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credit on the bay county sheriff's office and exemplify the best in the american people. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? without objection the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, today i would like to bring attention to the outstanding achievements of the university of texas at austin men's swimming and diving team. for the fourth con sec ty year, this team took home the ncaa title. college athletes from around the country dream about competing at the ncaa championships. as student athletes, this could also mark the peak of their athletic career. in addition to these incredible athletes, i'd like to congratulate their coach, eddie reese. coach reese has the most wins in this sport's history. after 40 seasons at the university of texas he's trained athletes to win 14 national titles. coaches like this don't come around often and i'd like to thank coach reese for his
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dedication to this great university. i'd also like to take this time to identify u.t. seniors on the team, jonathan roberts, brett ringgold and joseph schooling. as they leave those in favor say aye college days behind they'll remember this moment and this team. i would like to con grg late university of texas on these impress i accomplishments and simply say, hook 'em, in god we trust, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you so much, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize the ninth annual dream makers gala hosted by debbie's dream foundation. on april 21, health care advocates and community leaders from throughout our south florida area will gather together to raise awareness and mobilize efforts to fight stomach cancer. this year's event is especially meaningful to all the staff,
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volunteers and supporters of debbie's dream foundation. why? because sadly we recently lost debbie zellman. nearly a decade ago debbie was diagnosed with stage four stomach cancer. but rather than give in, she decided to take action. she started debbie's dream foundation to fund stomach cancer research and fight this dreadful disease. in 2018 more than 26,000 people will be newly diagnosed with stomach cancer in our great country. that is why this event and this organization are so important to defeat stomach cancer once and for all. mr. speaker, i would like to thank debbie's wonderful parents who carry on this fight, her family members, and all of the advocates for their life-saving efforts and tireless commitment to fulfilling debbie's dream. let us make this night a celebration of debbie's determination, perseverance and, most importantly, debbie's amazing life. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the
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gentlewoman from alabama seek recognition? without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. mrs. roby: mr. speaker, with congress out of session for the recent easter district work period, i had the opportunity to visit fort rucker and a gunnar air force base, the two outstanding military installations in alabama's second district. it's so important that i stay up to date with the needs and priorities of our military bases and i appreciate those who took the opportunity to meet with me recently. as maybe of the house appropriations subcommittee on defense, properly funding our military is one of my top priorities. i will always work to ensure that fort rutger and maxwell gunnar air force base remain strong components in our national defense infrastructure. mr. speaker, over the last year i've appreciated working alongside the administration that has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to rebuilding our military after years of damaging cuts. i'm proud to serve in a congressional district that is home to two of our nation's
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finest military installations and i'll continue to provide the brave men and women of our military with the best possible resources to ensure that they are well prepared for whatever challenges they may face as they work to keep us safe. finally, mr. speaker, i'd like to close by wishing maxwell gunnar air force base a happy 100th birthday. this past saturday maxwell celebrated 100 years of dedicated service. i speak for the entire second district in saying that we appreciate all that these men and women do for our country and our community, and i know that our region looks forward to many more years of partnership. mr. speaker, it is truly an honor to be an advocate for the fort and the air force base here in congress and i take this responsibility very seriously. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in support of a balanced budget amendment which should be one of
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several steps that we take in congress to control spending. as a state senator, i worked with governors, mitch daniels and mike pence, to balance indiana's budget every single year, while lowering taxes and investing in key priorities. today indiana has a $1.8 billion rainy day fund and a triple-a credit rating. sadly, washington, d.c., has not followed indiana's example. according to the latest estimates from the c.b.o., the federal government is set to run $82 trillion in deficits over the next 30 years. this is simply unsustainable. we cannot allow this crippling debt that will burden our children and grandchildren to continue growing. mr. banks: in the short term, i applaud the trump administration's consideration of using the rescission tool to rein in federal spending. the legislation that we are considering today, which would force congress to balance the budget, should be part of a
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comprehensive effort to address spending and get america's finances back in order. this amendment will ensure congress has no excuses and reforms the broken congressional budget process. hoosier families know how to live within their means and follow a budget. and washington ought to do the same. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from the u.s. virgin islands seek recognition? ms. plaskett: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. plaskett: thank you very much. mr. speaker, the rebuilding efforts of the u.s. virgin islands will require an extraordinary level of coordination and cooperation between the local and federal governments. we have in this moment both the opportunity and a responsibility to ensure that the greatest good emerges from the calamity to our virgin islands. yesterday h.u.d. awarded $1.6 billion to help the virgin islands to recover after the hurricanes. this recovery funds award were
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provided through h.u.d.'s community development block grant disaster recovery program. and are part of the hard-fought battle here in congress to appropriate funding specifically to the territories. the virgin islands normally receives a mere $1 million from this fund. this crucial funding will help us to address the disaster-related deficiencies in housing, public service and infrastructure as determined by local officials with citizen input. i'm imploring our local government to engage the community and have strategic plans in this. building more resilient infrastructure in the virgin islands is critical to future economic stability. we must rebuild the virgin islands and puerto rico the right way. our children are presently in schools in the v.i. four hours per day as they share space because of the tremendous loss of infrastructure. the negligence leading to inadequate care and oversight of our loved ones is unacceptable. the stress of hurricanes does not need to be exacerbated by inefficient evacuation protocols
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and lack of transparency. i urge congress and others to do what's necessary to support the virgin islands and others in this rebuilding. i yield back and thank you very much. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman rom kansas seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to highway light the give seven days challenge that began in -- highlight the give seven days challenge that began in my constituencies this week. mindy lost her father and her 14-year-old son at the horrific shooting in april of 2014. mr. yoder: who among us would have questioned mindy as she had slipped into despair after such a loss? losing a parent is difficult enough. losing your child on the same day is something no person should ever have to endure. but instead of despair, mindy has chosen love, faith, kindness and remembrance. she founded give seven days, which challenges young and old to embrace diversity across
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race, religion and culture. it also honors the memory of william and terry. mr. speaker, let's all follow mibbedy -- mindy's example. let's remember those we have lost and in their memory create a wave of positive change for the future. let's make a ripple and change the world. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman s recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize a group of thoughtful and innovative students in my district. six students have been working in their industrial design class to build a snow sled for the blind. working with students from vill novembera university, -- villanova university to make their prototype as strong as possible, they came up with a design that included a back rest and steering handles and it also enhanced this device with
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sensors that vibrate the handles when obstacles are he de-- are detected. mr. fitzpatrick: i'm proud of the hard work of students jonathan, brandon, jacob, tom, eric, and michael. and i would also like to commend ben salem curriculum coordinator for his guidance and for teaching his students that their gifts and talents can be used in compassionate ways. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, the regulatory relief bill that passed the senate just a few short weeks ago was crafted to get past the 60-vote cloture threshold and our senate colleagues are now asking the thousand pass that deal without amendment. mr. tipton: because they don't have an interest in voting on the measure again. that is not the legislative process envisioned by the framers of the constitution. and demonstrates a disregard for the policy work of the people's
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house. the house financial services committee has worked tirelessly to pass bipartisan bills that will provide necessary regulatory relief to main street america. chairman hensarling has identified 15 commonsense bills that passed out of the financial services committee with broad bipartisan support and have the support of the ranking member. yet some in the senate continue to insist that any amendment to legislation is inadmissible. while i support the goal of providing much-needed leaf to community banks and credit unions -- relief to community banks and credit unions, we should consider the will of the people as represented in this body. i'd like to thank the leadership in the house as well as chairman hensarling for fighting for the bipartisan policy initiatives of the members of this chamber and the regulatory relief process. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman s recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in honor of national library week.
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to recognize the importance of our nation's libraries to local communities. our local libraries cultivate life-long learning and reading and a profound sense of community across south and west texas. mr. hurd: they serve as community gathering places and local epicenters of educational innovation. at our libraries, folks of all ages can learn about their community's history, while accessing technological tools that lead us into the future. many towns in the 23rd district of texas, our public libraries go far beyond providing books and serve as the primary provider of literacy programming, especially in underserved rural areas. this is why i've taken advantage of an important program within the library of congress that allows members of congress to donate books to local libraries across their districts. for national library week, i would like to express gratitude for all the local librarians who provide these priceless services. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the
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gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for a minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in honor of the lady rock lions basketball team for winning the 2018 national association of christian athletes division ii women's tournament. these young women from the rock school in gainesville played through a grueling season to earn their spot in the tournament this past february. their dedication paid off and the lady rock lions were named national championships. mr. yoho: their hard work, discipline and unbreakable spirit have earned them the right to stand among the greats of high school basketball. i'm confident in their ability to continue to succeed both athletically and academically and i look forward to watching these young women bring more honor, pride and success to not just their lives but to our district. go, lady rock lions, and, yes, you do rock. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman yields back the balance of his time. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on the motion to suspend the rules if a record vote or the yeas and nays are ordered. or if the vote is objected to under clause 6 of rule 20. the house will resume proceedings on the postponed uestion at a later time. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek reck rigs -- recognition?
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mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass house joint resolution 2, proposing a balanced budget amendment to the united states constitution. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the joint resolution. the clerk: house joint resolution 2. joint resolution proposing a balanced budget amendment to the constitution of the united states. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 811, the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, and the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler, will control two hours. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on h.j.res. 2, currently under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. goodlatte: march 2, 1995, was a pick of toll day in the
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history of our country -- was a pivotal day in the history of our country. on that day the united states senate failed by one vote to send a balanced budget constitutional amendment to the sthathe states for ratification -- to the states for ratification. the amendment had passed the house by a 2/3 majority and the senate vote was the last legislative hurdle before ratification by the states. if congress had listened to the american people and sent that amendment to the states for ratification, we would not be facing the fiscal crisis we are today. rather, balancing the federal budget would have been the norm instead of the exception over the past 20 years and we would have nothing like the annual deficits and skyrocketing debt we currently face. in 1995, when the balanced budget amendment came within one vote of pass, the federal debt stood at $1 trillion, now it's $20 trillion.
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the public debt held by the public is rising as well and is increasing rapidly. unlike the past when the debt spiked to pay for wars of finite duration and was reduced after hostilities ended, now it's rising to pay for entitlement programs that are of indefinite duration and difficult to reduce other time. as john co fwmbings an of the hoover institute wrote, all the increase in federal spending real toiv g.d.p. over the past seven decades is attributable to entitlement spending. since the late 1940's, entitlement claims on the nation's output of goods an services has risen from less than 4% to 14%. surprising as it may seem, the share of g.d.p. that's spent on national defense and nondefense discretionary programs combined is no higher today than it was seven decades ago.
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as the nonpart season congressional budget office has observed, such high and rising tet will have serious negative consequences. interest rates will increase considerably. product iity and wages will be lower. and high debt increases the lisk of a financial crisis. what is particularly troubling is the debts we are incurring under entitlement programs will burden multiple future generations. indeed a few years ago, a cross national study found the united states ranked worst among 29 advanced countries in the degree to which it imposes unfair debt burdens on future generations. university of virginia philosophy proftsor lauren lamaskey has written, theorists devoted considerable attention to injuses committed across lines of race and gender. far less attended are concerns of intergenerational fairness. that omission is serious.
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measures that have done very well by the baby boomers have much les generous to their children and worse still for their grandchildren. the single greatest unsolved problem of justice in the developed world today is transgenerational plunder. it's time for congress to stop saddling future generations with the burden of crushing debts to pay for current spending. we should not pass on to our children and grandchildren the bleak fiscal future our unsustainable spending is creating. the only way to ensure congress acts with fiscal restraint over the long term is to pass a balanced budget amendment. experience has proved time and again that congress cannot for any significant length of time rein in excessive spending. annual deficits and the resulting debt continue to grow due to political pressures that the constitution's structure no longer serves to restrain. in order for congress to be able to consistently make the tough
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decisions necessary to sustain fiscal responsibility, congress must have the external pressure of a balanced budget requirement to force it to do so. constitutional principle will prevail where political promises have not. the frames of the constitution were familiar with the need for constitutional restrictions on deficit spending. when the constitution was ratified, it was the states that had exhibited out of control fiscal mismanagement by issuing bills of credit to effectively print money to pay for projects and service debt. as a result of that lack of fiscal discipline, article 1, section 10, of the constitution specifically deprived states of the power to issue bills of credit. over 200 years later,s the federal government that has proved its inability to develop sound fiscal policies and it's now time to adopt a constitutional restraint on federal fiscal mismanagement.
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several versions of the balanced budget amendment have been introduced this congress. including two i introduced this congress as i have every congress for the last decade. house joint resolution 2 the version we are debating today, is nearly identical to the text that passed the house in 1995 and failed in the senate by one vote. it requires that total annual outlays not exceed total annual receipts. it also requires a true majority of each chamber to pass tax increases. and a three fifths majority to raise the debt limit. today is the day we can turn proposals into legislative action. our extraordinary fiscal crisis demands an extraordinary solution. we must rise above partisanship and join together to send a balanced budget amendment to the states for ratity -- ratification. i urge all my colleagues to join me in supporting this amendment and in fleeing our children and grandchildren from the burden of a crippling debt they had no
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hand in creating so they can be free to chart their own futures for themselves and for their own posterity. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. e gentleman from new york is recognized. >> i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> i rise in -- mr. nadler: i rise in opposition to the proposed balanced budget amendment. it requires a balanced budget unless a three fifths majority overrides that. there are only two conclusions one can reach about this legislation. either it is fundamentally unserious a facade designed to pro pre-tent that republicans on the heels of a massive republican tax giveaway to
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corporations and the very rich that will increase the deficit by at least $1.5 trillion over the next decade have a shred of credibility when it comes to fiscal responsibility or it is deadly serious. the first step toward the ultmot goal of slashing social security, medicare, med said and every -- medicaid and other critical elements of the social safety net because you cannot enormous tax cuts and balance the budget without splashing tissue slashing spending on plms most americans dependen. understand the context in which we are considering this legislation. white house budget director mick mulvaney recently admitted the republican tax wind fall for the rich would cost the federal government $1.8 trillion in revenue over the next decade. in the wake of their budget busting tax scam, house republicans have the nerve to now seek to have us vote on this balanced budget amendment because they want to maintain the illusion that they care
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about fiscal responsibility. s the height of hypocrisy. if we assume republicans actually intend to pass this legislation, we should recognize the catastrophic con consequences it would have on senior citizens or on the disables and on low-income people. that's because it would require radical spending cut to achieve balance with the principal targets being social safety net programs like social security, medicare and medicaid that millions of americans exend on. i want to commend mr. goodlatte for his honesty he spent part of his speech talk about how we have to cut entitlements by which, what are entitlement snts social security, medicare and medicaid he talks about the lower percentage of the federal -- of expenditures that went for entitlement programs years ago. before medicare and medicaid were enacted. of course we spend more on entitlements now that we have medicare and medicaid. but you know, what's really
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causing deficits is not medicare, medicaid, or social security, this is erepublican tax cuts. in 1980, when rovend reagan was elect, the total federal national debt from george washington through jimmy carter was under $800 billion. then we had the reagan tax cuts and when george bush left office 12 years later, the national debt had skyrocketed from $800 billion to $4.3 trillion. then we had president clinton, democrat congress and newt gingrich who deserves some credit and we we had three yoferse balanced budgets in the late 1990's. and in 2000's, the projection was for $5.65 trillion federal surplus over the next 10 years. alan greenspan testifying in favor of the bush tax cuts said, we have to have bush -- we have to pass these tax cuts because otherwise we'll photoly pay off the national debt and that's a bad thing for various reasons. so we passed the bush tax cuts,
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the republicans did. and we -- between that and funding the iraq and afghanistan wars without a tax increase off the credit card, we greatly increased the national debt again. so the democrats have come in and cleaned up the messes that republicans have left on the national debt by their huge tax cuts for the rich. this legislation and now they tell us we can't afford social security and medicare and medicaid because we must keep these tax cuts for the rich going. this legislation would also undermine the federal government's ability to respond to an economic crisis. when the nation's economy weakens, incomes of individuals and businesses decrease because of job and business losses buzz of unemployment increasing which in term automatically results in reduced tax revenues. meanwhile spending on unemployment insurance benefits and food stamps increases as more people lack jobs and rely
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on unemployment benefits and food stamps to stay afloat. these programs also help overcome a downward spiral in the economy as they help stabilize the decline in consumer purchasing power an prevent the recession from turning into a depression. but by requiring a balanced budget, this constitutional amendment would effectively prohibit the government from drawing on these critical stabilizers. although the bill allows congress to override the amendment's balanced budget mandate, it requires a nearly insurmountable three-fifths supermajority of the membership of the house in both houses. by the time congress could react to an economic crisis it would have greatly delayed the effect. this legislation would almost guarantee that a recession would become a depegs. meanwhile, millions of americans who depend on these vital programs for food and shelter and rent would go without assistance. in addition to making it harder to avoid an economic crisis, this bill could actually help to precipitate one by requiring a
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three fifths supermajority vote in each house of congress to raid the debt limit, h.res. 2 increases the probability that the government will default on its obligations and cause the nation to spiral into a financial and economic crisis. beyond this devastating economic and social consequences, the bill is also anti-democratic with a small d. to the extent it requires a supermajority to undertake certain steps such as waiving the balanced budget requirement or raising the debt limit it shifts power away from elected representatives of the majority of the american people to a determined minority that can thwart the majority's will. moreover, this bill inappropriately seeks to endeadline into the constitution one particular economic view that would bind future generations and future congresses that they elect. whatever one may think about economic policy and government financing, those kinds of policies should be enacted as legs that can be modified,
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amended or repealed by future majorities, not enshrined in the constitution to bind future yen rages to the opinions of this generation. that is fundamentally undemocratic and tyrannical. finally, this bill suffers from a fund amountal flaw to its construction. there's no enforcement mechanism. it is not clear what would happen if congress ignored it and passed an unbalanced budget without the required super majority. presumably it would be resolved in federal courts. we'd see judges ordering tax increase os cuts in social security or revising the transportation budget. you name it. without any legislative guidance. on what pay sis they'd make such decisions is anyone's guess. we should not have judges determining inherently political questions regarding budgetary decisions. up ending the principal of -- principle of separation of powers and questions over who has standing to sue to what penl
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penalties the court can impose. this legislation is ill conceived and deeply problem mat egg. the bill is just for show in a few well-timed press releases, or it's a trojan horse that's designed to enable the long-held republican dream of dismantling social security, medicare, and medicaid, a goal they could never achieve politically but might achieve with a constitutional amendment on the balanced budget. either way, this bill is not worthy of this housms i urge my colleagues to oppose h.j.res. 2 and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman if new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. sensenbrenner a member of the judiciary committee and chairman of the crime subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. sensenbrenner: the reason we have a big deficit is not due to lack of tax revenue.
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it's due to the fact that congress spends too much money. let me repeat that. the deficit and the debt are not caused by a lack of tax revenue. it's because there's too much money that is authorized and spent right here in the congress of the united states. and this proposed constitutional amendment will give us the discipline that we have not had as we've sat and watched the deficit go up and up and up and up and away. it's the responsibility of presidents of both political parties that this has happened. and maybe it is time for us to tell colleagues now and in the future, and presidents now and in the future, that the time to put things on the cuff is at an end. i would say that doing what we've done, which means spending money on ourselves and sending
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the bill plus interest to the next generations, is bad economics. but it's also immore -- immoral. now, i have a grandson who is a little bit more than a year old. and unless congress stops doing this, he's going to end up having a debt that will boggle the mind that he and his contemporaries are going to have difficulty meeting. so what do we need to do? number one, we need to stop passing bloated omnibus bills. i voted no proudly on the omnibus bill, which busted the budget and added to the debt. we need to start getting honest about the fact that entitlement programs are spiraling out of control. and that doesn't mean cutting entitlement programs for existing people. it means slowing down their growth rate. but that's something that nice people aren't supposed to talk
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about. particularly here in congress. but it's something that is necessary if those entitlement programs are going to be worth anything for future generations when they may need them. rather than dealing with the present generation. i know we can all count up votes and people vote now and we're not going to be running in the future, but the time has come to think about the future and that is why this constitutional amendment ought to be passed. congress can't discipline itself. the only thing that can discipline us is saying what congress can't do in the united states constitution. just like the first and second amendments. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is ecognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield three minutes to the gentleman from new york, mr. jeffries.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for three minutes. mr. jeffries: mr. speaker, the so-called balanced budget amendment is nothing but a phony, fraudulent and fake effort to promote fiscal responsibility. i'm perplexed by the notion that my good friends on the other side of the aisle would come to the house floor to lecture the american people about the budget when their actions are primarily responsible for the situation that we find ourselves in. how did we arrive at a moment where in this country we confront a crippling $20 trillion debt, when the clinton administration handed the bush administration a budget surplus? i'm glad you asked that question. number one, a failed war in iraq brought to us by a republican administration. number two, an unnecessarily
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prolonged conflict in afghanistan brought to us by a republican administration. number three, the bush tax giveaways of 2001 brought to us by a republican house, a republican senate, and a republican president. number four, the 2003 bush tax giveaway brought to us by a republican house, a republican senate, and a republican president. number five, the collapse of the economy in 2008 brought to us by republican-inspiring financial de-regulation. number six, the republican tax scam of 2017 that will explode our debt by an additional $2 trillion. republicans burned down our
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fiscal house and then show up with a so-called balanced budget amendment and act like the volunteer fire department. i'm from brooklyn. i know a hustle when i see one. we will not allow anyone to balance the budget on the backs of working families, middle class folks, seen senior citizens, the -- senior citizens, the poor, the sick, the afflicted, veterans and rural america. we will not allow anyone to devastate social security, medicare and medicaid, the american people deserve a better deal. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. smith, a member of the judiciary committee, and chairman of the science committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for three minutes. mr. smith: mr. speaker, first of all, let me thank the gentleman from virginia, the chairman of
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the judiciary committee, for yielding me time. and also for his tireless efforts over the years to pass a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. mr. speaker, today the house of representatives votes to protect future generations from our debilitating debt. thomas jefferson believed that, quote, the public debt is the greatest of dangers to be feared, end quote. he wished it were possible to obtain a single amendment to the constitution, taking from the federal government the power of borrowing, end quote. it is past time that we listened to jefferson's comments -- commonsense advice. american families balance their check books, states and local governments balance their budgets. so should the federal government. the last balanced budget occurred in the 1990's. the previous balanced budget was during the eisenhower administration. surely it is not too much to ask that we take a major step towards having a balanced budget in our future.
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mr. speaker, only a balanced budget amendment will guarantee that the federal government puts its fiscal house in order and keeps it that way. i'll yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield three minutes to the gentleman from maryland, mr. delaney. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized for three minutes. mr. delaney: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong opposition to the balanced budget amendment, which in my judgment is one of the worst pieces of legislation i have seen since i've been in the congress. first, it will act as a dooms day machine, destroying critical programs like social security, medicare, investments in our infrastructure, investments in science and research, investments in our military. secondly, it represents wrong-headed economics. to manage the country with a zero deficit is not smart
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economic policy. thirdly, it's being presented to the american people in a deceitful manner, to compare fiscal planning of the u.s. government to how hardworking families in this country should manage their own personal finances is misrepresenting how we should think about our government. and fourth, it's being done entirely for political reasons. to direct attention away from tax legislation that has materially increased the deficit of this country. if he wanted to have an honest -- if we wanted to have an honest conversation about the country, we would focus on three numbers. the first number we'd focus on, the first percentage, is our debt as a percentage of our economy. the second ratio we'd focus on is how much we think our economy could grow each year. and the third number we would focus on is the percentage of our deficit as expressed relative to our economy.
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if we actually wanted to work together, if the majority and the minority wanted to work together and put together a fiscal plan for this country that was responsible, that represented smart economics, allowed us to invest in our country, and put us on a trajectory where the debt as a percentage of our economy would go down over time and return to normal levels, then we would be talking about how do we come up with a budget that had deficits on an annual basis of minus 1.5% to 2%? that wouldn't put us in a position where we have to slash so many important government programs because this government has insufficient tax revenues. in fact, our tax revenues are the lowest as a percentage of our economy that they've been in 50 years. but if we actually wanted to have a real conversation about putting this country on an appropriate kind of long-term fiscal trajectory, we would work
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towards 2% deficits. because if in fact our economy could grow at 2.5% a year, then by definition the debt as a percentage of our economy would go down and it would go down by setting realistic goals that don't represent inappropriate cuts to core government programs like medicare and social security and our defense spending and our investment in our country, and in our kids and our infrastructure and our research. that would be a conversation that represents smart economic policy. it would be an honest conversation with the american people, it wouldn't be done for political reasons. and it would materially improve the fiscal trajectory of this country. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from iowa, mr. king, a member of the judiciary committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from iowa is recognized for three minutes. mr. king: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, first i want to
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thank the chairman of the judiciary committee, mr. goodlatte, for leading on this constitutional amendment for a balanced budget. we have fought this out in past years and brought this to the floor a couple of times that i can remember here. but i'd like to dial back your memory, mr. speaker, to 1998. when the house of representatives did pass a balanced budget amendment to our united states constitution, and send it over to the united states senate, and late in the year of 1998, after a hard-fought whip team pulled the votes together they put together the 2/3 votes necessary, to pass that constitutional amendment for a balanced budget off to the states for ratification in 3/4 of the states. they had the votes. and at the last minute, one senator walked down and in dramatic fashion voted no when he was on the whip card expected to vote yes. and that's what plocked a balanced budget amendment -- blocked a balanced budget amendment in 1998. one within -- within one vote.
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because i think all of us are confident that the states would have ratified a balanced budget amendment and we would be living under the balanced budget amendment from some time, probably pretty near the turn of the millennium, around the year 2000. and think what difference it would be today, this station might have a little debt left, but it would be a shrinking debt. because whenever you balance the budget, if it's balanced you're always going to end up with a little black because the pencil doesn't work quite that precisely. we missed that window. we have the window now in this year, in our time. and we have an obligation to pass this balanced budget amendment. when i came here in 2003, we were balanced as far as the spending was concerned. but not with the budget that was approved. and i went to the budget chairman and i said, where's our balanced budget amendment? he said, we can't balance the budget, we are at war, we've been attacked in new york, and in the pentagon and in pennsylvania. and we have to set up t.s.a. and we spend all of this money. it's impossible to balance the budget. i said, it can't be impossible
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and i set about writing a balanced budget myself as a freshman in the first weeks here. i wasn't prepared to do that at that time. but had we got than done, had we tightened our belt, had we discipline -- had the kind of discipline this constitutional amendment before us today will bring about, we wouldn't be talking about debt and deficit. we wouldn't be talking about $107 million americans not in the work force because they're of age but they are being tempted to stay home on the couch with more than 70 different means-tested federal welfare programs. we haven't demonstrated the discipline. if interest should increase by 1%, that's $200 billion a year, and if that goes up and up, we're pretty soon collapsed in an untenable situation with our spending. we need to make this decision in our time, force this discipline on this congress, and we need to focus also on what was -- what failed the last time in 1998. one vote has now accumulated to over $20 trillion in national
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debt. one vote falling short in the united states senate. let's not fall short here today. let's send this over to the senate and let's send a message to america. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. boyle. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. boyle: thank you, mr. speaker, and i thank the ranking member. you know, last week when i saw the vote calendar for this week, and i saw on it was a schedule to vote on the balanced budget amendment, i actually laughed out loud. i assumed that it was surely a joke. because there's no way the republican majority, just a few months after voting for a $1.9 trillion tax cut that would add more to the national debt than any other single vote in my
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lifetime, surely they wouldn't have the nerve to come back a few months later and with a straight face be pushing a balanced budget amendment. yet it turns out it wasn't a joke. here we are. ladies and gentlemen, this is part of a two-prong attack. part one of that attack was the $1.9 trillion tax cut, 83% of which goes to the richest 1%. part two is to stand up here and say, my goodness, we suddenly have a debt problem. it must be because we are spending too much. and part two calls for pushing through a draconian bill that would mandate trillions of dollars of cuts to social security, medicare, medicaid, chip, veterans' programs and
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other critical spending. here are the statistics. under this legislation, by 2028, $2.6 trillion would be cut from social security. $1.7 trillion cut from medicare, $1.2 trillion cut from medicaid, chip and the a. crfrlt a. d $250 billion cuts from veterans' disbuilt. we cannot afford these cuts. we must stand up and reject this laughable attempt to simply push through the largest cuts in american history. we must say no. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: at this time, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. babin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. babin: i rise in strong support of the constitutional
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balanced budget amendment. our constituents sent me to washington to lower taxes, strengthen our economy and cut federal spending. we have made some progress on the first two, but we have a lot of work to do on the third. we've passed historic tax cut legislation which is stimulating job creation and economic growth, raising wages and allowing the american people to keep more of what's in their paycheck. the unemployment rate has remained low and over 200,000 new manufacturing jobs have been created in the past 15 months. that's all good news for america's future. unfortunately, washington has an addiction to spending money it doesn't have accumulating a national debt of now more than $20 trillion, four times more debt than in 1995 when washington fell one vote short. politicians in washington told the american people that congress could balance the budget on their own and didn't need a constitutional amendment.
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that was flat out wrong. unless washington is forced to rein spending through the discipline of a constitutional amendment, it will never balance the budget. look at last month's omnibus spending bill, which i voted against. that bill is exhibit a in the case for a balanced budget amendment. our national undermines our economy and our national security. washington has a moral obligation to balance its budget. our amendment gives washington the discipline that it lacks by ensuring that congress cannot spend more money than it takes in. this bill asks congress to make the same tough questions and decisions about its budget that the american households and small businesses make every single day. we owe it to our children and our grandchildren. so let's pass this bill as the first step towards financial discipline. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from illinois, mr. davis. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. davis: i thank the gentleman for yielding. the proposed bureaucratic approach of the balanced budget amendment says nothing about our national priorities, about what to do about massive and growing economic inequality and about addressing the imgract of globalization on the american people. it says nothing about infrastructure for sustainable energy, water, transportation, communication, health, education, housing, the opioids epidemic, climate change or social security. it says nothing about addressing the great inequities facing women, african-americans,
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latinos, native americans, the lgbt community, the disabled or the homeless. a balanced budget amendment would wipe out trillions of dollars of social security, medicare, military and civil service retirement trust funds and the fdic and pension benefit gar and ti corporation trust funds. at a time when our nation may be heading for a constitutional crisis because congress is unable to find a simple majority to legislate guaranteeing that no one man is above the law, a balanced budget amendment would create an ongoing scenario of endless potential constitutional crises should congress be unable to find supermajorities to resolve budget shortfalls creating the threat of political extortion by a congressional minority.
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the balanced budget amendment is a direct attack on our citizens and our democracy. mr. speaker, let us end this facade of reality and vote down this assault on real government. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. and the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. barton. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. barton: i thank the chairman of the judiciary committee. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. without objection. mr. barton: almost 34 years ago in january of 1985, i stood right over there, held up my right hand with my two-year-old daughter kristen, took an oath to defend this country and
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constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic and as soon as i had taken the oath of office to be a member of the house of representatives, i walked over to the hopper and put in the barton tax limitation ball angsed budget amendment. house resolution 33, i believe. that was almost 34 years ago. at that time, the national debt was less than $2 trillion. today it's over $20 trillion. in the time i have been in the house, we have had three or four balanced budgets on a cash flow basis, which means we have had 30 unbalanced budgets. we have piled almost $19 trillion on our children and our grandchildren's backs, with no hope to ever repay.
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the balanced budget constitutional amendment is not a pana seea and doesn't solve all of our problems, but it is a step in the right direction. i have a few issues with this particular balanced budget amendment. it's not as strong as i would like it to be, but i commend the chairman for bringing it to the floor for a vote. it is a positive first step. it is not compassionate to spend money we don't have and keep adding deficits that we will never repay. there is always an inexhaust i believe demand for more federal dollars. at some point in time we have to start living within our means and repaying what we've already borrowed. this constitutional amendment again is not perfect, but it's a step in the right direction. i urge its passage by 2/3 votes to send it to the senate for
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hopefully 2/3 votes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. yield three now minutes to the gentlelady from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. torres: i rise in opposition to the so-called balanced budget amendment. like so many americans who been following the budget process, i'm disappointed with this congress. the budget is a value statement by which we govern america. the amendment before us and the recent massive cuts passed by republicans are far of a reflection of those values. that tax bill added yet another $1 trillion of debt to our
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children's pocket books. and for what? so millionaires could get a tax cut 70 times larger than what the middle class received? the vote we take today will pay for that tax cut by cutting programs the middle class depends on. as a mother and grandmother, i have to ask, what kind of future are we leaving for our families? you cannot hand millions of dollars to millionaires and corporations one day while pretending to be concerned about our budget deficit the next. that doesn't make you a fiscal hawk. that's why the congressional hispanic caucus has been working on a plan to get us back on track. and i'm proud to help lead those
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efforts as the chair of the budget task force. in this role, i am pushing for solutions that promote the well-being and strength of our local communities. sure, we all want a balanced budget. this vote today is not a solution. it is an attack on the middle-class families we represent. as a former mayor and a state legislator, i know firsthand the difference between a true balanced budget and what that means for securing the resources and services our states and cities need. it's long been my priority to ensure health care remains accessible for everyone, especially the most vulnerable in our communities. we can't do that if we're making enormous cuts to medicare, to
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medicaid, to social security programs, our very low-income families, individuals with disabilities, seniors and veterans depend on for their livelihood. more than 50 million americans depend on medicare. many of them make less than $24,000 a year. the nation's seniors have worked their whole life to contribute to the social security program. t is not a gift to them. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yield back. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from ohio, mr. chabot, chairman of the small business committee and member of the judiciary committee. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman is recognized. mr. chabot: thank you, mr. speaker and thank you, chairman, for your long time commitment to this very, very important issue, passing a balanced budget amendment for our nation. mr. speaker, with the national debt exceeding $20 trillion, it's long past time that we take necessary steps to restore fiscal responsibility to the budget process. too often spending bills are passed by adding to the deficit rather than balancing the budget and helping to pay down our national debt. it's time to reverse that mentality. one of the debatest disappointments that i have experienced in my 22 years in congress happened when we passed a balanced budget amendment in the house required by 2/3 votes but the effort failed in the senate by just one vote. and a number of members from the house went down to the senate and personally watched that vote and personally stared those
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senators in the eye because we knew how important this was to our country. and 20-plus years later and the debt has gone up. had the balanced budget amendment passed back then our debt today certainly would be lower, much lower. the american people sent us here to make the difficult decisions necessary to balance the budget and to live within our means. just as the american people have to do, every family has to budget every week or every month and they can't spend more than they take in or end up going bankrupt or our federal government is bankrupt but since we print money, we are able to go on. it harms our economy. we cannot to hope we just pass a balanced budget. it has become increasing obvious ta the only way to ensure a balanced budget is to mandate,
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require congress pass one and that's what we are considering today. passage of this is the only thing to make certain that we and future congresses rein the out of control spending and have fiscal responsibility. this takes the necessary steps to ensure that for any fiscal year total outlays do not exceed total receipts, what we take in. our nation cannot continue to spend money that it doesn't have. let's end the borrow and spend mentality that created our staggering national debt, over $20 trillion and put our nation on a sustainable path by requiring that a balanced budget be enacted every year. i urge my colleagues to support this measure. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia
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reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. . mr. nadler: mr. speaker, you now yield three minutes -- i now yield three minutes to the ranking member of the crime committee, a member of the judiciary committee, the gentlelady from texas, sheila jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized for three minutes. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman and i thank the manager, mr. goodlatte. and i think it's important for those of us who have served here , that we're down this frivolous route again. this unconstitutional effort to remedy the disaster that has been perpetrated by the republican tax scam. let me tell you what the c.b.o. director said, who is known to be the bipartisan, nonpartisan arbiter of the work that the congress does. first of all, they said the tax cut will create deficits of historic proportion. not medicate -- medicaid or medicare, social security. $800 billion deficit in 2018, $1
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trillion in 2019, and $1 trillion in 2020. that is what the republicans have created. now in this false andry dick louis, possibly unconstitutional -- and ridiculous, possibly unconstitutional effort, here we go again with this balanced budget amendment. that will in fact deny and implode the needs of those who need medicare, social security and medicaid. this balanced budget amendment is anti-democratic in that it requires a supermajority in congress to increase the debt limit, deficit spending or raise revenue. all would have been unnecessary if we had not passed the tax scam. remember, we gave the corporate tax relief a 21% number instead of 25% coming from 33% when they didn't ask for it. it is anti-democratic because it enshrines one particular economic theory into the constitution. depriving future voters and future congresses of the ability
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to adopt other economic approaches. that is our responsibility as leaders and giving oversight to the needs of the american people. to the needs of the pentagon, to the needs of domestic spending. by the way, this deficit will be more than domestic spending, and defense spending. it raises separation of powers concerns. because it would open the door to allowing federal courts to make budget policy decisions. it is economically harmful because it would hamper the ability of congress to respond to economic down turns and other emergencies. was anyone here in 2007, in 2008 particularly when the secretary of the treasury under the bush administration came and told this democratic congress, of which i was a member of, that america as we knew it was getting ready to end, that we saw the demise of lehman brothers and the collapse of the market? it wasn't democrats that did that. it was republicans. it is economically harmful because it would hamper the ability again for to us deal
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with those kind of downturn. it jeopardizes funding of social security and military and it undermines the nation's financial system, including deposit insurance. it is unnecessary because congress was able to achieve a balanced budget in the 1990's, of which i was here through the existing political process and created the children's health insurance program. therefore, this balanced budget amendment is an amendment that creates havoc. what we should do is undo the tax scam, repeal it, and start again. and not implode social security, medicare, medicaid. to the seniors that are living there, don't buy into bald budget amendment, which is -- a balanced budget amendment, which is unconstitutional. buy into repealing the tax scam and standing for the american people. i conclude by saying -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is no longer being ecognized. the gentleman from new york
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reserves? and the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from tennessee, mr. roe, chairman of the veterans' affairs committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for two minutes. three minutes. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of h.r. -- h.res. 2, a balanced budget constitutional amendment. i want to thank chairman goodlatte for the incredible work he's done on this issue. mr. speaker, families across america have to balance their budgets. and it's time washington does the same thing. i was the mayor of my local city before i came here. six balanced budgets with surpluses each and every year. 48 states, including my home state of tennessee, require a balanced budget by law. what makes washington any different? members of congress are required to balance their office budgets or pay for overages themselves. guess what, mr. speaker.
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435 balanced budgets. the rhetoric we hear from the other side is that the reason we have magic buff deficits is tax cuts. let's talk about an inconvenient truth. revenues collected by the federal government have never been higher in the history of this country. revenue has increased nearly 8% annually over the last seven years. mr. speaker, the federal vernment would need to spend 8% more -- doesn't need to spend 8% more revenue each and every year. what we need to do is rein in our spending. spending is the problem. the other thing we've heard in the recent omnibus spending bill, another sign that congress lacks seriousness about addressing spending. well, discretionary spending has been growing at or about 2.4% over the last 14 years annualized. that's a lot more than many of us would like. but we basically have held this spending in check. the problem is our ballooning mandatory programs that account for 70 cents of every $1 we
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spend annually is a problem. mandatory spending, which includes pensions, food stamps, medicaid, medicare, social security and others is growing at 7.5% per year. medicare and social security both face a crisis in the nat too distant future. an congress -- in the not too distant future. and congress has to make hard choices about how to secure these programs for future generations. i'm con vinsd, however, that the only way -- i'm convinced, however, that the only way congress will make those hard choices is if we're forced. to both parties bear responsibility for our annual budget deficits. but people have a choice here today. the last time when he chance to vote on a similar resolution was 2011. and the only thing that's changed since then is that our debts and deficits have sfloded further. it's time that we -- have exploded further. it's time that we in congress make the hard decision, requiring washington abide by the same budget before it's too late and before we can't right the ship. the same thing families do every single week and month of the year. i strongly support h.j.s remain
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2and encourage all of -- h.j. and i encourage all of my colleagues to do the same. with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. youcef nadarkhani -- mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield three minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. johnson. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is ecognized for three minutes. mr. johnson: thank you, mr. speaker. no one in their right mind should be supporting this cynical and hypocritical republican balanced budget amendment. this bill has been rushed to the floor today without a single committee hearing. the don't tax but spend republicans just exploded the national debt. they exploded this national debt by nearly $2 trillion with the
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tax scam tax cut bill that ished out a $5.5 trillion gift to big multinational corporations and to the top 1% crowd. $5.5 trillion. now they come back, dumping like a wheelbarrow full of horse manure a radical balanced budget amendment onto this house floor today. "the washington post" said that this is like donald trump proposing to lead a campaign to make adultery illegal. i agree with that assessment. after passing their $5.5 trillion tax cut, and after passage of the omnibus spending bill that exploded the national debt, the don't tax but do spend republicans are now shamelessly demanding that needy seniors
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sacrifice their retirement security to pay for the shameful tax giveaway to the greedy. and that's not all. just this week the c.b.o. released a report forecasting annual deficits of $1 trillion or more every single year that president trump remains in office. this republican hypocrisy has got to stop. republican fiscal strategy has three goals. one, cut taxes for the wealthy. two, keep up the charade that they're fiscally responsible and three, and above all they want to cut the social safety net -- all, they want to cut the social safety net. they want to cut programs like social security, medicare, medicaid and food stamps. all to pay for their handouts to those who already have plenty. enough is enough. the american people cannot
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afford republicans' fiscal ypocrisy any longer. democrats will continue to fight for a better deal for working people in america. policies that create good-paying jobs, reduce the deficit and grow the economy for everyone. americans deserve a better deal. they deserve better jobs, better wages and a better future. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. loudermilk. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes. loud loud -- mr. loudermilk: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, mr. speaker, for the time. let's make no mistake today. the only reason we are here today talking about an amendment to the constitution, to force congress to balance the budget, is because the lack of fiscal responsibility of this body over the past several years. throughout the history of the united states, the united states has gone into debt during times
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of national crisis or war. but both parties understood the danger to our national security and our economy by sustaining a debt and therefore worked together to pay off that debt. but not in the modern era of congress. no. we continue to print money, we continue to go deeper and deeper in debt. and make no mistake, the american people understand that this enormous debt that we have accrued in this criff $21 trillion -- in this country of $21 trillion is the responsibility of congress and is our responsibility to fix this problem. a lot of people don't understand how much money $21 trillion really is. that's part of the problem. our debt is so big, no one really understands how big this debt is. let me put it in perspective. regardless of your background or your religious beliefs, if you know what today's date is, you know historically when jesus was born. if you were to go back to the moment that jesus was born and put $17,000 into the bank, and you waited 60 seconds and put another $17,000 in the bank, you
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waited another 60 seconds and deposited another $17,000 in the bank and you continued to put $17,000 in the bank every minute since jesus was born, you still wouldn't have enough money to pay off our national debt today and that is an atrocity to the american people. there's one way to fix this. we can either pass this amendment and have it ratified. or we can actually have the fortitude to pass a balanced budget. the republican study committee will bring to this floor a balanced budget as we have many times in the past. and if my colleagues who are calling us hypocrites are serious about balancing this budget, then they will come together and vote for a budget that balanced. we have the authority, we have the power to do that. it's just we don't have the fortitude or willingness to do what is hard. we owe it to our grandchildren, we owe it to our children. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is ecognized.
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the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the gentlelady from california, ms. chu. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. chu: after years of irresponsible -- irresponsibly adding to our national debt in order to make the mr. richmond:er, republicans are now -- the rich richer, republicans are now trying to couldn't american people with this insincere balanced budget amendment. i say indiana -- i say insincere because republicans have been the greatest contributors to our national debt. they eagerly supported and even extended president bush's 2001 tax cuts, which added more than $5 trillion to the deficit over 10 years. and at the start of this congress, they rushed head-long into another $2.3 trillion tax scam that the congressional budget office says will put our deficit over $1 trillion within just two years. and what do the american people
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get for all of that? very little, if you're not already rich. since 80% of that $2.3 trillion goes straight to the top 1%. and here's why i say this is insidious. first, they pass a robin hood tax scam that robs the coughers and gives it to the wealthiest. then -- coffers and gives it to the wealthiest. then they use that debt that they themselves created to justify draconian cuts to the vast majority of americans who are not millionaires. in his budget, president trump proposed cuts of $1.4 trillion from medicaid, $500 billion from medicare, $65 billion from social security. fortunately democrats blocked these cuts, but if this amendment passes, look out, america. the programs will pay for the tax cuts despite our warnings that it would result in this situation.
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the budget policy report found the cuts mandated would result n social security being cut. c.b.o.'s report, senator corker said it could be one of the worst votes i ever made. we tried to warn you, but now the american people shouldn't be the ones to pay for the mistake. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. chu: if republicans want to balance the budget. it's time we stop the tax scam. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from michigan michigan, mr. mitchell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. mitchell: my home state of michigan requires a balanced annual budget and we have a
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rainy day fund to ensure when tax revenues fall because of the economy, we can pay to run the government. every household noods to balance its budget and live within its means. and the federal government should do the same thing. mr. speaker, the current u.s. national debt has topped $21 trillion. take a big stack of that here and not sure we could count that high. we need to take aggressive steps to bring in our debt and spending. i spent 35 years in business, in order to be successful, you can't spend and hope it all works out. other side says what, we brought this to the floor without hearings. i can't imagine that. think about that. we talk about if we reduce our spending, we are going to pillage programs. on the other side of the aisle saying just increase taxes.
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i went to school of public policy. look at what is happening in greece. you can't raise taxes. it goes someplace else frequently. the answer is not spend yourself into oblivion and hope to raise taxes. stand in full support of h.res. 2. i support it. it brings needed financial discipline to this congress. only 16 months here, we are unable to control our spending. puts us in handcuffs. it's time to stop. we owe it to the american people and children and grandchildren, otherwise, frankly, we are going to shack will them to debt for tear entire lives. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. --
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mr. goodlatte: we held a hearing on the balanced budget amendment. i agree with the gentleman that he obvious was that it was held. mr. nadler: before yielding to the gentlelady from florida, i would note most households don't balance their budget, they borrow to buy a car and a mortgage and if they didn't do that, they wouldn't be able to uy a car or a house. ms. wasserman schultz: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i rise in strong opposition to this balanced budget amendment. just a few months ago, republicans plunged this nation $2 trillion deeper into debt with a tax scam bill that gave massive tax cuts to the wealthy. republicans care so much about balancing our budget that one of the first things they did upon taking the majority back in 2010 was repealing pay-go rules that
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equired congress to stop our spending. they are only two possibilities here. either my republican colleagues can't do simple math or something more sinister is going on. republicans have proven time and again they don't deserve the benefit of the doubt. when republicans preach the virtues of fiscal responsibility, they want to take away social security, medicare and medicaid benefits. that is not fiscal responsibility but moral cruelty. by creating a hole in the deficit, this con was to undermine social security and medicare. this disgaysful amendment is the second step. we have seen this movie before. republicans follow the bush tax cuts with an attempt to privatize social security and
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the bush recession with an attempt to voacherize medicare. the best way to clean this mess is to repeal the republican tax scam. we do not need to amend the constitution and force this on our seniors. i urge my colleagues to vote no and keep fighting against the republicans to bake the promises we have made to our seniors. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york reserves and the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. smucker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. smucker: thank you, chairman. i rise today in strong support of chairman demrat's balanced budget amendment. clearly the status quo here in congress is failing the american people and real change is needed. our budget process is broken and a balanced budget amendment is
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exactly the mechanism we need to force the decisions to get our fiscal house in order. congress has passed more than 100 continuing resolutions in the last 20 years. we move from one continuing resolution and one omnibus to the next. i knew when i came to congress that the federal budget process wasn't working as intended. from the outside, it doesn't look good. having served on the budget committee for more than a year, i can say it doesn't look any better from the inside. the latest omnibus supported a number of provisions like funding our military, fighting the opioids epidemic, school safety measures, measures that i support, but these prites can and must be achieved in a physicianically responsible -- fiscally responsible manner. how do i know we can achieve it? we took steps in that direction in the budget committee.
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there was a responsible path towards funding critical government programs. that budget is not enforceable and no one is accountable. i think the first step is to pass this balanced budget amendment here in the house. it's long past time that congress finally put an end to irresponsible spending sad willing our children and grandchildren with insurmountable debt. this would make balancing the budget the norm. it would codify congress' responsibility to be good stewards. there are numerous proposals to reform our budget process some i introduced myself. but this amendment would be the most meaningful budget reform that would act. it works for the states and pennsylvania and will work for washington. every congress since 2007 he has introduced this amendment. it's an important effort and one that he has led.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: i now yield two minutes to the distinguished ranking member of the foreign affairs committee, the gentleman from new york, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. engel: i thank my friend for yielding to me and i rise in strong opposition, the disgraceful so-called balanced budget amendment. it has been said again and again on this side of the aisle but it warrants saying it even more. the republicans passed their tax bill for the wealthiest 1%, which blew tremendous holes into the deficit. so coming here now a few months later and purporting to be concerned about the rising deficit, i mean it just -- the actions are different than the words because the republican tax
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scam blew a hole in the deficit, made it very difficult. if you really want to change and balanced to have a budget, sit down, both sides and figure out a way that is equitable and not something that helps 1% and devastating cuts for rest of americans. the republican tax cuts will balloon the federal deficit by nearly $2 million. this is an attempt to push an extreme agenda that will have cuts to vital programs. medicare would be cut by $200 billion by 2025. medicaid and health care subsid ease by $150 billion. and veterans' disability compensation would be cut up to $30 billion and not only will and urt our elderly,
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veterans but will make it impossible for congress to respond to natural disasters and international security crises. and a dramatic downturn in the economy. we won't be able to react to this. this amendment makes future increases in the debt limit nearly impossible. so i urge my colleagues to oppose this measure and work together to find responsible solutions to create jobs and take care of the american people. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: it's my pleasure to yield two minutes to the the gentleman from kentucky, mr. comber. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized -- comer. mr. comer: when we were growing how to use our credit card, our parents and teachers, budget
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your money and don't spend more than you have. this is a simple commonsense lesson that we were taught when we were growing up. it is reality for any individual who wants to have a sustainable future. it's unfortunate that the same rules do not apply for congress. our nation's largest and most important spender. the united states currently faces $20 trillion in debt, which will lead us to a fiscal crisis if unabated. year after year our mandatory spending increases leaving little room for military and other priorities. it estimated by 2040, spending for mandatory programs will make up 81%. this trajectory mandatory spending is skyrocketing our national debt. it is evident that this congress has not taken the necessary steps to balance the federal
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budget. it is time that this congress take the tough decisions to reduce the national debt and practice restrained spending. representative demrat's balanced budget amendment would require the president to submit an annual balanced budget to congress and congress cannot spend more money than it reseffs in revenue. this will impact future generations. we owe it to our children and grandchildren, those who will inherit this debate nation to address our national debt. i remain committed to ensuring americans' tax dollars are spent wisely. and i'm a proud co-sponsor of this balanced budget amendment. let's prioritize fiscal responsibility and make smarter more responsible federal spending choices for the people of this nation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the
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balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentlelady from new jersey. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for three three minutes. mrs. watson coleman: in december, republicans rushed a little thought that they had consideration for the long-term impact, a tax overhaul that has been exposed over and over again for structural and fiscal flaws. contrary to the false bill of goods that they are marketing to the american people, this scam would shower wealthy with the dollars shaved off of the income of americans. there is a gapping divide between the rich and the middle class and in new jersey my constituents will be among those hardest hit as it guts the
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federal deduction for state and local taxes, the exact opposite to the cuts and breaks that republicans have given service to. months after padding themselves on the back, they are back tracking. lining the pockets of millionaires and corporations isn't a sound fiscal decision to to fix it they decided bring forward the balanced budget almt. this isn't fiscal responsibility. this is a scam. to help keepsh and food on the table and that maintain basic living standards and how people find jobs. to say the cuts they made for millionaires, they'll use this amendment to slash health care, access and retirement security of our seniors through cuts to social security and medicare. to say the cuts they made for
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millionaires, they'll use this amendment to cut unemployment insurance, early childhood education programs. to say the cuts, they'll use this amendment to wreak havoc for working families. instead of more cuts, we should be focused on investments that will produce jobs and economic growth, building new roads and bridges and ensuring that workers make decent wages and giving young people the best chance at a good education and a bright future. i urge my colleagues to vote against this so-called balanced budget amendment and the harm it represents. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman frommon tona. . mr. gianforte: i appreciate your leadership on this critical issue. washington doesn't have a revenue problem. washington has a spending
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problem. plain and simple. and it's past time we get our fiscal house in order. last time the federal government ran a budget surplus was about two decades ago. at the time, the economy was growing. unemployment was low. and republicans controlled congress. in 1997, republicans cut spending and taxes and for the next four years the federal government ran a surplus. since that time, washington has failed to live within its means. the national debt stood at $5.8 trillion in 2001. since then, it has nearly quadrupled to more than $21 trillion. but this issue isn't just about the numbers. ultimately our kids and grandkid will pay for the federal spending where we're not willing to pay for -- that we're not willing to pay for today. we shouldn't force future generations to pick up the tab for washington's voracious
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spending appetite. the sobering truth is that if we fail to make the necessary spending reforms today, we will face a fiscal crisis. the only way out of such a fiscal crisis would be punishing tax increases and drastic cuts to essential government programs. it's time we take action to bring fiscal discipline to washington, and avert a fiscal crisis. if you're in a hole, the quickest way out is to stop digging. amending the constitution to require a balanced budget is how we quit dicking -- digging. the amendment will force the federal government to face the reality that households and small businesses face every day. you can't spend more than you make. let's get on the record here. should the federal government balance its budget? should it live within its means like hardworking americans who make tough decisions about how they make ends meet? the answer is yes.
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which is why i've co-sponsored and will vote for the balanced budget amendment. i encourage my colleagues to vote for this resolution. and begin to get our fiscal house in order. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves the gentleman from new york is recognized -- reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: thank you, mr. speaker. i now yield one minute to the gentleman from connecticut, mr. courtney. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from connecticut is recognized for one minute. mr. courtney: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning at the house armed services committee, secretary james mattis applauded the bipartisan collaboration and demonstrated political courage for lifting the spending caps if sequestration -- on sequestration so that the military readiness of this country could catch up with the huge demands that are happening in terms of our national security. i cite that reference this morning because in looking at this balanced budget constitutional amendment, a fox news reporter described the effect of this as that a balanced budget amendment would
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be sequestration amped up on a cocktail of steroids and fiscal fentanyl. if people who worried about the u.s. military over the last four years, since the budget control act was pazed because of sequestration, they should not vote for this balanced budget amendment. it's not only a straightjacket, it's a straightjacket with a constitutional lock that would freeze congress' ability to provide the resources to defend our nation. again, just look at the sequence what have happened in terms of sequestration and the damage it did to our country and listen to what that fox news analyst said, that it would do to our national defense and to our country's ability to address its basic needs, including social security and medicare. which will be the target if this ever were to pass. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. hensarling, chairman of the financial services committee.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for three minutes. mr. hensarling: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i also thank him for his friendship and i thank him for his leadership in fiscal san -- -- fiscal sanity. along with chairman goodlatte, i will be leaving congress at the end of this year. serving in congress has been the greatest privilege of my life. but i leave with one great regret. and that regret is my inability to convince my colleagues of the peril of ignoring the debt trajectory this nation is on. we cannot continue to spend money we do not have. mr. speaker, my ipad is awash, awash of reports about how our spending trajectory is unsustainable. c.b.o., o.m.b., from private foundations, they all conclude
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the same thing. the picture of national bankruptcy is ugly. and it wasn't that many years ago that we saw it in greece. e saw soup kitchens, padlocked factories, hospitals that could no longer turn on the lights. college educated people forced into subcystence agriculture. mr. speaker, i don't think america is going to be greece. i wish i knew it for a fact. but here's what i do know. if we don't quit spending money, we don't -- money we don't have, we will become a second-rate economic power, a second-rate military power, and, frankly, a second-rate authority, moral authority. as we become the first generation in america's history to leave the next generation with a lower standard of living.
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that simply is not unintelligent, that is immoral. can we have that stain on our ecord for generations to come? mr. speaker, frankly i wish we were debating a spending limit amendment today. which is my preference. but at least the balanced budget amendment is a fair fight so, that we at least do not mortgage our children's future, our grandchildren's future. again, there is a moral imperative. we know what churchill once said about us. and that is, americans can usually be counted on to do the right thing once they've exhausted every other possibility. it's a humorous comment for a situation that is not humorous. we cannot wait. this is the most foreseeable crisis in america's future. today we can make history. today we can ensure that we show
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fidelity to our founding fathers and to future generations. and for once going forward, ensure that it is enshrined in our most sacred document, that we balance the budget and do not mortgage our children's future. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. doggett. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is ecognized for two minutes. mr. doggett: thank you. like some stormy sermon from trump on the virtues of chastity, i believe these house republicans today really do deserve a gold medal for hypocrisy. after approving their budget-busting, trickle-down, trillion-dollar tax break, and refusing to pay a dime for their huge increase in military spending, they have the audacity to advance a balanced budget
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amendment. choosing words over deeds, they shamelessly preach the gospel of do what i say, not what i do. i've already voted myself for a balanced budget when i voted for not going into an unnecessary war without paying anything for it. i voted for a balanced budget when i voted to reject the distorted republican theology that when it comes to taxes, less always means more. the more tax cut theology has proven wrong over and over and over again. the more the republicans demand just one more tax cut to drive us even deeper into debt. dripping in red ink, this newest trump tax bill that he is promoting right now at the white house certainly validates his boast that he is the king of
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debt and these house republicans are his supplicants. our children and our grandchildren are being saddled with over $2 trillion in debt just because of this one bill. all so that trump, his wealthy buddies, and a few multinational corporations can receive a tax windfall. for trump and his congressional enablers, fiscal responsibility is just a hollow political slogan that they use to undermine the vital education, health care and retirement security initiatives like medicare that they've always not truly supported. they would surely let medicare wither on the vine, to use the word of one of the king of debts -- debt's loudest troubadours. reject this proposal. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the gentleman from louisiana, mr. johnson, can continue managing
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the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from west virginia . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.j.res. 2. and to chairman goodlatte, thank you for your leadership on this really critically important issue. washington is broken. after years of excessive spending and wasteful stimulus projects, our national debt now tops $21 trillion. that's more than $60,000 for each and every american. mr. speaker, this is unsustainable. but we are here to pass a resolution, the balanced budget
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amendment. this is a solution to this trillion-dollar debt. mr. jenkins: simply put, this amendment means washington can't spend more than it takes in. it means congress has to live within a budget, just like families in west virginia. families every day have to make careful choices about how to best spend their money. it's time for the federal government to do the same. i'm a proud co-sponsor of this resolution and urge my colleagues to vote yes later today for a balanced budget amendment. it's time to get our fiscal house in order. pass this resolution. pass the balanced budget amendment. let's get our fiscal house in order. the american people are depending on us. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from louisiana reserves. without objection, the gentleman, mr. cohen from tennessee, will take control of the time. mr. cohen: thank you, sir. i yield two minutes to mr. connolly, the gentleman from virginia, and a scholar and a gentleman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for two minutes. mr. connolly: i thank my good friend. thank you, mr. speaker. there's a word for what we're witnessing today. pa. that word is huds the majority is proposing a balanced budget to the constitution of the united states just months after passing the trump tax scheme, which the congressional budget office warned would increase the deficit by $1.6 trillion over 10 years. so i -- so, having broken the bank and spent their way into default, they now want a balanced budget amendment to protect all of rest of us. like i said.
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one would think since devoted reaganites might have learned the lesson already. the majority has once again asked the american people to stomach a massive deficit increase on the hope and the prayer that tax decreases will pay for themselves. that's the same trickle-down narrative we heard in the reagan years and the bush years, and it didn't work then and it's not going to work now. the 1981 tax cuts were so devastating that presidents reagan and bush had to enact legislation to raise taxes to ke up for the shortfall in 1982. 9834, 1984, 1987 and 1990. other than that, yeah, tax cuts pay for themselves. when president obama took over he took over $1.5 trillion that
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president bush gave him. that deficit was cut by more than 2/3 in president obama's time in office. by this time next year, president trump's policies will have doubled the deficit in just the first two years. this level of irresponsibility, fiscal irresponsibility could rival that of the bush years when we went from a surplus to a deficit from $128 billion surplus to a deficit of $1.6 trillion. trickle-down theories don't work. they are a bad experiment for the american people. i urge rejection on the grounds of intellectual honesty and integrity. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee reserves. and the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: i yield myself three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. johnson: as virtually every
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american now understands washington is broken. for years, congress has spent irresponse apply with what seems to be little or no thought how it might affect future generations. we are passing along a bill that our children and grandchildren may never be able to pay. it is immoral and unsustainable. our military first have warned congress that the number one threat to our national security is our debt. we have no choice now but to correct this wrong and institute policies that promote fiscal responsibility. currently, our national debt exceeds $20 trillion and the number increases every second. when i do town halls, i put the debt clock on the screen very often and allow our constituents watch that clock toll. the last omnibus package which is 232 pages in length jat indicated $1.3 trillion.
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our government is out of control. and we have to put an end to the dangerous and clearly excessive spending patterns coming out of washington. as i have said, people all across america sit down at their kitchen tables and create budgets. small businesses make countless sacrifices. and our government should act no differently. we cannot continue to spend money we don't have and drive ourselves into the debt of hostile nations like china who is the the primary creditor. passing the balanced budget amendment is the right solution and restore fiscal sanity. it will ensure our government is a good steward for the tax dollars. it has the potential to make the ploted budgets of washington a thing of the past. opponents of this amendment will say passing this will force
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serious cuts to our budget and respond and say, of course, it will. we have to make tough decisions. that's our job. that's why we are elected as the elected representatives of the people. right now our country faces a point of no return with our debt and there shouldn't be anything controversial by telling the federal government to act within its means. this is aligning and agreeing upon our top priorities. jefferson said the representatives of a nation should never take on more debt than they themselves can pay in their own lifetime. we abandonned that principle a long time and it's now our moral obligation to right this wrong. this is about who we are as americans if you listen to the founders. i urge my colleagues to support the balanced budget amendment to the constitution and help and preserve the american dream for our children and future
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generations. we owe that to the country. fiscal sanity, responsibility and good stewardship is why we were sent here. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. cohen: i just want to remind the members that my republican senator bob corker said that this congress will go down in history as the worst fiscal congress in history for having voted for both the tax scam bill and the big cuts for the wealthy. mr. scott, five minutes, please. mr. scott: i rise in opposition to h.j.res. 2 and we debate the title of a proposed constitutional amendment without getting into serious discussion about whether or not the specific provisions will help balance the budget. if we are going to balance the budget, it will require members to cast tough votes and many of these wire career-ending votes and the calling it the balanced
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budget amendment will not change that reality. it is ironic that the republican majority seems concerned about the deficit and balancing budget , they must have forgotten four months ago they voted for $1.5 trillion tax scam that gave massive handouts to big corporations and the wealthiest 1% and claimed that these tax cuts would pay for themselves but last week, the c.b.o. told the truth estimating that their tax scam will add $2 trillion to our national debt. one of the most consequential votes i cast in my career was the 1993 clinton budget. that had tax increases and spending cuts, it was the fiscal responsible thing to do. not one republican voted for the
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1993 budget. needless to say the budget was a tough vote but it helped create over 20 million jobs, stock market more than tripled and led to the first balanced budget and included projected surpluses large enough to have paid off the entire national debt held by the public by 2008. it also contributed to 50 house democrats losing their seats in the next election. as soon as the republicans took control of the federal government in 2001, they passed massive tax cuts, fought two wars, passed the prescriptive $5.8 d the debt was trillion. now we have the balanced budget amendment. the problem is the balanced budget amendment will not balance the budget. the major provision in this legislation is the requirement that if the budget is
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unbalanced, it requires a 3/5's vote and this proposal will make t impossible to pass a tough deficit plan. that budget wasn't balanced in the first year and instead of a simple majority, it would require 3/5's supermajority in the house and senate. it should be obvious that any tough deficit reduction plan will be unbalanced in the first year and it will be harder to pass requiring a 3/5's supermajority. will the supermajority make it more likely that it will end up with a fiscally responsible budget or fiscally irresponsible budget. it is more likely we would pass a christmas tree budget where a member would get a gift under
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the tree. and note, if this amendment places no limit on how far out of balance the budget can be once you get to 3/5's. mr. speaker, we shouldn't be distracted by the bill's misleading title. the balancing the budget will require tough votes not constitutional amendments. my colleagues must consider whether the bill's actual provisions will help or hurt. and making it impossible to pass any responsible budget. and therefore, mr. speaker, i ask my colleagues to oppose this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee reserves. the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: i yield two minutes to the gentlelady from georgia. and hand let me --
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ms. handel: i have been in congress for 10 months and i have seen firsthand that the budget process is fundamentally broken. while i supported the funding measures under this broken process, i did so with reluctance but both parties have brought us to this place with severe fiscal challenges that we face today. but balancing our budget should not be a partisan issue. across the country, virtually every state has a balanced budget requirement and governors and legislatures of both parties meet that requirement. congress should, too. ultimately balanced budgets are about accountability. we must hold the federal government accountable and incease that the overall budget be managed in a fiscally responsible way. the status quo, we'll get to it next time approach is no longer an approach. big problems require tough
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choices. every day that we continue to borrow and assume more debt, our decisions get all the more difficult and the solutions all the more catastrophic. this balanced budget amendment is a first, only a first step, but a much needed step to improving the fiscal state of our nation. our current path is unsustainable. sooner than most realize, this path will not allow us to keep the promises already made to the american people. don't spend more than you earn. that's what i was taught. and that's what families across this country do every single day. it's time for congress to do the same, mr. speaker. i ask my colleagues to support this will bugged amendment not for the sake of politics but for the stake of this country and generations to come. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana reserves. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. cohen: i yield five minutes to my ranking member on
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transportation, who is always so generous and kind, mr. defazio. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. defazio: i thank the gentleman. there weren't too many of us on the floor today who were here in 1996 when i supported the balanced budget amendment. had it become law, george bush could not have invaded iraq and cut taxes and blown the projected surplus into a huge deficit and debt. but here we are today. now this debate was actually scheduled for april 1. april fools' day, but the house was on its easter recess and this is as soon as they could bring it up. this is an april fool. now we have one colleague call it a chutzpah. i was thinking of how to describe it, hypocrisy.
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not this balanced budget amendment, not at this time. they have just cut receive news by $3 trillion. we are projecting a deficit of $1 trillion in two years and they are saying they want to cut taxes more. well, that means something else has to go. and speaker ryan has talked about what the something else is, it's medicare, social security and medicaid. toes are the things that got to go. well, there is a dirtly little secret about social security. i was using this on 9/11, but this is an updated version. this is a social security trust fund and this is the information for the trust fund and it is backed by the full faith and credit by the united states of america to be fade to the federal old age and survivors trust fund. there is $3 trillion that has been collected from every
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working american in the social security trust fund. aging are having an population. the point is, under this amendment, if it was law today, social security benefits would be cut today, because they would not allow under this amendment social security could only stamp its income which this year was $40 billion less than its outlays. it cashed in some of its $3 trillion in assets and paid full social security benefits. if this little dream they have going to pass, they would see it reduced by $643 and every year that number would grow while the $3 trillion would never shall paid out. talk about false promises to the american people. that is one heck of a false promise. now i have introduced a balanced
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budget amendment that makes more sense. can't have these overseas contingency operations funds where we shell money onto the pentagon. we are borrowing the money, but it doesn't count. under my amendment, unless you had a declared war, unless congress has the guts to declare war when we have to fight someone overseas, you couldn't have that kind of overseas contingency operation fund and do money off the books. my balanced budget amendment also would protect the social security and medicare trust funds from those who would rob from that trust fund and begin to immediately reduce benefits for social security and medicare. . this is a ruse. talk about the drunken sailors spending money, oh, i've got a wicked headache. let's pass a balanced budget amendment, maybe that'll cure it. it ain't going to cure it.
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we need fiscal responsibility around here. it's going to be a balance of rescinding some of your obscene tax cuts, $3 trillion worth, which would go a long way toward helping move us toward a balanced budget and imposing -- imposing fiscal discipline on the pentagon. the pentagon is yet to be audited. the only ainltcy of the federal government that cannot be audited happens to get the larblingest single discretionary grant of money every year. once i managed to pass an amendment on the floor to require an awe tit. that disappeared in conference committee because the pentagon can't be audited, doesn't want to be audited, they just need more money. don't worry, they'll spend it wisely. let's talk about real fiscalties plin around here and a real balanced budget amendment to protect the assets of the social security trust fund and med kay. you don't care about that, you want to kill it.
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i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. mr. johnson: -- >> i yield to mr. byrne. mr. byrne: the first thing i introduced when the 115th congress kicked off last year was a balanced budget amendment. with a national debt of $ 1 trillion it's no secret that the federal government has a spending issue. before coming to congress i served in the alabama state legislature. like many states, alabama is required to pass a budget that does not spend more than we have. we do it each year. a balanced budget is not some far flung idea. families in southwest alabama and all around the country sit around the kitchen table and figure out how to make ends meet. small businesses face the exact same challenges. the federal government should be
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required to play by the same rules. i want to be clear about a few things. first, despite what my colleagues on the other side of the aisle believe, the answer to our debt issue is not to tax the american people more. we do not have a tax problem. we have a spending problem. second, the most serious drivers of the national debt are on auto pilot. so-called mandatory spending programs must be reined in and a balanced budget amendment would require congress to tackle those problems head on. mr. speaker, i know passing a balanced budget would be hard but i did not run for congress because i thought the job would be easy. we were elected by our neighbors to make difficult choices and decisions. we can make a strong step in the right direction by passing this balanced budget amendment and i urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill today. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from louisiana
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reserve. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. cohen: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cohen: government is and should be about more than just dollars and cents. government and especially democratic government is about nurturing community, taking care of one another and defending our common humanity. h.j.res. 2 proposing a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced budget every fiscal year strikes sharply against those core values. as much that we see in government these days does. a balanced budget amendment undermine ours commitment to each other as expressed through critical social safety net programs like supplemental nutrition assistance programs, snap, medicare, medicaid, and social security. my constituents in the ninth congressional district of tennessee and millions of vulnerable americans nationwide depend on these and other programs to make ends meet in difficult economic circumstances. therefore it concerns me greatly that this congress which hip commitcally passed tax cuts to
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corporation theans super wealthy is devoting its time to what is essentially a gimmick to avoid making difficult decisions tabt the federal budget. just this week , my tennessee colleagues -- colleague, respected senator bob corker, called out his fellow republicans when he tweeted if we were serious about balancing the budget we'd do it instead of doing the real work some will push this symbolic measure so they can feel good when they ghow home and face voters. i wear on my lapel the letter f. that's the grade bob corker and i give this congress on its work toward balancing a budget. there wills of -- trillions of dollars of debt with billions of giveaway, trillions of dollars of debt with a budget that gives the pentagon $70 billion more than they want a balanced budget is nothing but an attempt to shortcut government and would impose real harm on millions of americans. social safety net programs would be a particular risk since the balanced budget amendment could
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be adopted because they are funded every year by drawing on savings accumulated in prior year. after giving tax breaks to the wealthiest and corporations, after giving away mass i budget amounts, particularly to defense, they want to balance -- they want a balanced budget amendment. how would they balance the budget? on medicare, on social security, and on medicaid. on people who are ill and seniors who need money to live on and health care to keep their lives going. that is who this cruel congress would say the balanced budget amendment falls on. that would be on the chopping -- they would be on the chopping block this funding mechanism ensures benefits could be paid to those who need them and provides the opportunity to stave off funding shortfalls before they occur. the state of the department of justice is another example. given president trump's sharp political attacks on general sessions out of frustration with his recusal from any
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investigation in russian interference, the active efforts to undermine the work of a free press are other meaningful topics worthy of our attention, issues prnt to the american public, not a balanced budget amendment that won't come into existence and will harm the american people. i strongly oppose the idea of a balanced budget amendment to the constitution because it threatens social security, medicare and medicaid. it threatens snap, it threatens programs that keep people alive and makes their existence tolerable. many constituents of mine depend on these and many in america do. the house has better things to devote its time. i strongly support house joint joint resolution 2 and i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. walker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. walker: thank you, representative johnson. our national debt stands at over $21 trillion. this is not a surprise to
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anybody. it should frighten us enough to immediately alter the behavior of this house. congress approved a largely unpaid $1.3 omnibus, several supplementals and exploded two years of spending caps in the last few months. unsustainable mandatory undisciplined discretionary spending designed decades ago created a debt monster that's seemingly unstoppable. over the last few months we have heard a great deal from our democratic friends and their newfound concern about the rising deficits and debt. 10 my question is, how many would join us in supporting a balanced budget amendment? many democratic members in the past were willing to vote for what 49 out of 50 states already have, a balanced budget. in fact, in 1996, a balanced budget amendment garnered 72 democratic votes in the house. including our esteemed colleague across the aisle, mr. hoyer. in 2011, the same version we are voting on today got 25 democrat
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votes in support. i wonder how many have the courage to support it now. we know what it takes. we should roll back wasteful spending including rescinding appropriations that aren't needed. we need to reform our entitlement programs including getting able bodied adults back to work. this is about hope, not judgment. i invite my colleagues to join me in supporting this amendment that sour moral obligation to ensure that american dream remains attainable for our children and for future generations. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. cohen: thank you, sir. i recognize the lady from illinois for two minutes, ms. shah cusky. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. schakowsky: i thank the gentleman for yielding. first the republicans passed a tax scam that blows a $2 trillion hole in the budget and gives 83% of its tax cuts to the wealthiest among us and corporate c.e.o.'s. then they offer a budget that would fill that gap by cutting
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more than $2 trillion in social security, medicare, medicaid and even programs like meals on wheels. and now they want to amend our constitution to require a balanced budget. now we know how the republicans plan to balance the budges, on the backs of seniors. we've seen this movie before. budget after budget, cuts social security, medicare, medicaid. budgets that leave seniors without their earned benefits or access to long-term care. budgets that the privatize the veterans administration and medicare. providing vouchers and not health benefits. that raise the age of eligibility for medicare and social security. that cap and slash medicaid. the largest source of long-term care and no wonder seniors groups are raising the alarm. thunder bill, the aarp says, quote, social security and medicare would cease to provide a predictable source of financial and health security in
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retirement. and the alliance for retired americans calls it, yet, irresponsible and extremely harmful to older americans. and the national committee to preserve social security and medicare says it would force seniors to -- severe cuts in social security, medicare, medicaid and other vital federal programs and the strengthen social security can coligs says, quote, we regard voters in balanced budget amendment as vote to cut social security and as well as medicare and medicaid. when paul ryan announced his retirement yesterday, he said before he leaves, he hopes that he's going to be able to go after these retirements and cut these entitlements and cut them. social security and medicare. this has already been announced. this is the future if we let it happen. we need to vote no. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: i'm happy to yield two minutes to my colleague from pennsylvania, mr. fitzpatrick.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. fitzpatrick: on my first day serving in this congress i introduced a balanced budget amendment to the constitution and i'm honor bed to be -- honored to be co-sponsoring the bill on the floor today. as i travel back home in my district, as i'm sure many of my colleagues do, i get this question, i'm repeatedly asked, why doesn't congress manage the national budget the way businesses manage their budgets and families manage their budget? why doesn't congress follow the same rules businesses and families do, that we only spend what we generate in revenues. which gets us to the need for a balanced budget amendment. one would think we would not need to amend the constitution to do what members of the body should be doing anyway. this is commonsense, mr. speaker. for decades we have seen the problem perpetuate which is the responsibility of both parties. i'm convinced this is the only mechanism to force this body to balance the budget. $21 trillion in debt, mr. speaker. to my friends voicing opposition, we need to be honest about what this bill does this
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bill does not necessitate any cuts of any kind. it simply requires that the budget balance. a commitment to raising revenue through pro growth economic policies is the answer. that's what this bill will force this body to do. raise revenues to offset expenditures on a dollar for dollar basis. prior to this congress our economy was sluggishly growing about 1.6 growth in g.d.p., fiscally and financially unsustainable. we are well over 2%, on our way to 3% and need to get to 4%. as one of only a handful of c.p.a.'s in this congress i know economic growth has three essential components. tax reform, regulatory reform and a balanced budget. when you balance the books you create jobs which leads to more revenue, which leads to an expanding economy, making it easier for us to fund critical priorities like serving our veterans, protecting our troops, funding public education and preserving our environment. mr. speaker, that's what this bill is about. that's why i'm proud to co-sponsor this legislation.
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this is common sense, mr. speaker. the american people want this by overwhelming margins. we need to get this done for them, it's our moral responsibility. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. cohen: thank you. before i recognized mr. neal i want to say mr. fitzpatrick got the award from the american bar association for his work and i compliment him on that i yield five minutes to our ranking member on ways and means, ritchie neal. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. neal: the previous speaker said we really shouldn't have to do this. and the answer is, we don't have to do this. bill clinton proved on four occasions that you can balance the budget. it's only been done five times since the end of world war ii. so what we really should be calling this legislation that's in front of us today is the
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esse james seeks clemency act. we are here because of their tax cut. invade iraq, let's have a tax cut. invade afghanistan, let's have a ax cut. the last round, let's borrow $2.3 trillion over 10 years before the federal reserve board has the chance to raise interest rates three times as they predicted for the purposes of providing a tax cut. and oh, by the way, how about that old song, don't worry because tax cuts pay for themselves. this is what we have heard. $20 trillion we are in debt. here's the caveat they attach to these arguments, by the way. if there is a democratic president, you need to balance the budget. if there is a republican
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president, you don't need to balance the budget. their spending priorities are to borrow money and provide tax cuts for the top 1%. let me give you some numbers here that i paid attention to over the years. n january, 19, 2007, we were staring at a surplus and record economic growth, greatest economic growth spurt. surplus, again, $5.6 trillion. so what happened? well, we cut taxes over the $1.3 trillion. then we had a recession and losing 800,000 jobs a month. by the way, in 2003, we came back and cut taxes again here by
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$1 trillion plus the bonus, then ey decided to do a tax holiday. and now they're here -- my father used to have a great line. at least jesse james had enough respect to wear a mask. i mean this is unbelievable they come in with a balanced budget after what they have done repeatedly all of these years to wreck the budget all under the guise of, if we cut taxes, everything will get better. the reason this deficit is ballooning is not because of an expense in spending. revenue is in that 17% to 18%. that is the post-war norm except for the bush w. when percentage went to 15 cents on the dollar because of the tax cuts, and by the way, increased spending for iraq and afghanistan. let me remind our republican
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friends of this. the priorities have been wrong. we could reached an accord on these issues, but today to bring forth a balanced budget amendment we are going to disturb the constitution of the united states to maybe get them through the next round of elections. the tax cuts are going to reduce revenue and here's the footnote, 83% of this tax cut that they voted for without one democrat in the house supporting it, 83% of the benefit is going to the top 1% of the wage earners in america. and then they found time, by the way, to double the exemption on the estate tax. so we are taking the estate tax from $11 million to $22 million and remember this. the estate tax is not a estate tax on conrad hilton but paris hilton, and my god, who could be against that.
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when you think about how this has been pursued, it's about concentrating more wealth at the very top for people who have said, we don't need it. there wasn't anybody beating down our doors saying cut my taxes. we could have reached an accord on the corporate rate and done things in a bipartisan manner to address some of these issues and making america competitively internationally. but they chose to do what they always do, starve the federal budget and we have to cut social security and medicare and let's starve the federal budget and say we have to get rid of medicaid for people who need it. this is why we find ourselves ith the $20 trillion debt. i'll take the clinton years in terms of revenue forecast. c.b.o. came back and said what?
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these are the numbers -- one minute. c.b.o. came back and said, let us tell you right now what's wrong. they gave us hard core numbers about economic growth and hard core numbers about debt and zifflets. and the answer was, well let's not believe what they have to say. let's not pay attention. because it doesn't square with the philosophy of tax cuts paying for themselves. if you voted for the tax cuts and you voted for the omnibus spending bill on the republican side because no democrat voted for the tax cut, you ought to wear a mask when you cast your vote because jesse james would be honored. and i yield back. mr. cohen: we reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: i am glad to hear that the gentleman didn't vote for the tax cuts. yield two -- three minutes to
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mr. jordan. mr. jordan: everyone knows this is a joke. it's all pretend. never going to become law, never going to happen. people are going to support it because voting for a balanced budget amendment is like voting for mootshood and apple pie but everyone knows this is all pretend. the time to deal with spending was three weeks ago. that was the time for political courage, some discipline, some political will was three weeks 2,032 paged ot a bill. that is when we needed to deal with spending. 15 hours to look at a $1.3 trillion spending package, the second largest spending package and we had 15 hours to look at it. you know how long we got to debate it, one hour on a bill. you know how long we are
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debating this? four hours. the time for political courage was three weeks ago. the last vote we took before the easter recess, $1 poing 3 trillion funding things as republicans said we would never fund and not telling voters things we weren't going to fund and first thing we do with four hours of debate is a bill that is never going to happen. no wonder americans hate this place. no wonder they are cynical. i don't blame them. this ticks me off. no other way to say it and ticks off the american people and it should. you know the last 24 hours everyone in this town has been focused on who is going to be the next speaker. much more important than who is going to be the next speaker is what are republicans going to do this year.
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are we going to get back to what the american people elected us to do on november 8, 2016 or get back to do what we told them we are going to do or keep doing pretend things like this. let's do what we said. we make this so hard. let's do what we said we would do. that would be good politics and good policy for the hard-working families of this great country. i yield back. mr. johnson: we reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. cohen: i recognize the ranking member and the future chairman of the budget committee, the gentleman from kentucky, mr. john yarmuth. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cohen: five minutes. mr. yarmuth: i thank my friend for yielding. mr. speaker, just months ago, we were debating the so-called tax cuts and jobs act.
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during that debate, i warned it was the first republicans' three-step plan and give to the wealthy. republicans were successful in enacting step one, the tax scam that gave more than 80% of the enefits to the top 1%. pfizer pharmaceuticals is $218 million more every week under this new law. and they are not alone. these tax cuts are somehowering corporations at an obscene level. that was step one. step two, exploding our deficits was confirmed this week by the congressional budget office. they concluded that the g.o.p. tax cuts will add $2 trillion to the federal debt over the federal decade. and step three, having provided corporations with huge tax cuts that do little to grow our economy, the g.o.p. has starved
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our government revenues. naturally, they are resulting the deficits as an excuse to massive cuts to programs that americans rely on including medicare, social security and medicaid. that is what it would do. it would place in a constitutionally mandated process to impose these cuts because it comes with their belief that tax cuts for the rich will save us all. they believe this despite the fact that history and nearly ever respected economist will tell you the only way we can ballance the budget is to include new receive news. this is a stunt to give republicans political cover for their deficit sfloding tax scam. the party of fiscal hawks has become the party of fiscal hypocrites. they know it. while this bill may be a political gimmick, it's a
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dangerous one that will have dark consequences. when in effect, it would require the entire federal budget this year would be cut at least by 20%. that would not be unprecedented but devastating. medicare, medicaid, social security, veteran benefits, job training, nutrition assistance, programs for higher education would be jeopardized. this amendment would put an intolerable financial strain on every state forcing them to do more with less. my state of kentucky relies on federal funds to cover 37% of the commonwealth's budget including 16% of education funding and 32% of transportation funding. speaker's ryan's home state relies on federal funds to cover 24% of its budget. and all of that is at risk under this amendment.
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and it wouldn't stop there. this amendment would not only threaten our ability to respond to economic crises and make them much more. during economic downturns congress can cut taxes and increasing investments as we did during 2008. this amendment had been in place then, our economy would have been in serious jeopardy facing a much higher risk of a prolonged depression. should our country face another financial crisis, this amendment would be the worst policy at the worst time. so in sum, this amendment would threaten the retirement security of every senior who relies on medicare and social security and every working american paying into these programs now. it jeopardizes every federal program that helps our communities grow and hard-working families succeed. it places extreme financial extreme. and it would make it harder for
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our government to respond to crises. other than that, it's a great idea. mr. speaker, this is terrible policy that ignores reality and real consequences and purely intended to save republicans' rear ends. not just me making this case. senator corker stated quote, republicans control the senate, house and white house. if we were serious about balancing the budget, we would do it. some will push this measure so they feel good when they face voters. if my republican colleagues truly believe this is a good bill and it is good for the american people, then it is time for them to go home. i yield back. mr. cohen: we continue to reserve, although we can't add much to what has been said. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman continues to reserve. and the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: i yield two minutes
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to the gentleman from kansas. mr. estes: i rise in support of the balanced budget amendment. this comes at a critical time. years of unchecked spending led to massive deficits. threats at home and abroad, crumbling infrastructure and natural disasters have forced the government do more. this requires tough decision making but that's what the american people expect us to do. as i talked to constituents in my district, one of the issues they ask is the ballooning federal debt that will be passed to their kids and grand kids. we have to balance our checkbook every month. i served as kansas state treasurer and we had to balance our budget. i don't think there is any reason that the federal government should get a pass. i'm proud to support this resolution which would require the federal government to spend within its means.
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during the past year, we have accomplished a lot to help families, cutting regulations and passing the tax cuts and jobs act that got the government out of the way. workers are seing bonuses and larger paychecks and this growth has allowed us to make significant investments in the military, disaster relief, agriculture and other areas. to build on this progress, we need time to implement policies to protect future generations. this proposal is a great start and long overdue. let me be clear, this is not a silver bullet, balancing our budget and reducing our debt will require us to reform our entitlement programs and i call on the president and the congress to implement spending cuts which will work towards our goal of fiscal responsibility and stability. this amendment are needed start to that difficult and immensely important task. the future of our country
quote
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depends on it and i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield bark. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is ecognized. mr. cohen: i yield the gentlelady one minute, the once and future speaker, ms. pelosi. ms. pelosi: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. cohen is a member of the judiciary committee. this is a balanced budget amendment and what's interesting is, it's not coming by way of the budget committee, as you might suspect. it's coming by way of the judiciary committee. because it intends to amend the constitution of the united states. how sad. mr. speaker, as you know, members of congress take an oath to support and defend the constitution, yet this proposed amendment we are debating does
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great harm to our sacred founding document. this legislation is a brazen assault on seniors, children, and working families, the american people we were elected to protect. make no mistake, this g.o.p. con job does nothing, has nothing to do with fiscal responsibility. it is not balanced in terms of money because of their g.o.p. tax scam that's placed us in a bad spot fiscally and it's not balanced in terms of values. to the republicans, fissdal responsibility just means -- fiscal responsibility just means ransacking medicare, medicaid and social security and breaking our nation's sacred promise of dignity and security for seniors and families. republicans like to pat themselveses on the back and play pais lip service to the idea of fiscal responsibility. in fact, the deficit hawks have either become an endangered species or extinct.
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they don't seem to exist in this republican house of representatives. it may be counterintuitive to the public but democrats have always been the ones who have fought to put our fiscal house in order. in the 1990's, president clinton put us on a trajectory of job growth and smaller deficits, despite inheriting the mass i reagan-bush deficit. the last four, some would even say five, condition servetively speak, the last four clinton budgets were either in balance or in surplus. president clinton handed president george w. bush a projected $5.6 trillion 10-year budget surplus but republicans squandered that surplus with massive tax cuts for the wealthy and two unpaid for wars. their spending sprees exploded a vast new $5 trillion-plus debt that was an $11 trillion
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turnaround from the democratic path to surplus. under president obama, then, democrats restored responsibility spending rules. we had pay as you go. do you want to invest in something? you must cover it. you must offset it or pay for it that held true for investments as well as for tax cuts. republicans didn't mind paying for food stamps, but they did mind paying for tax cuts for the rich. that they wanted to have exempted. rom pay as you go. this republican congress, despite president obama's restoring responsible spending rules and slashing the bush deficit by hundreds of billions of dollars, this republican congress has raced back toward fiscal ruin, recklessly erasing that progress and exploding the debt with their contempt for fiscal responsibility. republicans exploded deficits by
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more than $2 trillion with their g.o.p. tax scam and its massive handouts to corporations and the wealthiest 1%. just this week, the c.b.o. exposed the staggering cost of the republican special interest agenda, forecasting deficits of , more than illion every year president trump remains in office. understand that the trump trillion dollar deficit is here for the life of his presidency. may that -- know that for sure. yet republicans have the nerve to demand that seniors and little children sacrifice to pay for their tax cuts for the rich and corporate america, for their fiscal recklessness. g.o.p. has nothing but contempt for the health and security of america's families. the trump budget slashed a half trillion dollars from medicare, $1.4 trillion from medicaid.
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$72 billion from social security. -- from social security disability benefits. why? so they could give a tax cut of $1.5 trillion to corporate america with the interest that it incurs would be over $2 trillion deficit. paid for by cuts in medicare, medicaid, social security. their legislation priorities add to a mountain of utter, utter derision. disregard and distain for -- disdain for hardworking families from slashing snap, the food stamps, to gutting consumer protections for seniors and service members, our men and women in uniform, to sabfadging -- sabotaging america's affordable quality health care. and now with this constitutional amendment the republicans found another cynical tool to gut the bedrock guarantees of medicare, medicaid, and social security. this so-called balanced budget
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amendment which is going nowhere, it won't even win the te on the floor today, budgetary engineering designed to slash medicare, medicaid and social security. as the aarp warn the g.o.p. balanced budget amendment, so-called, would subject social security and medicare to deep cuts that would be, in their words, devastating for millions of americans the american people cannot afford republicans' fiscally pockcy and their relentless efforts to gut medicare, medicaid and social security. can't say it enough. just to enrich the special interests. democrats know that investments in the health and strength of the american people are the best ways to reduce the deficit and grow the economy. in fact, nothing brings more money to the treasury than investing in the education of the american people. early childhood, k through 12, higher education, post-grad, lifetime learning for our workers.
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democrats will continue to -- will continue to cut the deficit, create good-paying jobs, protect american families with a better deal, better jobs, better pay, better future for all americans. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from louisiana is recognized. mr. johnson: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield three minutes to the gentleman from maine, mr. poliquin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. poliquin: thank you, mr. speaker, i appreciate it, appreciate the time. mr. speaker, the big career spenders here in the house and in the senate who have only recently found fiscal discipline, well today they have the chance to join me to vote for, vote yes, for a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. you know, when i was maine state treasurer, mr. speaker, i helped make sure augusta's books were balanced without gimmicks. now it's well time that
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washington is forced, forced to live within its means just like every other family and small business in the state of maine. mr. speaker, 49 states in this country have constitutional amendments at the state level to make sure they spend lnl what they take. in it's about time washington has the same discipline. mr. speaker, it is not fair, and it is not right when career politicians spend every single nickel that they collect from you in taxes and then borrow as much as they want to to spend more. the spending, mr. speaker, is out of control. a lot of us have seen enough. that's why i ask every republican and every democrat in both the house and in the senate to pass a commonsense balanced budget amendment to our constitution. i'm very proud to say, mr. speaker, that the first piece of
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legislation that i co-sponsored the day after i was sworn in three years ago was a balanced budget amendment. every big spending bill in this own is loaded with pork. the process is terrible. to force an up or down vote in the 11th hour on a bill that's a couple thousand pages long. it does not make sense. a balanced budget amendment washington force to prioritize our spending like we do for those of us that run businesses. or balance the family checkbook. prioritize our spending and that will help eliminate waste. and that only will lead to balancing our books and then having the ability to start paying down $21 trillion in debt. you know, i look, mr. speaker,
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at these young adults in the fwalry. it is immoral to saddle these great young adults with $21 trillion in debt and rising that they've got to pay. a federal government's budget, which is legally required to be balanced, will force the house and the senate even with the senate's harmful 60-vote filibuster rule, it will force them also to spend only what we take in. mr. speaker, this is our chance. today. to start running our government more like a business. more like a family budget. it is made common sense to spend only what we take in mr. johnson: i yield the gentleman 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. poliquin: one of the biggest gifts we can give to our kids and grandkids is taking care of the spending and debt problem so they're not saddled with a
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mountain load of this stuff. america today, mr. speaker, is watching. who has got the guts, which republicans and which democrats in the house and senate, whose got the guts to stand up and do what's right and pass a balanced budget amendment to our constitution? i will. i look forward to it. i ask everyone to join me. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. does the gentleman continue to reserve? >> mr. speaker, what i'd like to do is ask unanimous consent to pass control to -- of the time to the chairman of judiciary, mr. goodlatte. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman from virginia reserve? mr. goodlatte: reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is
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recognized. mr. cohen: before i yield to mr. levin, the previous speaker said does anybody have the guts to stand up. i'm standing up, i voted against the tax cut bill and against the mammoth budget bill that caused this deficit to go up by $4 trillion. i yield to mr. levin for a unanimous consent request. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. levin: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks and place them in the record. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. the gentleman's request is covered under general leave. mr. cohen: and now i'd like to recognize mr. langevin for 1 1/2 minutes. thank you, sir. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. langevin: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, we absolutely need to address the crisis of our federal debt. and we do it by coming together
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in a bipartisan way, having the adult conversation, the difficult conversation addressing both revenue and spending. this is not rocket science. a balanced budget amendment would be worthy of consideration if properly crafted to provide flexibility in times of war, recession, or national emergency. in fact, i have co-sponsored such a resolution. however, this amendment fails to anticipate these inevitable ton kohn tin generalcies. instead it's a cynical attempt to paper over the enormous costs of the tax bill we recently pass and the one passed under george w. bush enacted to the benefit of special interests and the wealthy, overwhelmingly in their favor and to clear think way to wholesale cuts to programs for children and seniors like medicare and medicaid. congress has the tools it needs to fix the deficit as we saw during the clinton years when
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they had the adult conversation. when they did the tough work addressing revenue and spending in a bipartisan way. when the federal government ran a budget surpluses as far as the eye could see, when president clinton left office. we need to must they are will to enact responsibility fiscal policies that address spending and revenue and the sooner we do it, the better. it has to be bipartisan. we have to make the difficult choices on spending and revenue. mr. speaker, i ask my colleagues to reject this amendment and work with me, work with our colleagues across the aisle in a bipartisan way to enact comprehensive budget sloughs that work long-term for all americans. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. e gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: at this time it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. allen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. allen: thank you, mr. chairman. mr. speaker, i rise today to urge my colleagues to join me in supporting h.j.res. 2, the
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balanced budget amendment. as a business owner for over 40 years i'm well aware of what it takes to balance a budget, make a payroll, and operate within my means. . a practice that washington abandoned long ago and everyone in this chamber is responsible for it. you know in business i had tools like a balance sheet, like an income statement. like a cash flow analysis. and a business plan to make decisions on how to spend money and generate revenues. i've never seen a body that operates in a manner where we vote to spend money and we have none of those tools available to us. in fact, we can't even run ratios on this federal government to know if we should even borrow money. in fact, we don't even know if this government is sol vept. other than we know -- solvent. other than we know we can continue to borrow money. and we know for every quarter of a percent that happened two
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weeks ago that we borrow, it creates another $50 billion in mandatory spending. that is what i do know. let me tell you something else that i know. and i've been out in the district the last two weeks. and i've never seen optimism like i've seen since i've been in office and i've been in office for a very short time. this administration that congress' efforts to reduce regulation -- and this congress' efforts to reduce regulation and tax reform has created tremendous expansion and opportunity, particularly for our small business community. it's growing the economy. we see the effects of it. it is growing jobs and giving americans the opportunities they deserve. we know that for every percent this economy grows, it adds $2 trillion to revenues. over 10 years. yes, we have a spending problem. but don't we want to grow revenues? they're two parts of the balance
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sheet here. folks, i have never been part of a body where you spend the money first and then you have to vote to increase the debt after you spent the money. there may be a reason for that. in that i don't know that anybody would increase -- vote to increase the debt if you did it before you spent the money. you don't do that in business. who has ever heard in business of spending the money first and then going to the bank to borrow the money? it will not happen. and it should not happen here. the legislation we are voting today -- on today is simple. it requires congress, and we need this discipline, to not spend more than it receives in revenue. facing over $20 trillion in debt in this country, congress must make a change to address washington's out-of-control spending habits. this legislation is long past due. and i am proud to vote to finally hold washington to the same standards that we hold the american people to.
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it's common sense to balance our budgets. i'd like to thank the house judiciary committee for all of their hard work in getting this legislation to the house floor. and i urge all of my colleagues to join me in supporting this important legislation. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. without objection, the gentleman from maryland, mr. raskin, will control the time for the minority. the gentleman is recognized. rassrass mr. speaker, thank you very much -- mr. raskin: mr. speaker, thank you very much. i'm going to call on the house minority democratic whip, mr. hoyer. for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. hoyer: i thank the speaker. i thank the chairman. ladies and gentlemen, i rise today not so much to oppose this legislation, as to deride it. as a sham. as a fraud. as a pretense of fiscal responsibility. if you want to balance the
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budget, just do it. i've served here for years and years and years, when my republican colleagues have controlled the house, the senate and the presidency. just do it. don't talk about it. i come here as someone who's voted for balanced budget amendments in the past. but i have become extraordinarily cynical at people who vote to cut the costs of their product way below the price of producing it. that is a formula for bankruptcy. in any business. anyplace in the world. for republicans to bring a balanced budget amendment to the loor just weeks after adding $1.8 trillion to deficits in tax breaks for the wealthiest is the
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pitome of hypocrisy. nobody, nobody believes anymore that republicans care about deficit reduction or balancing the budget. let alone their own members. now, ladies and gentlemen, on the republican side of the aisle let me call to your attention the chair's remarks of your freedom caucus. hear me. i'm going to quote mark meadows. mr. meadows says, quote, the freedom caucus, the most conservative element supposedly of the congress, mark meadows says this, there is no one on capitol hill and certainly no one on main street who takes this vote seriously. mark meadows. conservative republican tom
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very a republican, a conservative republican, says this. quote, audacity, noun. voting on a constitutional balanced budget amendment only four legislative days after ramming through a massive deficit spending because you believe this stunt, massiey's word, not mine, -- massie's word, not mine, this stunt will convince constituents that you care about balancing the budget. not my words. two of the most conservative republicans in this house. and republican senator bob corker said this, republicans control the house, the senate and the white house.
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if we were serious, this is the republican senator, -- senator saying, if we were serious about lancing the budget, we would do it. we know what it takes to balance budgets, mr. speaker. we did it during the clinton administration four years in a row. now, my republican colleagues may jump to their feet and say, yes, but we were in charge of congress. that's correct. and president clinton would not let them cut the price of our product. because to do so would have led to bankruptcy. so what did we do? we balanced the budget four years in a row, the only time that's been done in the lifetime f any listener to these words. what happened? our republican colleagues took
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office, they took the house, the senate and the presidency, and they cut the price of the product. but they didn't cut the cost of the product. and what did we have? we increased the debt by $87 -- y 87% in the bush eight years. democrats instituted pay-go rules to pay for what we buy. and they worked. and we balanced the budget. republicans came into the majority and scrapped those rules. now we're mired in growing deficit. the c.b.o. baseline, congressional budget office, nonpartisan, released on monday shows can thank accounting for republican policies -- shows that accounting for republican policies passed since trump took office, just a few months ago, the deficit will reach, this year, -- do you have two additional minutes? mr. raskin: we can give you an extra minute. mr. hoyer: this is good stuff. mr. raskin: great stuff up. get a full 60 seconds.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute more minute. mr. hoyer: since president trump took office this year, fiscal year 2018, $980 billion in deficits. next year, $1 trillion. every year thereafter, during the trump administration, another $1 trillion of debt. it will total some $14 trillion. after republicans passed their tax law, they knew they'd be on the hook for its enormous deficit price tag. so immediately they said they wanted to cut social security, medicare and medicaid. the safety net programs. this program would essentially write those cuts into the constitution. hear me. medicaid, medicare, social security, write those cuts into the constitution. this is a backdoor effort to gut the programs that help working americans get ahead. i said i rose to deride this amendment. it's a fraud, a sham. a pretense. but it's also a bad -- it's also
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bad for our country, bad for our people. i urge my colleagues, defeat this silly waste of time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from arkansas, mr. hill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas is recognized for three minutes. mr. hill: i thank the speaker, i thank the chairman of the judiciary committee for bringing this measure to the floor today. i stand in support of h. gentlemen's -- of h.j.res. 2. a straightforward, long overdue effort to have a new tool to balance the budget. something my constituents in arkansas have long talked about. when arkansans sent know washington, they demanded leadership and accountability and for me to be part of the solution to washington's top-down, one-size-fits-all approach to spending. with just over $8 trillion, mr. speaker, added in debt over the
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past eight years, my constituents continue to argue that same point they did when i was elected three years ago. that the government is too big, it tries to do too much, and there has been no serious effort, bipartisan or otherwise, to rein that spending in. today's vote is something that, like my friend from maine, a measure i co-sponsored upon arriving at the house. it's a significant step to getting our fiscal house in order and delivering the kinet kind of accountability and -- the kind of accountability and transparency that my constituents demand of their federal government. why, why now, why today? and i approach this, mr. speaker, without the cynicism of the other side or the condensation, the condemnation of this effort. because, when our debt was only $5 trillion in 1995, the senate
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and the house had a balanced budget amendment before them. and it failed to pass by a single vote in the senate. so it was a bipartisan effort to get spending under control using a balanced budget amendment. and that -- and that maybe led, mr. speaker, to the constructive comments that some have argued today about reining in spending on a bipartisan basis, as was the case in the 1990's. combined with economic growth. now with our tax cuts, we have economic growth. economic growth we haven't seen since 2005, according to the c.b.o. but the national to debt is now, because of that $ trillion increase, dshes -- -- $8 trillion increase, 76% of g.d.p. i'm now convinced this amendment is the tool necessary. because we've tried budget caps, sequester, rescissions, other caps, and we are now left with a tactic, a strategy that all of
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our states, all but one of our states use, which is some form of a balanced budget amendment. which is why i come here, mr. speaker, to support this effort. it starts that conversation that was as constructive as i hope in the 1990's. that we have a national discussion about spending priorities in this government and how we can return our budget to long-term fiscal health. how we can prioritize the only 30% of the budget that we debate on this house floor. discretionary spending. and have long-term strategies for 2/3 of our spending, our mandatory spending. we want a bright future for our children and grandchildren. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. hill: and i yield back the balance of my time and urge a yes vote. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. raskin: mr. speaker, i yield to ms. kaptur of ohio for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from ohio is ecognized for two minutes.
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ms. kaptur: i thank the ranking member for yielding. this phony balanced budget amendment is an old, sad, republican rerun. the only real answer to deficits is responsible budgets. america doesn't need this phony constitutional amendment meant to cover up presidents and congressional republicans' failure to produce a balanced budget even for one year when they hold all the reigns of power. if the republicans cared about the national debt they wouldn't have pass thared tax giveaway last year that will add more than $1.8 trillion over the next decade. hoa, $1. trillion more, debt held by the public will approach 20% of economic product by 2028. it reminds me of president trump being in the casino business and bankrupting them.
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our country hasn't seen this level of debt since just after world war ii when the debt to g.d.p. ratio hit an all-time high. that's 1946. this is 2018. couple that with the ballooning u.s. trade deficit which represents the gap between foreign imparts versus u.s. exports. now reaching over half a trillion dollars every year in the red. half of that coming with unfair trade with china. if this croce i pattern of financial abandon and foreign borrowing continues, at some point in the future foreign interests will view america's financial subservience to them as a strategic victory. sadly the republican pattern of tax giveaways to the rich while racking up huge federal deficits is not new. the mammoth deficits remind me of republican ronald reagan's gaping deficit which is democrat ill clinton had to rein in the
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1990's. then president bush, post september 11, pulled america into unending wars and never paid those bills. when the terrible financial crash of 2008 hit from that republican abandoned, americans paid an enormous price for that and our economy was finally pulled out with the rigor of president obama and democrats in this congress. the balanced budget amendment is a ridiculous sham. it is a transparent attempt and a very thin cover for republicans to protect themselves during the mid term coming election the republican party is the party of red ink and i can guarantee you the american people deserve better and that change is coming. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. goodlatte: at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from washington, mr. newhouse. actually, three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman recognized for three minutes. mr. newhouse: i thank the
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gentleman from virginia for yielding me time today. i rise in strong support of the balanced budget amendment offered by my friend and colleague, congressman goodlatte. reining in the federal debt is not a partisan issue. the majority of americans are united in consistently supporting a requirement to balance the federal budget. our national debt has surpassed a record $22 trillion. you've heard that several times today. that's more than $64,000 for every man, woman, and child in this clint. it's more than $174,000 of debt for every u.s. taxpayer. if we continue to let this number grow, we will continue to dig a deeper hole for our children and our grandchildren. since i came to congress in 2015, i've worked to ensure the government does not spend above its means. i've co-sponsored several resolutions in support of an amendment to the u.s. constitution to balance the budget and am proud pob an original co-sponsor of this legislation that we consider
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today. in the 114th congress my colleagues and i offered an amendment to the debt management and fiscal responsibility act requiring the secretary of the treasury to appear before congress and submit a report with solutions to control the national debt before raising the debt ceiling. i have also consistently voiced my strong concerns with fiscally irresponsible spending packages, as i did earlier this year with the deal to bust our budget caps and send our nation further into debt. mr. speaker, we are on a high speed train heading toward a very large fiscal cliff and soon it may be too late to slow this train down. this insurmountable debt threatens our nation's economic and national security as well as future generations. the people of this country and of washington state's fourth congressional district demand better and expect their representatives to promote fiscal responsibility. other 20 years ago when the federal deficit was at $5
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billion, excuse me, $5 trillion a balanced budget amendment failed by a single vote in the u.s. senate. it's time to put a stop to the federal government's out of control spending and use our authority in congress to prioritize spending. this balanced budget amendment to the u.s. constitution is a great step in the right direction. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. once again the gentleman from maryland is recognized. mr. raskin: i yield to the gentleman from connecticut, mr. larson if two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. larson: i thank the gentleman. what a profiles in lack of courage this is today. exhibited in the house of representatives. but it does give us an opportunity, however limited the ime is, to expose a lot of the myths like this notion that the other side continues to perpetuate that social security
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and medicare are entitlements. newsflash. it's the insurance that the american people have paid for. newsflash. 10,000, 10,000 baby boomers a day become eligible for social security. newsflash. the average woman in this country, when they retire, gets $14,000 annually from social security. and for more than half of them, that's all they have to live on. and yet these bastions of courage on the other side would like to cut these programs. not by coming to the floor of the house of representatives and having a vote on it. not by having a discussion in a
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committee or even the semblance of a hearing. but somehow as mr. neal said, with a mask on, decide that you're going to introduce an amendment where they'll never, ever have to vote on what their constituents actually have to face day in and day out. these are american citizens who have paid through an insurance program, not an entitlement. it's called fica. the federal insurance contribution act. whose contribution? the american people's contribution. if you want to vote to take it away, have the courage to bring up a bill and vote on it. how about we increase the benefits for the people of this country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expire. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: at this time it's
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my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from nebraska, mr. bacon. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. bacon: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of h.j.res. 2 which proposes a balanced budget amendment ott constitution of the united states and i'm proud to be a co-sponsor. for too long the united states government has overdrawn its checking account and we must sfop stop or we're going to leave our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren saddled with debt. in nebraska we balance our budget and have cash reserve on hand of around $500 billion. this is the nebraska way and we need to make it the federal way. this has resulted in nebraska being ranked sixth for best fiscal condition in the nation. we need to force balances of the federal budget. what nebraska does so can we with our budget.
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there are some safeguard event -- measures in the event spending needs to exceed revenue. a requirement for a three fifths vote for both chambers would be required to raise the debt ceil bug congress can waive that for any fiscal year the country is engaged in a cop flict that is an imminent threat to national security and is declared in both bodies. if i can balance my checkbook at home high why can't the united states? if the state of february can balance their budge and have a cash reserve, why can't the united states? i urge my colleagues to vote yes on h.j.res. 2 and put our great nation on the path to debt recory. i yield back the remainder of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. raskin: i yield to mr. crowley for three minutes. mr. crowley: i'm hearing a lot from my friends on the other
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side of the aisle about soul searching. now that they passed a $2 trillion plus tax plan, my republican colleagues say they're doing some soul searching. particularly my friends on the ways and means committee. you know when you search in your soul you may think you've done a moral wrong. so today, they're making an atempt at repentance. they've spent hours railing against the dangers of our country's debt, casting a dim picture if truth be told. what they forget to say or perhaps are choosing not to remember is their out of control spending that got us to where we are now in the first place. it was just, i'll remind my colleagues, just 112 days ago they passed a $2 trillion tax scam. the tax scam we know is bankrupting america and our middle class. i say bankrupting because now three months later, their real target is coming into focus.
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if republicans really cared about our nation's debt and our deficits, they wouldn't have spent $2 trillion on a massive giveaway to corporations and the wealthiest 1%. no, the republican tax scam was just the opening salvo to undo the critical programs americans have worked hard to earn. social security and medicare. that's what today's vote is actually all about. they want to enshrine in our constitution their long sought goal to gut the benefits working people have earned under the guise of balancing our budget. mr. speaker, the american people have seen this ruse before. they didn't fall for it then and won't fall for it now. if this so-called balanced budget amendment passed, social security and medicare would be restricted from paying benefits to those who have earned them. not because they wouldn't have the money to do so but simply
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because it would be unconstitutional if this were to become law. but i'll tell you this, we won't stand for the misdirection. this isn't about soul searching. this isn't about deficits. this is about cutting social security. this is about cutting medicaid. this is about cutting medicare. this is about balancing our books and the expense of seniors, children, working americans, when they just gave out lavish gifts to the wealthiest corporation in the history of mankind and the mega rich and it's shameful. these programs have worked well for decades. these programs are the reason the majority of seniors today don't die in poverty. and sick kids can see a doctor. and that families stay healthy so parents can work. don't get me wrong. we should be cautious about what the government is spending. but the republican soul
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searching that's happening across the aisle is a little too much for me. it's not as if our republicans didn't know how much their tax scam would cost the american people. they knew, they simply didn't care. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. forgetson. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for three minutes. mr. ferguson: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to urge all my colleagues to join me in supporting the balanced budget amendment. this much-needed constitutional amendment would finally hold washington accountable to the same standards that every family, every american family faces and that is a balanced budget. i stand here in awe today listening to my colleagues from the other side of the aisle stand here and lecture about fiscal responsibility. the gentleman from maryland, the minority leader, stood in the well and said if you want to balance a budget, just do it. the house budget committee did it. and you know what?
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the number of democrats that voted for it, could stand on this desk in a thimble. there weren't any. when it comes to time for fiscal responsibility and having an honest conversation about the meaningful safety net programs that our nation dependsen and values, we don't need the harsh rhetoric down there every single republican and democrat should have an honest conversation about the future of those programs and where we are and shame on the other side for using it as a scare tactic. without a balanced budget amendment this body has proven since 1974 that only four times has it had the foresight and the political courage to balance -- to put forth a budget and pass appropriations bills. and it's only balanced in just a few of those. enough of the rhetoric. it is time to come come to the table and have the discussions. if you want to balance the budget, join with us. don't accuse us of not doing it.
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your vote shows you did it. enough is enough. it is time to have an honest conversation and if those programs are so important then we as a nation need to decide how we're going to pay for those and we do know that they are. we can no longer stand here and have the kind of rhetoric and kind of misinformation that is being spewed out by the other side. it is time to take our fiscal responsibility serious, pass a balanced budget amendment, because without it, this nation has been able to hide behind debt and we have hidden the real cost and real pain from the american people and enough is enough. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. raskin: i yield two minutes and 30 seconds to mr. takano of california. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. takano: i thank the gentleman from maryland for yielding. i rise in strong opposition to this legislation. after passing nearly a $2
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trillion tax cut that gives 83% of the benefits to the wealthiest 1%, it is both shockingly hypocritical and morally indefensible to propose a balanced budget amendment that would force dramatic cuts to the programs that support america's veterans. in the wake of the g.o.p.'s corporate tax cuts, balancing the budget every year would likely require cuts to the veterans' health administration, which serves nine million veterans every year. or cuts to the g.i. bill, which is a key recruiting tool to ensure military readiness. or cuts to benefits for disabled veterans who are injured in combat. or cuts to pensions that veterans earn through their service. or cuts to our national cemeteries which ensure veterans are laid to rest with the dignity they deserve. this legislation would undoubtedly require cuts to medicaid, which serves 1.75
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million veterans and it would prevent us from expanding existing programs like caregiver benefits for veterans of all generations. all of this would happen while the wealthiest people in this country enjoy a tax cut that they did not need. mr. speaker, when it comes to our priorities, veterans belong in the front of the line, and corporations belong in the back. the majority believes that we can afford a corporate tax cut that costs $1.3 trillion, but yet we cannot afford to extend caregiver benefits to every veteran, which would only cost $4 billion. this vote is indeed about a country headed toward bankruptcy. but it is not so much financial bankruptcy as it is moral bankruptcy. i strongly urge my colleagues to reject this amendment and i yield back the balance of my
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time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from arizona, mr. biggs, a member of the judiciary committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize for three minutes. mr. biggs: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the chairman for his work this bill, bringing it forward, as well as his graciousness for letting me speak today. i will say that what i'm hearing from the other side leaves me -- my head spinning. i hear yammering. but i constantly wonder, did they bother to read this particular balanced budget amendment? the struggle i have with this balanced budget amendment is not what they say. they say this is going to go to -- directly to spending reductions. the issue for me is when i look at it i see that we make it easier to raise taxes. that's what we make it easier to do. 51% vote. when i see it, we make it easier to spend like we did in the omnibus, the bipartisan omnibus
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bill, because that only requires 3/5 votes to set aside the balanced budget restraints by this amendment. that gives me concern. because 61% of the vote in the house would have exceeded that. just a couple weeks ago. with the omnibus bill. and the senate, it was by more than 60%. so that's a bit problematic for me. additionally, and i'll make one last point here before i continue on to the previous point, is that we are going to see seven years, roughly, for the ratification process and then another five years after that before this actually is enacted. that's 12 years. that means that we're going to have probably around a $30 trillion national debt by then. now, my friends on the other side who are using scare tactics and saying this is going to cause this cut here, this cut program there they don't know that. they're making assertions to do
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what david horowitz calls inspire through fear. and that's what we're seeing here. i don't think -- i think this bill could be better. significantly better. but i also think that rhetoric does not do this body or the american people good when we're discussing something of this magnitude. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. raskin: i'm yielding two minutes to mr. kind of ohio. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. kind: i thank my friend from maryland for yielding me this time. mr. speaker, this is truly embarrassing. i don't even think "saturday night live" could come up with a skit of this nature. here we are today debating a constitutional amendment to balance the budget on the heels of one of the most fiscally reckless tax cuts in our nation's heftry. which the congressional budget office just -- history. which the congress aal budget office just estimated -- congressional budget office just estimated will increase our
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debt. 83% of the benefit going to the wealthiest 1%. what relief is being delivered to working families disappears in five years. also on the heels of a two-year budget that exceeds the current spending caps by over $300 billion. now, don't take my word for it. consider what republican senator bob corker recently said, who was the deciding vote in the senate on that tax cut. and i quote, if it ends up costing what has been laid out here, it could well be the worst votes i've made. none of us have covered ourselves in glory. this congress and this administration likely will go down as one of the most fiscally irresponsible administrations and congresses that we've seen, end quote, republican senator bob corker. i've supported the balanced budget amendment in the past. but i've done it primarily as a check against reckless republican spending. because history has shown that it's typically during republican administrations, when budget deficits explode, and during democratic administrations when they come down.
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but why are we making this so difficult on ourselves? we don't need a constitutional amendment. we need to get back to budget rules that we know work. pay as you go budgeting worked. we had it in place in the 1990's during the clinton administration. and it led to us four years of budget surpluses, we were paying down the national debt. we had pay as you go budgeting in the early years of the obama administration. when he inherited a $1.5 trillion budget deficit from the previous administration. and by the time president obama left office, that was re-- that was reduced by over 2/3. we don't need a constitutional amendment. we need political courage. we need budget rules that have shown that they worked in the past. that's what we should be discussing today. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from michigan, mr. bergman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. bergman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of a
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balanced budget amendment to our constitution. h.j.res. 2 proposes an amendment to the constitution prohibiting congress from spending more money than it takes in every year. at a time when our national debt is over $20 trillion, and our yearly deficits run in the hundreds of billions of dollars, now, now, now is the time for action. i came to congress to make sure that we're leaving a better world for our kids and for our grandkids. for all our kids and all our grandkids. and do so means controlling federal spending. our national debt is one of the greatest security threats and it's time to show our constituents and the rest of the world that we are serious about getting our budget under control. we can't ignore this problem anymore and the only way we're
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going to accomplish anything is if we all feel as though we have real skin in the game. every individual and business in michigan's first district has to live within their financial means. there's absolutely no reason that the federal government should be an exception to that rule. this constitutional amendment would require congress do just that. live within our means. i urge my colleagues to support this amendment, this much overdue legislation, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. raskin: thank you. i'm yielding two minutes to representative there delauro of connecticut -- to representative delauro of connecticut. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for two minutes. ms. delauro: mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to this budget amendment.
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the majority forced through their $2.3 trillion tax cut for corporations and the wealthiest americans, they did not give a second thought to the deficit. 83% by the way of the cuts went to the top 1%. the richest families in the country, the richest corporations. including president trump. now the majority wants our children. they want seniors. they want working families, middle class families to cover the cost. this amendment would likely decimate social security, medicare, medicaid, education, funds for rebuilding american infrastructure, veterans' pensions, and, yes, the supplemental nutrition assistance program. and according to the center on budget and policy priorities, by 2028, this amendment could trigger cuts of up to $1.7 trillion to medicare and $2.6 trillion to social security.
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the association for the advancement of retired persons, aarp, has said of this amendment, and i quote, the lack of a dependable social security and medicare benefit would be devastating for millions of americans. this amendment would endanger our economy. it would starve the government of revenues. it ties congress' hands in a national or economic crisis. center on budget and policy priorities said this amendment would, and i quote, make recessions longer and deeper by forcing spending cuts or tax increases when the economy is weak. over 270 service, health, child welfare, labor, environmental, good government organizations, paralyzed veterans of america, afl-cio, the n.e.a., the narkse oppose this measure. we need -- naacp, oppose this measure. we need to oppose it. with this amendment president trump and my colleagues in the minority want -- majority want to leave families and workers holding the bag for their $2.3
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trillion gift, the tax cut was a gift to corporations and the richest americans. it is a mistaken policy and a cynical gimmick. it is a coverup for completely ignoring the budget-busting that they were engaged -- with the tax bill. this amendment is bad for workers, bad for families, bad for our nation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. delauro: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia -- the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: may i inquire how much time is remaining op each side? -- on each side? at this time, mr. speaker, i am pleased to yield four minutes to the gentlewoman from tennessee, mrs. black. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognize -- the gentlewoman is recognized for four minutes. mrs. black: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, fiscal conservatism means cutting spending where possible and in turn spending
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responsibly. yes, it is a balance. in our homes we have to do it, in our businesses we have to do it. when the economy goes down you don't spend as much in your business or your home. so you have to be balanced and responsible. today's vote is timely. the c.b.o.'s record, recent record, excuse me, the c.b.o.'s recent report confirmed what many of us already know. washington has a spending problem. the budget deficit will near $1 trillion next year and trillions more are projected indefinitely. only a decade ago the federal debt held by the public was 39% of g.d.p. let me say that again. it was only 39% of g.d.p. maybe even too much at that time. but today it's 75%. and it's expecteded to surpass 96% over the next decade.
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anybody think that that's sustainable? at what point does the debt become so severe that we stall our economic growth? maybe we cannot answer that question today. but we all know that point looms on the horizon when we must answer that question. if we don't act, we or our children or perhaps in my case even our grandchildren are going to find out the hard way. the burden of our borrowing is going to fall on our future generations, hurting their ability to flourish. i wonder how many of us want to look our children or our grandchildren or maybe in some cases our great-grandchildren in the eye and say, we weren't responsible enough to do that, we're going to leave that burden to you. i could not in good faith support the recent budget cap agreement. nor could i support the most recent omnibus bill. in fact, i voted for the cut,
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cap and balance act during my first year in congress which would have capped future spebleding based on the g.t. -- spending based on the g.d.p. and i'm very proud of that vote. that same year i supported the budget control act, which reined in the years of highland level discretionary spending. some of my -- high-level discretionary spending. some of my colleagues across the aisle are trying to use this bill to attack the tax cuts but tax cuts are not the problem. our economy needed a jolt and that's what we did. in fact, let's just look back a couple of years at what our economic growth was. didn't even make it out of 2%. many quarters we were down at 1.5%. we're up at 3% now. is that not something that's worth jolting the economy for? we're where jobs are being created, that just -- where jobs are being created, that didn't just happen out of the horizon, that's because of tax cuts that we see jobs being created and by the way, people are having more money in their pocket as a result of that.
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whether he continue to see economic growth from our tax cuts -- we will continue to see economic growth from our tax cuts for years to come. i was with a group of people not long ago that were talking about how small business owner, a lady that had a pizza shop, that started out in her -- in that organization as washing dishes, serving pizza, she then bought it and you know what she's been able to do because of this tax cut? that's now bought a second business. that's what our tax cuts are doing. spending is the problem. our mandatory spending has been projected to nearly quadruple by 2040. that population is aging. our work force participation rate is stagnant. for every 1.65 employed persons in the private sector, we have one person who received welfare assistance. when people need assistance, we want to give them assistance. but work is dignity.
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mr. chairman, may i have another two minutes? mr. goodlatte: i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentlewoman. mrs. black: work is dignity, thatst what our goal should be, not having people depend on the government. when you ask people what they do, and they can tell you what they do, they're prideful. when you ask someone their name what do you do? we want everybody to be at work, not where 1.65 people in the private sector, one is receiving assistance. that's not dignity. my budget last year began this process of addressing mandatory spending and we need to build on that progress. i agree that offering a constitutional amendment should be done rarely and reluctantly. our debt burden threatens the kind of country that we leave behind for our children and grandchildren and we must end this borrow and spend cycle that has gone on for far, far too
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long. ensuring future generations have the same opportunities that we have today means making hard choices. no more delays. no more denials. i urge my colleagues to vote for this resolution and i yield back the balance of my time. sproim the gentlewoman yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr.s are cain: i recognize and yield to mr. blumenauer for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. this is a poignant moment. speaker paul ryan announces his retirement the same week that the republicans bring to the floor the so-called balanced budget amendment, which signals a surrender that republicans admit they can't budget responsibly. after the largest transfer of wealth in our nation's history with a tax bill that was so flawed, they couldn't even wisconsin having a hearing on it they literally were writing the
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bill while we were in work session in a desperate scramble for votes and special interest support. ryan leaves as his legacy a guy who on the budget committee, railed against deficits and deficit spend, leaves as his legacy trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see, year after year. they come forward with a balanced budget amendment. wait a minute. if my friends wanted to balance the budget, they could do it. they control the white house. they control the senate. they control the house. if they wanted to, there's nothing stopping them. but instead, they came forward with an omnibus bill that explodes spending further and adds to the deficit. the balanced budget amendment would put into the constitution a requirement that somebody else, eight years from now,
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balance the budget. it's a classic bait and switch situation. what a legacy for paul ryan and the republicans. they have made a shambles out of the tax code. they've made a mockery of tax fairness. they are not willing to make hard spending decisions today. they want to freeze something in the constitution that would require somebody seven, eight, 10 years from now to do what they're afraid, unwilling, or unable to do today. it's a sham. bait and switch in the classic sense. i don't think the american public is going to stand for it. and certainly no responsible member of this house should vote for it. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. raskin: i yield to mr. costa of california for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. costa: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise in support of this imperfect balanced budget amendment. let me say why. this week, the congressional budget office released the annual budget and economic outlook that estimates that the trillion dollar annual deficits will return in two years. this represents the largest deficit in six years and is 84% of increased spending over last year. today our national debt is over $21 trillion and approximately for each individual american $174,000 plus for tax -- per taxpayer. outrageous. that's simply the debt on the budget. when accounting for off-budget debt, things like unfunded pension obligations, projected spending increases and the social safety net programs, baby boomers retirement from the work is actually much greater. in order to make our budget
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sustainable, we must decrease eficits by $379,000 -- by $379 billion every year for the next 75 years. sadly, we're not even coming close to this. in fact, we're going in the opposite direction. history shows us that nations and empires that usually fail when the cost of serving their debt exceeds the cost of defending their borders. if we continue down this path, america could be spending more on the debt, interest payments than we do on our national defense within five years. however, serious as this issue is, the future of our country and future generations, no one can possibly take this vote seriously. let me tell you why. we are voting on a balanced budget amendment because my republican friends passed on a party line vote a deficit financed tax cut that will result in $2.2 trillion in additional borrowing over the next 10 year. therefore this is nothing more than a fig leaf and it's the
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height of hypocrisy. what we should be doing is voting on a balanced budget amendment that stephny murphy fewport -- put forth that protects commitments our nation has made by protecting social safety net policemans like protecting medicare and social security from cuts. but we are not allowed that choice yet we must get our fiscal house in order. i'm one of 38 members that voted for the simpson-bowles act. talk about profiles in courage. let me make an observation after being here 14 years. that is the rhetoric that we see in this debate and seen in past debates on budget deficit does not comport to the hard realities of choices we have to make. it's that simple. after 14 years in congress, it's my view that this will only happen when republicans and democrats come together to make hard choices to agree on long-term revenues that are in line with our expenditures. it's not a difficult conceptt's debate going. ultimately, h
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continue to reserve. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. raskin: i recognize mr. deutch from florida for three minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. deutch: thank you. i thank my friend from maryland. mr. speaker, according to a fox news poll from march -- march 25, 91% of voters want background checks on gun buyers. another poll from quinnipiac found that 94% of voters in gun-owning households support universal background checks. yet as the american people ask for stronger gun law the majority would rather talk about mental health instead. that's fine. want to talk about mental health? the vast majority of people with mental illness aren't violent and are more likely to be the victims of violence than the perpetrators and more than half of the americans who need mental health care don't get it. we have a mental health access crisis in this country and gun violence is only a heartbreaking
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sliver of that problem. nearly 43% of psychiatrists accept medicaid compared with 73% of other physicians. but what -- this has to do -- what does this have to do with the balanced budget amendment in? this amendment is an attempt to tie our hands, an attempt to force us to dismantle programs like social security, medicare and medicaid. it would force cutting benefits, reducing coverage, slashing payments, or all of the bf. the most vulnerable americans rely on these programs for a secure retirement, to stay healthy and to make ends meet when a bread winner is disabled dies. medicaid is the single largest payer for mental health services. meaning that forcing constitutionally required cuts on medicaid will plunge our mental health care system into further disarray. this amendment is just the latest example of mental health hypocrisy of the republican caucus. it's standard page out of the
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g.o.p. playbook when there's a mass shooting. step one, talk exclusively about mental health until people stop paying attention. step two, undercut access to mental services. i'm not going to let congress stop paying attention. i refuse to let my republican colleagues use those who immediate mental health care as excuses and scapegoats. if we can't move forward, something is rock. congress isn't representing the people. it's representing the bottom line of corporations that sell s. and if we want to amend our constitution, let's amend it to get money out of politics. let's stop gun corporations from flooding our elections with money to protect their profits. let's everturn citizen united. let's give the voices of the american people more power than wealthy special interests. democracy for all amendment. house joint resolution 31. supported by over 160 members of congress and voters across party
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lines and it would do just that. that is the constitutional amendment we should be considering today. one that will put the american people in charge of the agenda of this house. instead, we're voting again to put profits bf our health, above our safety, above our democracy. i urge my colleagues to vote no. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman. mr. goodlatte: continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland. mr. raskin: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself knive minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. raskin: our good friends across the aisle have been bristling when my colleagues point out the breathtaking budget hypocrisy being shown by the majority today. i thought instead i'd offer the comments of their fellow republicans. here's headline news, conserve ties irate over g.o.p.'s budget hypocrisy. critics chafe over balanced budget amendment vote on the
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heels of omnibus spending spree. then we get quotes from a number of members, including free dom caucus chairman mark meadows who says there's no one on capitol hill and no one on main street that will take this vote seriously. we hear from someone named barbara bowland who equated the exercise to gorging on a sumpts you feast while insisting you want a svelte physique. america knows they just drove a $2 trillion deficit hole into our budget with their gold-plated tax and spend scam and the c.b.o. now projects the deficit will reach abasounding $1 trillion in 2019 and will continue increasing annually to $1.5 trillion by 2028. that's not something the constitution made them do. that's not something the deck la rage of independence made them do or the gettiesberg address. that's something they cooked up by themselves. mr. speaker, they promised to
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drain the swamp but they just moved into the swamp and drained the treasury instead. the treasury is ransacked but the swamp is teeming with monstrous special interests devouring the commonwealth of the american people. after slashing taxes on the wealthiest corporations and individuals, they proposed cutting hundreds of billions of dollars from medicare and medicaid and social security, the programs built up by the american people with they're blad -- blood, sweat, tears and hard-earned labor. now today after giving us one of the most regressive tax plans in history, they effectively want to make it unconstitutional to spend what we need on the people's medicare and medicaid and social security. the whole idea defies a basic principle of our constitution which was enunciated by justice oliver wendell holmes in his dissent in 1905, he said, a constitution is not intended to
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embody a particular economic theory. president trump just signed a spending bill into law while complaining bitterly about it and saying he never signed a bill like that again. perhaps he shouldn't have signed it in the first place but he's got the right solution in mind, mr. speaker. show some courage. here's the bottom line. if you show political courage and wisdom, you don't need a balanced budget amendment and if you show no courage and no wisdom, then a balanced budget amendment will not save you. we have the constitutional power right now to pass completely balanced budgets. indeed, one of our recent presidents, bill clinton, saw to it we posted not just balanced budgets but big surpluses in 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001. all of it done without a constitutional amendment. mr. speaker, mr. speaker, if this had been in place when president obama took office, with nearly 10% unemployment and g.d.p. having
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fallen 3.5% over the previous year, it would have locked the bush-era recession into place. and driven our country into a deep depression. if you have a congress that can't balance the budget, you don't need a new constitutional amendment. you need a new congress. if you have a majority that won't govern responsibly, you don't need to spray paint political graffiti all over our constitution, you need a new political program and new political vision. they burned fiscal discipline and budget planning to the ground with their tax bill. let's not throw the constitution into the bon fire too. i yield back the remainder of my time to my side. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. mr. raskin: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time the my pleasure to yield to the gentleman from georgia, mr. woodall, such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i appreciate the recognition. i want to thank my chairman for bringing this resolution to the floor. i confess i don't have the kind of speech writer working for me that my friend from maryland has working for him. he's always had the gift of pros. i come -- i come completely unarmed with clelf prose, i just have some factor on my side. and the truth, is mr. speaker, and you've been here long enough to see it, there's been a little bit of truth on both sides of the aisle. today. there's a little bit of frustration that folks say, hey, how come it's true that we're bringing up a balanced budget amendment in the days after we just passed a bill that is the largest spending bill that i've seen since i've been in the united states congress? i think that's a legitimate concern. i think it's a legitimate concern. now, i come to the other side of the aisle and folks say, it's because we just passed that spending bill that we have to talk about balanced budget amendments again. because why? the house did its work, as all my colleagues recall, the house
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zits work underneath the budget -- did its work underneath the budget caps, on time, before the end of the fiscal year, in the same fiscally responsible way that i've seen this body act over and over and over again in the seven years i've been here. then that bill went across the united states senate, where republicans don't control 60 votes, and it became a partnership bill. and the frustration that i've heard on both sides of the aisle about the level of spending in that bill happened for one reason and one reason only. because democrats voted yes and republicans voted yes and a majority of the congress acted. what this balanced budget amendment says, mr. speaker, and you know, you've read it, and if any members haven't, it's only three pages long, so it's easy to digest, it says, listen, spend as much money as you want to, for all the challenges that my friend from maryland just recognized, and they're coming again, for folks who believe economic cycles are over, i have bad news, economic cycles are still in effect the laws of the
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economy that are still in place and we're going to have down cycles again. what this bill says is, if you want to buy something, agree to pay for it. seems fair. if you want to spend sb something in the name of helping -- spend something in the name of helping your children, pay for it out of your bank account nevada mortgaging your children's future to pay -- instead of mortgaging your children's future to pay for. it i think that seems fair. mr. speaker, you know how culture is. culture is hard to chavenlgt for first 200 years of our republic, the men and women who ran this chamber, republicans, democrats, they didn't borrow against the nation's credit card except in times of war. as you know, it's only at the end of world war ii where we saw levels of debt at the size that they are today. but something's happened culturally, in my lifetime, where we decided that the responsible thing to do was to spend but not tax. that's not the responsible thing to do. it's not a responsible liberal thing to do. it's not a responsible conservative thing to do. now, mr. speaker, you've heard over and over again talk about
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the big tax cut that happened last year for america. i'm glad that happened for america. i'm seeing bonuses in paychecks in my constituency back home. i'm seeing new businesses open. i'm going to more ribbon cuttings. i see excitement and optimism on main street in ways i haven't seen it in years. i'm excited about that. and to my friend from maryland's point, that's what he referenced in in the clinton administration -- referenced in the clinton administration. in the 1990's we didn't cut a penny in spending. congress spent more and more and more and more but america was enjoying such a great economic boom, all that money folks were making, turns out you can't pay your income taxes if you're not making an income. folks were making more money, they were sending more money to the federal government. that's how the budget came to balance. mr. speaker, over the next 10 years, after the tax cut, after the tax cut, c.b.o. has just projected tax revenues are going to increase -- are going to increase by more than 60%.
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i i'll say that again -- i'll say that again. for folks who want to do more in america, tax revenues are going to increase by 60%. the only way then we'll run a budget deficit is if folks want to spend even more than 60% more than we're spending today. and guess what, mr. speaker, they do. nobody likes to be lectured in this institution. certainly not by folks that they don't believe have credibility on the issue. and we've heard the word hypocritical time and time again on the floor, mr. speaker. i'm sorry that's true. but my friends on the democratic side of the aisle remember our budget process. what i love about the budget committee, my friend, ms. jy bawl pal, we serve -- ms. jayapal, we serve there together. we have opportunities to talk. we shed a whole lot more heat and a lot less light than either one of us would like on that committee. but when we had an opportunity to bring all of our ideas to the floor of the house, every single
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democratic plan for federal spending raised taxes by trillions and reached balanced budgets never in the 10-year window. that's just a fact. and it's ok because we're talking about priorities and where we invest our money and folks prioritized investments over a balanced budget. that's fair. now on the republican side of the aisle, every single budget that came to the floor cut taxes and balanced budgets. within a 10-year window. that reflects our priorities. we believe in balanced budgets. we believe in cutting taxes. on the other side of the aisle, folks believe in investments. they believe in borrowing today so we can get greater returns tomorrow. those are perfectly legitimate conversations to have. but, mr. speaker, my frustration is this. what my friend, the chairman of the judiciary committee, has brought before us today is a simple resolution that says, put
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out your best ideas and let the best idea win. but do not, do not, do not mortgage your children's future because you lack the courage today to pay for it. we just increased spending on n.i.h. by $3 billion, mr. speaker. $3 billion. we're going to do amazing things together as a nation, things that are going to make every american family proud. cures for diabetes, for parkinson's, for alzheimer's. we're going to move the needle for generations to come. we did that together. we both agreed that was an investment that was worth making. but we're $21 trillion in the hole, mr. speaker. there are a bundle of ideas that we can use together to attack that challenge. this is but one and it's the one we have before us today. i would just ask my colleagues, recognize that there's more that unites us in our drive and desire to do what's best for the american people than that divides us. recognize that we all want
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what's best for america. if you don't believe in balanced budgets, fair enough. but let's not deride the judiciary committee, which has been working on this issue not for a day, not for a week, not for a month, for years, this isn't the first time we've had this conversation. we missed it by one vote during the clinton era. this is something that can bring america together and not divide america. i know this, if we do not come together, mr. speaker, come together with the votes required for a constitutional amendment, come together for the votes required to make a courageous change in the direction of federal spending, it will be to all of our detriments and sadly not just our detriments, but to the detriments of our children and our grandchildren aps well. i believe we have a chame -- as well. i believe we have a chamber full of men and women who want to do the right thing for the right reasons, mr. speaker. this is a great way to start today. i thank the chairman for yielding me the time and providing the leadership to make this resolution available. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. without objection, the
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gentlewoman from washington, ms. jayapal, will control the time for the minority. the chair now recognizes the gentlewoman from washington. ms. jayapal: thank you, mr. chairman. i now yield four minutes to my very good friend from rhode island, representative cicilline. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for four minutes. mr. cicilline: thank you. i thank the gentlelady for yielding. i ridse in strong opposition -- i rise in strong opposition to house joint resolution 2 which would force deep cuts to social security, medicare and medicaid under a so-called balanced budget amendment. like the republican tax bill, this amendment is another scam that will hurt american families and the american economy. of course i support balancing our budget and fiscal responsibility. but it's impossible to take this proposal seriously after the republicans just gave away trillions of dollars in tax cuts to the most profitable corporations and the wealthiest americans without paying for them. i've been listening to speaker after speaker lecture us about the importance of fiscal responsibility. about the future of their children. what a joke.
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this is the same party that added $2 trillion to the deficit , the largest contribution to the deficit by a single act of congress in our history. and they have the audacity to talk about fiscal responsibility? let's be clear, mr. speaker, about what's really happening here. what this is really about. my colleagues on the other side of the aisle are using this amendment to lay the groundwork and to cover up their plans to cut social security, medicare and medicaid. they plan to balance the budget on the backs of middle class families and seniors. and then they'll say, we have no choice. it's the balanced budget law that requires us to do this. the american people can see right through this. mr. speaker, the american people look to congress to protect the interests of all americans. and not the privileged few and the well connected. but once again we see our republican friends, they're saying one thing and doing another. they're trying to lecture us about fiscal responsibility, just a few weeks after they blow up the deficit to pass tax cuts
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for the top 1%. this is the kind of political double talk that drives people crazy. it's the kind of stuff people hate about washington. they don't expect their representatives to give huge tax cuts to the wealthiest 1%, and then pay for them by underfunding crucial programs that millions of middle class families rely on. but this is exactly what will happen if house resolution 2 becomes law. republicans are hoping to fool their constituents into thinking they're serious about fiscal responsibility. but all this amendment does is expose their shameless hypocrisy. they're hoping that we all have short memories and that we forgot that just a short time ago they ran through the g.o.p. tax scam which resulted in a huge deficit spike. remember, these are the same folks who told us, oh, tax cuts for rich people, they pay for themselves. of course we know that's not true. we said it then, we say it now.
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and we certainly know the congressional budget office has proved that in their recent report that concludes that this tax bill will add nearly $2 trillion to the debt over the next 10 years and that the deficit will jump to $1 trillion by 2020. it's hard to take today's proposal -- proposed legislation seriously in light of this fiscal recklessness. we already know that the republican tax scam will cut trillions of dollars from medicare, medicaid, education, infrastructure investments, health care for our veterans, in order to fund a massive giveaway to billionaires and corporations. it turns out that the republican tax scam was part one. part two is to gut the social safety net and crucial programs for working families and the earned benefits for seniors. given the federal deficits that are projected in the coming years, the mandate under this amendment would result in an unthinkable reduction in spending on critical government programs. no program would be safe. it would require cuts to national security, the military,
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health care, environmental protections and medical research. it would require stealing money from bedrock social safety programs like medicare, medicaid, social security, food stamps, disability insurance and veterans' pensions. the center for american progress estimates that this amendment -- if this amendment were ratified this year, it would require cutting the government budget by nearly 1/4 in 2023. one more minute? ms. jayapal: i yield the gentleman another 30 seconds. mr. cicilline: thank you. it would slash social security by $308 billion, medicare by $239 billion, and medicaid by $114 billion in one year alone. mr. speaker, if republicans are truly concerned about rediesing the deficit, they -- reducing the deficit, they should start with repealing the tax bill that adds trillions of dollars to the deficit. congress cannot pass this legislation which is a direct threat to the health and safety of all americans and will decimate social safety net programs for veterans, retirees and children.
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i urge my colleagues to vote no and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. . mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from nebraska, mr. smith. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. smith: thank you. i appreciate the time and i certainly appreciate the chairman's long-term commitment to the issue of a balanced budget. mr. speaker, i rise in support of this resolution, providing states the opportunity to add a balanced budget amendment to our constitution. let me also say amending our constitution is something we should never take lightly. when drafting our foundational document, our founders intended it to provide not just the outline of our federal government but also to restrict the powers of each branch through a system of strong checks and balances. we must also understand this amendment, if ratified, is one part of addressing our fiscal
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situation. we must look at spending, reducing spending, reforming entitlements for the future, and encouraging the economic growth and opportunity needed to eliminate our deficits in the short term and certainly pay down our debt in the long term. this is a vital, very vital first step, mr. speaker, in getting our nation on better fiscal footing, but we have a long road ahead. i urge support for this resolution, and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from washington. ms. jayapal: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent to enter into the record a list of over 270 organizations opposed to the balanced budget amendment. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. jayapal: thank you. and i now yield five minutes to my good friend, representative stephanie murphy from florida. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for five minutes. mrs. murphy: thank you, mr. speaker. when the federal government spends far more than it receives year after year, it threatens the long-term stability of our economy,
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compromises our children's future, and undermines our security. amending the constitution to require a balanced budget is a serious step, but one that's become appropriate. that is because all other efforts to make congress demonstrate a reasonable degree of fiscal discipline have failed. but not all proposed balanced budget amendments, or b.b.a.'s, are created equal. the b.b.a. we are considering today, and i say this with respect to my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, is profoundly cruel and cynical. it's poorly crafted because it's excessively rigid. it doesn't allow federal lawmakers to run small deficits to help a country emerge from a recession or depression. that's bad economic policy. it is cruel because it will allow a federal court if called to enforce the b.b.a. to order cuts to social security and medicare payments, harming seniors who have earned their benefits through a lifetime of hard work.
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it's cynical because house leadership is bringing this bill to the floor after it enacted a tax law that doesn't do enough to help middle class and small businesses. and that will explode our nation's deficits and debt. in fact, in a sobering new report, the congressional budget office estimates that our annual deficit will exceed $1 trillion within two years. c.b.o. also estimates that the debt to g.d.p. ratio will approach 100% within a decade, a dangerous figure not witnessed since the immediate aftermath of world war ii. it's hard to avoid the conclusion that this b.b.a. is a superficial exercise in political messaging rather than a serious effort to address a real problem. this is a real shame because we must tackle this problem, not as democrats or republicans, but as patriotic americans concerned about the future of the country we love. that is why last june i filed my own b.b.a. which has been endorsed by the blue dog coalition. i believe my bill is a far better approach to the problem
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than the bill we are considering today. my bill generally prohibits the federal government from spending more than it receives in a fiscal year but it does not dictate how lawmakers should bring receipts and outlays into balance. we must examine the problem in a holistic manner and make the tough but necessary choices our constituents elected us to make. my bill contains provisions to protect social security and medicare. unlike the bill before us, it would not balance the budget on the backs of those who build our economy. and my bill recognizes that there are times when running a deficit is necessary or sensible. like when our nation is engaged in a military conflict or mired in economic slump. therefore, the bill authorizes an exception to the balanced budget requirement when congress declares war, when g.d.p. does not grow for two consecutive quarters or when unemployed exceeds 7% for two straight months. in addition, a supermajority of the house and senate may vote to authorize outlays to exceed receipts and other circumstances.
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in short, the goal is not to make annual deficits impossible but to make it harder for policymakers to sacrifice the long-term stability of our economy for the sake of short-term gain. if the federal government is going to spend more than it receives, that decision should be taken in a deliberate and bipartisan fashion and not merely because it is politically expedient. my broader goal in filing a b.b.a. is to spur an honest conversation in congress. in my central florida district and around the country about the consequences for both our economy and our national security of piling deficit upon deficit. it is clear our country must change course. we still have time to act. the question is, do we have the courage to act? thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from florida yields back. the gentlelady from washington reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield five minutes to the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from alabama is recognized for five minutes. mr. brooks: thank you.
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i'd like to reiterate some of the comments of others here and make it very clear. we have been warned over the years in writing by the congressional budget office, by the government accountability office, and by the comptroller general of the united states that our current financial path is unsustainable. in accounting language, that means insolvency and bankruptcy. back in 2015 by way of example, we as house republicans had been able to successfully reduce america's annual deficits from the peak of $1.4 trillion under the obama administration in the 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 time frame to $248 billion in 2015. however, beginning in 2015, washington took a wrong turn. in 2016, the deficit increased to approximately $585 billion. in 2017, the deficit increased approximately $666 billion.
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congressional budget office said we are almost $1 oughly trillion. every year thereafter $1 trillion or more, hastening the day that united states of america suffers from a debilitating, a dangerous insolvency and bankruptcy. hence, it is very important that we become masters of our own faith. it is very important that we do not become the debtor as warned in proverbs 22:7 that becomes a slave to the creditor who becomes the master. in that vain, let's be clear about who one of our masters is, one of our secretors, china. $1.2 trillion. perhaps the long term will be a geopolitical friend but there's also a chance they will be a geopolitical foe. do we really want them to have control over our fate as a
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country? and let's be clear about the situation that we're in right now. right now if the congressional budget office's projection of $800 billion is accurate, if in fact we are going to spend roughly $1.3 trillion in our discretionary budget that we just got passing a few days ago, in my judgment irresponsibly, but that's in the past, it happened, if that's the case, if our creditors tomorrow were to simply cut us off, to say we are not going to lone you more money, which they have -- loan you more money, which they have every right to do, and that $800 billion shortfall out of $1.3 trillion, you are looking at roughly $400 billion cut to national defense. that would be their share of an $800 billion proration out of $1.3 trillion. that puts national security at risk. so it's important that we have a balanced budget constitutional amendment that forces washington, d.c., to act like every family has to act,
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to act like every city, county, and state government has to act, to act like every business has to act, and that's to act within our financial means, act within our financial resources. that having been said, i am inclined to vote for this balance the budget constitutional amendment but i have serious reservations if it's ineffectsive and somewhat hallow. i think it needs to be stronger and i urge the senate to make it stronger if it passes this body and gets to the senate. here are the three problem areas. section 2. the limit on the debt in the united states held by the public shall not be increased unless 3/5 of the whole number of each house shall provide by law for such an increase by a roll call vote. ladies and gentlemen of this body, 3/5 doesn't need to cut it. it needs to be 3/4 or 4/5. something substantial so those who understand the economic risk of national insolvency or national bankruptcy are able to
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enforce this provision and force the united states government to be financially responsible. that's one area. 4/5.ase that 3/5 to 2/3, section 235, get, the provisions of this article may be waved for any fiscal year in which the united states is engaged in military conflict which causes an imminent and serious military threat to national security and so declared by joint resolution adopted by a majority. a mere majority of the whole number of this house. so let's be clear. in virtually every year since december 7, 1941, we had a military conflict. a sharp lawyer is going to say that it involves national security which triggers a majority vote to go into deficit spending. now, what is the law now? the law in the house is 50% plus one and you can pass a spending bill. the law in the senate, though, is 60% because their filibuster rule. we're moving that 60% threshold
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down to 50% thereby making it easier, easier to pass a deficit written bill. finally -- mr. goodlatte: i am pleased to yield an additional minute to the gentleman from alabama. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from alabama is recognized. mr. brooks: finally, this legislation has no express enforcement provision. what good is it to have a balanced budget constitutional amendment if there is no enforcement mechanism? i as a united states congressman or any of my colleagues, 434 congressmen, united states senator, jane voter, joe voter, they are not given the power under this constitutional amendment to enforce its terms. so i would urge the senate, then, to change three aspects of this. number one, increase that 60% to 2/3, 3/4, 4/5. number two, make sure we adjust the problem of a majority vote whenever there is a military conflict which the united states seems to be per putually be in -- perptually be in.
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and make sure this is not a hallow shell of a constitution. it will prevent the debilitating insolvency that took our ancestors centuries to build. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentlelady from washington is recognized. ms. jayapal: how much time remains on each side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from washington has 11 minutes remaining, and the gentleman from virginia has 26 minutes. ms. jayapal: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. jayapal: thank you. mr. speaker, i would like to ask unanimous consent to enter into the record two letters. one from ask me and one from aarp. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. jayapal: thank you, mr. speaker. let me read this -- a couple perhaps from this letter from ask me. the proposed constitutional amendment is a draconian and unwise proposal that would damage the economy, result in huge job losses and weaken
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vital public services that all americans depend on. it unwisely requires outlays to match receipts each year, regardless of economic conditions. a supermajority of 3/5 to increase the debt ceiling. only in times of war but not during recessions or disasters. this is a false attempt to claim fiscal responsibility on the heels of a reckless tax cut projected to cause the deficit to skyrocket to $1.9 trillion over the next decade. mr. speaker, let me read from the aarp letter. this is as we know aarp, the largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering americans over 50 and -- on how they choose to live as they age. here's what they had to say. a balanced budget amendment would likely harm social security and medicare, subjecting both programs to potentially deep cuts without regard to the impact on the
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health and financial security of individuals. it would also likely diminish the resources available for programs assisting americans who are least able to provide for themselves. services such as meals or healing for those who are too poor or physically unable to take care of their basic needs without some support. mr. speaker, the letter goes on to say, the lack of a dependable social security and medicare benefit would be devastating for millions of americans. social security is currently the principal source of income for half of older american households receiving benefits and roughly one in five households depend on social security benefits for nearly all of their income. over 50 million americans depend on medicare. half of whom have incomes less than $24,000. even small fluctuations in premiums and cost sharing would have a significant impact on the personal finances of older and disabled americans. . mr. speaker, i am here to say
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that we are in strong opposition to the so-called balanced budget amendment today. and there's a word that's been thrown around in this discussion and i wanted to make sure, because i care about words, i warranted to make sure i was using the -- wanted to make sure i was using the right word for what was happening so i looked in the dictionary and i looked up the wordpy pock are asy. and here's the -- hypocrisy. and here's the definition. claiming to have standards or beliefs to which one's own behavior does not conform. and the dictionary definition goes on to say, a pretense. and that, mr. speaker, is what is happening. a pretense. and so now, mr. speaker, i'd like to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, at this time i'm pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. arrington. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is
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recognized. mr. arrington: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the gentleman from virginia, our chairman, for his leadership on quite frankly two of the most important issues that we face as a nation. number one, border security. which is national security. and then our national debt, which if we ever, and we don't know when, but when it happens it will be awfully hard to put it all back together. but a sovereign debt crisis would be devastating and would be our greatest national security threat. and so i want to thank him for his leadership. mr. speaker, our great country is currently over $21 trillion in debt. and if we don't address this looming crisis, our children will not inherit the exceptional nation that we as americans have known for generations. this is the most important issue, i think, of our day. this is my generation's greatest challenge. one of the main reasons the american people are so frustrated and have lost
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confidence in congress is because we play by different set of rules -- by a different set of rules. and nowhere is that disconnect more prominently on display than how we fund our government. no one gets to spend money they don't have on things they don't need. no one has a money tree growing in their backyard. except apparently the united states treasury. a day of reckoning is coming. and once the sovereign debt crisis begins, we won't be able stop it. and the dark days of high taxes and high unemployment will descend upon the next generation of americans. history has prove a few things. and one of them is that congress will only limit its appetite for spending and responsibly manage its fiscal affairs when forced to do so. so the only solution that i see to this potentially devastating problem is to force congress to do what it collectively doesn't have the will to do.
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that's why i support a balanced budget amendment. get equires congress to, this, not spend more money than it receives. not to spend more money than it receives. -- than it gets in revenue. the american people have to prioritize, to live within their means. mr. speaker, their government ought to do the same. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlelady from washington is recognized. yea jay mr. speaker, i'm -- ms. jayapal: mr. speaker, i'm prepared to close if the other side is. mr. goodlatte: i just have myself remaining to speak. so, whenever the gentlelady's prepared to close, we are too. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from washington is recognized. ms. jayapal: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself the balance of my time. mr. speaker, i mentioned the word hypocrisy and pretense. if this was such an important issue, why did it not get proposed before the g.o.p. tax scam? because if you're really worried about the deficit, then you
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would not have passed a tax scam that costs this country $1.9 trillion simply to give tax cuts to the wealthiest individuals and corporations in our country. this morning in budget committee, where i serve as vice ranking member, the congressional budget office director reaffirmed what we always knew. that these tax cuts do not pay for themselves. and he also told us that there's no such thing as sustained growth of the rates that our republican colleagues have thrown out there and said are going to happen. so if you're worried about a balanced budget, you should have voted no on the g.o.p. tax scam. but that's not what my republican colleagues did. and if you were worried about a balanced budget, then republican colleagues should not have insisted on a $670 billion military spending budget, but we didn't hear a peep about this then. you can't just oppose spending, mr. speaker, when you don't like the things that we're spending on. and by the way, i have some
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breaking news. republicans control the house, the senate and the presidency. republicans have control. but as we are seeing, that does not mean that republicans know how to govern. this amendment is a new low to showcase a contempt of the american people's memory and intelligence. but i believe that the american people are watching. they didn't buy the tax scam where they are now seeing that only 5% of those tax cuts are actually going to workers. and they're not going to believe in this maneuver either, mr. speaker. why? because as i said during the tax scam debate on the floor last year, the american people are going to rise up against any concerted and naked effort to cut earned benefit programs like medicare and social security. and i want to emphasize the word earned benefit. because people call them entitlement programs but social security is a program that people have contributed into
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with a promise that they would be taken care of when they retire. but let's talk about the real purpose of this balanced budget amendment. it's similar to what i said on the floor last year. in the middle of this debate. a three-step dance. step one, pass a g.o.p. tax scam to transfer $1.3 trillion in debt from working americans to the wealthiest 1% and largest corporations. step two, explode the deficit, exactly what we heard from the c.b.o. director today. it $2 trillion -- $2 trillion to the budget deficit over the next 10 years. step three, use those exploding deficits to justify deep cuts to the very programs that matter the most to americans. social security, medicare, medicaid. and we've already seen the strategy in the president's fiscal year 2019 budget, which slashes $500 billion from medicare, $1.4 trillion from medicaid, and $72 billion from social security disability.
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mr. speaker, it's not just the american people and democrats in congress who have noticed the hypocrisy of what's being proposed today. even some republicans in congress have talked about it. our colleague, congressman mark meadows, said, and these are his words that i'm quoting, there is no one on capitol hill and certainly no one on main street that will take this vote seriously. he's right. this isn't going to fool anyone. least of all the american people. americans deserve so much better. my friend from georgia talked earlier about how we both sit on the budget committee and we've had conversations about how we wish we could actually talk about real solutions. that doesn't happen as often as it should. and certainly if you want to have a conversation about the deficit and the debt, we should have that. but to propose a balanced budget amendment after you've already voted for a tax cut that increased the deficit by $2
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trillion over the next 10 years, that i think is something that people will see through. americans will see through that just as they saw through the -- who the benefits of the tax cut are actually going to. so, mr. speaker, today i urge all my colleagues to vote no on this amendment and let's get back to the real work of serving the american people, with real discussions, real questions that come up at the time when they are relevant. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from washington yields back the balance of his her time. the gentleman from virginia is recognize -- of her time. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, i yield myself the balance of the time. in closing, let me quote president ronald reagan. in his address to the nation on the fiscal year 1983 federal budget, he said, quote, only a constitutional amendment will do the job. with the stick of a balanced budget amendment, we can stop government squandering over taxing ways and save our
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economy, end quote. a few years later he said this in his weekly radio address, quote, one part of our founding fathers' genius was their provision for amending the constitution. they knew they created a good document, but not a perfect one. in fact, even two centuries ago some of them, especially thomas jefferson, were troubled by one omission. the lack of a limitation on public borrowing by the federal government. well, even in their reservations about the constitution, the founding fathers were perceptive and wise thifment most of you know how -- wise. i think most of you know how badly out of control federal spending has gotten in recent years. quoting president regean in 1980, today the national debt is $2.25 trillion. i'm one of those americans who has always believed a constitutional amendment mandating that congress balance the budget is the answer to what ails us, end quote. that was 30 years ago.
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today the national debt is over $20 trillion and president reagan's words ring 10 times louder as a result. i urge all my colleagues to join me in supporting this amendment and in freeing our children and grandchildren from the burden of a crippling debt they had no hand in creating. so they and their own children and generations to come can be free to chart their own futures. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support this important amendment to the united states constitution and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass house joint resolution 2. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the joint resolution is passed. ms. jayapal: mr. speaker. i request the yeas and nays.
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the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. the chair lays before the house the following communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, sir. i, norma j. torres, am submitting my resignation from the house committee on natural resources in compliance with the rules of the democratic caucus. it has been a privilege and honor to have served on this committee. if you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. signed, sincerely, norma j. torres, member of congress. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the resignation is
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ccepted. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess subject to the call of the chair.
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sproip speaker ryan: you know, we are in one of the best economic areas in year.

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