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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  May 17, 2018 12:00pm-2:01pm EDT

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>> as this hearing wraps we will let you know the entire hearing. we didn't get to show all of it to you this morning. the entire hearing will reair 10:00 on c-span2. right now on c-span we will take you to the house floor as they continue debate on the farm bill, a new set of amendments coming up. rule debate on that first. live coverage on c-span. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2018] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] chaplain, mon john zenz, holy name parish, birmingham, michigan. monsignor zenz: be true to your keep us true to your gift of life. you manifest your power by mercy and compassion. may we be true to you as stewards of your power.
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we call upon you as father. keep us true to your care for the human family. by our loving concern for the common good. as we approach memorial day, may we be true to your promise of life eternal, remembering all who have died, especially those in the service of freedom and peace. be true to your name, o, lord, and may we always be true to your name as well. amen. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, forjournal stands approved. what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, pursuant to clause 1, rule 1, i demand a vote on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the
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journal. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on geeg to the speaker's approval of the journal. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make the point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8, rule 20, further questions will be postponed. the pledge of allegiance led by our colleague, the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. gallagher. mr. gallego: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible with liberty and justice for all. -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from michigan, mr. trott, is recognized for one minute.
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mr. trott: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize the contributions of monsignor john zenz, a staple in southeast michigan, and pastor at holy named catholic church. ordained almost 40 years ago, he received a doctorate in spiritual theology in 1984 and has served at the faculty at sacred heart for over 35 years. starting as a weekend associate at my hometown parish in birmingham, michigan, he became pastor at holy named since 2008. e serves on the board of sacred heart. he's currently a chaplain to the detroit cardinal club and has extensive experience working with catholic network of detroit, ensuring god's word reaches as many homes as possible. mr. speaker, it's an honor to host monsignor zenz today and thank him for his dedication to
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southeast michigan. demonstrate the demonstrate th dedication he has done on a daily basis. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. martin: mr. speaker, message -- the messenger: mr. speaker, messages from the president of the united states. the secretary: i am directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives messages in writing. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 further requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. furred the gentleman from south carolina seek reek -- for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? will wilson: i ask unanimous consent mr. wilson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: i was grateful to lead nine of our colleagues in the house of representatives on a congressional delegation to jerusalem for the opening of the u.s. embassy with ambassador david friedman, ivanka trump and jared kushner.
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i was joined by representative mario diaz-balart of florida, ron desantis of florida, jody hice of georgia, steve knight of california, tom rice of south carolina, dennis ross of florida, scott taylor of virginia, lee zeldin of new york. i appreciate armed services committee chairman mac thornberry for authorizing the delegation. we had the opportunity to meet to the israeli parliament and especially grateful as a senior member of the house foreign with committee to meet the parliament. we must work together to stop hamas terrorist attacks, using human shields financed by iran. with president donald trump, the alliance has never been stronger to protect american families. in conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from the virgin slands seek recognition? ms. plaskett: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. plaskett: i rise in opposition to the roskam amendment to the nutrition act. contrary to the original intent of the animal welfare act of 1976, and that intent was to aid state and law enforcements in jurisdictions where game fowl events were prohibited to transfers that allowed it. caulk fighting like horseracing is a long standing recreational activities in the u.s. virgin islands. it's regulated in the virgin islands along with puerto rico. i understand the concerns of those opposed to this sport and believe regulatory processes, educational outreach are the best means within those jurisdictions to address them.
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lawing caulk fighting in the u.s. territories will only create underground industries which will prove problematic, particularly for men of color. mr. speaker, to pass an amendment that solely affects the territories, that none of the delegates from the territories support, is paternalistic, yes, colonialistic and downright wrong. the territories have always been treated unfairly under numerous important federal laws and programs this amendment sadly is yet another example. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from wisconsin seek recognition? mr. gallagher: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. gallagher: mr. speaker, i stood in this very spot about one year ago urging congress to do the work of the american people, the work they sent us here today. i introduced a do your job act which is simple. it would allow congress to go into recess unless we actually done our work, passed all our appropriations bills. and instead, i fear we're going to find ourselves in the same
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crisis we found ourselves in just a few months ago. that's why i was glad to see the president recently said that we should cancel the august recess, if necessary, if we can't do our job. because in just two months we will once again adjourn for a month-long recess without a budget or getting all our appropriations done. to say nothing of the other issues that remain unsolved, like immigration, take your pick. once again, if we don't make hard choices the government may shut down. i think that's unacceptable. we know how this plays out. we saw it last year as we karined from one budgetary deadline to the next, from one short-term bill to the next wefment can't keep making these mistakes over and over again. to do so would be the literal definition of insanity. let's put an end to this madness. let's stay here if necessary, even if it means canceling a recess. better this country because that's what our constituents sent us here to do. yield the balance of my time.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? mr. hoyer: to speak out of order for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from maryland, the minority leader, is recognized for one minute. mr. hoyer: i thank the speaker. mr. speaker, one year ago, my community was shaken by the murder of second lieutenant richard "richie" collins iii, a young african-american stabbed to death while waiting for a bus on the campus of the university of maryland. he was a student at bowy state university, just -- bowie state university, just days from graduation. he was in college park celebrating his recent commission as an officer in the united states army. he was a young man of great promise. very talented and driven to succeed. he was popular on campus and helped create bowie state university's first lacrosse team. he was an avid player of golf, soccer, baseball. richie loved deep conversations
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about life, politics and philosophy. the individual on trial for his murder has been charged with a hate crime. mr. speaker, we must do more to combat the spread of hatred by spreading tolerance and respect instead. and we must never forget those like richie collins whose lives were cut short by hatred and prejudice. i, again, offer my condolences, as i have, to richie's parents, richard and dawn, his family, his friends to mark a somber anniversary. we ask for whom the bell tolls. t tolled for us. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from colorado seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize the passing of a
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truly great american, the mayor aurora, colorado, steven d. hogan. mayor hogan passed away on the 13th of may. throughout his nearly eight-year tenure as mayor of my hometown, steve hogan oversaw a remarkable and exciting renaissance of the city. aurora has become colorado's third largest city and a driving force behind innovation, development, and economic opportunity. mr. coffman: aurora has also become an even greater place to live, work, and raise a family. i met steve hogan 35 years ago when i returned home to aurora after having served in the marine corps. i have had the distinct pleasure to call him a friend ever sense. mayor hogan's career in public service has taken him from serving in the colorado house of representatives in the 16970's to serving six terms as an aurora city councilmember and finally two terms as the
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mayor of the city, a city i know he loved so dearly. mayor hogan exemplified the spirit of that -- of public service and my hometown of aurora will not be the wonderful place it is today without his vision and his leadership. we all are better off because of his decades of hard work. mr. speaker, i am proud to have been able to call mayor steve hogan a friend and his family will remain in my thoughts and prayers. i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following message. the clerk: to the congress of the united states, pursuant to section 233-e-1 of the social security act, as amended, by the social security amendments of 1977, i transmit here with a social security totalization agreement with slovenia titled agreement on social security between the united states of america and the republic of slovenia and the accompanying legally binding administrative
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arrangement titled administrative arrangement between the united states and the republic of slovenia for the agreement on social security between the united states of america and the republic of slovenia, collectively, the agreements. the agreements were signed in slovenia on january 17, 2017. the agreements are similar in objective and content to the social security totalization agreements already enforced with the other leading economic partners in europe and elsewhere, including australia, canada, chile, japan, norway, the republic of korea, and switzerland. such bilateral agreements provide for limited coordination between the united states and foreign social security systems to eliminate dual social security coverage and taxation and help prevent the loss of benefit protection that can occur when workers divide their careers between two countries. . 233-c-4 ant to section
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of the provisions to carry out the purposes of section 233. i transmit for the information of the congress a report required by section 22-e-1 of the social security agget on the number of individuals who will be affected by the agreements and the agreements' cost effect. also included are the main provisions of the agreements with descriptions of each article. the department of state and social security administration concluded that these agreements are in the national interests of the united states. i commend to the congress the agreement on social security between the united states of america and the republic of slovenia and the administrative arrange meant between the united states of america on social security between the united states of america and the republic of slovenia. signed donald j. trump. the white house, may 17, 2018.
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the speaker pro tempore: this is referred to the committee on ways and means and ordered printed.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? mr. newhouse: by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 900 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 145, house resolution 900. resolved, that at any time after adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 18i, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of the bill h.r. 2 to provide for the reform and continuation of agricultural and other programs of the department of agriculture through fiscal year 2023, and for other purposes. no further amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution. each such further amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be
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offered only by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the house or in the committee of the whole. all points of order against such further amendments are waived. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment pursuant to this resolution the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or ithout instructions. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for one hour. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker,
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during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. and i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from massachusetts, my friend, mr. mcgovern, pending i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, on wednesday, the rules committee met and reported a rule, house resolution 900 providing for further consideration of a very important piece of legislation for america's farmers and ranchers. h.r. 2, the agriculture and nutrition act commonly referred to as the farm bill. the rule provides for consideration of h.r. 2 under a structured rule allowing for consideration of 31 amendments that were offered. mr. speaker, earlier this year, i traveled to every county in my
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district for one reason, to listen, to hear, to get the input and the concerns from farmers, ranchers and producers across central washington state. i traveled to the county where my constituents discussed the opening of new sources for exporting across the globe. i visited with farmers who discussed the importance of comedy sourcing and stressed the need for stronger education to the public about farming and where the food that lands on our tables comes from. i heard from constituents who stressed the importance of agricultural research from producers in quincy, who shared their personal stories about the impacts of crop insurance on their livelihoods and farmers in
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othello who raised concerns about regulatory burdens on the agricultural community. i'm proud to rise to say today that this farm bill makes great strides in addressing these challenges that face america's farmers. the rule we bring before the house provides for further consideration of the underlying legislation, h.r. 2, the agriculture and nutrition act, a bill that is critically important to my district in central washington and to rural districts just like it across the country. as a farmer myself and as a former state agricultural director, i know how important these farm policies are when it comes to our agricultural economy. this farm bill strengthens the farm safety net to help america's farmers and ranchers compete. after five years of depressed prices and 52% drop in farm
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income, our farmers need us, hey need congress, to re-- re-authorize these important programs. while american farmers have faced these depressed prices and severe drops in income, we have a robust safety net in place. due to the previous 2014 farm bill, our agriculture community was able to hold on and continued to provide american consumers with food in our grocery stores, in our schools and in our food banks. it is incumbent upon us to ensure these policies continue. we must pass this farm bill and ensure a steady food supply will be on the shelves and in our markets for the years to come. the underlying legislation includes the creation of a new international market program, which i would argue is more important today than ever before. programs within it including the
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market access program and the foreign market development program are incredibly important to producers seeking to maintain and expand their export markets for u.s. agricultural products and commodities. the market access program on its own is a net positive program which every one dollar spent, $28 are returned to the american economy. i know these critical trade and export resources are at the top of the minds of american farmers and producers across the country and we must continue to ensure their availability and access for the agricultural industry. this bill also maintains and strengthens the nation's nutrition programs to assist those who struggle to put food on the table while providing critical training to help people attain the skills necessary to gain well-paying jobs, financial self-sufficiency and better
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futures for themselves and for their families. supports the supplemental nutrition assistance program without any cuts in funding. it adds further funding and empowers states with the flexibility on how to best administer their respective programs. the state of washington has done innovative work in their administration of the snap through the bfet and rise programs to help some of the most vulnerable populations and i'm pleased this farm bill will allow these programs to continue if the state so chooses. this legislation contains employment and education provisions for those who need a hand up due to falling on hard times. mr. speaker, the farm bill contains a comprehensive approach to farm policy, nutrition, trade, conservation,
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crop insurance, regulatory reform, rural development, animal health, specialty and/or beganic crops and provisions to help beginning farmers and ranchers. this rule provides for further consideration of amendments offered by our colleagues in the house on a great variety of these issues. i look forward to listening to the robust debate on potential provisions to strengthen this legislation. as this is the first farm bill i have had the opportunity to engage since being in congress, i welcome input from my colleagues on both sides of the aisle and from every perspective. we must continue to bring forward solutions for america's farmers, ranchers, rural communities and families. mr. speaker, this body, the people's house, is made up of many walks of life. we have physicians, we have attorneys, we have ordained
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ministers, we have engineers, school administrators, former state and local government officials, scientists, law enforcement officials. today i'm proud to come before you as a farmer. i'm not the only one. there are maybe about 20 farmers, ranchers and producers in the house, the people's house. among us is an almond farmer from central california, a plus berry farmer from the state of kentucky, ltman from a rice farmer from minnesota and yes a proud hops farmer from the state of washington. i'm privileged to come before you in support of this rule and underlying legislation. h.r. 2, the agriculture and nutrition act. i humbly urge my colleagues to support the rule, support the bill and strengthen the future for america's farmers and all of those who depend on it. thank you.
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i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i want to thank the gentleman from washington, mr. new house for the customary 30 minutes. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks and yield myself such time as i may consume the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i spoke yesterday about the big picture numbers behind this cruel bill, how it would cut the snap benefits that families rely on to buy groceries by over $20 billion that includes slashing benefits like veterans and homeless and teenagers aging out of foster care by $9.2 billion. there is a provision that would rip benefits away from working families with kids by eliminating an important state flexibility option. the bill even included a provision that would have constructed barriers to accessing snap for those with
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disabilities, who have out of pocket utility costs. that is until democrats shamed the majority into abandonning it as part of their manager's amendment unveiled last night. this fix didn't come without a cost. tucked in the manager's package which was written in secret is a provision that will kick over 600,000 vulnerable adults off of snap in the first two years after enactment of this bill, two years before their misguided work bureaucracy goes into effect. 600,000 vulnerable men and women will lose their benefits before they even have the opportunity to take advantage of the majority's new make work program. really? what are you thinking? this entire bill is an an embarrassment and this manager's amendment only makes it worse. it should be scrapped and sent back to the agriculture committee where we can have real bipartisan negotiations and craft a bill that actually helps people because despite some
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changes around the margins the republican farm bill remains an unmitigated disaster. i want to zoom in on that big picture and give telling examples of how this disastrous bill will impact real people in their every day lives because that's what is at stake with the republican farm bill because that's what we need to be focused on because it goes well beyond the numbers on a page. . take, for example, a woman named sabrina, who was quoted in the story. she works side jobs like cleaning houses and doing yard work but has a difficult time finding steady employment at her age of 59. this bill will take away her benefits because she may not meet its 20-hour per week requirement. she's working. she's exactly the kind of person my republican friends say they want to support.
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do you think she purposely found jobs that pay so little and has so few hours? that doesn't fit so nicely into the majority's press releases, but that is the reality. or take, for example, thomas, a single dad who lost his wife a few years ago and is raising his preteen daughter on his own. he's worked diligently to find stable employment, but jobs are scarce in his community. without snap and reduced price school meals, thomas said he and his daughter would not be able to survive. these are the kind of people my republican colleagues are demonizing during this debate and it is deeply frustrating. or lisa, a working mother of four kids, earning about $14 per hour as a nursing assistant. lisa has to stretch her monthly income to cover rent and utilities after school care, clothing and car costs so she can get to her job. currently, she receives a modest snap benefit to feed her family, and her kids receive free school meals. but because her income is just over the 130% threshold for a
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family of five, she would automatically lose her snap benefits if this bill becomes law. for lisa, snap makes an incredible difference in her ability to feed her children. or elton, a u.s. navy veteran, who lost his benefits for two years because of the strict work requirements and time limites that are already part of the snap law. during the two-year period, he was unable to access snap benefits. elton was hungry every day do to ng what he could eat in order do to eat in order to get by. and it wasn't that elton chose not to work. he worked physically demanding jobs his entire life, but he lost his job after an injury. he continues to struggle with health conditions and doesn't have reliable access to transportation, issues that exacerbating his job search. under this bill, elton may lose his modest food benefits entirely. these are real people, and if the majority in the ag committee actually took the time and did a hearing on the
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heartless nutrition title in this bill, they would have heard these and many other real-life stories. take a moment to think about what you are doing here. my republican colleagues are denying food benefits to veterans, single dads struggling to find work, and working moms. why? because paul ryan asked you to do? because of a myth that people aren't struggling? it's sickening. mr. speaker, this bill is just legislation by sound bite. bad legislation. it demonizes the poor and trades in stereotypes. apparently just to help some in the majority with their next hit on fox news. this bill has real consequences. it will hurt real people -- our constituents, yours and mine, in every single congressional district in this country. a , it's obvious this is not serious attempt at legislating. they ignored the recommendation fathers democratic and republican witnesses during the
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agriculture committee's 23 hearings on snap. provisions were inserted in this bill without explanation on where they came from. i asked. i still can't find out. democrats were left in the dark as this legislation was drafted. we were left to read about it in news reports. a total affront to the bipartisan tradition that has defined the farm bill for years. now, the majority may be calling this a farm bill, but it's really a total transformation of our social safety net. it's a farm bill that doesn't even improve the farm economy. let me state, our farmers work hard. they should be valued, and they definitely deserve a hell of a lot better than what's contained in this bill. if the republican want to den gait the poor, they have to do it alone. make no mistake about it, that's what this bill is designed to do and that's what it will do unless the responsible adults in the republican party join us in defeating it. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, the chairman of the house ag committee, mr. conaway, and i have worked together on many issues and i know he recognizes that the trade promotion programs that i referenced in my opening remarks are vital to our agriculture economy. for decades, usda export development programs like m.a.p. have helped american farmers create, expand, and maintain access to foreign markets. throughout their history, the successful public-private partnership has cultivated hundreds of billions of dollars in exports and created millions of american jobs, both in the agricultural sector and in support industries, as well as the program brings a return to the united states economy. in the findings of the underlying bill, it states that united states export development programs significantly increase demand for the united states
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agricultural products, generating a return of $28 in added export revenue for each invested program dollar. additionally, our global competitors provide substantially more public support for export promotion than is provided in the united states agricultural exporters. we are at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to the rest of the world when it comes to agricultural trade. mr. chairman, without these private contributions and the private sector's resolve to support our export programs, it's very likely that the u.s. would not be the agricultural exporter of the highest quality products that we are today. i think it's time we look at our export promotion programs and take a serious look if we want to continue our exporting success. mr. chairman, i introduced a bill to grow the investments in the m.a.p. and f.m.d. programs. i offered an amendment that would have a smaller investment in the m.a.p. and f.m.d.
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programs. while we are not considering those amendments today, i am grateful that chairman conaway has agreed to come and engage in this important issue. mr. speaker, i'd like to yield three minutes to the good gentleman, the house agriculture committee chairman, mr. conaway. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields and the gentleman from texas is recognized for three minutes. mr. conyers: thank you. i want to thank -- mr. conaway: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank mr. newhouse. as you well know, trade is important to the agriculture committee with u.s. agriculture exports estimated at $140 billion per year and trade accounting for one of every $5 in agriculture production value. through the extensive hearings and listening sessions, the committee heard from every segment of the agriculture industry about the importance of maintaining support for our trade promotion and our market development programs, especially considering the uncertainty in the current trade climate.
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while i'm confident america's farmers and ranchers can compete with everyone in the world on a level playing field, they simply cannot be expected to compete against foreign treasuries on their own. so in addition to maintaining and strengthening the farm safety net, h.r. 2 restores and increases funding for popular and successful market access program and the foreign market development program. this was no small feat considering the c.b.o. zeroed out funding for f.m.d. as well as the technical assistance for specialty crops programs in the most recent baseline projections but the committee worked together to get creative and made
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come closer to answering the calls for doubling funding for m.a.p. and f.m.d. and proud of the work we did. i believe the streamline will give the usda undersecretary for -- the tools necessary to continue tearing down and opening up new markets. that said, we can always do better. i am committed working with mr. newhouse and the members in the senate for those important trade promotion efforts. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized. mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, i'd like to thank chairman conaway for his commitment on working on this important issue and i look forward to working with him. mr. speaker, at this point i'd like to yield the remainder of my time to the gentleman from georgia, mr. woodall, and ask unanimous consent for him to be able to control the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. reserves. and the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, as my colleague, the gentleman from washington, is leaving,
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i'd just urge him to read the bill. because if he did, he would realize if this bill were to become law, there are 60,000 people in his home state of washington who would lose snap benefits just due to categorical eligibility changes alone. more would lose their benefits but for this one tweak in this bill. the majority of the people who would lose their benefits under categorical eligibility changes are working families, working families with kids, children, mr. speaker, will lose their snap benefits and many of them will lose access to free school meals. so, you know, again -- i mean, for all the talk about how on the other side about how this bill is somehow a good bill for families, read the bill. it's a pretty cruel bill for working families and for children. mr. speaker, i'm going to ask we defeat the previous question and if so i will offer an amendment ensuring before the legislation can take effect, the president must certify to congress that none of the administration's recent trade
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and tariff actions and negotiations will harm u.s. farmers, ranchers, and other agriculture producers. i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of my amendment in the record along with extraneous material immediate lie prior to the vote -- immediately prior to the vote on the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mcgovern: to discuss our proposal, i yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlewoman from illinois, a member of the agriculture committee, mrs. bustos. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. the gentleman from washington yields. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized. mrs. bustos: unless i look like a gentleman from georgia. all right. i hope i don't. thank you very much, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. mcgovern. i appreciate the time. hardworking families across the heartland know firsthand what the negative impacts of trade can look like. they've lived through it in places like galesburg, illinois, when the maytag plant padlocked its gates and sent
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every last job to mexico. they lived through it in freeport, illinois, when vullture capitalists bought out a factory and sent every one of those last jobs over to china. and today, at the end of planting season, corn growers and soybean farmers and pork producers all across the heartland are getting hit in their wallet by the trump trade war. mr. speaker, two weeks ago, i wrote -- rode in a john deere tractor while he was planting his soybeans. you see, right now as planting season is wrapping up, our farmers are making a lot of tough decisions. that's because in illinois, in many of our neighboring states, our soybean farmers sell about a quarter of their crops to china. in fact, in illinois, if our state was its own country, we'd be the fourth largest producer f soybeans in the world.
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it's being felt right now. in fact, just this morning, there was a headline in bloomberg news this i want to read to you, i want to show to you. it says, china buys record amount of soybeans as it shuns u.s. growers. that's this morning. the fact is our farmers have been struggling in a tightening market with low profit margins. so in 2016, when president trump stood up here and declared he would, quote, end this war on the american farmer, they took him at his word. midwesterners do that. we believe people when they say something and we also believe promises ought to be kept. for those of farmers, that promise has been broken. -- for those farmers, that
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promise has been broken. if you don't support this amendment, it will also be broken by this congress. i urge you, please keep your word. protect our hardworking farmers and ranchers from this trump trade war. let's work together and as the president says, let's end this war on the american farmer. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i think that the gentlelady from illinois speaks on behalf of a lot of members in this chamber. nobody wants to see a trade war. nobody's advantaged by a trade war. i think so many of the provisions that are in this underlying bill, mr. speaker, h.r. 2, are designed to create more stability for farm families. the gentlelady is absolutely right when she referenced the instability trade war conversations in -- create so much more important that we come together now to provide that safety net and stability
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that's included in h.r. 2. i appreciate the gentlelady's encouragement that we get to the other end of these trade negotiations. i do believe that's something we all share. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the gentleman from new york, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. . mr. engel: thank you for yielding to me. i rise in opposition to one of the amendments made in order, the foxx-davis amendment would alter sugar policy by eliminating the safety net for sugar producers. there was a refinery loathed in my district which has been a staple in the neighborhood for almost a century. according to their own figures, it employs 280 people and sustains an additional 138 jobs through trucking, terminal operations, cargo handling, that is more than 400 local jobs, most of them union jobs
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supporting local families and pumping additional dollars in our community. these are the men and women i represent and they are the ones with whom i cast my vote. i urge my colleagues to vote against this amendment. america sugar policy is operating and it has worked 14 of the past 15 years and sugar will run at a zero cost to taxpayers over the next tax years. according to the international sugar organization, food manufacturers pay 10% less for sugar than other developed countries and sugar prices are among the lowest in the world and most importantly, the reason i rise is that the u.s. sugar industry provides good union jobs. without the current sugar policy, 145,000 american jobs are in jeopardy being outsourced. hank you, mr. speaker.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the gentleman spoke about one of the amendments that is going to be offered and in total there are 52 different amendments that have been made in order both in the rule we did yesterday and this rule that i hope our colleagues will support. 51 different amendments proffered by members of this chamber to make this bill better. if we pass this rule today, we will be able to move to the underlying big for consideration of those amendments. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. gomp govern i thank the gentleman from georgia reminding us there were 51 amendments amendments were made in order but 54 were blocked. i yield one minute to the
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gentleman from florida. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker, i rise in strong opposition to the republican farm bill. i didn't think i would have to say that. this bill will strip our nation's most vulnerable of the necessary resources they need to feed their family. the bill kicks 265,000 school kids out of free and reduced lunch and i have attended schools where i see the kids on ree and reduced lunch. hardworking 130,000 floridians will go hungry as a result of this farm bill. it just doesn't hurt floridians but the entire country, it hurts
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seniors, college students and disabled and even hurt active military families. the farm bill also hurts rural communities. i represent several of those rural communities in north florida and border those borders that i receive calls from. i want to remind my colleagues of the motto of the usda, do right, feed everyone. the farm bill does not do right and surely doesn't feed everyone. i caution my friends to remember, mr. speaker, i want to end a quote -- mr. mcgovern: i yield 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. lawson: in you pull your self out from the hungry and then shed your light, rise in darkness and your gloom be at noon day. mr. speaker, i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i yield myself such time as i may consume to associate myself with the gentleman from florida and his commitment to public service. he is a new chamber but fighting for his constituents since he arrived. there are a lot of men and women in this chamber that fit this bill. i wish we spent time celebrating those good servants among us, but i have the pleasure of yielding five minutes to a gentleman who fits exactly by that mold, the gentleman from maine, mr. poliquin, has come time and time again to this floor, to committees, every single opportunity he has to build bipartisan support, to work together with his colleagues and work not on the citizens of maine but all americans. he is a model for energy and partnership which everyone would agree on.
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five minutes to the gentleman from maine. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine is recognized. mr. poliquin: thank you, mr. speaker and maine is the greatest state in the union. i know you didn't say that, but i know you meant that. maine is the home of the most honest, hardest working people you can find anywhere in this country. we grew up in a resilient and independent time in maine and we care for our neighbors and friends because it is compassionate to extend a helping hand. my 90-year-old mother was a terrific nurse and cared for folks in nursing folks in nurs homes and hospitals throughout central maine and my dad who is 88, he was a seventh grade social studies' teacher and basketball coach for 30 years. i was raised in a big hearted american family devoted to helping others and that's why i
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work so hard to make sure government does the same thing. i have great news for forecasts across america who are looking to escape poverty and work their way up the ladder of independence. for two years, i have been pushing very hard to include job training, commonsense job training, community service and work requirements or able-bodied adults. and in order to receive food stamps. we have to be compassionate, mr. speaker, to help folks escape poverty, instead of being trapped in government programs that has no end to it. you know, the role of government, mr. speaker, is not to keep folks trapped in poverty and make them -- help make them comfortable living in it, but try to give them a helping hand so they can learn a job skill, get a job and live better lives
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with more independence. my work requirement against what the media has reported and continues to report, there are no cuts to food stamps by imposing these work requirements. if the benefits are not used, they -- because someone got a job, they are recycled back into job training. mr. mcgovern: will the gentleman yield? mr. poliquin: no, i won't. if you are pregnant and caring for young kids and have a disability, again, you are exempt from these requirements, but if you are able to work, we need to be compass nature and require people to lift themselves out of poverty. mr. speaker, there is one other part of the farm bill that i'm proud of that is in the bill and that helps rural maine and rural america. for the first time, locally grown fruits and vegetables can now be frozz yes or no or dried pureed in dried or
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order to qualify for school lunches and snacks. they are able to buy foods that are just as nutritious as those who are fresh, save a hot of money and make sure our kids can eat healthy year round and helps local farmers. i have one son who is 27, and nothing was more important than making sure he had nutritious food on the table to eat. this helps us do that. with that, i encourage people to vote yes for this farm bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i would suggest he read the bill when he says no benefits will be cut from snap, he is wrong. benefits will be cut. benefits will be cut to support
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an underfunded, unproven, ridiculous excuse for work force and training program. i would say, i hope nobody want to emulate the state of maine when it comes to people who are struggling in poverty and need food. i would instruct my colleagues to read appear article that appeared in the "washington post" last year about what harsh policies have resulted in. a veteran who served this country lost his job due to an injury and because of maine's strict work requirements was thrown off the snap benefits, became homeless and was skinning squirrels in order to provide, that isn't a policy that this state or this country want to reach toward. one of the things i am proud about the snap program, it means that we recognize that we have an obligation to make sure that nobody in this country goes hungry.
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why is that such a radical idea? why has this program been demonized. and when he talks about a life of dependency, read the statistics, the average time that someone is on snap is less than a year. i'm not sure what he's talking. i yield two minutes to the the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. delauro. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for two minutes. the hypocrisy of this farm bill from president trump and the republicans means more subsidies for the rich and greater hunger for the poor. the food stamp program is one of the most successful anti-hunger programs in our fage. last year, it prevented 42 million people from going hungry and 4.8 million seniors, 1.5
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million low-income military veterans and yet our colleagues are seeking to undermine food stamps as they shield farm subsidies for the rich. if you will look at the number of people who are the farm subsidy beneficiaries and the millions of people who are the fat beneficiary. and what you want to see how 1115-- snap beneficiaries, per year and the farm subsidy, almost $10,000 a year. that's farmers, receive six times the benefit of a person receiving food stamps, even though the vast majority of the beneficiaries are food stamp recipients. this farm bill would cut benefits by more than $23 billion. republicans refuse to include
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limits on subsidies for crop insurance, one of the few federal programs without any eligibility caps or payment limits. that is the untold on story. who benefits? and the republican tax scam for the rich, 83% of the benefits went to the top one percent. the farm bill is rigid for the rich. farm subsidies, which the c.b.o. says will cost $12 billion are so skewed toward the rich that the top 10% of farms, about 76,000 farms received over 60% of all farm subsidies. you know snap recipients -- mr. mcgovern: i yield an additional minute. ms. delauro: snap recipients have income and asset limits. $1.40 per meal. snap recipients have work requirements. millionaires and billionaires
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who pocket subsidies do not. nearly 18,000 people in the 50 biggest cities receive farm subsidies. they do not work the land or till the soil, where are their work requirements. 23 republican members of this congress who oppose snap have financial ties to farms that receive subsidies. they are poised to support this bill. they get theirs while the kids go hungry. the country needs to know this in the land of food abundance, no one should go hungry. the republican farm bill is a massive give away to the rich which will deny food. we need to eradicate hunger and do not need to araid indicate the anti-hunger programs. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves -- the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: the farm bill is
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different than what we have teen seen in years past. we would normally have more bipartisan support here on the floor. we got side ways on a couple of issues early on in the process. but the arguments that we're hearing aren't different than the arguments we traditionally hear in a farm bill, as if we are pitting those families in need of food against those families who produce the food. we're not. this bill is h.r. 2 for a reason, mr. speaker. a lot of folks don't understand how bill numbers get handed out. they get handed out by order of priority. h.r. 1 was the tax reform and joobs act. it has brought unemployment levels down to the highest levels of economic growth. h.r. 2 is the farm bill, because if you want to know who benefits from american farm policy, it's
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anybody who eats, anybody who eats i tell folks, mr. speaker, we on't need to give ever child a laptop, we need to send them on a mission trip around the globe to see how other countries do it. we're so blessed in this country, and we take it for granted oftentimes. for example, i can put up laptop, distribution of charts about the farm policy until the cows come home. ut the largest 15% of farms in this country produce almost 90% of all the food in this country. i'll say that again. those folks who are doing it bigger and bert than anybody else, 15% of farmers producing almost 90% of american food. i'll tell you something, mr. speaker. we can't afford to lose those 15% of farmers. what keeps food in this country
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a lable, affordable is consistent farm policy, which is why time and time again republicans and democrats come together from across rural america to try to provide certainty to american agriculture. it's the largest part of the georgia economy, mr. speaker. agriculture. it's true of so many districts, so many states across this land. this ought to be a partnership. it's not today. and i regret that. we'll have opportunities to make that change going forward, but just understand for folks who are here seeing this debate for the very first time, go back and see the farm bill debate from five years ago. you'll see the same accusation, the same recriminations, you'll see the same fear and scare tarktics used. and then you will -- tactics used. then you'll see a huge bipartisan vote because this bill is so important to so many americans. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i would like to
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ask unanimous consent to insert into the record the article that i referred trump told americans to get work or lose benefits, which talks about a veteran in main that basically was shut out of his food benefit because of maine's policies. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from georgia just suggested we all take a mission trip around the world to see hunger and see how lucky we're here in the united states. let me tell the gentleman, you don't have to go halfway around the world to see hunger. i can take you halfway down the block and you can see hunger right here in our nation's capital and every congressional district in this country. there are over 41 million americans who are hungry or food insecure in this country. the richest country in the history of the world, we should be ashamed. we ought to do something about it. this farm bill makes hunger worse. i yield one minute to the gentlewoman from virgin islands, miss blast ket, a distinguished member of the agriculture committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman virgin islands is recognized. miss blast ket: thank you very much, mr. speaker. thank you for yielding me this
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time. i would posit to my colleague across the aisle who said that we're trying to pit farm producers against farm recipients -- food recipients. i believe that it is this bill that has done that. we have worked in a bipartisan manner for, i understand, years before this bill was put through without being -- without being discussed, without the hearings on both sides of the aisle. i try to think about what would have meant to impose the massive system of new snap work requirements under the bill during the time immediately after the islands were hit by two category 5 hurricanes. submit their lies monthly paperwork? how would they go to jobs and business that is were shut down? how would job slots be provided were localities provide on subm monthly paperwork? how would they go to jobs and business provide -- focus on providing receipts. if the majority did not think of the exempt these communities, what else was overlooked in terms of reasonable standards? unfortunately, we didn't have the opportunity to work with the majority to get an answer to
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such key questions before this bill was unveiled and rushed to the floor. this doesn't add any help to farmers facing record low income and commodity price, hardships due to trade retaliation, as my colleague from illinois discussed. it does not support farmer mental health or appropriate funding for broadband, tackling the opioid epidemic. this bill cuts hundreds -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. plaskett: energy initiatives and falls short on assisting beginning underserved and veteran farmers. why? because it is not a bipartisan bill. i urge my colleagues to vote no. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. million woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. iam. my chamber has stood with her in those hard times in the face of really extraordinary national
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distaries. again we can make accusations on this floor all we like, but we could also spend time bragging about those things that bring us together. there are already disaster provisions at you will, that provide specifically disaster snap, for example, when communities are so hard hit, we do have these conversations. we do have these concerns for one another and our communities. and we do work together to address those concerns. we're not always successful, mr. speaker. but i promise you we're less successful when we don't work together than when we do. my juvend standing, i don't sit on the agriculture committee, but my friends across the aisle do. single democratic amendment was offered in committee. it's my understanding. again i don't sit on the committee. i don't mind being corrected. i won't be embarrassed at all to have the record single democrat amendment was offered in committee. corrected. my understanding is five hours of markup in the agriculture committee and not one idea for improving the bill was offered.
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now, that's a legitimate strategic position to take if folks want to take it, mr. speaker. i just don't understand it as someone who wants to get the job done and make danchese in a collaborative way on behalf of the american people. this bill is getting better every single day. it's gotten better through every conversation,. as you heard my friend from washington say in his opening statement, so many farmers with real world experience -- we heard yesterday from members who have real world labor and work force development experience. this bill is getting better every time. if we support the rule that we're discussing at this time, mr. speaker, it will make 31 additional amendments in order so that we can improve the bill even further w that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: -- further. with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the time is reserve. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i'm trying to think of a response to the gentleman from georgia who is trying to defend the process in the ag committee as somehow this
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bipartisan process that some of our democrats didn't want to participate. it's just not worth t we have been explaining it over and over and over again this. process is indefensible and it makes a mockery of the agriculture committee. it makes a mockery of this institution. i yield one minute to the gentlewoman from wisconsin, ms. moore. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. moore: thank you so very much. i have not had the privilege to serve on the ag committee, but given the comments of the gentleman, i would suggest as an amendment that since this bill is about work, that we have work for 12-year-olds. maybe boys could be shoe shine boys. and the girls could be shampoo girls at the beauty salon so they can help subsidize families. in fact, mr. speaker, there is an old saying that's appropriate for this discussion. if you aren't at the table, you are on the menu. d children are definitely on
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the menu and at the tender mercies of the job market. this bill will cut access not only for snap but kids who go to school every day. this the menu means in my state ther will be 23,000 kids who will not get school lunch and breakfast because of this bill. i'm going to turn in, mr. speaker, some of the stories of people in my district who need snap, real people, single people like jana, who's worked on a job for 11 years. lost her job. and been looking for work for three months and couldn't find it. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. moore: i would ask we reject this bill for people who need snap to survive. this bill is not about work, it's about taking food out of the mouths of babes. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, could
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i inquire of the gentleman from georgia does he have any speakers over there? anybody want to talk about this bill? we have a ton and we just want to -- mr. woodall: if the gentleman would yield. mcgovern: it's an inquiry. mr. woodall: i would be happy to answer or we could leave it -- mr. mcgovern: it's an mcgovern: doesn't come out of my time. mr. woodall: i yield. we do have additional speakers remaining. if we make this rule in order. we'll have 31 different amendments and speakers coming down on each one of those as well. mr. mcgovern: i'm taking note of all the excitement on your side of the aisle on this bill. mr. speaker, i would like to yield one minute to the gentlewoman from maine, ms. pingree. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentlewoman from maine is recognized. thank you very much, mr. speaker. from maine. thank to you my colleague, mr.
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mcgovern, for being kind enough to yield the time and doing a great job on a challenging bill. i rise today to voice my strong opposition to the current version of the farm bill. there are many reasons why. among them the unrealistic challenges to food assistance programs that will have a big negative impact in my state in maine. but what i want to focus on in my limited time is how this legislation does a disservice to the farmers and rural communities we represent. the public is very clear. they want greater access to healthy, locally grown food. they want more of it grown orr beganically. and they want -- organically and they want to support local farmers. federal policy is behind the times. this legislation would make it worse. farmers aren't ignoring the trends, they are capitalizing them. in my state, the changing market and demand for locally grown and/or beganic food has -- and organic food as reig vigorated the economy. this man picture heered, after earning a master's degree and
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apresent tissing, he decided to return to his hometown to start his own farm. the small sources of federal support available to farmers like josh pail in -- pale in comparison to what commodity armers -- farmers receive. for instance, josh uses the organic program to help cover the cost of certification which helps him get more for his product. the funding for this and many other programs sen dangered in this farm bill. over the next five years consumers will continue to change their buying acts and our food system. the question is whether the federal government would make good policy to help farmers like josh. ask anyone in this chamber if they support rural america. they'll say yes, absolutely. i ask we put our money where our mouths are. we should send a message to those keeping our farming communities alive that we believe in their potential. we value their service, and we will help them succeed by voting down this terribly partisan legislation and start over making a good bill.
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i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia reserved. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, the gentlewoman from wisconsin, ms. moore, talked about how we're literally taking the food away from children. i want to make it clear to my lleagues, there should be no mistake, this bill is mistake, this bill is going to hurt kids. first it cuts one million people off benefits through categorical eligibility changes alone. these people are working families with kids. and once these kids lose their snap benefits, c.b.o., the nonpartisan group of experts we rely on, expects 265,000 children will lose access to free school meals. i ask my colleagues, is that what you want out of a farm bill? we can do so much better. i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. you, mr. l: thank speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. georgia's a rural state. like so many jurisdictions represented in this chamber, sometimes you have a big city in one part of the state and the rest of the state is rural. the conversations we have in georgia are not republicans against democrats politically, it's atlanta against the rest of the state politically because folks often don't connect the dots between the food that they are buying on the shelf at kroeger being directly you, mr. related to whether or not farmers are producing that food in the field. we have made huge strides in terms of trying to bring more fresh produce. not just in to our school systems but local farmers markets. huge strides into making sure electronic benefits aren't just able to be used at the local convenience store, but are able to be used in farmers markets, higher quality produce can end up on families' tables. again, mr. speaker, we can find
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disagreement in every bill that comes to the floor, but we can also find progress. of progress in this i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, at this point i would like to yield one minute to the of progress i this bill. it will support this rule we'll get to the underlying bill and spend the rest of the day discussing that. nevada, ms. titus. the gentlewoman from ms. titus: thank you for yielding. i rise in opposition to this rule and underlying bill which much like the republican tax measure comforts the comfortable and afflicts the afflicted and will have devastating impact including one in seven who are on this program and take away food assistance from some of our most vulnerable, young children, seniors and the disabled and will force families to jump through extra hoops in order to
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access other needed benefits like assistance with their electricity bills. we can and should be doing more to lift families out of poverty and end hunger in the united states. shamefully this bill does just the opposite. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: at this point, i would like to yield one minute to the the gentlewoman from alabama, ms. sewell. ms. sewell: today i rise in opposition of this cruel and mean-spirited farm bill. a farm bill that will leave working families and children out in the corled. the farm bill cuts $23 billion from snap. the supplemental nutrition assistance program. that would leave 2 million americans without the support they need. i represent both rural and urban
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from birmingham to the plaque belt of alabama and every community in my district will be worst off. for children and working families, snap means the difference between a hot meal or going to bed hungry. for farmers and grocery stores, snap is an investment in our food system that creates 50,000 agricultural jobs. after the republicans passed a tax cut that gives cuts to wealthiest americans and want to cut the benefits for hungry children and working families. i believe this is morally wrong. the fate of snap is not the welfare mother trying to get over. the face of snap in my district where 70% of the people who are beneficiaries are children. they have children under the age of 17 years old. the face of snap in america are needy children. we must and can do better.
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i'm going to vote no and i urge my colleagues to do the same. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i yield myself such time as i may consume. we feel very passionately about issues on this floor. i want to give my colleague from alabama an opportunity to retract the accusation that this is a mean-spirited and cruel bill. i know the men and women who serve on the agriculture committee and don't have a cruel bone in their body. they care about farmers and families. we can argue about whether or t if you are an able working age, able bodied childless man in this country whether or not we ought to get you a job while you are collecting federal benefits. we can talk about that. i don't think that is mean-spirited or cruel at all.
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that is exactly what we ought to be doing lifting families out of poverty. but i would say to my colleagues with their passion, which i know is heart-felt, feeding hungry children is a shared priority and we see that every single day in the bills that are passed here, and we do damage, we do damage to this institution and we do damage to the very honest and needed debates we have in this chamber when we characterize one another in ways that we know, that we know are not accurate. i know the men and women on the agriculture committee. i know why they chose to serve on that committee. i believe on the work they're doing. we don't need to question each other's motives or integrity in order to make this debate valuable. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i would like to yield one minute to the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. kind.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. kind: mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the rule and underlying bill because it is a missed opportunity. i offered amendments to improve the bill, all of which were rejected. for instance, why is a farm entity with adjusted gross income of $500,000 still receiving tax subsidies under this bill? why can't we at least track the crop insurance subsidy payments to the individual entities? right now that is currently prohibited under the bill. that is not right. the taxpayers need to serve how their dollars are being run. three out of every four farmers applying for conservation funding assistance today are denied because of inadequacy of funds? this should be helping our family farmers succeed not special interests here in washington. this is why this is a missed
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opportunity. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts reserves. the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: it's my pleasure to yield three minute to one of my classmates, the class of 2011 and budget committee mates back in the day. the gentlelady from missouri, mrs. hartzler. mrs. hartzler: i rise today in favor of the 2018 farm bill. missouri farmers work hard every day to feed the world and need the certainty that this legislation provides. this bill strengthens safeguards for our food supply and improves public-private risk management programs that are vital to american agriculture. the farm bill makes significant investments in broadband infrastructure by setting a minimum speed for federal investment. this bill contains historic improvements to snap, which helps resip yints break the cycle of poverty by improving
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work opportunities for able-bodied adults. this bill promotes work and individual success while empowering those dependent on government assistance. these reforms will reduce unemployment and instill a sense of pride and work ethic by helping people move from dependency to independence and self-sufficiency. these are commonsense improvements. the 2018 farm bill is a responsible and effective piece of legislation which maintains safety net programs and crop insurance for america's farmers while making investments in job training programs to lift those in need out of poverty. this bill has my full support. and i thank and commend chairman conaway on moving the legislation forward and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts reckfiesed.
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mr. mcgovern: i yield to mr. kildee. mr. kildee: i'm here to speak against the amendment and cluding this rule foxx-davis amendment. in defense of the 2,300 factory workers and 900 family farmers at grow sugar beats in my -- beets in my community. the company that is formed is a co-op formed by local growers that come together and all they ask for is a chance to compete and grow their high quality prouth and not compete with foreign sugar that is dumped if we don't have a program that protects our local growers. the question is simple. it comes down to marginally increasing the profits of large
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corporations or supporting family farmers who support their armers by growing sugar cane and sugar beets and doesn't cost the taxpayers a dime. it comes down to a simple question, are we going to support our own growers or support foreign-produced sugar and inkeys the corporate profits of large companies. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentleman from michigan and spent a good deal trying to get to some bipartisan solutions. he got grilled by both the republicans and the democrats. everybody wanted their ounce of michigan flesh in that day, but at the end of that conversation and i don't say this flippantly, at the end of that conversation i felt more optimistic about us
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coming together and doing difficult infrastructure investments. those things don't happen without people investing the time and energy like you have. i tell the gentleman how much i appreciate that. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: a message from the senate. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house the senate has passed ith an amendment h.r. 3249 and authorize the neighborhood grants program which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: mr. mcgovern is recognized. mr. mcgovern: may i inquire how many more speakers the gentleman has left? mr. woodall: i'm prepared to close.
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mr. mcgovern: i have to give credit where credit is due. this majority can't balance a budget and can't even pass a budget and can't fund the government without first shutting it down. so busy cozying up to big banks and passing tax breaks for the wealthy. right now as we speak, this republican majority is trying to jam through a farm bill that won't even help most farmers. but the one thing this republican majority is good at, the one thing they do with ruthless efficiency is stick it to poor people. this majority is robin hood in reverse. they are master legislators for the mega wealth question. they may want this chamber to look at those at the top giving them tax breaks and pollute our planet and attacking the safeguards we have put in place to stop another financial collapse, but while they work
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with dogged determination to give a helping hand to the fat cats and tell those who are begging to get by, they say just work harder. never mind they didn't grow up in a good neighborhood and quality education. maybe they started off having to play catchup and maybe need help from their government to make the american dream in their life or maybe they were born with advantages but fallen on hard times and need a little bit of help. i'm standing here today, democrats are standing here giving a voice to our workers, middle class and those trying to break into the middle class. if my republican friends actually listened to their voices, they would join us and vote against this bill that attacks working citizens and takes lunch money away from children. it is disgusting. i urge a no vote on the previous
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question, the rule and i urge all of you, no, i plead with all of you to vote no. i grew up in a family where helping those who are struggling is the decent thing to do. please, please, send this bill back to committee. let's demonstrate to the american people that we are here to help, that we care and decent. the gentleman from georgia commented that we are so emotional on this side of the aisle. you damn right we are. we are emotional, we are angry and frustrated because people are going to hurt. if you ever met a hungry killed, it should break your heart. and there are millions and millions in this country who are hungry. we have the greatest country in the history of the world, the richest country and tens and millions of our fellow citizens are food insecure. why isn't that a bigger priority
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for another big tax cut? i know my colleagues deep down inside care about those who turf suffer in this country, so here's an opportunity to prove it. let's do a farm bill that doesn't make hunger worst in this country. i'm not asking you to eliminate hunger, i'm saying don't make it worse. this bill will throw millions of people off of a food benefit and millions of children will be impacted and they aren't just people who aren't working. many of these permit are working families and can't make ends meet. you are taking a we -- away a food benefit. what is wrong with this institution? vote no on this rule and vote no on this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: can i inquire how much time is remaining?
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the speaker pro tempore: gentleman has 3 1/2 minutes. mr. woodall: i thank my friends on the ag committee. it's not easy to do with big pieces of legislation. we do a farm bill every five years and my friends on the ag committee have taken the arrows. you heard the accusations that have been made on the floor today. the unemployment is as low as it ever been in my lifetime and the number of childless working age men who are sitting it out is as high as it's ever been in my lifetime. . we can argue about how to love people more. but i can tell you helping someone find a job matters. historically, mr. speaker, it's one of those things we agree onle of for whatever reason we made it the topic of something we're going to pretend to disagree on today. more jobs available in this country than ever before.
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i think we owe it to families who haven't been able to connect themselves with that job market to help them to do better. mr. speaker, so often we talk about all the lawyers in congress, all the lawyers who are bureaucrats, all the folks working on policies they just don't understand. i want to close where my colleague from washington state began. he he's a former ag commissioner from washington state. he said this, he said he's not the only farmer in this house. there are 20 farmers, ranchers, and producers serving here in the people's house. an almond farmer from central california a blueberry farmer from maine. a rancher from south dakota. a cattleman from kentucky. a rice farmer from minnesota. and a hops farmer from washington state. mr. speaker, this body really does reflect working americans. folks out there trying to be the breadbasket to the world. trying to put fresh produce on the shelves for every american
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family to benefit from. this bill continues our commitment to serving the hungry, and it continues our commitment to being the finest agricultural production nation that this planet has ever seen. vote yes on this rule. let's consider some amendments to make this bill better and send it to the senate and give the american people a bill they can be proud of. with that i yield back the balance of my time and move the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes y electronic device.
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pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 20, this 15-minute vote on o ordering the previous question will be followed by five-minute votes on adopting the resolution, if ordered, and agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal, if ordered. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 228 and the nays are 189. the previous question is
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ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. . those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. mcgovern: i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman request the yeas and nays? mr. mcgovern: i do. the speaker pro tempore: those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. . his is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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