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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  May 22, 2018 10:59am-1:00pm EDT

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costs which are ultimately transferred onto consumers. it ensures businesses have access to reliable financing. and it improves credit access for small businesses and americans by making it a lot easier for these community banks to stay in business and to lend. i want to thank chairman hensarling for being a consistent champion of these efforts. no one has been more exited to getting this done thanory -- committed to getting this done. these reforms are yet just one other way that we are unlocking economic growth so that we can make a real difference in people's lives. we are never going to stop fighting to make this economy better, to make it deeper, and to make it so that everyone has a shot at their version of the american idea. we are already seeing these policies working by the way. just yesterday -- [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2018] >> we will leave this briefing at this point as the house is about to gavel. in you can see the rest of it online at cspan.org. the house again set to work on financial regulation legislation today. experimental drugs for the terminally ill. and a defense program and
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policy bill. also a vote to revote last week's failed farm bill. now to live coverage of the u.s. house here on c-span. the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, the reverend mark geoglein, harrisonville community church, harrisonville, missouri. the chaplain: lord god of heaven, you are the great and mighty god whose unwavering love and faithfulness for the world never ends. we bow in humble recognition of your holiness and majesty, asking you be open and attentive to the prayer of your servants. may we love one another just as you have loved us. we thank you for another day to do what is good, to to justice,
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and to love kindness, and to do what is best for this great nation. bless those who serve in congress and assist them faithfully. grant each of them wisdom to make the best decision, provide strength for those who are tired, and allow courage to do what is right for this great nation. help us to realize we're better together, tear down the dividing wall's hostility, reconcile us and restore us to pursue life and liberty together. amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from missouri seek recognition. mrs. hartzler: mr. speaker, pursuant to clause 1, rule 1, i demand a vote on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. soip the speaker: the question is on o aa greigg to the speaker's approval of the journ. those in favor will vote aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it.
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the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from missouri seek recognition. mrs. hartzler: i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order a quorum is not present. for what purpose does the speaker: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed. the pledge of allegiance will be led by gentleman from illinois, mr. schneider. mr. schneider: please join me in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: without objection, the gentlewoman from missouri, mrs. hartzler, is recognized for one minute. mrs. hartzler: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to welcome my pastor, mark goeglein, to the u.s. house of representatives and commend him for his many years of faithful service to the lord and to others. it's a blessing to have him here offering the opening prayer for today's legislative session. he grew up familiar with the legislative process as his
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mother was a long time state representative from indiana. i'm thrilled to have him here today and appreciate his support of me and his love for our country. mark has served in ministry for 25 years in churches in his home state of indiana, texas, california, and now as pastor of the harrisonville community church in missouri. i appreciate his passion for sharing god's word with his congregation and how his love of scripture shows in his preaching and in the faded thumb print on his bible testifying to the many years he's held that bible preaching, studying, and praying. besides a love of the word, he loves the pittsburgh steelers, basket, and his family. he is blessed to have his wife here today along his daughter and sons. this family is an inspiration to our congregation and a testimony of god's faithfulness and goodness. i wish pastor mark god's continued blessings and know
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his faithfulness will be richly rewarded. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the chair will entertain up to 15 further requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition. mr. schneider: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. schneider: mr. speaker, i rise today joining the families and friends in santa fe, texas, grieving for another 10 lives tragically cut short by senseless gun violence. yesterday this body held the now routine moment of silence in respect for the victims. just as we did after the waffle house shooting in nashville, marjory stoneman douglas high school in parkland, first baptist search in sutterland springs, route 91 arts musical -- music festival in las vegas.
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and the list goes on and on and on. 46 sometimes this chamber has stood to remember the victims and every single time congressional obstructionists stood in the way of doing anything concrete to change this deadly pattern. we haven't considered background checks, or bans on the assault weapons, or gun violence restraining orders to keep firearms out of the hand of mentally ill, or even for goodness sakes, bump stocks. i sit on o the judiciary committee. we haven't held a single hearing about reducing gun violence or working to keep our children safe. we can't prevent every tragedy, but there are actions we can take right now, today torques save lives. we have the power. i urge my colleagues to find the courage to act. our kids are counting on us. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from utah seek recognition. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. mrs. love: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to raise awareness
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about postpartum depression. i rise today to raise awareness about maternal deaths. let the country know about one of my constituents, emily dikes. she was a good person. she was active in her community, beloved by all who knew her, let the country but most of all she was an amazing mother. however with her fifth child she developed some difficulties and emily was overtaken by anxiety. severe anxiety. so severe, in fact, that it led to her mistreatment, but most o misdiagnosis, misunderstanding of her condition. eventually it led to her suffering so badly that her search for safety she ran on to a freeway and was killed by a semitruck. the horrible fact is that emily is not the only woman who suffers from this. right now there are thousands of women who suffer just like emily suffered. as a mother, i want those women
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to know you are not alone. here are many like you who have gone through very similar experiences, and there are places you can can can go to get help. i encourage you to reach out, i encourage families to help out. this is not something that will goway unless we work to find a solution. that is unless we as a society recognize it and take away the stigmas related to pose paragraph tum depression and help provide support to those ave gone through very who come forward for help. we raise this awareness. if we do this we can find solutions to make sure that tragedies that befell emily and her family won't happen again. i ask my community, state, colleagues, friends, members of congress to come to the table to help save lives so that children like emily's five children are not left without a mother. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition. >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute.
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mr. hastings: thank you very much, mr. speaker. as my colleague, brad schneider just said, yesterday we held a moment of silence for those that were killed at santa fe high school. i have relatives and their children that live in parkland, so these kinds of shootings affect us all. everybody in this country knows that we have a gun epidemic in this country. e also know that we have a severe mental health crisis in our nation. in my opinion, it's morally unjust for this congress to do nothing. severe mental health crisis in our nation. i own a gun. i believe in the second amendment. i would stand toe to toe with anyone who would urge that we take guns away from people. but i'll stand with anyone that
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says that assault weapons should only be in the hands of military and police. i cannot understand how we continue to have these moments of silence and return to doing nothing. we don't have all of the answers, but we do have some of the answers. and to do nothing is morally bankrupt and legislative malpractice. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from north dakota seek recognition. mr. cramer: unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. cramer: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, during one of my recent weekly talk radio town halls, i spoke to a family member of a veteran who served aboard the destroyer, u.s.s. frankie evans, during the vietnam war. the vietnam veteran, richard, advocates for service members who died during the vietnam war but not presently recognized on
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the vietnam veterans memorial wall here in washington. the u.s.s. frankie evans provided naval gunfire off the coast the vietnam, including during the tet offensive. while conductsing friendly maneuvers outside the stone t. collided with a friendly australian aircraft carrier, killing 74 crew members. i introduced an amendment to the defense authorization act to engrave the names of the 74 crew members who died that day on the vietnam veterans memorial wall. their sacrifice and that of their families is worthy not only our mention but the high honor of being memorialized forever on the wall. i'm honored to lead this amendment and urge my colleagues to support t and look forward to the day the wall sen graved with the 74 heroes of the u.s.s. frankie evans. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. does any other member seek recognition? for what purpose does the entleman from texas seek heroes
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recognition. mr. burgess: by direction of the committee on rules, i call up house resolution 905 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: housaled number 146. house resolution 905. resolved, that at any time after adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill, h.r. 5515, to authorize recognition. appropriations for fiscal year 2019 for military activities of the department of defense and for military construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. general debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on armed services. after general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. in lieu of the amendment in the
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nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on armed services now printed in the bill, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of rules committee print 115-70 shall be considered as adopted in the house and in the committee of the whole. the bill, as amended, shall be considered as the original bill for the purpose of further amendment under the five-minute rule and shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended, are waived. section 2, a, no further amendment to the bill, as amended, shall be in order except those printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution and amendments en bloc described in section 3 of this resolution. b, each further amendment printed in the report of the amendment to the bill, as committee on rules shall be considered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be
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debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the house or in the committee of the whole. c, all points of order against the further amendments printed in the report of the committee on rules or amendments en bloc described in section 3 of this resolution are waived. section 3, it shall be in order at any time for the chair of the committee on armed services or his designee to offer amendments en bloc consisting of amendments printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution not earlier disposed of. amendments en bloc offered pursuant to this section shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for 20 minutes equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on armed services or their designees, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the house or in the committee of the whole.
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section 4, at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment pursuant to this resolution, the committee of the whole shall rise without motion. no further consideration of the bill shall be in order except pursuant to a subsequent order of the house. section 5, upon adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to consider in the house the bill, s. 204, to authorize the use of unapproved medical products by patients diagnosed with a terminal illness in accordance with state law, and for other purposes. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. of order against consideration of the bill are waived. the bill shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill are waived. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and on any amendment thereto to final passage without intervening motion except, one, one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on energy and commerce, and, two, one motion to recommit. section 6, upon adoption of
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this resolution it shall be in order to consider in the house the bill, s. 2155, to promote economic growth, provide tailored regulatory relief, and enhance consumer protections, and for other purposes. all points of order against onsideration of the bill are waived. the bill shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill are waived. the previous question waived. shall be considered as ordered on the bill and on any amendment thereto to final passage without intervening motion except, one, one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on financial services, and, two, one motion to commit. section 7, notwithstanding clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on the recorded vote ordered on the question of reconsideration of the vote on the question of passage of h.r. 2 may continue to be postponed through the legislative day of friday, june 22, 2018.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is now recognized for one hour. mr. burgess: thank you, mr. speaker. for the purpose of debate only i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from florida, mr. hastings, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. during consideration of this resolution, all time yielded is for the purpose of debate only. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. so ordered. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, house resolution 905 provides for the consideration of three important bills aimed at protecting our country, reducing regulatory burdens in the financial sector, and allowing patients, allowing patients who have nowhere else to turn, with another option to potentially save their lives. these three bills taken together show house republicans' commitment to putting americans' interest first. today's rule provides for a
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structured rule, to begin consideration of h.r. 5515. the national defense authorization act for fiscal year 2019. the resolution grants one hour of debate, equally divided between the chair and the ranking member of house committee on armed services. in addition, as the first of two likely rules on fiscal year 2019 d.n.a., the rule provides -- ndaa, the rule provides for consideration of 103 amendments to the defense bill. along with the defense authorization act, the resolution today provides for a rule for house consideration of s. 2155, the economic growth regulatory relief and consumer protection act, the senate-passed bipartisan bill to reduce the regulatory burdens imposed on community and local banks by the dodd-frank financial regulatory
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legislation. the legislation went through rigorous debate in the house and the senate and it mirrors in many ways the house-passed choice act, passed by the house in the summer of 2017, under the stewardship of financial services chair, jeb hensarling. moreover, the resolution before us provides for a rule to allow the house to consider the unanimously passed senate bill, s. 204, the trickett wendler, frank mongiello, jordan mclinn and matthew bellina right to try act of 2017. this legislation highlighted by the president during this legislation, highlighted by the president -- this legislation, high loited by the president, -- highlighted by the president, allows terminally ill patients a last chance at survival, using a carefully crafted f.d.a. process. h.r. 5515, the national defense authorization act for fiscal
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year 2019, would authorize appropriations for military activities of the department of defense for military construction, as well as prescribe military personnel strengths for the next fiscal year. this critical piece of legislation, one of the most important bills that any congress will consider in any year, provides the resources and the direction necessary for our men and women in uniform to do what they do best, protect and serve our country and to project throughout the world. as will be discussed by many members of this body over this week, this bill touches on all aspects of military policy. from the middle east, to the korean peninsula, to the arctic waters. among the hundreds of amendments the rules committee is likely to make in order on this legislation, i am pleased that once again my amendment, offered with ms. lee, mr. lance, mr. defazio, mr. jones,
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mr. welch, mr. lewis, ms. schakowsky, will again be made in order. this continues to push the department of defense to finally complete a full audit of its finances, as required by law. corrects some of the more egregious provisions in the dodd-frank financial regulatory legislation. the bill focuses on the regulatory relief, on smaller financial institutions, namely community banks and credit unions. so that they can more readily meet the needs of their local communities, without burdensome federal regulations stifling their economic growth. this places the focus of the financial institutions back on their customers, instead of on completing paperwork and answering to agencies in washington, d.c. finally, mr. speaker, our final bill in today's rule, h.r. 204,
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will look familiar to many people here today. as we are again considering legislation that would bring hope to terminally ill patients across our country. a similar bill, h.r. 5247, passed this house in march. minority leader chuck schumer and senate democrats have refused to act on h.r. 5247. the revised version of the right to try legislation, which passed the house two months ago on a strong bipartisan vote. as this body had heard earlier this year, right to try was the one piece of legislation, the one piece of legislation that president trump, when he came here to this house and stood in the well of this house and specifically promised to the american people in his state of the union address, today i will say again what i said in march when we first took up right to try, i stand with the president, i stand with the thousands of americans with terminal diseases and their families and their friends, in getting this important policy
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to the president's desk. because, mr. speaker, when we pass this bill today, it doesn't go back to the senate. it's already been passed by the senate. it goes immediately down to the white house for a signature and becomes law. here's an interesting fact. in the last couple of months since the house passed its right to try bill, even more states have joined this strong grassroots movement. now 40 states, including my home state of texas, have passed and signed a version of right to try into law. in nine other states, a version of right to try has already been introduced. including the state of new york, which is the home state of the minority leader of the united states senate. last year the energy and commerce health subcommittee held a hairing on access to -- hearing on access to investigating a drugs. at that time -- investigational drugs. and at that time, the administrator of the food and drug administration and other advocacy groups expressed concerns on the various right
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to try bills introduced in the senate and the house. so, when the president asked the congress to act, the house responded by holding multistakeholder discussions with patient groups, medical research advocates, and the administration in order to improve the original right to try bill. and i want to commend chairman walden for leading these negotiations. i'm also proud of the revised right to try legislation that the energy and commerce committee produced, because the policies were sound, and i believe it was a positive step forward in granting access to new treatments while allowing additional input from the food and drug administration. unfortunately, unfortunately the minority party on the other side of the capitol, senate democrats, said no thank you to the revised house bill. while i'm not surprised by their decision, i think the american people, particularly patients with terminal diseases and their loved ones, would not be satisfied with a no thank
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you non-action by congress on such an important issue. today the house is ready to act for the american people and will be considering s. 204, the trickett wendler, frank mongiello, jordan mclinn and matthew bellina right to try act of 2017. this passed the senate unanimously last august. this bill will offer terminally ill patients a chance at life. and after it passes this house, will be signed into law. our nation has achieved unprecedented innovation and scientific breakthroughs and recently and over the course of the last decade. american patients have widespread access to innovative treatments, thanks to researchers in our academic institutions, and those worksing in the pharmaceutical and -- -- those working in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. we continue to hear from patients with serious life-threatening conditions, including constituents from north texas, who remain frustrated with what they see as regulatory barriers from trying new therapies when
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everything else has failed them. as a physician i understand that access to investigational drugs and therapies is a deeply personal priority for those seeking treatment, for those loved ones diagnosed with very difficult diseases. this crossroad, where our nation seems to be, when a potentially life saving treatment, while not approved, both exists but remains unavailable, is an important debate that we are having today for these americans. to them, it is not only a matter of life or death. but another chance to spend more time with their children, grandchildren, parents and other family members. some of the opponents of right to try point to the food and drug administration's current expanded access program, which is aimed at helping patients who do not qualify for clinical trials gain access to therapies that the agency has yet to approve. while this program makes a good-faith effort to help patients, we can do more by passing the right to try and
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creating an alternative pathway for these patients to access eligible investigational drugs. additionally, we know that many individuals may not qualify for a clinical trial if they do not meet strict patient inclusion criteria, which may include factors such as age, gender, type and stage of their disease, previous treatment history and other medical conditions. there are also many patients for whom participation in a clinical trial is not feasible. those two live in rural areas, far from the clinical trial sites. most, if not all, of the patients with terminal medical conditions fall into these cat dwoirs. this legislation that -- categories. this legislation that we're doing today allows patients to participate in an alternative pathway, opening another door to investigational drugs that does not exist today. while there are a few differences between s. 204 and the house-passed right to try legislation, the underlying policies between the two bills are very similar.
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for example, only certain investigational drugs are considered eligible under both bills. in order to qualify, the drug must have completed a phase one clinical trial and have an active application at the food and drug administration. it has to be under active development or production by a manufacturer. and may not -- and has not been amoved -- approved, licensed or cleared for sale under current law. also, both bills require reporting of serious adverse events, having written informed consent to the treating physician and notifying the agency when a sponsor provides an investigational drugs. -- drug. lastly, commissioner gottlieb at the food and drug administration recently expressed support for the senate-passed right to try bill being considered today, and said that the agency, his agency, would ensure that an appropriate level of patient safety through guidance and rulemaking. in other words, while the food and drug administration may have some additional work to
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keep -- the -- work, the key point is the agency can achieve the proper balance of ensuring patient safety and granting access to new investigational drugs. i think the commissioner would agree that we would have preferred the revised house right to try legislation, but doing nothing is currently not an option. hundreds of thousands of americans with terminal illnesses and their families are looking for us to act. i support restoring hope for these patients and giving them a fighting chance at life. i urge members of this esteemed body to support today's rule and all three underlyinging bills. mr. speaker, i'll -- underlying bills. mr. speaker, i'll reserve the alance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: thank you, mr. speaker. and i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding me the customary 30 minutes for debate. and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, the underlying measures that are in
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this combined rule are matters of substance that do need to be addressed. and i will get back to it in a moment. but several of my colleagues will join me today in cognizing an historic moment in this particular body, in his great country of ours. mr. speaker, first let me recognize -- madam speaker, let me recognize that tucked inside this rule is the majority's of and 84th closed rule this congress. and we're just in may. with more to go. that is a historic number. because it makes the 115th congress the most closed congress ever.
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my republican friends have made history for all the wrong reasons. but we should not let this milestone go unrecognized right from the very beginning. because it's a sad point in this chamber's history. it is why we have ignored virtually every major issue the public cares about. it is why this congress can't get anything done. . it is why we're so dysfunctional. it is clear it me that the majority has turned a deaf ear, which is absolutely shameful. please know this that 1,793 amendments offered by members of this body have been denied. when i came to congress in 1992, there was an echo chamber from the right talking about the democrats' closed rules.
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quite frankly at that time i did not understand that dynamic. and i arrived here and during that particular session of ongress we did have open rules, but there were closed rules as well. when nancy pelosi was last speaker, we had 12 open rules. this speaker, our now lame duck peaker, up to this point has been and is the only speaker of the house of representatives never to have an open rule. what that means is not just democrats have been shut out but republicans have been shut out. day in and day out, night in, and night out in the rules committee members offer up
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meaningful suggestions to this congress, and they are denied. what that is is not denying the member of congress, it is denying the people that those persons here to represent them expect them to advance measures that are pertinent to their respective communities. there will be members that will talk about the shamefulness of the kinds of amendments that have been denied. this particular measure $647 billion in base budget authority for defense programs in the coming fiscal year. as well as an additional $69 billion in overseas contingency operations. the legislation comes on the heels of the bipartisan budget agreement signed into law in february which increased the budget caps for defense and nondefense spending for two years.
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the legislation provides rightly a 2.6% pay raise for active duty troops. the highest such raise in nine years. it strengthens the military health system, provides assistance to local educational agencies servicing military dependent students, and improffings the transition assist -- improves the transition assistance program to provide service members better tailored resources and information as they prepare to enter civilian life. i was glad to see that this ndaa establishes a prescription drug monitoring program in order to prevent opioid abuse within the military, a proactive step that will help our country combat drug addiction. about this tant
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particular measure is the chairman, chairman fortenberry, and the ranking member, adam smith, have about this particular measure is the chairman with the members of th armed worked together along services committee to produce a bipartisan product. it proves it can be done. this is a bipartisan measure and most members in this body will have amendments that will be made in order and will have an opportunity to present their ideas how to better sustain military readiness. that is as it should be. but there are members of the armed services committee that belong to other committees of jurisdiction, and in those committees of jurisdiction where few hearings are held, no bipartisan effort is undertaken, they are shut out just as well as the rest of the members of the other jurisdictions. every jurisdiction in this congress should be bipartisan and should have input from both parties. and i find it passing strange
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that i hear voices saying that democrats are obstructionists. obstructionists of what? we can't even get amendments made in order. so the only thing we have left that we can do is voice our objection to the kind of closed process that we have witnessed during this particular session of congress, and i hope the american public understands how much their members are being denied an opportunity to represent them. of military readiness, the fiscal year 2019 ndaa dedicates substantial funding towards cutting edge of militar capibility and countering meerging threats from investments and cyber and space. the bill includes funding for thousands of additional active tute troops and authorizes important funding for military construction and infrastructure. you know what it doesn't include and what it won't, and there will be members that will
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offer that we have an authorization for the use of military force. 17 years have passed since we have had a new authorization for the use of military force. congress should be declaring war not presidents. and it doesn't mean this president. the three or four before him operating in this congress were allowed to go forward under the aegis of 17 years ago authorization for use of military force. i was also pleased to see an improved commitment to historically black colleges and universities in this year's packages. schools that are critical to ensuring a pipeline of highly skilled, diverse college graduates into the united states armed services. this bill also takes significant steps to support our allies. it provides $.3 billion for the european deterrence initiative
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and declares that it is the policy of the united states to counter russian influence campaigns. the bill also imposes additional sanctions on russia for violating the intermediate range nuclear forces treaty, and it renews authority in the war against the islamic state of iraq and syria and fully funds israeli missile defense partnerships. mr. speaker, there is a lot we can be proud of in this ndaa, unfortunately, despite all these important investments, there are few provisions in this bill that raise serious concerns. i have already spoken to the failure to pass a new military use of force measure. the one we have is overly broad and members have never had an opportunity to vote on a new
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one, even as we commit to military engagements overseas. members on both sides of the aisle agree that an up or down vote on a new aumf is long overdue. this is the time and place to do it. my colleagues, barbara lee, i'm sure, and my colleague on the rules committee, jim mcgovern, i'm sure, are going to offer measures that will accomplish that. i'm also particularly alarmed that this legislation repeals the federal ban on military production of low yield nuclear weapons. repealing this 15-year ban and pursuing low yield nuclear warheads for submarine launch ballistic missiles will have significant ramifications for global security. additionally the ndaa includes a number of provisions targeting d.o.d.'s fourth estate, which refers to nonmilitary portions of the defense department. these provisions affect human
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resources, information systems, and other important services that affect the day-to-day and of our service men women, as well as national readiness. under this bill, these offices are targeted with an and unrealistic and unnecessary spending cut. setting up a see quester-like, automatic 25% reduction to critical support functions. madam speaker, this brings me to the second measure, the economic growth regulatory relief and consumer protection act. under the pretext of providing relief to community banks, this bill rolls back importantings information and consumer protections and provides a giveaway to large wall street anks, allowing them to skirt enhanced regulations aimed at protecting our economy from another financial crisis. jordan d measure, the
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macklin and matthew belina, right to trial act, exposes more patients to farm and further sidelines the federal drug administration's ability to oversee investigational treatments than the bill passed by the house in march. in fact, during the rules committee hearing in march, energy commerce chair walden and house subcommittee and committee chair burgess had reservations about committee chair burgess had reservations about this measure, which is why the house took up the more narrowly focused bill in the first place. madam speaker, last friday there was another madam speaker, last friday there was another school shooting. again america watched in horror as students and teachers fled their classrooms from a murderous gun rampage. again community leaders and government officials offered
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houghts and prayers. yesterday we offered a moment of silence. again calls for stricter gun control laws and heightened school security runch. we all know -- return. we all know this will happen again to our young people. for that reason i can can state emphatically and without fear of having to correct the record that the republican leadership of this house has not only abdicated their responsibility to the american people and our children, but their commonsense -- common sense as well no. other country in the world has s many guns, as many homicides, or as many mass shootings as we do. there's simply no more time to wation. we -- waste. we need to be can considering a ban on bump stocks. we need to be considering a ban on assault weapons. we need to be considering --
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don't let anybody tell me we can't ban assault weapons. we did that when i first came to congress, we banned assault weapons and the kind of mass killings tweef seen went down after we did that. we need to be considering protective orders allowing people to petition a court to temporarily remove firearms from an individual in crisis. and we have seen evidence of that working when florida passed its law one week afterward, that law went into effect, a person had his guns removed who would have been a harm to himself and others. we need to be considering comprehensive background checks. we can't stop there. we need to increase access to mental health services. we need to eliminate the feeling in this country that seeking help that carries with it some sort of stigma. we need to learn to recognize the danger signs and offer a clear course of action. we need to teach students about conflict resolution, and we need to do more about civility
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in this nation, in this house, and we should be its leaders not standing and offering a moment of silence and returning to do nothing as we have done shooting after shooting, mass shooting after mass shooting in this country. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. at this time i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from michigan, member of the financial services committee, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in support of the f.y. 2019 national defense authorization act. want to thank chairman thornberry for all his leadership on this bill. providing for our nation's common defense is our constitutional duty. as a retired lieutenant general in the marine corps, i know that certainty from washington, especially on this side of the
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river, is critical for the military to carry out its missions. our men and women in uniform need consistency and reliability over the long term to meet complex threats, changing threats in all corners of the world. mr. bergman: this bill increases resources for readiness training and upgrades essential equipment to provide our war fighters with increased capabilities on land, at seas, and in the air. i also want to thank the committee for including report language highlighting the critical roll that the sioux locks play. located in my district are a single point of failure in a multibillion dollar supply chain and potential target for disruptive activities. any unscheduled outing of the locks would threaten our national security and in turn our national security. again, i thank the chairman for all his hard work on this defense authorization. i urge my colleagues to support the rule and the underlying
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bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: thank you, madam speaker. to discuss the commonsense issues we all care about but have been blocked during this yield a gress, i minute and a half to the distinguished gentleman from california, mr. lieu, a member of the foreign affairs and judiciary committees. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. . yield a inute and a half to the lieu: the majority has employed a technique called martial law that allows them to bring up bills with little to no notice, and now we have the most closed congress in u.s. history. . the majority has blocked most amendments on all bills.
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23 amendments of mine have been blocked. simple amendments. one of them basically says, hey, the federal government should invest more in cybersecurity. we can't even get a debate on that. really? another amendment i have deals with anti-corruption and whether you're a republican or a democrat or an independent, you don't want corruption. you don't want members of the executive branch making money off the taxpayers' dime. so one of these amendments basely says, we're not going to -- basically says, we're not going to reimburse the president or other members who they spend money at mar-a-lago. can't even get a vote on that. why? because the republican leadership knows it would pass. we need to open up this congress and have a debate. we came here to debate ideas, not to block them. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. at this time i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from indiana one minute, please.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. messer: thank you, madam speaker. i rise today in support of this historic bipartisan compromise that rolls back some of the most harmful policies from the dodd-frank act. and will help grow our economy mented -- economy. the act includes bipartisan legislation that i authored to help communities in indiana and across the united states save money on roads, bridges and schools. it reverses a backward banking rule that gave foreign countries an advantage over american cities and towns. this will drive down the cost of borrowing and make it cheaper for cities and towns to finance local infrastructure projects. ultimately, this bill saves taxpayer dollars. that's why it has passed the house twice, is supported by numerous advocacy groups, and my good friend, the state treasurer of indiana, kelly mitchell. i applaud this bill's inclusion in this banking reform package, and urge my colleagues to
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support the rule and the underlying bill. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: madam speaker, to discuss the commonsense issues that we all care about, but have been blocked during this closed congress, i yield a minute and a half to the distinguished gentleman from rhode island, mr. cicilline, a member of the foreign affairs and judiciary committees. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from rhode island is recognized. mr. cicilline: i thank the gentleman for yielding. you know, we pride ourselves on being part of the most deliberative body in the planet and all of us come here to contribute our best ideas to improve the live -- improve the lives of the american people. you wonder why this place doesn't work. the wholesale exclusion of ideas from nearly half this body. i'm someone who has offered 25 amendments that were blocked by the republicans. what are they afraid of? debate your ideas. make your arguments, vote be, be held accountable -- vote, be
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accountable. be a accountable. be a eanled -- account a -- accountable. a provision to end tax breaks for companies that ship american jobs overseas, and an amendment to increase funding for the fire departments in the safer grants thosmse are just examples. they've marked an important moment in history. not a good moment. the most closed congress in the history of the united states. excluding from consideration debate, argument, and accountability. vote on these things. so the american people know where you stand. and that is what we have here. over 1,000 ideas proffered by democrats that our republican colleagues won't even bring to the floor for consideration. so that the american people know where they stand on a range of important issues. this is a dark day for congress. the most closed congress in our history. it means the voices of the american people as reflected in nearly half of this body are not being considered, debated
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and voted upon by the congress. it's wrong. it's negatively impacting the lives of the american people. there are real consequences, not just that we want our own amendments considered, it's because we understand it will benefit the american people. and i urge my colleagues to have some self-reflection on what they're doing here. and with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: let me yield myself 30 seconds for the purpose of rebuttal before i yield to mr. budd of north carolina. as a point of situational awareness, as of last week in this congress, over 1,000 amendments have been heard on the house floor. 47% democratic, 41% republican. 15% bipartisan. for a point of reference, when the last term, where nancy pelosi was speaker of the house, the 111th congress, less than 1,000 amendments for the entire congress. we passed that milestone prior to last week. we will continue to hear amendments on the floor.
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i now yield one minute to the gentleman from north carolina. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized. mr. budd: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the gentleman from texas. today is a great day for north carolina's community financial institutions, small business innovators and, most importantly, our economy. i rise today in strong support of this rule that will bring a much-needed regulatory relief bill, s. 2155, to the house floor. the most damaging aspect of the dodd-frank bill was the additional and unnecessary regulatory burden placed on community financial institutions. and because of this, we've seen american consumers and small businesses struggle to get the credit and the support that they need. economic growth is held back because of dodd-frank. i am happy to report that relief is on the way, with the passage of s. 2155. mr. speaker, while i urge adoption of this rule and urge passage of this bill, i also look forward to working with our chairman and our leader,
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jeb hensarling, senator mike crapo, and senate democrats to craft a package of bills that focuses on capital formation. i offer any support i can to help bring that collection of bills across the finish line as well. i urge adoption of the rule. madam speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: thank you, madam speaker. just to respond briefly to mr. burgess. it's a good thing that they made a handful of amendments in order that added up to 1,000. if we went through it, they would look like studies and things that were not significant. but when it came to the health care measures when it came to tax reform, not one amendment was made in order by a democrat. madam speaker, to discuss the significance of this record-breaking closed congress, and real people affected by these closed rules, i yield a minute and a half to the distinguished gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. delauro, who is a member of the
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appropriations committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. delauro: madam speaker, this week the republican majority won the honor of having run the most closed congress in the american history. 84 closed rules, zero open rules. what does that mean? it neens they blocked us -- it means that they blocked from us fully debating or amending legislation, prohibiting us from fully giving our constituents a voice in this congress. why are we here? our constituents sent us here to be able to debate issues and to vote on those issues. two weeks ago the majority blocked my amendment to ensure equal pay for equal work. congress passed the equal pay act in 1963 to end unequal wages. yet in 2018 women still earn about 80 cents on average to a man's $1. the gap is worse for women of color. a woman working full-time will lose -- full time will lose $400,000 over the course of her
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career. african-american women lose $840,000. latinas will lose over $1 million. an since women are the sole or co-bread winner in half of the families with children, our nation's families and our economy suffers. which is why i offered the paycheck fairness act as an amendment. it toughens recommend disin the equal pay act to help america's working women fight wage description and receive a full paycheck. they blocked it. the strength of this institution is its potential. to make a difference in the lives of the american people. that is vital when the biggest economic challenge our jobs -- are jobs that do not pay them enough to live on. help pay wages, improve education, fix crumbling infrastructure, we cannot do that when this majority, more than any in american hift -- history, has closed the house to debate and amendments. they've closed it to action. it's unacceptable. the american people deserve better. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. ms. delauro: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. at this time i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from georgia, mr. loudermilk, for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. loudermilk: thank you, madam speaker. i thank my colleague from texas, mr. burgess, for yielding this time to debate these important measures. this is a historic moment here in the house. today we will be sending the most significant financial regulatory relief legislation to the president's desk in more than a decade. i am proud to have been part of this effort and i thank all of my colleagues who helped get us to this moment. mr. speaker, madam speaker, for the past 3 1/2 years i've served in this house, i have been telling the same story over and over again. my home state of georgia lost 70 banks during the financial crisis. the most of any state in the nation. today 52 of georgia's counties do not have a community bank headquartered there and three of georgia's counties have no bank branch whatsoever. why? because of excessive regulatory burden placed on small
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community banks and credit unions by previous legislative action and through overreach by regulators. today we are taking a major step toward reversing that trend by taking bold action to send pro-growth regulatory relief to small community banks and credit unions to the president's desk. this bill will help ensure that community banks and credit unions will no longer be crushed under the weight of regulations that do not distinguish between them and the largest financial institutions. much of this bill originally came from house bills, bipartisan i may add, and this moment is an example of the legislative process working well in a strong bipartisan favor. i urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: madam speaker, would you be so kind as to advise both parties how much time remains? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida has 10 1/2 minutes. mr. hastings: 10 1/2? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas has 13.
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mr. hastings: thank you very much, madam speaker. to discuss the significance of this record-breaking closed rule and the real people affected by the g.o.p.'s shutting down our democratic process, i yield a minute and a half to the distinguished gentleman from michigan, mr. kildee, a member of the financial services committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. kildee: thank you, madam speaker. i thank my friend for yielding. i'm here to protest what has been the most closed congress in american history. and i know the other side will site the -- cite the number of amendments that have been allowed but the fact remains, this is the most closed congress we have ever had. 84 closed rules. not one open rule. we are sent here by our constituents to advocate for their interests. and in the minority, one of the few tools we have is the ability to offer amendments and have those arguments heard on the floor of this house. knowing that we may not win
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every fight, knowing we may not win a majority on each idea, but we ought to at least allow the power of a good idea to have a fair hearing. 28 times i've offered amendments, thoughtful amendments that were crafted with the idea that we could actually improve policy, and 28 times those amendments have been blocked. and these are not messaging amendments. just to give two examples. one would vin creased the amount of funding -- would have increased the amount of funding available to local governments that are struggling to improve their drinking water systems. think about my hometown of flint and the hundreds of other communities that would have benefited from that. another would have directed the federal government to do more to deal with this issue of chemicals that is poisoning ground water. and in fact, while the e.p.a. is having a conversation today about this very dangerous chemical that's affecting human life in this country, i offered an opportunity for congress to do something. why didn't we do it?
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because up in the rules committee it was blocked. the ideas ought to have a chance on the floor of the house. that's what we are sent here to do. we ought to open this congress up. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. i'm pleased to recognize for one minute the gentleman from lye, mr. davidson. one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. jordan davidson mr. speaker, i rise in -- mr. davidson: mr. speaker, i rise in support of this legislation. this pro-growth bill is thanks to all the hardwork of members of the house financial services committee and i'm proud to have contributed to this meaningful reform. s. 2155 will reduce regulatory burdens hindering main street by providing job creators with resources they need to grow their businesses. and frankly their banks. under dodd-frank, big banks have gotten bigger and small banks have become fewer. our economy is not well served when small banks are handy capped. as a former manufacturer i understand the toll excessive regulatory burdens can have on small businesses.
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that is why i'm a proud supporter of this legislation and i look forward to seeing this bill signed on the president's desk. with that, mr. chairman, i yield. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: madam speaker, if we defeat the previous question, i'm going to offer an amendment to the rule, to bring up representative sarbanes' bill, h.r. 20, the government by the people act. this legislation would overhaul our broken campaign finance system and return to a government of, by and for the american people. madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of my amendment in the record, along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote on the previous question. . the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hastings: to discuss our proposal i yield to the gentleman from maryland, a member of the energy and commerce and oversight committee, mr. sarbanes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized.
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mr. sarbanes: thank you, smars. i thank the gentleman for yielding. no matter what you think of s. 2155, one of the underlying bills being considered today, it is not what a clear majority of americans want congress to be doing. madam speaker, nobody's coming up to us in town halls and asking congress it deregulate large financial institutions. we're not going to fish fries and hearing from people that they want to dismantle important consumer protections. and nobody at v.f.w. halls, rotary clubs, and p.t.a. meetings thinks this bill should be congress' priority. the reason this bill is on the floor is the powerbrokers on wall street want it on the floor. it's their bill. not the people's bill. our broken campaign finance system lays at the heart of this warped political system where big money calls the shots in washington. for starters, in this system this broken system, too many good candidates without access to big money are effectively barred from running all
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ogether. those who make it through spend hours dialing for dollars, courting a narrow slice of the nation's elite, while high powered lobbyists and special interests are dictating legislation here in congress like today. most cleently she backroom powerbrokers used influence to demand billion dollar handouts for the wealthiest 1% from the g.o.p. tax scam. now they are once again tearing down critical rules to protect our financial system those who make it through spend from another economic collapse. today's previous question would force a vote on h.r. 20, the government by the team act, a comprehensive reform of our campaign finance system to combat the influence of big money in our politics. raise civic engagement. and amplify the voice of everyday americans. this legislation would increase and multiply the power of small donors in america, breaking candidates' reliance on a big money crown, and giving candidates the resources they need to compete and win. when it comes time to
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make policy, elected representatives of the people will work on behalf of our constituents not the big money donors. madam speaker, the american people are sick of getting a raw deal from washington. that's why democrats are offering a better deal from our democracy. a comprehensive reform agenda to get rid of the corruption that's led to such a dysfunctional political system here in washington. we will deliver real reforms that will restore a government, of, by, and for the people. i yield back. the eaker pro tempore: gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. at this time i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from tennessee, mr. kustoff, for one minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. kustoff: i thank the gentleman. thank you, madam speaker. the gentleman from florida today i rise in support of s. 2155, the economic growth regulatory relief and consumer protection act. this pro-growth package provides the desperately needed regulatory relief to our
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community financial institutions while providing consumers with greater options for accessing credit. for too long we have seen many of the onerous regulatory burdens restrict banks and credit unions from serving the needs of their communities. after eight years of failed economic policies, which led to the slowest, weakest recovery in the modern era, the economy is finally starting to take off and consumer optimism is increasing each and every day. as a member of the house financial services committee, we have remained committed in passing legislation designed to roll back some of the most burdensome provisions in the dodd-frank act. this legislation was intended to reign in large financial institutions while harming our local community banks and credit unions. these increased regulations create add hire cost of business and diminished credit availability. frankly the economic growth regulatory relief and consumer
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protection act tailors the rules to the size and risk provial rather than imposing sweeping damaging changes to our consumer financial institutions. i want to thank my colleagues for their work on this important legislation. urge passage on the rule and final vote. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hastings: to continue the discuss we all care about but blocked during this closed congress, i yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from texas, mr. gonzalez, a member of the financial services committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. gonzalez: i thank you my friend and distinguished member of congress. mr. hastings, for providing me the opportunity to speak today on behalf of deported veterans. mr. speaker, setting the record for the most closed congress is not a proud accomplishment. our job is in our title, representatives. we represent the american
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people. according to the most recent gallup poll, 78% of americans disapprove of the way congress is handling itself. can you blame them? when i came to congress i heard from constituents and americans across the country about the injustice of deported veterans. i heard from arnold from connecticut who was sported to italy after coming to the united states at age 4 and serving honorably in our country. i heard from a purple heart recipient from my district brought to the united states as an infant, served two tours in iraq, came home, honorably discharged with ptsd, suffered major injury from an i.e.d., and failed to get the care he needed from the veterans administration. due to drugs and chow, found himself in trouble and now deported. these stories are flooding in from all corners of the globe. we're deporting honorably discharged veterans after a promise. this is a disgrace. i yield back my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i reserve at this time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: mr. speaker, to discuss commonsense issues we all care about but have been blocked during this closed congress, i recognize and yield one minute to my good friend, the distinguished gentleman from vermont, former member of the rules committee, mr. welch, who is now a member of energy and commerce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from vermont is recognized. mr. welch: i thank the gentleman. this is the most closed congress in my lifetime. 84 closed rules. it means we don't debate on the floor. that's also on top of the fact we don't debate in committee. the tax bill passed out of the ways and means committee had no discussion, no debate, no publication until it was brought up for vote. the same thing with the health care bill. we need to be debating things. one of them was allowing citizens to import safe
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prescription drugs from canada at lower cost when those prescriptions were manufactured at f.d.a.-approved facilities. i loffered that amendment. we were denied the opportunity to vote on that. had we been allowed to vote on it, it would have passed. mr. speaker, americans would have saved billions of dollars. i said the word billions. billions ofle toars on saved prescription medication if we could crack the lock that phrma has on price gouging for pharmaceuticals. we could do that if the majority would allow us to vote on amendments that pursue the opportunities that americans need to be safe and secure. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman reserves. gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: thank you, very much, mr. speaker. to discuss the significance of this record breaking closed
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congress and real people affected by these closed rules, i'm very pleased to yield two minutes to the ranking member, my good friend from massachusetts, mr. mcgovern, who also serves on the agriculture committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: thank you. mr. speaker, this is a sad day. a very sad day for this institution. today it becomes official, this will become the most closed congress ever in the history of the united states. and you heard why this matters. you heard from some my colleagues here today that important issues, issues that the american people care about, like insuring clean water for children, high ethics in the executive branch, cyber security, like banning bump stocks, or protecting our veterans or medicare, social security these amendments are routinely denied. shut out. out.
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millions of young people all over the country protested for us to do something to combat gun violence. and we have done nothing. we have done nothing in this chamber other than a moment of silence. and the frustration of these young people is compounded by that we can't even bring an amendment to the floor to ban bump stocks or to expand our background checks or to ban assault weapons. they don't want that we can't t come to the floor. it is outrageous and for anybody to stand up here and to defend this process, to somehow normalize this process, give me a break. this closed process is something you would see in russia or turkey it is or some other authoritarian government not in the people's house. this is supposed to be the greatest deliberative body in the world. what's so radical about deliberating every once in a while? we have a report that we're releasing today, 230 pages, go to the rules committee democrats webpage, you'll read all about it. how there has been a deliberate attempt to shut out the voices
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of the american people. enough. this is not the way this place is supposed to be run. if we're given the privilege to run this place again, if democrats could control this house again, we need to be more accommodating. we need to be more open. we need to allow this place to be a deliberative body where important issues get debated. may i have -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized. mr. mcgovern: we need to fix problems in this country. we could pass a bill to protect the dreamers in a nanosecond if the republican majority would allow us to bring an amendment to the floor. but they won't. why? because they are afraid we would win. they don't want a fair fight. they want a system that's always rigged in their favor. that's not democratcy. that's not the way this place is supposed to be run. if we have a more accommodating approach to legislating, then i guarantee you that the polarization will be less. you'll have more bills that will pass in a bipartisan way.
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and by the way, it's not just democrats. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. mcgovern: 180 republicans -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 15 seconds. mr. mcgovern: the sad thing is get hey just go along to along and they are complicit in this most closed process in u.s. history. enough, enough. we deserve better. the american people deserve better. get along and they are complicit in this most my constituents deserve better. your constituents deserve better. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. mcgovern: this place used to be run differently. i said to my republican friends, have the guts to stand with us and vote no on this closed process. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: let me yield myself a minute and a half for purposes of response. i would of course lead with the observation that those who do not remember their history are doomed to repeat it. i don't remember precisely who aid it, but i think it bears
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repeating today. in the 111th congress, speaker pelosi and the democrats allowed less than 1,000 amendments to be considered can on the floor. less than a thousand. will i not yield because this is -- -- i will not yield because this is important to get out there. at the bills considered at that time, dodd-frank was one of those bills much the amendments blocked by the democrats in the 111th congress were precisely the types of amendments that we're now considering today in the bill to alleviate some of the obstruction, some of the gridlock that has occurred with our credit unions 1345u8er banks -- smaller banks, things people have been asking us for repeatedly for the last five to seven years. the fact of the -- mr. speaker, can we have regular order. mr. speaker, the number of amendments that were blocked in the 111th congress was significant. we have a chance today to undo some of that process.
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and i believe we ought to take that opportunity. as of a week and a half ago, over 1,000 amendments had been made in order in this congress. the rules committee is run differently today than it was in the 111th congress. submit to be you had to amendments, 45 copies. you had a time limit by which you had to submit those amendments. you can submit amendments late. chairman sessions has submit amendments, been very accommodating. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. burgess: another 30 seconds. chairman session hasegawa been very accommodating in allowing us to bring rules to the rules committee late. there is no clock in the rules committee as the gentleman well knows. you can can talk for as long as you want in the rules committee about your amendments. u can can offer whatever amendments you prefer. the process while not ideal, the process is important that we move forward with these important reforms that people have been asking us for years. and today amendments you prefer. that day.
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and those reforms will be delivered. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. hastings: i yield mr. mcgovern 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 15 seconds. mr. mcgovern: let me say to my friend from texas. we don't want to talk. that's what you guys want to do. we want to legislate. the fact is the majority of bills that you have brought to this house floor have been closed. you have more closed rules than any other congress in the history of the united states of america. how anybody can can defend that with a straight face is beyond me. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. hastings: i ask how much time i have remaining. the speaker pro tempore: one minute. mr. hastings: i'm advise my friend from texas, i'm prepared to close if he is.
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i ask the american people to look at this chart. rules under speaker ryan. structured rules 44%. closed rules 56%. open rules, zero. that's what we're talking about. as with all bipartisan measures, this n.d.a. has many things to like and some provisions that are causes for concern but it did demonstrate there can be bipartisan cooperation in order to safeguard our national security and that should be the case in every one of the jurisdictional undertakings here in congress. i commend the committee for once again tackling such a major legislative package but sadly this approach is far and away the exception to the rule around here. finally mr. speaker we have a moral responsibility to address gun violence in this country. gun violence has overtaken our country.
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every child that takes -- attends school not thinking about if a shooting will happen ut when. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i yield myself the balance of our time. mr. burgess: i again want to reiterate the rule committees has spent hours listening and considering member testimony, we've offered over 225 member it is testify during this congress nd roughly 493 times have made over 1,000 amendments in order including 474 from democrats and over 150 which were bipartisan amendments. the rule today is important. three important pieces of legislation. the national defense authorization act, our number one priority when we're elected is the defense of our nation and we are authorizeding -- authorizing that expenditure today.
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the bill to reform the financial ervice institutions. the speaker pro tempore: the request sewn the motion. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. mr. hastings: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. pursuant to clause 8 and clause
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9 of rule 20, the 15-minute vote on ordering the previous question will be followed by five-minute votes on adoption of house resolution 095 if ordered approval of the journal if ordered. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 22, the nays are 184. the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. >> i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having risen a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 227, the nays are 180. the resolution is adopted. without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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pursuant to clause of rule 20, the unfinished business is the question on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal which the chair will put de novo. the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the journal stands approved. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: mr. speaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: question the yeas and nays on the journal. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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