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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  June 27, 2018 1:59pm-4:00pm EDT

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the speaker pro tempore: ton this vote the yeas are 231, the nays are 181. the resolution is ordered. the question is on adoption of they have resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the opinion of the chair the ayes have it. the gentlelady from california. >> i ask for a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady requests a recorded vote. those in favor of taking the recorded vote will rise. a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes
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by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 230. the nays are 185. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, sir, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, -- rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on june 27, 2018, at 11:38 a.m. that the senate passed senate 2385, that the senate passed with an amendment h.r. 5895. signed, sincerely, karen l. aas.
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. the house will resume proceedings on postponed questions at a later time. he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from alabama seek recognition? mrs. brooks: mr. speaker, i move to the suspend the rules -- mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5345, the american leadership in space technology and advanced rocketry act, otherwise known as the alstar act. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman move to pass the bill as amended?
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mr. brooks: yes. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: a bill to designate the marshall space flight center of the national aeronautics and space administration to provide leadership for the u.s. rocket propulsion industrial base, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from alabama, mr. brooks, and the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from alabama. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and xtend their remarks and to include extraneous material on h.r. 5345, the bill now under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman. -- the gentleman is recognized. mr. brooks: as congressman for the tennessee valley in the state of alabama i appreciate the valuable contribution the marshall space flight center has made and continues to make to america's rocket propulsion capabilities. as a child growing up in
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huntsville, alabama, i well remember the 1960's as nearby saturn 5 rocket engine tests shook the ground and rattled the windows. i also remember the great pride in america i felt the moment neil armstrong stepped on the moon after leaving the earth on one of our saturn 5 rockets. no doubt about it, developing and improving rocket propulsion is essential, essential to americans' leadership in space exploration and national security and it has been the marshall space flight center that has provided and continues to provide the cutting edge expertise america needs in both solid and liquid rocket propulsion. over the last several years, america's witnessed a resurgence in the rocket propulsion industry as traditional and emerging actors move forward. it is important that the federal government minimize
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expensive duplication and support healthy cooperation and communication between the private sector and federal government to promote america's robust rocket propulsion industry. with president trump's establishment of space force as an independent branch of the military, rocket propulsion is recognized as even more important to securing america's future than ever before because america's military relies heavily on its space assets. global positioning satellites being but one example to protect our national security. as congress guides america's national space policy, we must promote the robust rocket propulsion industrial base that to to our space presence. my bill, h.r. 5345, the american leadership in space technology and advanced rocketry act of 2018, commonly
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known as the alstar act, helps ensure the long-term stability of the rocket propulsion industry through better coordination and collaboration between all relevant stakeholders, public and private. . specifically, the alstar act formally designates the marshall space flight center as nasa's current and future lead center for rocket propulsion. in addition, the alstar act directs marshall to explore, develop, and mature new rocket propulsion technology in cooperation with partners across and outside of government. this new emphasis, while building on a strong foundation, helps to ensure that america remains at the orefront of space exploration. mr. speaker, in the 1940's and 1950's, voyages to the moon were thought impossible. but america rose to the challenge and overcame the impossible.
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today america must once again challenge itself to reach far beyond its limits. through our increased attention, focus, and support of the utilization of space and their exploration of deep space, we, too, can overcome the impossible and help inspire the next generation of americans to look to the stars and go where no one has gone before. thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from alabama reserves. gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. veasey: i support a robust and innovative space industry, also believe that it is very important that we leverage the investments taxpayers have allowed the nation to make in its facilities and work force. the bill before us today that
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is known as h.r. 5345, are also known as the american leadership in space technology and advance rocketry act recognizes the rocket propulsion work of the marshall space flight center, and that center's role in helping to develop the next generation of rocket propulsion capabilities. the marshall center has long -- has a long and storied history in rocket development dating back to the huge saturn five rocket set that powered our satellites to the room. i support moving this bill out of the house floor. thank you. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. gentleman from alabama is recognized. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. lamar smith. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i thank the vice chairman of the space subcommittee for yielding me time and i appreciate all that mr. brooks has done.
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the gentleman from alabama, for space exploration and for space flight. the house science, space, and technology committee has demonstrated time again that u.s. leadership in space is bipartisan activity. the scientists, engineers, and technicians at the marshall space flight center in huntsville, alabama, have for more than half a century led the world in the development of rocket propulsion. h.r. 5345, the american leadership in stays technology and advanced rocketry act, recognizes the impressive accomplishments of marshall, as well as the vital ongoing work they continue to do to ensure continue ited american leadership in space technology -- continued american leadership in space technology and rocket capabilities. as our future in space looks bolder, bigger, and brighter, i'm quf dent marshall will continue to be a reliable, powerful, dependable team player in moving this nation forward. mr. speaker, vice chairman brooks has always been a strong and effective advocate for space initiatives and marshall
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space flight center. i appreciate all he has done on this subject and we very much appreciate his being such a leader on the science committee. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from alabama reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i continue to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from alabama. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. brian babin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. babin: thank you, mr. speaker. it's an honor and privilege to work with mr. -- representative mo brooks on the space subcommittee. advancing our nation's priorities and doing our part to ensure strong leadership in america's space program. mo, i want to thank you for this important bill. you are a true champion of marshall space flight center, the center's employees, and the important work that they do every day to keep america first
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in space. the excitement and enthusiasm about our government and the private space activities has been building toward a fevered pitch. to fine scientists, engineers, and technicians at marshall space flight center have for more than half a century led the world in the development of rocket propulsion. this bill recognizes the impressive accomplishments of marshall, as well as the vital ongoing work that they continue to do to ensure continued american leadership in space. i'm very proud to have worked on and co-sponsored this legislation with my colleague, mr. brooks. as our future in space looks bolder and brighter, aim confident that the marshall space flight center will continue to be a reliable, powerful, dependable team player in moving this nation forward. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from alabama reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: i continue to
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reserve. the speaker pro tempore: reserves. the gentleman from alabama is recognized. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers and i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i have no further requests at this time. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. the gentleman from alabama is recognized. mr. brooks: mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5345, as amended. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition. mr. posey: i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5346, the commercial space support vehicle act. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5346, a bill to amend title 51 united states code to provide for licenses and experimental permits for space support vehicles, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, gentleman from florida, mr. posey, and the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida. mr. posey: thank you, mr.
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speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and to heir remarks include extraneous material on h.r. 5346, the bill now under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. posey: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. posey: thank you, mr. speaker. h.r. 5346, the commercial space vehicle support act, was largely developed with input from the department of transportation report on approaches for streamlining and licensing and permitting of hybrid launch vehicles to enable nonlaunch flight operations. hybrid launch vehicles are those that have some of the characteristics of aircraft, and some of the characteristics of launch vehicles. companies would like to utilize space support vehicles to train crews and space flight
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participants by exposing them to the psychlogical effects encountered in space flight, or conduct research in reduced gravity environments. space ports like those in florida and other states would like to attract those companies to operate out of their facilities. the d.o.t. report concluded that, quote, the opinion of having a single statutory regime and regulatory office oversee a demonstrated commercial space program throughout its operational lifestyle would allow consistent application of regulatory philosophy and safety oversight, and be more efficient and cost-effective for the launch operator, as well as a licensing agentcy. for an evolving industry, a regulatory environment that can adjust to accommodate changes, would allow for more flexible and more responsive oversight, end of quote. additionally, the g.a.o. report issued last year recommended
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that f.a.a. exam -- examine the f.a.a.'s current regulatory framework for space vehicles and suggest changes as applicable. i believe h.r. 5 4 provides the appropriate regulatory approach by authorizing the secretary of transportation to develop the regulations by march 1, 2019. allowing license space port flights, the intent of timing is to include the development of regulations in the regulatory reform process. and the vice president and the national space council task the f.a.a. to complete by that date. of course i want to thank my friend of many, many decades, congressman lawson from the great state of florida, for his co-sponsorship and support of this bill, as well as chairman lamar smith and subcommittee chairman brian babin, both of texas, for advancing and
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co-sponsoring this great piece of legislation. thank you, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: i rise to support a robust and successful commercial space industry. in that regard i look forward to continuing to work with my colleagues on policies that facilitate the nation's continued growth and leadership in space. the bill before us today, h.r. 5346, known as a the commercial space support vehicle act, will amend the statute to provide the secretary of transportation with the authority to license or permit space support vehicles for space support flights such as crew training, research, and development that are related to space launch or re-entry. while i am not aware of any pressing need for this amendment at this time, it may provide the industry with some
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additional flexibility. in addition, mr. speaker, it's very important to point out, too, that the f.a.a.'s office of commercial space transportation has traditionally resourced to accommodate any additional work so the office can continue to focus on its core responsibilities of licensing and permitting commercial space launch and re-entry vehicles. i support moving the bill out of the house. thank you. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. posey: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized for two minutes. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i appreciate the long time efforts of the gentleman from florida, mr. posey, to advance space initiatives. his efforts are reflected in h.r. 5346, the commercial space support vehicle act, which he authored and brings to the floor today. maintaining and expanding america's leadership in human space activity, especially in
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the commercial speights sector, is a pry -- space sector, is a priority of mine and paramount importance to mr. posey and the members of the science, space, and technology committee. the commercial space support vehicle act was developed with input from the department of transportation as a new and better approach for streamlining the licensing and permitting process of hybrid launch vehicles. private companies would like to use space support vehicles to train crews and space flight participants by exposing them to the physicalological effects and reduced graphity -- gravity environment encountered in space flight. many space ports would like to encourage companies to operate out of their facilities. this bill provides the fairest, most appropriate regulatory aa proach by authorizing the secretary of transportation to develop regulations according to the requirements of the bill by march 1, 2019, thereby enabling licensed space support flights. mr. speaker, i again want to thank mr. posey who is a
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leader, always, on space issues for taking the initiative on this bill. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. the gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. babin: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my colleague, the gentleman from florida, mr. bill posey, for his tireless efforts in drafting the commercial space support vehicle act and his leadership in the space subcommittee in moving this bill to the house floor today. bill, you have always been and continue to be one of the leading champions in congress for american leadership in space. and i'm pleased to be a co-sponsor of your bill. simply said, this bill will create jobs and economic growth in the nation's commercial space ports and it will streamline licensing requirements so that our innovators in the hybrid launch
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vehicle market can train special flight crews and participants. these innovators are at the forefront of providing aerial platforms for very important microgravity research. g.a.o. recommended in its report that the f.a.a. examine the f.a.a.'s current regulatory framework for space support vehicles and suggested regulatory changes as applicable. i believe that h.r. 5346 provides the appropriate regulatory approach by authorizing the secretary of transportation to develop the regulations by march 1, 2019, which will allow licensed space support flights. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. the gentleman from florida reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. posey: thank you, mr. speaker. i once again want to thank the
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co-sponsors on both sides of the aisle here. this has been about a nine-year journey to make this much-needed change to our laws. continue to reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman reserve? the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i have no further requests, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. posey: mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time nd i am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5346. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, seek recognition?
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mr. weber: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5905, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. , a bill : h.r. 5905, to authorize basic research programs in the department of energy office of science for fiscal years 2018 and 2019. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, and the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. weber. mr. weber: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to include extraneous material on h.r. 5905, the bill now under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. i yield : mr. speaker, myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, is recognized. mr. weber: mr. speaker, i am rising in support of h.r. 5905, the department of energy science and innovation act of 2018. this legislation authorizes the department of energy's office of science programs for fiscal years 2018 and 2019.
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it also authorizes upgrades and new construction of major user facilities at the department of energy, d.o.e., national labs, and universities. over the past four years, the energy subcommittee has met with stakeholders, held hearings, and wrote -- worked extensively with our colleagues to draft the language included in today's legislation. during this comprehensive process we spoke with d.o.e. officials, directors of d.o.e. national labs, academia and industry representatives about the right priorities for these office of science programs. the result was a series of bills that the science committee advanced through the house this congress including 4377, 9, h.r. 4376, h.r. and h.r. 4675. now, the legislation we will consider today combines these bills to form a bipartisan authorization of the department's basic science research.
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this includes over $6 billion in fundamental research and discovery science, largely performed at d.o.e. national laboratories and user facilities around the country. last month, i had the opportunity to visit a number of these facilities at argon national laboratory with several of my science committee colleagues. we got to see firsthand the incredible work that researchers do for our country and for the world. from advanced scientific computing to nuclear physics to fusion energy science, focusing on basic research at our national labs provides the best opportunity for u.s. economic growth and technology innovation. h.r. 5905 authorizes funding for critical infrastructure projects at these national labs. in the basic energy science's program, it authorizes upgrades to world leading x-ray
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facilities around the country like the advanced foe ton source at argon national lab and the advanced light source at lawrence berkley national lab. these facilities give american scientists the tools they need to study the structure and behavior of both physical and biological materials, enabling innovation in many fields, including creating new materials for industrial as well as pharmaceutical use. this legislation also authorizes the construction of new d.o.e. research facilities for nuclear physics and high energy physics. this includes construction of the facility for rare isotope beams at michigan state university which will enable the critical nuclear physics research across a wide bred of elds bredth of fields, including a facility at a lab
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and project designed to build the world's highest intensity nutrino beam. this will help shed light on the universe and its orgeins. this bill, mr. speaker, also specifically authorizes basic research in fields that are critical to u.s. dominance in science and technology. it authorizes research in exoscale computing, fusion energy sciences. it establishes a doe computing program, a low dose research program and programs for managing our energy frontier research centers and bioenergy research centers and ensures we fulfill our commitments to the project for fiscal years 2018 nd 2019. significant investments in foreign countries like china threatens america's global standing as the leader in scientific knowledge. to maintain our competitive advantage as a world leader in science, we must continue to
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pport the research and the research infrastructure that will lead to next generation energy technologies. h.r. 5905 is a commonsense bill that will maintain american leadership in science. want to thank chairman smith, ranking member lofgren for co-sponsor this important legislation. i'm grateful for the opportunity to work with members of this committee to help america compete around the world. and, mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 5905, the department of energy science and innovation act of 2018. this bill provides important statutory direction to the department of energy's office of science, which is our nation's largest supporter of research in the physical sciences. so it is impossible to overstate its importance to our energy -- to our energy future
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and to our overall innovation enterprise. this agency also operates more than 30 world-class scientific user facilities whose applications range from developing new materials for next gen batteries to new pharmaceuticals that will better treat diseases. to even examining the fundamental building blocks of the universe. much of this bill is derived from previous bipartisan, bicameral agreements that were included in h.r. 589, the house-passed department of energy research and innovation act of 2017. as we await senate action on that legislation, i support moving forward with additional language included in this bill that would authorize upgrades to several important user facilities. i direct d.o.e. to provide sufficient support to maintain our commitment to the international fusion project and provides statutory authority to fund low-dose radiation research as well as a
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promising computational materials initiative at our national labs. i would also note that i'm happy to see robust funding levels included in this bipartisan bill. particularly for the biological and environmental research program, which supports critical research to reduce uncertainties and better understand the impacts of climate change. i strongly support this bill and encourage my colleagues to do the same. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, is recognized. mr. weber: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i'd like to give to the chairman lamar smith from texas four minutes, yield him four minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. smith, is recognized for four minutes. mr. smith: mr. speaker, first of all, let me thank the chairman of the energy subcommittee, mr. weber, the gentleman from texas, for yielding me time. i strongly support this bill, h.r. 5905, the department of energy science and innovation act of 2018. this bipartisan legislation, sponsored by 12 members of the
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house science committee, authorizes the basic research programs within the d.o.e. office of science for fiscal years 2018 and 2019. the programs include research in basic energy sciences, advanced scientific computing, high energy physics, biological and environmental research, fusion energy science, and nuclear physics. these basic research programs are the core mission of the department of energy and will produce the scientific discoveries that will help maintain u.s. leadership in technology. this bill also prioritizes basic research funding for solar fuels, electricity storage, bioenergy research, exoscale computing, low-dose radiation research. it provides office of science funding for upgrades and construction of seven high priority user facilities at d.o.e. national labs. this legislation is the product of over four years of bipartisan work by the science committee to advance basic
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research and set clear science priorities for the department of energy. h.r. 5905 builds on the initiatives included in the house-passed bill, h.r. 589, the department of energy research and innovation act, and also incorporates four bipartisan science committee infrastructure bills that passed the house in february. one example of the central mission's authorized in the d.o.e. science and innovation act is the exoscale computing program. developing a system is critical to enabling scientific discovery, strengthening national security, and promoting u.s. competitiveness. this will have real-world benefits for american industry and entice the best researchers in the world to conduct groundbreaking science at the d.o.e. labs. to strengthen u.s. energy independence, this also supports fusion energy sciences. when commercial fusion becomes
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available, it will revolutionize the energy market and could significantly reduce global carbon emissions. h.r. 5905 also authorizes funds for u.s. contributions to the international thermonuclear reactor project, a critical step toward achieving commercial fusion energy. again, i'd like to thank representative weber as well as representative lofgren for their longstanding support of basic research and investments in our world-class science facilities at the d.o.e. national labs. i urge my colleagues to support the bill and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. smith, yields back his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, reserves. and the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i continue to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, is recognized. mr. weber: thank you, at this time i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the distinguished dr. marshall from kansas. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from kansas is recognized for 1 1/2 minutes. mr. marshall: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of h.r.
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5905, the department of energy science and innovation act, sponsored by my friend and colleague, representative weber. his bill contains the text of my bill, the low-dose radiation research act, which unanimously passed the house this past february. the language directs the department of energy to utilize $20 million to carry out a research program on low-dose radiation within the office of science. this program will increase our understanding of the health effects that low doses of radiation have on biological systems. research has consistently shown us the adverse health effects with high doses of radiation but we are long away from accurately assessing the effects of low doses of radiation. as the product of industrial activities, medical procedures, and naturally occurring systems, humans are exposed to low doses of radiation every day. . it's impairive we can accurately assess this risk. there is consensus that more research is necessary for federal agencies, physicians,
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and related experts to advance the use of radiation technologies. we have invaluable diagnostic tools today such as c.t. scans which emit low doses of radiation. it's vital physicians are able to inform patients of the health risks associated with these types of imaging processes. s a physician in my home state of can a. i have a firsthand understanding of the crucial importance of verified research and ensuring the best medical diagnosis for my patients. i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, reserves. the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i continue to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, reserves, the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, is recognized. mr. weber: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, is recognized. . weber: mr. speaker, by strengthening our national labs and investing in basic research, this will help ensure americans' leadership in
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science and technology. i again want to thank my 11 colleagues on the science committee who have co-sponsored r. 5905 including chairman mar smith, representative zo vice chairman frank lucas. i also want to thank the dozens of researchers and stakeholders who provide feedback as we develop this legislation. i urge the adoption of this commonsense bipartisan legislation and i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, reserves, the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, is recognized. mr. veasey: i have no further requests for time. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, yields back his time. the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, is recognized. mr. weber: this is great legislation. i want to urge the adoption of this commonsense, bipartisan legislation and i yield back the balance of my time. vice ch frank lucas. i also want to thank the dozens of researchers and stakeholders ho provide feedback the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas, mr. weber, yields back the balance of his time of the the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5905 as amended. so many as are in favor say
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aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oklahoma seek recognition. mr. lucas: i move to suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5906, the arpa-e act of 2018, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the tile of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5906, a bill to competes act ca
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to establish department of energy policy for advance research projects, agency energy, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. lucas, and the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. lucas: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and and their remarks include extraneous material on h.r. 5906, the bill now under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. lucas: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized. mr. lucas: this legislation requires -- i should say, actually, mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 5906, the arpa-e act of 2018. this legislation requires that the department refocus arpa-e towards developing transformative science and technology solutions to address energy, environment, economic, and national security issues. arpa-e was credited -- created to ensure that the u.s. energy sector maintained a
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competitiveness in developing energy -- emerging energy technologies. the program was established to help develop high potential, high impact energy technologies that were too early in stage to attract private sector investment. arpa-e was designed to bring this finite r&d funding for a limited time with the intention to make quick, notable impact on the development of new energy technologies. in order to accomplish this goal, arpa-e was given a unique management structure with flexibility to start and stop research projects that are no longer achieving individual goals. expedited hiring and firing authority to make sure that rpa e staff could adequately select and support projects, and the tools to identify market challenges that could affect the advancement in project technologies. however, we have all heard of the concerns of arpa-e. the first is the worry that this is just one more of the same from d.o.e.
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with the energy efficiency and renewable energy program office funded at over $2.3 billion, it's easy to see why some would ask if we need another clean energy program. second, we have all heard of concerns over the years that arpa-e wasn't meeting its intended goal, to fund the kind of technologies that are so innovative they would never attract private sector investment. but was instead provided funding to big companies access to market capital, or funding research that was already under way in other federal agencies, or in the private sector. the science committee on which i serve as vice chairman, particularly explored these concerns under the obama administration. i believe there were valid concerns that must be addressed for the program to continue. arpa-e is a program that can have tremendous impact on the development of new energy technologies. but we can't have another agency playing favorites or handing out grants that distort
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our energy markets. the bill we will consider today will address these concerns and enable arpa-e to apply its innovative approach to a more appropriate set of technology challenges within the d.o.e. mission. as the trump administration sees it. it does not, i repeat, this bill does not authorize new spending or expand the size of the program. h.r. 5906 will refocus the mission of arpa-e to mirror the full d.o.e. mission and empower the agent is to to promote science and technology driven solutions. my bill will allow the agency to solve big challenges. like nuclear waste management and cleanup and improving the reliability, resiliency, and security of the electric grid. the arpa-e act also provides important steps to prevent the duplication of research across d.o.e. and to require applicants to indicate they have attempted to find private
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sector financing for a particular technology. this is a good government reform that is vital to ensuring that arpa-e can't be abused by crony capitalism purposes in the future. we can't afford to spend limited taxpayer dollars competing with the private sector. h.r. 5906 will rely on arpa-e's novative approach with the right mission goals and management. it will build on the basic science and early stage research of the department. right mission goals and nd help fast track new technologies that will grow our economy. i want to thank chairman lamar smith and ranking member johnson for co-sponsoring this important technologies that will grow leg. and for their leadership in advocating the reformed agency functioning within the department of energy's missions and goals. i'm grateful for the opportunity to work alongside the other members of the committee to craft a bipartisan bill that will improve, yes,
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improve a d.o.e. research program, but still allows congress the opportunity to reduce funding for the program as appropriate. i encourage my colleagues to support the bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oklahoma reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 5906, the arpa-e act of 2018. after years of successes and several independent assessments raising arpa-e's work, this bill is a welcome development. it preserves the mission and flexibility of the agency, while enabling it to consider funding projects or technologies that can address d.o.e.'s monumental and long-standing challenge of environmental cleanup at the legacy sites of the manhattan project. it also includes language from a bipartisan arpa-e re-authorization act that our committee's ranking member
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introduced last year which would ensure that sensitive business information collected by the agency remains protected. this will enable even greater private sector engagement in its programs. arpa-e projects have attracted more than $2.6 billion in private sector follow-on funding. 71 projects have formed new companies and 109 have gone on to partner with other government agencies to further their research. i want to thank the congressman, lucas, and chairman smith for embracing arpa-e's innovative model and joining our members in supporting its re-authorization. i support this bill and encourage my colleagues to do the same. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman is recognized. mr. lucas: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, the chairman of the science and technology committee, mr. smith. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i thank the gentleman from oklahoma, the vice chairman of the
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science committee, mr. lucas for yielding me time on his bill. the energy bill we're considering is h.r. 5906, the arpa-e act of 2018. it establishes clear d.o.e. policy and a new direction and new requirements for the advance research projects agency energy called arpa-e program. this legislation updates the mission of arpa-e to focus on developing technological solutions to energy, economic, environmental, and national security challenges. this includes allowing arpa-e to develop technologies to address the management, cleanup, and disposal of nuclear waste and enhance the security and resilience of the electric grid. h.r. 5906 also maximizes the department's resources. it requires arpa-e to coordinate with other d.o.e. programs and avoid duplication and assures that arpa-e grants go to innovative technology that is would not otherwise be funded by the private sector. the bill reforms arpa-e but
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does not authorize any funding for arpa-e. instead, h.r. 5906 provides much needed reform to the arpa-e program. it also leaves the door opened for congress to readdress arpa-e funding in the future and determine if the agency is need meating its intended purpose. unfortunately, there have been some mischaracterizations of this legislation. supporting h.r. 5906 will not prevent congress from cutting as we did in the house past energy and water appropriations bill earlier this month or even eliminating funding to arpa-e in the future. continue ted it allows us to enact reforms today that refocus arpa-e on technology within the d.o.e. mission. in addition, one organization that opposes this legislation apparently didn't read the bill and confuse it in with another bill that re-authorizes arpa-e. thanks go to vice chairman lucas and ranking member johnson for their work on this
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reform bill and for their support of advanced research around the country. mr. speaker, i just want to mention one more thing and it might be of interest to all embers, even those who are not on the science committee. of the 27 bills after this bill passes, of the 27 bills that the science committee has brought to the house floor, 24 of the 27 on the science committee. of the have, in fact, been bipartisan pieces of legislation. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support this legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oklahoma continues to reserve. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i continue to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. lucas: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers. i believe i have the right to close and reserve for that purpose. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i have no further requests at this time. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. the gentleman from oklahoma is recognized. mr. lucas: thank you, mr. speaker.
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i wish to yield myself the -- as much time as i might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. lucas: reforming the mission and goals of arpa-e would transform the agency to do what the d.o.e. does best, develop innovative technology solutions to complex science, energy, and national security challenges. i again want to thank my nine colleagues on the science committee who co-sponsored h.r. 90 -- 5906, including chairman smith and ranking member johnson. i want to thank the new leadership staff at arpa-e and the department of energy who provided technical comments and policy recommendations as we developed this legislation. i urge adoption of this bipartisan, good government legislation. and yield back the balance of my time. , mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5906, as amended. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
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in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. . the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5907, the national innovation and modernization by laboratory act. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: a bill to give signature authority for certain agreements and other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois, mr. hultgren and the gentleman from texas, mr. veasey, each will criminal 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois. mr. hultgren: i ask unanimous
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consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on this bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. hultgren: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of this bipartisan legislation i've introduced with my good friend from colorado, mr. perlmutter, to give our national labs the tools they need to better work with outside entities, develop new technologies and let new business ideas come out of our world-leading research facilities. as you've heard today with the prior bills pass odd on the floor, the house science committee has done tremendous bipartisan work to support our national laboratories and research infrastructure. i thank chairman smith and also the ranking member, ranking member johnson, both from texas, for their bipartisan work on this package and i was pleased to see prayer past research infrastructure dealing with upgrades at fermilabs, ar gone and other national labs included in the package. our national labs are often referred to as the crown jewels
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in our ecosystem here in the united states. the secretary referred to them as national treasures. they house some of the most complicated research equipment in the world which no one business or university would be able to support. our lab also maintain a number of user facility, where university researchers, other research agencies and the private sector can work with these tools. that agreement must then go through a separate review by the department. while i whole heartedly agree in our need for thorough oversight what we're attempting to do is set a threshold so smaller agreements don't need to go through the additional review process. all national labs except one have been set up under a government-owned contractor-operated model -- model. what my bill would do is
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strengthen this arrangement by giving lab what they need to remain nimble, a toible react to the needs of private sector and other researchers being able to come. in when many researchers need to use a facility for a few hours they won't wait around 90 days for the ghovement private sector does not move at the pace of government nor should we expect it to. this legislation would cut some of the red tape out of working with the labs so the private sector can take good ideas and do what they do best, innovate and react to the market. with these agreements i believe this strikes the proper balance for oversight with the department and the intentions of congress in creating the government-owned contractor-operated model for the labs. i'm grateful for the secretary at a recent hearing signaling his willingness to work with this idea and i believe it fits with the administration's priorities of removing red tape where it's not needed and freing the private sector to innovate and bring new ideas to the marketplace. i thank my colleagues for their
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work on this legislation and thank the chairman for his co-sponsorship of this bill as well as his leadership on this package of bills authorizing the office of science and other d.o.e. activities. i do encourage my colleagues to support passage of this important legislation and i reserve the balance of the time. mr. veasey: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. veasey: i rise in support of .r. 5907, the national laboratory act this bill will provide our laboratories with the authority to directly into into certain research agreements with the private sector as long s those align with the strategic plans by the department of energy. it also includes safeguards to prevent waste, fraud, or abuse of this provision. this language previously passed, it passed the house as part of bipartisan legislation we considered in the last congress. and i'm happy -- happy to see
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this important policy change is moving forward once again. i support this bill and enurgeky many -- encourage my colleagues to do the same. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman reserves. the gentleman from illinois. mr. hultgren: it is my privilege to yield five minutes to chairman smith. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman recognized for five minutes. mr. smith: let me thank the gentleman from illinois, an active member of the science committee, mr. hultgren, for yielding me time on his bill. we're discussing h.r. 5907, the national innovation modernization by empowerment or nimble act this legislation authorizes the secretary of energy to provide signature authority to the direct dwhroferse national laboratories allowing lab directors to make funding decisions on cooperative agreements with industry where the total cost is less than $1 million this provides labs with more flexibility and eliminates red tape and bureaucratic
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process that makes it difficult for businesses to partner with the labs. d.o.e. national labs can provide the private sector to access to critical research infrastructure but a burdensome approval process can smother industry's interest and constrict the pace of technology development. 24 bill gives the labs freedom to pursue agreements that will increase u.s. competitiveness and maintain our innovation and productivity leadership. i have want to thank representative randy hultgren again and this bill's 10 science committee's co-sponsors including representative perlmutter, vice chairman frank lucas, energy subcommittee chairman randy weber and energy subcommittee vice chairman steve knight for their on fwoing support of d.o.e.'s world leading national laboratories. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and before i yield back the balance of my time, i want to say to -- about mr. hultgren that his leadership on the committee has been
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appreciated for years and he has never failed to be an effective advocate and leader for the national labs. this is a good example of his interest being put into legislation. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. veasey: i continue to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from illinois. mr. hultgren: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers and am ready to close but i think i have the right to close so i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. veasey: i have no further requests for time, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from illinois. mr. hultgren: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my good friend from texas, mr. veasey. i want to thank my really good friend from texas, the chairman of the science committee, for his important support on this bill. it is a commonsense bill. it's one that has passed previous congresses with strong, bipartisan support. our labs are a treasure. but they're also a great benefit
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for innovation. and this allows that innovation to continue working again on smaller agreements for those to be able to move more quickly when oftentimes business or -- businesses need to move that quickly and the labs can do this but if it had to go through the whole cumbersome process of coming here to washington, wouldn't be able to. this is commvens, bipartisan, i thank the co-sponsor -- co-sponsors and with that, i ask my colleagues to support it this and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5907. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for what purpose does the gentleman pr texas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to take from the speaker's table the bill h.r. 5515 with the senate amendment thereto, disagree to the senate amendment and request a conference with the senate thereon. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5515, an act to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2019 for military activities of the department of defense for military construction and for defense activities of the department of energy to describe military personnel strength for such fiscal year and for other urposes. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection to the gentleman's request? without objection, so ordered. without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i have a motion
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at the desk. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: mr. carbajal of california moves that the managers on the part of the house on the disagreeing votes of the two houses on the senate amendment to the bill h.r. 5515 be instructed to agree to section 703 of the senate bill. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 7 of rule 22, the gentleman from california, mr. carbajal, and the gentleman from texas, mr. thornberry, each will control 30 minutes this chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. carbajal: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks on the motion to instruct. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. carbajal: mr. speaker, this motion would bring tricare contraception on par with the affordable care act by prohibiting cost-sharing for any method of contraception provided in the tricare retail pharmacy
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network on mail order. mr. speaker, our nation's service members should be provided the same access to preventive health care as those insured under the affordable care act. currently, tricare beneficiaries, including nonactive service members and their dependents, and certain act i military members, do not have the same access to cost-free preventive care as civilians do. by requiring coverage for contraceptives with no out of pocket costs, the a.c.a. increases women's access to contraceptive and saves women $255 per year on average. this is a benefit we currently deny our female service members. one third of our military, one third of our u.s. military are women. currently, about 15% of active duty service members and 19% of
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the reserve forces are comprised of women. women are bravely serving in all parts of the military, including infantry and other combat units. servicewomen are continuing to break barriers across the military. proving again and again they are indispensable when it comes to defending this nation. unfortunately, this house continues to refuse these brave service members access to the same health care that all civilian females have access to. preventive health care services, including contraception, should be provided to all tricare beneficiaries without any co-pay. access to preventive health care is vital for the health and quality of life of all women serving this nation. but it is also critical to the readiness of our military. in 2008, researchers found that the rate of unintended pregnancy was roughly 50% higher among
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service members compared to the general public. this problem is made worse by the fact that it is often difficult for female service members to access preventive medication in the field. another recent study found that among service members who use contraceptives, only 24% brought enough medication to last their entire deployment. 41% of those needing refills found them difficult to obtain while deployed on active duty. we should not make it more difficult for these women to access contraception. by asking them to pay for med case that the civilian population already receives at no cost. we are doing an absolute disservice to those who are willing to sacrifice their lives to defend our nation every day by denying them preventive health care that is critical to treat certain health conditions and for family planning.
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the senate has included this tricare provision in their bill for the past two years. because they understand this issue goes beyond political parties and personal views. this is about the health and well being of those who are sacrificing their lives every day to defend our nation. this is about providing the resources and delivering policy to the military that will increase readiness. this motion would provide all service members access to preventive health care which they not only deserve but are entitled to and i would say earned. i urge my colleagues today to put politics aside and follow in the senate's footsteps and support this motion. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. thornberry: mr. speaker, the gentleman from california has just laid out a number of arguments in support of a senate
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provision. there are obviously members who may think differently on his arguments, although i do not believe this is the time or the place to make -- to have that debate. that will be discussed in the course of the upcoming conference with the senate. at this point, i would just like to offer two thoughts. one is the provision that the gentleman talks about requires that there be a mandatory spending offset. now when you look for -- how that spending can be offset, really, armed services has two ways. one is to increase tricare copays and second one is to reduce retirement benefits. i notice that the gentleman's motion to instruct does not deal
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with that part of the equation. my thought is that it's far better to look at the whole universe of issues in the course of a conference rather than to dictate one outcome or another that doesn't include something. second point is there are 907 house provisions and 603 senate provisions that will be the subject of this conference. they will all have to be hashed t in one way or another, but the conferees should have the flexibility to deal with all of those 907, 603 provisions in a way that makes the most sense for national security. and so my suggestion is that the house reject this particular motion and allow the conferees to do their work in looking at the whole union investigate for
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what's best for the men and women who serve and what's best for the country's national security. i reserve the balance of my time. i have no further speakers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. carbajal: thank you. and i appreciate those comments from any good friend and chairman of the armed services committee. for the fact of the matter is, in two years we have not been able in conference to address this issue. there is always one excuse or a barrier raised at one time or another. and the mere fact that what ends up resulting is that our service women, who are putting their ves on the count for our country are being treated as second-class citizens and not treated the same as their male counterparts. what this motion does is achieve party with prevailing law.
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tricare beneficiaries, it is time we deliver. i urge my colleagues to support this motion. let's provide all service members with the same access to preventive health care that we all have access to. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. thornberry: i yiled myself such time as i may consume. to say there are a number of provisions that members consider inequitable and a big challenge a particular enact provision, you have to pay for it. and so my point is, we need to look at the whole universe of not only what we would like to have done but also how it would be paid for. mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. carbajal: i'm ready to
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close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. carbajal: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: all time for debate has expired. the previous question is ordered. question is on the motion to instruct. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the noes have it. mr. carbajal: i ask for the yeas and nays. those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted.. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. pursuant to clause 9 of rule 20, this 15-minute vote on the motion to instruct conferees will be followed by five-minute votes on the motion to conference. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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mr. thornberry: as classified national security information may be discussed, provided that any sitting member of congress shall be entitled to attend any meeting of the conference. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12 rule 22 and the the yeas and nays are ordered are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 403, the nays are 15. the motion is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. pursuant to house resolution 961 and rule 18, the chair declares in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for the further consideration of h.r. 6157. will the gentleman from illinois, mr. hultgren, kindly ake the chair.
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the chair: the house is in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for further consideration of h.r. 6157, which the clerk will report by title. the clerk: a bill making appropriations for department of defense for fiscal year ending september 30, 2019 and for other purposes. the chair: when the committee of the whole house arose, amendment number 24 printed in part a of house report 115-783 offered by the gentleman from maryland, mr. brown, had been disposed of. pursuant to clause 6 of rule 18, proceedings will now resume on those amendments printed in part a of house report 115-783 in the following order. amendment number 9 by mr. langevin of rhode island, amendment number 20, by mr. poe of texas. the chair will reduce to two minute votes. the unfinished business is request for a recorded vote on
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amendment number 9 offered by the gentleman from rhode island, mr. langevin on which further proceedings were postponed and the noes prevailed. the clerk: amendment number 9 printed in part a of house port 15-783 offered by mr. langevin of rhode island. the chair: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support will rise. a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of epresentatives.]
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