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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  July 24, 2018 4:50pm-8:44pm EDT

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i do not agreed annual report so i went through and read the reports of the larger companies when i discovered something called the -- issue where every dollar they earn a premium and they have to in claims,5 or more right? so that leads 10-15 cents for all of the other expenses from the country -- from the company. 2% or 3%.em to pocket why do thehe case, press and other companies vilify insurance companies? compared to what the tech companies make? guest: it is an important provision of the aca. mpore: the house will be in order. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on passage of h.r. 184 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 184, a bill to
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amend the internal revenue code of 1986 to repeal the excise tax on medical devices. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the passage of the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 283. the nays are 132. the bill is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered or votes objected to under clause 6 of rule 20. the house will resume proceedings on postponed questions at a later time. he house will come to order. he house will be in order.
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members, please take your conversations off the floor. he house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass the bill s. 1182, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 1182, an act
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to require the secretary of the treasury to mint commemorative coins in recognition of the 100th anniversary of the american legion. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. hensarling, and the gentlewoman from california, ms. waters, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and tend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is correct. the gentleman will suspend. he house will be in order. the gentleman may resume. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i come to the floor today to do
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something i do not often do and that is i have asked my leadership to put a bill on the floor that i do not support. i'm talking about the bill that nonreform de for a re-authorization of the national flood insurance program through the end of november. i want to make it very clear, mr. speaker. i believe this program needs to be re-authorized, and the house has done its work. the house passed a bill with reforms last november. never underestimate the senate's capacity to do nothing. and unfortunately the senate has done nothing, but this is a program, mr. speaker, that continues to be in dire need of reform. and now we have re-authorized
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it without reforms not once, not twice, not three times, not four times, not five times, six times since the financial services committee first reported this bill out. enough is enough. r. speaker, we lost in america 115 lives last year -- 116 lives last year to flooding. billions and billions of dollars of property loss. and yet, we have a program unreformed that insentence people to live in harm -- incents people to live in harm's way. we should not do this, mr. speaker. i went and i visited those who survived hurricane harvey, people close to your district, people whose homes flooded three times in the last eight years and i heard harrowing tales of survival and yet we
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have a program that says, you know what, we will help you rebuild your same home in the same fashion in the same place. hope you survive next time. that's wrong. that's just wrong, mr. speaker. and, yes, we need more mitigation money. we need better flood control projects, and the house bill had more flood mitigation money than any other reform bill. but this bill before us has no reforms. finances. this is a program that the taxpayer has subsidized so far by $40 billion. some of the debt has been forgiven, but it runs a billion and a half dollar deficit every single year, mr. speaker. it is unsustainable. the congressional budget office says it, the g.a.o. says it, o.m.b. says it. it is an unsustainable program. the finances do not work, and then last but not least, mr. speaker, it is a government
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monopoly. it's a government monopoly when people could, through a competitive marketplaces, actually get more affordable, more affordable flood insurance. and that's just not a theory. that's happening as we speak. and the small little bit of the marketplace that's open to competition, people are saving hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in places like pennsylvania and in places like florida. we have testimony. we had testimony in our committee, and so it's just rather disappointing that, again, we face the seventh time, the seventh time of not reforming a program that has no market competition, that is fiscally unsustainable and yet we continue to see premiums skyrocket in the government monopoly. i do want to thank the gentleman from california, mr. royce, the gentleman on the
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other side of the aisle, mr. blumenauer from oregon. they tried to put together a reform package with the most minimal, minimal level of reforms, and unfortunately it did not appear to carry to date. so now i suspect we will soon cast with an overwhelming vote a clean re-authorization, but i don't think they're going to take it up in the senate. maybe i'm wrong. in which case we will have to deal with this. and i would just simply again ask, particularly for the people on my side of the aisle, i think it helps maybe once or twice a month we ask ourselves ronald reagan's eternal question -- if not us, who? if not now, when? i invite somebody to answer that question for me, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: thank you very much. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. waters: thank you, mr.
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speaker. since the national flood insurance program's multiyear authorization expired on eptember 30, 2017, ideological differences have led congress to pass six short-term extensions and even allowed the program to briefly lapse twice since the government shutdowns. more than five million families ely on the nfip for affordable coverage. many rely on it for mitigation assistance and small business relies on the nfip to pick up the pieces when the inevitable storm hits. yet, the long-term stability of this program falls victim to partisan politics. mr. speaker, 2017 was an absolutely catastrophic year in terms of hurricanes and other natural disasters. in 2017, for the first time on record, three category four hurricanes made landfall in the united states, serving as
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painful reminders of the importance of affordable and accessible flood insurance. while hurricanes harvey, irma, and maria may be a distant memory for some, families affected by these storms are still just beginning their long road to recovery, and we continue to learn about the challenges that families in puerto rico face with no signs of leadership from the trump administration. and we hear today in the midst of the 2018 hurricane season with no credible plan to do anything differently from the partisan gamesmanship that has brought the nfip to the brink of lapse several times already this congress. i'm deeply disappointed that congress continues to miss opportunities to responsibly help homeowners, businesses, and renters who all need access to affordable flood insurance by taking sensible steps to stabilize flood insurance premiums, deal with the nfip's
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debt, and invest in up-to-date and accurate flood maps. instead, the house has passed controversial and ideological reforms that makes flood insurance more expensive, less available, and less fair, which is obviously going nowhere in the senate. given the critical importance of the nfip to our housing market, i'm pleased we're taking the small step today of re-authorizing the program for four months to at least provide some level of certainty to businesses and families. let us not be fooled into thinking that our work is done. i have led the effort for years to provide long-term re-authorizations of the nfip that also ensure the affordability and the availability of flood insurance , and i will continue to do so when this latest short-term extension expires in november. with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized.
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mr. hensarling: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm now very pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from louisiana, the majority whip, mr. scalise. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana is recognized for two minutes. mr. scalise: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding. and i really want to thank my colleague, mr. mcartur from new jersey, -- mr. macarthur from new jersey, which you would re-authorize this flood insurance program through hurricane season. why are we here, mr. speaker? the house did pass a five-year re-authorization of nfip that included really important reforms, reforms i was happy to work with the chairman on to pass through the house but unfortunately as the bill went over to the senate, we kept hearing story after story that the senate would pass something. a month would go by and another month would go by and ultimately the senate hasn't done nothing to really re-authorize this program. so we are left days before the program expires. mr. speaker, we can't play the game of chicken with the lives
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millions of families that affect all 50 states. this isn't something that applies to coastal communities. we have every inland state as well that has families that rely on this program that work. mr. speaker, what kind of program would we like to see? i would love to see a vibrant marketplace with the private sector company after private sector company that would offer options to families just like we have with car insurance or homeowners insurance but we don't have that today. so what we need to do is usher in reforms like the legislation, mr. speaker, that i'm a co-sponsored of. ross castor was in the house-passed bill. there are reforms that gets better mapping from fema. some of those reforms were included in the royce-blumenauer legs which was also in the house-passed bill so we can talk about the reforms that are needed and i encourage us to get those kind of reforms done but on the
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midnight hour, let's at least keep this program going for a few more months while we continue negotiating and let's get a long-term deal that actually has the reforms that will make this a sustainable program with private sector involvement for years to come. with that i urge a yes vote and i yield back the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana yield back, the gentleman from texas reserve the gentlelady is ecognized -- is recognized. ms. waters: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from missouri, mr. cleaver. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. cleaver: thank you, mr. chairman, thank you to the raking -- ranking member. i rise to support the house amendment s. 1182, the national flood insurance extension act of 018. this bill would provide a clean four-month extension for nfip. i do plan to vote in favor of this bill but do so with deep
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consternation that we are yet again passing a short-term he authorization. this will be the seventh short-term extension for the nfip in the last 1 months. this is somewhat embarrassing, or should be, to all of us. we fail to re-authorize the program, the nfip will not be able to be -- to issue no policies and borrowing authority would be limit asmed lapse in authorizations during the height of hurricane season could have serious ramifications for communities that have already weathered last year's severe storms. when the frsrble services committee began to consider the nfip re-authorization, i advocated far long-term re-authorization. i met with mr. duffy many, many times. we discussed that a long-term re-authorization of five or even 10 years would provide policyholders and stake holders with certainty. it would give stability, communities a chance to develop mitigation plan, and
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policyholders peace of mind. afordability must remain a central component of any long-term plan to revamp the nfip. rates are already increasing for many policyholders. and we need to ensure that homeowners who rely on the nfip for protection are not priced out of the program. additionally, i've urge my -- i've urged my colleagues to consider forgiving the nfip's debt. though the nfip has been self-sustaining for many year, extreme and unexpected damage following hurricane katrina and superstorm sandy left the nfib a $20 billion debt. now the nfip continues to pay over $400 million a year in interest and it's ridiculous. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. ms. waters: i yield an additional minute to the gentleman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman veck -- is recognized for one minute
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mr. cleaver: thank you to the ranking member. the nfip continues to pay $400 million on a year on interest, that's money that could go to making improvements in the program or helping enhance affordability. we need to wipe the slate clean and give the nfip a fresh start. lastly, enhancing mapping technology and increasing mitigation resources would go a long way in improving the program and preparing communities for prevention and recovery efforts. to be sure i'm pleased we're voting to keep the nfip up and running for 24 months. i'm concerned we've in the been able to agree on a left arm plan. i urge my colleagues to come to the table for a solution and updating the npf -- nfip. thank you, mr. chairman, i thank the ranking member, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: i'm please t.d. yield two minutes to the gentleman from michigan, the chairman of our capital markets and securities investment subcommittee, mr. high zen gasm the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. huizenga: i rise with deep hesitation in supporting another clean extension of the national flood insurance program through november of this year. while i agree that letting this program... in thed my tholve hurricane season is problematic, it's inconceivable that even extremely marylandest -- modest reforms to this troubled program have not included in the legislation. house amendment to senate bill 1182 is a simple piece of legislation with a simple extension. what's notable is the fact that the legislation contains none of the reforms passed by this house in a bipartisan man for the november. nor does the legislation contain any of the more modest reforms recently introduced by my colleagues from california and oregon, representatives royce and blumenauer. s the sixth time as the gentleman from missouri said this will be number seven of an extension in less than a year this is even after congress forgave that $16 billion in nfip
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debt. all while fewer than 2% of the five million policies that are out there have absorbed more than $8 billion in pames. these numbers are staggering. instead of passing a clean extension after clean extension, the senate should -- no, wait a minute, the senate must do its job and take up bipartisan reform that we passed in november. so i urge my colleagues to be responsible and work toward crafting a long-term re-authorization in this, a program that needs to shift toward risk-based rates, increasing private sector involvement in the program and to address repetitive lost properties, all of which will put the program on a more sustainable financial path. i grew up on a floodplain in michigan. right along lake michigan and the great lakes. this is real for those of nuss west michigan. at the end of the day work this legislation, a no vote is not a lack of willingness or interest to address this issue as it may be portrayed but equally a question vote should not be acceptance of the status quo and
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hopefully by this bill moving forward there may be action in the senate. frankly, at the end of the day, members are being put in an impossible, no-win situation. not for us, mr. speaker, but for our constituents, the taxpayers, it's a no-win situation, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, the ranking member of the subcommittee on oversight and investigation of the financial services committee, mr. green. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. green: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the ranking member and the chair of the full committee , i too nd mr. speaker am not enthralled with the idea of a temporary fix. our preference is a long-term remedy. and while we have different
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reasons for being opposed to a temporary fix, the truth is we have no choice at this point. in about a week, the program will expire. i know what happens when we are unfortunately coping with hurricanes such as katrina. which cost us $160 billion. i saw what happened in louisiana, in new orleans, after katrina. the ranking member and i were there on the ground to see how people who had been quite prosperous were now having to abandon what was their home and they had to move to other places. the astrodome in houston, texas, became the home for many thousands of people who were fleeing the aftermath of katrina.
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i saw what happened after harvey and how people were suffering and trying to go back into homes that were completely devastated. and they had nowhere else to go. so we have no choice. we must re-authorize and four months, while it seems like it is an inappropriate amount of time, it does give us some additional time. my hope is that we will come to samkon collusion that will be acceptable such that we can have a long-term extension. realtors are calling to my attention the need for certainty in this program. it helps the economy to have certainty. my belief is, we can have certainty and we must extend. i yield back. ms. waters: i yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from texas. mr. breen: thank you for the 30 seconds. my belief is we must have certainty and we must extend. my belief also is this.
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that if not us, who will extend it? if not now, when will we extend it? i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. the gentlelady from california continues to reserve. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, chairman of the house foreign affairs committee a very senior member member of the financial services committee, mr. royce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. royce: we stand here today doing what we've done, i guess, 38 times now since 1998. and that is passing an extension of the national flood insurance program without the much-needed reforms that should be in that program. this is unacceptable. subsidized flood insurance represent what is economists call a moral hazard. let me tell you why. we tell americans that if you buy flood insurance from uncle
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sam new york matter how many time yours house floods, we will give you money to rebuild it. we haven't worked to decrease that moral hazard through reform. rather, we've embraced and refueled it and we make it more difficult for people to move than rebuild. we fail to encourage communities to mitigate flood risk. we continue to build in high-risk areas. the clearest sign of moral hazard is the number of repeatedly flooded properties that are rebuilt with little deference to mitigation. i'll give you some examples. a $90,000 home in missouri has been flooded now 34 times. at a cost of more than $600,000. a $56,000 home in louisiana flooded more than 40 times. at a cost of $430,000. a $72,000 home in texas that flooded again last year, costing
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taxpayers over $1 million in payouts. i came to the floor today hoping to support a bill that mr. blumenauer and i authored that would have extended the flood program with what "the wall street journal" called de minimus policy changes that have broad bipartisan support which would do something about the fact that you've got fewer than 2% of the five million policies that absorbed more than $8 billion of the payments. because we don't have these reforms. that's not in the bill before us. unfortunately, i oppose this can-kicking exercise and i urge my colleagues to do the same. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from oregon who has long pushed for reducing flood risk in this country, mr. blumenauer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two
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minutes. appreciate the gentlelady's courtesy in permitting me to speak on this and i'm pleased to follow my friend mr. royce from california. this is troubling for me. his reference here to 38 extensions without reform. this -- i've been working on this for 20 years. this is the 41st time, and we had one back 2004 with my friend dough berider where we had some small steps but they were anticipatory of being able to make greater reforms. and i am vexed that we continue to move forward and dodge some hard facts. we are subsidizing too much for people who grow placent. i am concerned about affordability and there are things we can do to deal with
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affordability but that doesn't mean to have massive subsidization for people who don't need it and in fact encourage people to be in harm's way. and in fact after they're flooded out, to go back, putting them in harm's way again. there are simple, commonsense steps we can take. there were thing mrs. royce and i had that are sort of the lowest common denominator. i am deeply troubled we are going to do this again without dealing with the problems. i just want to say that it's not just financial hardship. it's not just waste of money. our failure to reform the flood insurance program puts people at risk. every one of these massive events shows that people will go back to try and deal with a family member. they're dealing with their business. they're dealing with a pet. people die because we fail to take steps to reform and make it work right. i appreciate the ranking member,
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i appreciate the chair, mr. duffy, mr. royce, there is a path forward. this bill is not the path forward. i don't want it to lapse, i don't want disruption. but it's hard for me to sit here and vote yes for something that doesn't do the minimum. we don't do anybody any favors along this path. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. this gentlelady from california reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentleman from missouri, the chairman of the financial institutions and consumer credit subcommittee, mr. luetkemeyer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. r. luetkemeyer: the national flood insurance program in desperate need for reform. the current construct in nfip is left unwell. the program provides antiquated
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policies and provides insufficient coverage. fema holds a monopoly on the flood insurance space leaving people with no freedom to choose the policy best for them. last year we came together as a body and passed nfip reform and the senate didn't pass anything. tomorrow we'll probably pass another bill and kick the can down the road and probably do the same thing in november and, mr. speaker, i will oppose this bill because i think it's time to make some reforms. it's time to take a stand and do something to protect the taxpayers who are on the hook for all of these -- what i call the mismanagement of this agency and for these continued risks to our individuals who are policyholders of these policies who continue to live in dangerous areas. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: thank you very much. mr. speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from louisiana who has been a true leader on the national flood
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insurance program. he comes with a very, very important background. he was louisiana's chairman of coastal protection and rest take authority. so i am pleased to have worked with him, to talk with him, and to understand that we need him when we are working on the reforms that we will work on after we pass this bill and so i give three minutes to mr. graves. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana is recognized for three minutes. mr. graves: i want to thank the gentlelady for yielding. mr. speaker, this discussion needs to have a reset. it needs to have a reset because i keep hearing people talk about repetitive floods and how there's a certain set of these flood victims that are costing this program all sorts problems and money.
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do you think they want to be underwater? if you believe that you have never stepped in a flooded home or spoken to victims. do you think they want all their family air looms lost? -- heirlooms lost? that whole concept is irrational. the reality is we want this program to be solvent. we want to have a solution. we want to have reforms. the things that are being pushed aren't the reforms that will result insolvency. the reforms that are being pushed are a defense. you don't go out on the field and play defense. we need to lean forward. we need to integrate mitigation, some of the corps of engineers levee projects. look where we can protect areas and where that's the most cost-effective solution and not tell everyone you are out of your house or we'll charge you unaffordable rates. mr. speaker, think about this
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for a minute. we represent the state of louisiana. we drain from montana to two canadian provinces to new york. all that water comes and drains down through our state. it's one of the largest watersheds in the world. more water is coming to us now. so, yes, we're more vulnerable. but the people who live in these homes and businesses, they're innocent. folks are trying to charge them more for something they have no control over. that's not american. that's not ok. we're in hurricane season right now, mr. speaker. we're in hurricane season where we need to provide people certainty. let's be crystal clear on what this bill and what it is not. a yes vote provides people certainty during hurricane season. it provides certainty to realtors, to homeowners, to home builders. a no vote kills the flood insurance program and leaves people completely with uncertainty and limbo. i want to thank the gentleman from new jersey for proposing this bill, for bringing it up, because it is important. we had 222 disasters costing over $1 billion since 1980.
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in total we spend $1.5 trillion responding to these disasters. mr. speaker, there are similar programs that exist. right now price anderson for nuclear power plants, shria for terrorism risk insurance. i agree we need to reform these programs but we need to do it in a way that does not penalize the innocent. until he we get to that point, we need to do an extension to provide certainty, to ensure we make it through hurricane season and we have a rational debate. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas -- the gentlelady from california reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to yield a minute and a half to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. macarthur, who is also the author of the legislation, for the re-authorization bill before us. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. mac artur: thank you, mr.
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speaker. -- mr. macarthur: thank you, mr. speaker. i know this program. i would guess better than anyone here, and i know what it does for people. i know its weakness as well. 140 million americans live in coastal counties today. they are ordinary americans, mostly of moderate means. i represent many of these folks in ocean county, new jersey. these are the victims of disasters like sandy, who absolutely depend upon this program. in october, the house passed a bill that i worked on and i supported. a five-year re-authorization, modest increases in premiums, increased mitigation dollars, and still some accountability at fema. it was too much reform for some, not enough for others but it was absolutely necessary we do that. the senate has totally failed to act. so what do we do today? we hold every homeowner along the coast hostage?
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we cannot do that. we cannot do that. the nfip program has $30 billion of borrowing capacity. that drops to $1 billion if this lapses. that's a modest event in this country. how do we -- how do we look the american people in the eye after a storm and say we don't have the money that you've been paying premiums for? how do we do that? how do we shut down the real estate market? if you can't get a mortgage, you can't buy a home. and you cannot get a mortgage in coastal counties without flood insurance. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. macarthur: i urge my colleagues -- mr. hensarling: i yield the gentleman 30 seconds. mr. macarthur: mr. speaker, i appreciate that. we can't pull the rug out from people depending on this program. i'll continue working with the committee, with the chairman, with the senate, who needs to get off their backsides and do something. they've done nothing on this. i'll continue to work.
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in the meantime, we must continue this program until the end of hurricane season. that's why i chose the date, november 30, on this bill. that is the last day of hurricane season. i urge my colleagues, whatever your reservations, support it and we'll keep working on reforms. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas continues to reserve. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: thank you very much, mr. speaker. continuing in this bipartisan effort to pass a clean bill, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from mississippi, who's long been a champion of the national flood insurance program, mr. palazzo. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. palazzo: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to thank madam chairwoman for the time. we are one week away from july 31. that's seven days. that means the deadline to re-authorize the national flood insurance program is nearing very fast. i'd like to thank mr. macarthur for understanding the importance of avoiding a lapse in the nfip program and for introducing legislation that will continue coverage for millions of policyholders. we know flooding always has
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been and will continue to be the most costly natural phenomenon humanity faces. i support this amendment to extend the national flood insurance program through the end of the 2018 hurricane season and urge my colleagues to do the same. policyholders that rely on the program to ensure their -- insure their homes from flooding should not be caught in limbo while congress works on coming together in a bipartisan matter to re-authorize the program. while i, along with many of my colleagues, support reforming the program, the time to enact bipartisan reforms is gone just for now. and we have to take immediate action. if the nfip lapses, policyholders will not have the opportunity to renew their policies and tens of thousands of home sale closings will be nelltively impacted by a lapse. we are in the middle of hurricane season, and a disruption in the program will be detrimental to many in the united states. it's our duty to ensure flood insurance remains affordable
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and available for our constituents. since 1968, this program has helped people since flooding. the nfip has saved the government billions of dollars. we are providing our constituents the certainty by supporting this bill, and i urge my colleagues to join me in voting to extend the nfip through the end of the 2018 hurricane season. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady from california reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. rothfus, who is the vice chairman of the financial institutions subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for one minute. mr. rothfus: mr. speaker, i rise in support of the house amendment to s. 1182, the national flood insurance program extension act. this summer has been a channeling time for western pennsylvania. residents of some of these communities are still recovering from the damage. at the same time, the nfip, the flood insurance program, is close to lapsing. that is because like so many things we have done in this
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house the senate has failed to act. we know the nfip is in need of reform. as a member of the financial services committee, i applaud chairman hensarling and duffy for their work to craft a bipartisan bill that we have passed. many of these reforms in this bill are bipartisan. they're noncontroversial. pennsylvania's own insurance commissioner, a democratic appointee, even testified before our committee in support of the private flood insurance provisions which is essential to improving consumer choice. unfortunately, the senate stalled. we should continue urging our senators to take action. in the meantime, i urge my colleagues to support the passage of this temporary extension, and i urge the senate to get back to work. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from texas,
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mr. babin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. babin: thank you, mr. chairman. i represent a working coastal community in texas district 36, hit very, very hard by hurricane harvey, and our nation's energy security relies on those communities. coastal energy and petro chemical refining facilities like the 150 that i represent cannot function without a steady and reliable work force and that work force cannot exist without a stable housing market. i'm hopeful that my house colleagues will have the wisdom and see the necessity of we ing senate bill 11882 so can maintain this -- 182 so we can maintain this national -- 1182 so we can maintain this national security issue. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady continues to reserve. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i'm now pleased to yield 30
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seconds to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. abraham. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from louisiana is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. abraham: allowing the national flood insurance program to expire is simply not an option. it would be catastrophic on financial markets but more importantly for that family sitting around the family table, it would be catastrophic. chairman hensarling, majority whip scalise, they had a good reform bill, but the senate needs to act. but until that happens, we've got to re-authorize this so that the next hurricane doesn't have a devastating effect on the economy and the families. i urge members to support this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: -- the speaker pro tempore: does the gentlelady from california wish to be recognized? ms. waters: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i'm happy to yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. higgins. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 30
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seconds. mr. higgins: i have a map in my office that shows areas of the united states that have been impacted by flood. it's virtually the entire country. this the house of we the people. this is an easy yes vote. i urge my colleagues on my side of the aisle to try and explain to the american people how you can vote yes six times on an extension and no the seventh time. we did our job in november. we passed some comprehensive reforms, nfip five-year re-authorization. the senate has failed. we serve the people. this is right for the people. i urge my colleagues to step up and vote yes on this extension. we don't like it, but we serve the people and this bill is for the people. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from texas reserves of the the gentlelady from california is recognized. -- the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i'm very pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from
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wisconsin, mr. duffy, the chairman of our housing and insurance subcommittee. and the author of the real flood reform bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin is recognized for two minutes. mr. duffy: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the chairman for yielding. listen, this is a rich conversation. i'm hearing my colleagues say, we're almost out of time. we have to re-authorize the program. we can't let it expire. . but the truth is, we've known for months that this program was going to expire. we have known and we have fried to go to those who disagree on any flood reform to craft a deal, but lo and behold there was no compromise on flood reform. it was no, no, we want to come to the very end and pretend like it's a crisis and we have to extend the program because we can't put people in harm's way.
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by the way, this program puts people in harm's way. we know people don't want a flood, just like people don't want to get in a car crash or their house to burn, but two times, four times, someone's use burns, we have a problem and someone gets in a car crash 15 times, you have a problem with your driving. with flood insurance, you can flood 10 times and you can flood 15 times and your premiums don't go up at all. ou are grandfathered with my daughter crashed the car, but flood insurance, your premiums don't go up. let's fix these program. there are commonsense reforms and we aren't asking for a bill we introduced last year.
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look at the severe property loss, the ones that are 3% but account for 25% of the losses and maybe address those properties. some little bit of reform that could make the program work better, $25 billion in debt and forgave $16 billion in debt. let's work on fixing it. let's help people get out of harm's way. and let's get it done. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentlewoman from california is recognized. ms. waters: i'm so pleased to hear that some of my friends on the opposite side of the aisle are going to cooperate in re-authorization bill taking into consideration many of the concerns. i do want you to know that i sent a letter out july 18, 61 mbers signed this letter for
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re-authorization. and i want you to know that i understand that we have differences. and i understand that i am focused on affordability of one of the important aspects of any re-authorization bill. and i do know that some of the other side are concerned about how many times flooding will take place where people will have to be re-established, and the homes rebuilt and repairs done. we know all of that. but we're here now and we have no choice. we have to pass this bill immediately, a clear bill that will re-authorize for four months and have mr. duffy and others shout out loud when we take up the bill after the four months. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: i'm prepared to
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close, mr. speaker and i think i have the right. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. waters: i have no more speakers and i'm prepared to close and i yield myself the remainder of my time. harmful reforms passed out of the house have stalled this long enough. while i would prefer a longer term re-authorization, i support today's four-month extension to provide homeowners, renters and communities with the sirnt they deserve. but make no mistake, this short-term re-authorization does absolve congress of its responsibility to re-authorize the flood insurance program for the long-term. the congress needs to pass a long-term re-authorization to ensure that americans are protected this and every hurricane season to come. it brings you out the best in america. with everyone putting aside
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their differences to help one another in their time of need. it's time for congress to do the same thing. and we need to ensure the continued affordability of coverage for millions of americans. long-term re-authorization that ensures affordable flood insurance continues to be available for communities. it must be congress' priority when we return from the august recess. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognize dollars. mr. hensarling: how much time is remaining? the speaker pro tempore: 1 1/2 minutes are remaining. mr. hensarling: deja vu all over again. the house has been here many times before. we have had 41 re-authorization of this program, 38 with no
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reforms. and so a fote for s. 1182 is a vote for the status quo. and what is the status quo? it is people in harm's way in homes that flood five, six, seven and eight times putting their lives in danger and, and burdenening the taxpayer at the same time. a vote for s. 1182 is a vote to ensure that we continue to have more red ink as far as the eye can see. $40 billion of taxpayer subsidies to the program already, mr. speaker. vote for s. 1182 is a vote to protect a government monopoly. the ranking member spoke about affordability. well, the iron is is if we had market competition, we would have more affordable flood
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insurance. when is enough is enough? when do we finally act? if we can vote down this, we can vote in favor of reforms which is what we should have been doing in the first place. for us to expect ar different result, we all know, mr. speaker, is the very definition of insanity. i have no doubt that this thing should be voted aye and shouldn't be and it is a sad day for the house and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass senate bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative the rules are suspended -- mr. hensarling: mr. speaker, i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in favor say aye. those in favor say aye.
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pursuant to clause 8, rule 20, further proceedings of this question are postponed.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. roe: i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2409 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: a bill to allow service members to terminate their cable, satellite television and internet access service contracts while deployed. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from tennessee, mr. rowe and the gentleman from california, mr. takano, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. so ordered. mr. roe: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. roe: i rise in support of
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..r. 240 as amended it was enacted by congress to protect active duty service members and members of the national guard and reserve from charges and judicial obligations that could incur due to their military service. cell phone service if a contractor. it currently allows a service member who is ordered to move or deploy for longer than the 90 days to cancel their cell phone contract by paying those fees but does not protect service members from paying early termination fees for contracts. h.r. 2409 as amended, which is sponsored by ryan costello of pennsylvania would fix this. i'm grateful for his efforts in this bill to acknowledge its service members would be given the same type of protections for
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cable, cable tv and internet contracts. the bill would extend those protections to surviving spouses of service members who are killed while on active duty. i thank the congressman costello for bringing this bill forward and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. . mr. takano: i rise in support of this bill to allow certain service members to terminate their cable, satellite, television and internet service contracts while deployed. this is an important part of modernizing the service members civil relief act and helps reflect the current lifestyle of service members. internet and television access have become necessities in the modern world.
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the s.c.r.a. is key to protecting the rights of service members and allowing them to fulfill their service obligations. i would like to thank the chairman for working with the minority to match these bill to the changes we are making h.r. h.r. 8852, the gold star relief act, which we will be voting on today. i would like to thank the chairman for working with us on including national guard and reserveist service members who are killed while on duty. i want to recognize mr. kilmer and mr. mcgovern for working with mr. costello to bring this important bill forward. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the alreserves. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i yield two minutes to the author of the bill, the gentleman from pennsylvania. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized. mr. costello: i rise in this
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bipartisan legislation that i introduced with congressman kilmer and i thank congressman kilmer for his work on this bill and i recognize the stellar leadership of chairman roe and ranking member takano and the v.a. staff seated behind me and those not seated behind me who work every day to make this a highly performing committee. when our brave service members are ready to deploy they shouldn't navigate cancellation fees and policies. protections are granted to service members with military orders for civil agreements. but they cannot terminate their cable, satellite television and internet service contracts while deployed without incurring early termination fees. our legislation fixes this by updating the civil relief act.
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and while some states already do provide relief, this legislation would update the act to enact policy at the federal level to ensure they receive uniform assistance no matter what state they reside in. i thank chairman roe to help us pass this. and thank andrew and erica. mr. speaker, it's our responsibility to provide peace of mind while they prepare to deploy. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: i yield three minutes to my good friend, the gentleman from washington, mr. kilmer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. kilmer: i rise today in support of this bill which would allow our service members to terminate contracts once they receive orderers to real locate. we ask a lot from our military personnel. i know that because my district is home to so many veterans. i met with these amazing talented men and women and they are so impressive and they step up and sacrifice and they are being asked to uproot themselves all over the world on very short notice. when their country calls, the members drop everything. they have our backs and we should have our backs. they shouldn't have to worry about bills piling up because they are locked into contracts for television and the internet. in the last few days, at home with their kids and spouses and shouldn't have to spend a second on hold.
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i'm very proud to work across the aisle on this bill with mr. ross tello. taking care of our military we want to stand behind. and i express my appreciation. this bill will provide a small measure of relief to our military members and their families. it is the least we can do. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back. . mr. takano: i have no further speakers and i am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i also have no further speakers and i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i ask my colleagues to join me in passing h.r. 2409 as amended and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the the gentleman from tennessee is recognized -- the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker.
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as i was thinking here as we were listening to the testimony, when i went into the army, many, many years ago, to go to southeast asia, there was no internet, there was no cable tv and there was no -- there were no cell phones. so it was pretty easy for me to leave. but things have changed a lot since then. and i encourage all members to support h.r. 2409 as amended and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 2409, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the
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gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 2787 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 2787. a bill to establish in the department of veterans affairs, a pilot program instituting a clinical observation program for preed me students preparing to -- premed students preparing to attend medical school. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from tennessee, mr. roe, and the gentleman from california, mr. takano, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: so ordered. the gentleman is recognized. mr. roe: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 2787, as amended. the veterans specific education for tomorrow health professionals act. the bill would create a pilot program to provide undergraduate
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students with a clinical observation experience at the department of veterans affairs medical centers. the pilot would give them a window into the health care profession that would help inform their educational paths and careers. we also provide them an early introduction to both v.a. health care system and the medical conditions common among our nation's veterans. v.a. has a number of recruitment and retention challenges and one of which is an aging work force that's increasingly retirement-eligible. given that, it's imperative that v.a. take every available opportunity to engage young clinicians and make a concerted effort to attract them to a career serving veterans within the v.a. health care system. this bill is spops sponsored by congresswoman kaptur of ohio and i appreciate her efforts. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 2787, as amended. m.d. act. the department of veterans affairs, like the nation, is experiencing a shortage of health care providers. with shortages in areas like mental health care and medical administration it can be increasingly difficult to maintain a facility's efficiency anden quality. that is why it is -- and quality. that is why it is increasingly important to promote medical education and employment within v.a. as soon in a student's educational career as is possible. this bill allows v.a. to capture students as they complete their premedical undergraduate degrees by offering them the opportunity to shadow medical professionals in v.a. facilities. not only does this create a familiarity with the v.a. among the students, but allows v.a. to
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continue to do one of the things it does best. educate the nation's future health care providers. i appreciate the hard work of my colleague, representative kaptur, and urge my colleagues to vote in favor of the veteran m.d. act. -- vet m.d. act. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield three minutes to my good friend and the author of this bill, the gentlewoman from ohio, ms. kaptur. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from ohio is recognized. ms. kaptur: i want to thank the ranking member, takano, for your great support and for yielding me the time. and i want to thank chairman roe very much for moving this bill through your committee. r. 2787, the vet m.d. act, also called the veterans specific education for tomorrow's health professionals act, and i'm honored to speak on
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its behalf this evening. the vet m.d. act works to break down barriers and expand opportunities for health care professionals to get training to care for our veterans. the bill creates a three-year pilot program for prehealth undergraduate students to gain clinical observation experience within at least five v.a. medical centers. health schools recommend or require clinical observation hours, but there is no formal process to apply for these hours. opportunities to shadow are limited and are based on where you go to school or who you know. and students who attend schools outside major cities, as well as those whose families lack connections to the medical community, find it harder and harder to shadow and are thus disadvantaged in medical school admissions. this place is an -- this places an unfair burden on otherwise qualified students who come from less affluent communities or rural areas.
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several years ago two premedical undergraduate students highlighted to my team the struggles, disadvantage -- struggles disadvantaged minority and other young people who lack personal connections face as they apply for medical school. i'd like to thank shea muss and andrew for bringing this serious omission to our attention and i'd like to thank my legislative assistant on this important issue, for her work throughout. through their own struggle, these students struggled to gain access to clinical observation experience so, critical in medical circle, -- circles, and they realized an immense opportunity was missing. first generation college students, of which i was one, students referred by minority serving institutions, and, of course, veterans. the vet m.d. act creates a pipeline for future physicians and medical professionals and
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prioritizes training for students who specialize in a health profession where there's a serious staffing shortage. this important step will help narrow the gap and ensure we are training prehealth students in careers that are in demand and necessary and i can tell you, in every hospital system i represent, there's an unmet demand, thousands and thousands of individuals are needed. might i have an additional 45 seconds? mr. takano: i yield an additional 45 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. ms. kaptur: importantly, prehealth students in the pilot will gain a deeper understanding of veterans' specific health needs which is critical for health professionals who treat veterans, many of whom have complex conditions, as the chair and ranking member know. one of our to top responsibilities as a -- our top responsibilities as a congress is to make sure that our veterans, those who sacrificed so much for our country and for liberty's cause, receive high-quality health care from highly trained health professionals and this bill
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furthers that effort and i'm pleased it will get a vote this evening and i would like to thank my colleagues, mr. takano, for his diligent work on this bill, and ranking member walz and chairman roe, for bringing this bill to the floor so expeditiously. on behalf of our health professionals, our veterans, myself and all the co-sponsors, i can't thank you both enough. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i have no more speakers and i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i have no further speakers and i too am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, as i was listening to my friend from the state of ohio, i'm just struck by just how the process of legislating in this body works. how ideas come from very real people seeking their -- seeking to solve problem through their representative. i watched this legislation move through committee. the gentlewoman grarnsely accepting the changes and --
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graciously accepting the changes and improving the bill and i know my colleague from tennessee, a doctor himself, cares so much about the medical education. we've worked together on expanding the number of medical residencies. i'm delighted this bill has come to the floor so, he pedishesly. often legislation takes so much time to weekend its way through. but we -- wend its way through. but we moved through an idea that is very worthy in record time. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in passing h.r. 2787 as amended and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. in closing, i too came from rural america and i too am a first generation college graduate. and had an opportunity to use a public education system to go to college and medical school. after that, then mentored and taught for over 25 years in medical school.
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so i had a chance to see young students and i think this is a fantastic idea and i want to thank my colleagues on the other side of the aisle for bringing this forward. to bring a young person in who's never had a chance to be in that sort of environment and expose them to that, you don't know what sort of light bulb you're going to turn off -- turn on in their head, to encourage them and mentor them. and many of them will become passionate about medicine, nursing, physical therapy, cupation altherrpy, ptsd treatment. i could go on and on the and i think this is a great idea. i strongly encourage all members to support h.r. 2787, as amended, and, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 2787, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3
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of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid n the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5538. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 673. h.r. 5538. a bill to amend title 38, united states code, to provide for the inclusion of certain additional periods of active duty service for purposes of suspending charges to veterans' entitlement to educational assistance under the laws administered by the secretary of veterans affairs during periods of suspended participation in vocational rehabilitation programs. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from tennessee, mr. roe, and the gentleman from california, mr. takano, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee.
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mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. roe: mr. speaker, i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in support of h.r. 5538. under current law, if a member of the guard or reserve is called to active duty under certain orders while receiving training through the department of veterans affairs vocational rehabilitation and employment program, the charges for that training are waived. however, those charges are not waived for members of the guard or reserve who are called up under orders regarding emergency response or augmentation of overseas combat forces. this creates a disparity. h.r. 5538 would address that disparity and level the playing field by waiving training charges for all service members, regardless of which active duty orders they are serving under.
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i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. takano: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 5538, the reserve component vocational rehabilitation parity act. this bill corrects an overlooked provision related to our national guard and reserve service members who are mobilized under 12304-b authorities. this bill allows service members to pause the clock on the 12-year limit to use vocational rehabilitation programs while mobilized on active duty orders. currently, this is allowed for most mobilizational authorities but this particular authority was overlooked. simply, the bill adds to 12304-a d 12304-b authorities to the 12304 provision already listed within the statute. this is an important fix because of the increased use of 12304-b
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authority by the department of defense over the past few years and the increases planned for the future. . as we move the reserve components to an operational reserve component, we need to ensure while service members are in uniform. this is a step in the right direction. congress has the opportunity to be proactive instead of reactive. i would like to thank mr. peters for bringing this issue forward and identifying this. he is a reliable and critical fix for our guard and reserve members. i would like to thank mr. bergman and joining mr. peters in introducing this bill. and i recognize the co-chairs of the house's national guard and
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reserve components for supporting the initiative. i would like to thank the six other members of our committee who were original co-sponsors. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i yield five minutes to my good friend and the author of this bill, the gentleman from california, mr. peters. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. peterson: thank -- mr. peters: i appreciate your commitment. my bill e component, before the house today, those fighting for our nation. it is our duty they can access the resources they earned. many have realized they didn't qualify for all their
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departments after the department of defense used their reserve component. the new authority unintentionally excluded these reservists. thankfully we passed a few of these fixes in the forever g.i. bill last year. we are passing other bills to make sure other benefits are steppeded. one unresolved was vow occasional rehabilitation to help them direct their career path. it helps them determine transferable skills and what additional skills they need. upon separation, a veteran must use his or her benefits within 12 years. any years or months served doesn't go on the time clock. wo reservists may not have
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access under which they have mobilized. reservists involuntarily called-up. in both cases these guardsmen and reservists supported combat zones and received the same benefits and my bill, the reserve component rehabilitation party act ensures that they have access to the full 12 years of rehab benefits by pausing the clock. we are happy to have received of the support of the national guard in this effort. i urge congress to pass the bill so they can access the benefits they have earned. and i thank general bergman and i want to thank chairman roe,
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ranking member walz and veteran committee staff to support our nation's veterans. and i urge its passage and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. mr. takano: i have no further speakers and i am prepared to close and i reserve. mr. roe: i have no further speakers and am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i yield back. mr. roe: i want to thank mr. peters for bringing this needy piece of legislation up. now this congress has a chance in a bipartisan way to cregget this. i encourage all members to support h.r. 5538 and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the
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balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5538 as amended. hose in favor say aye. those opposed, no. . in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition. mr. roe: i move to suspend the rules h.r. 5649 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: a bill to amend title 10 and 38 united states code to amend the social security act and defense, labor and homeland security and the administrator of small business administration to take some actions to improve transition assistance to members
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of the armed forces to separate, retired or discharge from the armed forces and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from tennessee and the gentleman from california each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i ask ask that members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 549 as amended, the navy seal chef petty office william bill muddler improvement act of 2018. one of the most important things our government can do to help our nation's service members is to ensure their transition from military to civilian lifle is smooth. an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure and some of the
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problems that veterans incur could have been mitigated if they had a successful transition. i know the goal of this bill and provisions that are aimed at improving the national defense authorization act are to help service members to have as smooth a transition as possible to civilian life. i will allow congressman arrington to go into the specifics of it in a moment. i want to thank him and congressman o'rourke and all the members of the subcommittee on economic opportunity for taking the time to sit down with stakeholders and really examine the transition process from the very beginning and look at the need for improvements. while this bill is an accumulation of bipartisan review and work, it is only a stop in the process to ensure a
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smooth transition. we will remain dedicated to making improvements to this process to reach this goal. a request to include in the record enexchange of the committee on ways and means and i thank chairman brady to help expedite the bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 5649 as mended, the william bill muddler improvements transition act of 2018. i would like to recognize the economic opportunity subcommittee chairman and ranking member, mr. arrington, and mr. o'rourke, for their bipartisan focus on this issue and the bipartisan way they have
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crafted this piece of legislation and moved it forward. this bill was generated out of feedback from our veteran service organization partners, vigorous oversight and includes a number of changes, expansion of changes as well as first steps to make it a larger transition effort. and ms. brownley's effort which eliminates the period of eligibility. currently veterans only have 12 years to utilize educational i reserve the balance of my time.tive service. this removes that deadline and anyone who qualifies to access those services in definitely. t includes mr. poe's veterans' act which includes educational assistance to students impacted
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by natural disasters. this is similar to the benefits provided to veterans whose schools close their doors to make sure they are not struggling. this would allow veterans to continue collecting their housing benefits even their school is closed and allows them to stop and restart their tuition benefits once the schools reopen. we close a loophole in-flight school costs while making modification to laws. all of these provisions have been crafted to fix issues we have seen in the field and they will make life a little bit easier for our veterans. again, thank you to mr. o'rourke and mr. arrington for these necessary improvements. a testament to their work is the broad support they have received
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including ms. kuster and i look forward to their future work as they continue to focus on and refine the program. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i would like to yield four minutes to the economic subcommittee, my good friend, representative arrington, texas 19. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. arrington: mr. chairman, i can't thank you for the opportunity to serve with you wenstrupakano and brad and i'm seeing colleagues on both sides of the aisle have worked to solve problems so we can better serve our veterans and i've got to say, it has to be the most productive committee in all of the united states
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congress. and that is refreshing. and no worthyier customer to serve than those who wear the uniform and those who sacrifice today so we can have our tomorrow. i think it is notable toll remind my colleagues of the work under your leadership to produce er 70 pieces of reform legislation. 70 bills that have passed the house of representatives. it's not a small task. 20 bills have become law of the land. plrl takano and my friends on the other side of the aisle, this is a truely bipartisan committee. i urge my colleagues to support my bill. it's not my bill but the bill of the committee and subcommittee for economic opportunity and this is a bill that was amended
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as the navy seal william bill muddler improvement act of 2018. there is no greater honor to serve the men and women who served our country with honor and distinction. this will significantly improve the lives of our servicemen and women who are in transition from active duty to civilian life. when they come home, doesn't mean the conflict is over. it is a battle that continues to rage on inside of them and that is a big reason that we see unfortunately 20 veterans commit suicide every day in this country. one of those veterans was my good friend bill mulleder, after whom this bill was named. i'm proud this is named after bill and i'm glad to his family.
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he was a true american hero who served his country with honor and distinction and bill returned home from service with an internal struggle, with scars that you couldn't see with the naked eye and he was working through his transition from civilian or to civilian life after 20 years as a combat navy seal. that's tough you have. i can't imagine after redefining after fighting for 20 years as a navy seal. our country makes a tremendous investment, as you said, mr. chairman in preparing our citizens to be freedom fighters and but we only invest a fraction of that helping our soldiers. i have said like you have stated an ounce of prevention is better
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than a pound of cure and do a better job on the front end and identifying the highest risk individuals, i think we can reduce the number of individuals who struggle with unemployment, suicide, et cetera. this bill is the result again of mr. takano and mr. o'rourke, ranking member, my friend and fellow texan and will make the following improvements. . . we will engage our active duty personnel earlier in the process. we will have a more comprehensive assess. including mental health wlefment -- assessment. including mental health. we will comes to -- customize support for them. mr. roe: mr. speaker, i yield another minute. mr. arrington: thank you, mr. chairman. it will not just be a one-size-fits-all like we've seen in the past. whether he also connect them back to community organizations and we will track and we will measure the success and the
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outcomes so we'll know what is working, where we can continue to make those investments. again, i want to thank my friend and fellow texan, mr. rocker, for working with me on this packing an -- mr. o'rourke, for work in owe -- working with me on this package. i'm proud to say that this bill is fully offset. it's budget-neutral. and i believe it will have a positive impact. in fact, i pray it will actually save lives of our american veterans. i urge all members to support h.r. 5649 as amended and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, the work of this subcommittee is the work of great heart and i appreciate the heartful work that the chairman, mr. arrington, has put forward. and certainly i'd like to yield three minutes to my good friend,
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the ranking member of the economic opportunity, the gentleman from with great heart for veterans from the state of texas, mr. o'rourke. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. o'rourke: i'd like to thank the vice ranking member of the full committee, mr. takano of california, for this time to speak in favor of this bill. as my colleague from texas and the chairman of the subcommittee pointed out, by the best estimate of the v.a., which many believe is a conservative estimate, every single day in this country 20 veterans will have taken their lives. the purpose and the function and the dignity that they found as a member of the armed services, as a contributing member of their military unit, where the decisions that they made, the actions that they took, would literally save and determine the outcomes of the lives of their fellow service members, to return that level of function
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and purpose to their lives when they come back to this country and reintegrate within our communities, that is the purpose of this legislation. and i want to thank my colleague, the chairman of the subcommittee, for his diligent work on this. by convening stakeholders, veterans service organizations, veteran student service organizations, members of the v.a., the department of labor, other colleagues from the committee, to make sure that we got this right. and that we help those service members transition into a life that allows them to give to their full potential, once back in their home community, once back in their country. i want to make sure that we do everything we can to ensure the success of this legislation, that we follow the outcome assessments that are provided for in the legislation. that we meet the intention and the purpose that is described here so it's not a box that is checked at the end of a service
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member's career, but something that is pursued with thought so that when that service member reintegrates, they are ready to hit the ground running. and lastly, i want to thank the chairman of the full committee. some will say that without tennessee there would be no texas. without chairman roe there would be no h.r. 5649. the fact that you elevated this and that you spent so much of your time personally listening to these veteran service organizations and your colleagues on the committee i think helped to make it a much better bill than it would have been otherwise. and for that i am grateful. -- to the k to the gentleman from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: at this time i'd like to yield two minutes to my good friend, dr. brad wenstrup, a former member of the committee and chair of the subcommittee on health. also as a member of the house armed services committee and the intelligence committee.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. owens: thank you, thank you, mr. speaker -- mr. wenstrup: thank you, thank you, mr. speaker, thank you, mr. chairman. i urge high colleagues to -- my colleagues to support this bill. as a member of the army reserve who served in iraq, i know how difficult the transition to civilian life can be after service for so many of our service members. i still remember the eerie feeling of the quiet and serenity of home life after returning from the battlefield. for those service members who don't have a clear-cut path upon the return to civilian life, there's often a struggle for what i like to refer to as postnecessary stress. when you go from being completely necessary, part of a team, part of something big, and you come home and you don't have that same feeling, it takes its toll on you. it's hard for many service members to actually settle back into civilian life when they get back. this is what this is about. and we can combat this problem by encouraging service members to focus on transition earlier. even when they first join the armed services.
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imagine if you were being recruited and you're talking to a recruiter about what you plan to do when you enter the military, and if they also said to you, and what do you plan to do afterwards? if we were plotting a course for your life, when in uniform and after. so this gives us a chance, modernize our curriculum for those going through the trings assistance program, to -- the transition assistance program, to ensure that the information they have is timely and specific to the service member. i think this legislation's important -- an important first step to better equip service members with the skills needed to successfully transition into civilian life. i encourage my colleagues to support this legislation. i want to thank the committee, all the members on the committee, and the staff for pushing this along, and doing such a great job of that. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i would like to yield three minutes to my good friend and the ranking member of the subcommittee on
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disability assistance and memorial affairs, the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. esty. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from connecticut is recognized. ms. esty: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 5649, the navy seal chief petty officer william "bill" mulder transition improvement act of 2018. a bill that will improve the transition process for service members returning to civilian life, to a life of purpose and meaning. i want to thank my colleagues, the gentleman from texas, mr. arrington, and mr. o'rourke, for introducing this important bill. and for including my own bill, the job tools for veterans act, as a provision within this larger legislation. the job tools act for veterans would ensure that veterans of all eras have access to transition assistance classes. the transition assistance program, commonly known as t.a.p., was established to help current service members transition to civilian life.
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with job search and training information. prior to the establishment of t.a.p., very few service members received any job training assistance during their transition at all. we know that access to job training is essential to our mission of ensuring that all our service members land on their feet when they return home from protecting our freedom. and given that transitions that veterans face over the years, especially in a changing economy , these job training programs are especially valuable throughout life. and that is why our bill would allow veterans, no matter when they served, to get access to this crucial assistance. additionally, it will allow veterans from any service era access to all t.a.p. programs, and will expand the t.a.p. program to at least 50 locations across the united states. the men and women who have admirably served our great nation must know that we stand
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behind them when transitioning from military to civilian life, and that we stand behind them for life. i want to thank chairman roe, ranking member walz, vice ranking member takano, for their work in getting this important bill to the floor today. for the outstanding bipartisan work of this committee, which i'm so proud to serve on, and for our excellent staff. i fully support h.r. 5649 and i urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation. and to stand behind the veterans who will be assisted by this across the nation. thank you and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers and i'm prepared to close. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i'd like to yield two minutes to mr. rutherford of florida, a form very active member on the veterans' affairs
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committee, and very good friend. the speaker pro tempore: how much time does the gentleman yield? mr. roe: two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. rutherford: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in strong support of h.r. 5649, the navy seal chief petty officer william mulder transition improvement act. in my time on the house veterans' affairs subcommittee on economic opportunity, my colleagues and i heard from countless constituents, including active duty and separated service members, about how ineffective the federal government's comprehensive transition assistance program was at placing our veterans in long-term, stable employment. under the leadership of chairman roe and subcommittee chairman arrington, the subcommittee held a number of round tables, hearings, meetings, to receive feedback from all the stakeholders. we heard from d.o.d., the department of labor, veterans
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affairs, community providers and, of course, veterans themselves. one section of this bill that i would like to highlight and thank chairman arrington for including is section 203, which is bill language i introduced last year called the veterans armed for success act. this section makes grants available to organizations that provide service members transition assistance of their knowledge, skills and abilities to private industry through such means as resume building and interview training. it's mirrored off an organization called operation new uniform that does just that in my district in florida. this group has a 97% success rate in placing veterans in long-term employment. as we learned through the information gathering process, the successful transition often relies on the communities supporting our veterans and connecting with the resources that they need. we should help this and other
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similar organizations around the country use this model to help our veterans succeed. i strongly commend chairman roe, chairman arrington, ranking member walz and all the members of the committee for their incredible work on this important piece of legislation. you all, along with the committee staff and other groups that worked so hard on this, should be proud of the real-world impact that this legislation will have. as i now serve as a member of the house appropriations subcommittee on military construction and veterans' affairs, i look forward to building on this important work with my colleagues to assure our veterans are set up to succeed. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i reserve at this time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i have no further speakers so i'm prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, this is a very special legislation,
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piece of legislation to me. i was once the ranking member of this very subcommittee and i applaud the work of ranking member beto o'rourke and chairman arrington. this is a work of great heart, of great compassion, and we all know that we need to improve the transition from military service to civilian life for our service members. so with that, mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in passing h.r. 5649, as amended. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to close by thanking mr. arrington and mr. o'rourke for bringing this great piece of legislation to the floor. and i -- as i was listening to the debate and conversation, it sort of took me back a few years. and recall 53 years ago when i
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i a college student and buried a very good friend of mine who was a scout master. first sergeant thomas e. thair who was killed in vietnam. won the silver star there. had four children. and family at home. his life was worth i think $10,000. i think that's what it was worth. and i thought about what it did to his family and how little our country did for our nation's heroes at that time. and i fast forward to what we're doing now. we're making some things right. and i know mr. argueton spoke very warmly of his -- arrington spoke very warmly of his friend, chief petty officer bill mulder, who -- a true american hero who died. i know when i separated from the litary in 19 -- end of 1974, separated, got back from southeast asia, separated from the army, i had no -- there was no transition.
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it was basically just out the front gate you went and no one called, checked, whatever. . we are much better as a country and much better for what we're doing. and this bill, i agree with mr. o'rourke and mr. arrington. if you put these young men and women back in a job and school, which we just passed a forever g.i. bill from this committee and the president has signed it into law, all of these things i think will make a huge difference in the future of not only these young children that served our nation so honorably, but will help our nation. i, as a veteran and as a person that did not benefit from this, i'm certainly more than happy to support this. and i think this is a great piece of legislation. and again, i thank mr. walz, mr.
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takano and others who helped push this through. i encourage all members to support this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5649 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. roe: i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5882 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: a bill to amend the service members' civil relief act to provide for the termination of a spouse of ertain lessey when they die in
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service. the speaker pro tempore: each will control 20 minutes. and the chair recognizes the gentleman from tennessee, mr. roe. mr. roe: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to extend their remarks and insert extraneous material. i yield myself stutch time as i may consume. i rise in support of this bill, the gold star leasing. the death of a service member could have a profound impact. our government should take every measure necessary to help family members through such a time of need in recognition of that, the gold star spouses relieve act ould amend the s.c.r.a. to allow a spouse of a service member who has died to break their residential lease without
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penalty within one year of the service member's death. paying fees for breaking a lease should be the last thing on someone's mind when they are confronting life without their spouse. sponsor of nk the this bill. i also want to thank ranking member walz and his staff for his suggestion to improve the bill that would extend protection to extending benefits . we should recognize the service of all service members on active duty orders and i'm glad the amended version includes that provision. with that, mr. speaker, i urge support of this bill. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. mr. takano: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 5882
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as amended the gold stars releasing act. i would like to first start thanking the the gentlewoman from illinois for drafting this bill and allow the spouse of a service member to terminate their lease after the death of a service member. oftentimes families are required . move far away from home in the difficult time after the passing of a service member, spouses should not be stuck in a lease far away from their home and support network. this may seem like a small detail but it is something that could make life easier in a very trying time. i thank the chairman. as we move the reserve components from a strategic
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reserve, we are seeing too many deaths of national guardsmen and women and reservists while in uniform. it is important that we modernize our statutes to ensure benefits partity. i would like to thank the gentlewoman from illinois for working on this issue and mr. wenstrup for introducing the bill. for k ms. kuster co-sponsoring this bill and raising the profile of this issue. i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i would like to recognize mr. when strum. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio is recognized. mr. wenstrup: i rise in support of this bill.
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legislation that i'm proud to have introduced my colleague congresswoman bustos and i thank her for this to bring it forward. part of this commitment is the commitment to their families especially if they endure the loss of life. as gold star families grieve, they should have the freedom to relocate. sadly, it's not the case. cindy, a native of portsmouth, ohio lost her husband during the first desert storm war. she wanted to move home. but she had signed a one-year lease in north carolina. her landlord refused to waive her loss. cindy suffered enough. this legislation would protect gold star families by ensuring they are not trapped in a
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residential lease after the death of a service member. they have depreeved enough. i urge my colleagues to support this important legislation and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: i yield five minutes to my good friend and author of this bill, the gentlewoman from illinois, mrs. bustos. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. bustos: i rise today in support of my bill the gold star spouses relieve act. this bipartisan bill would support the widows and widowers our fallen by terminating leases in the wake of a service member's death. this came to my attention when i met kyley from farmington,
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illinois. kyley's life was forever changed on october 19, 2016 when her husband, sergeant douglas riney died defending our freedom. kyley and her two young children, james and ella, were living in texas at the time. this is their beautiful family before tragedy hit. they had moved there when he was assigned to fort hood before eploying in support of deployment. kyley chose to be back in illinois with her family surrounded by those who she loved and loved her so they could mourn together in this inconceivable loss. in the wake, their landlord refused to allow kylely to terminate the lease that she and her husband had signed. it is hard to get those words
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out. refused them to get out of their lease. the families of fallen heroes have sacrificed far too much and we should ensure that grieving spouses receive the support they need. for this reason, i was proud to introduce this bill and i want to thank my colleague, congressman wenstrup who is an army reserve officer and a physician. i would like to thank chairman roe and ranking member walz to bring this to the floor. the service members protect them from fees when they deploy or eceive a permanent change of protection. and our law extends that protection to those who are killed. ranking member walz the bill
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would protect families including those who have lost a -- those who lose a member of the national guard or reserves. he has been an advocate and it is a pleasure to work with him. i could hardly think of anything worse of taking advantage of a grieving widow or widower who made the ultimate sacrifice. i urge support of this bill to ensure it doesn't happen again. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i have no more speakers and i'm prepared to close and i resevere. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i'm prepared to close also. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in passing h.r. 5882 as amended.
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i thank the gentlewoman from illinois for introducing this important piece of legislation. m dumbfounded that we have landlords that would not recognize the situation of a fallen soldier. but this law is necessary. and i urge all my colleagues to support it. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized to close. mr. roe: i, too, associate my comments with mr. takano. and i grew up in a military town where i saw families broken apart and had to move. i find it almost unimaginable that a landlord would insist that someone -- not separate, not do this, when they have lost a spouse. the lives are changed forever.
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and the last thing that young widow needed to worry about that. she needed to explain why their father wasn't coming home or another case, mother is not coming home. i encourage support, all members to support h.r. 5882 as amended. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the after five and the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? mr. roe: i move to pass the bill h.r. 5864. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman call the bill as amended? mr. roe: i do. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title.
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the clerk: a bill to direct the secretary of veterans affairs to establish qualifications for the human resources within the veterans health administration within the department of veterans affairs and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee, mr. rowe and the gentleman from california will each control 20 minutes. mr. roe: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise today in support of h.r. 5864, the v.a. hospital establishing leadership performance act. the significant recruitment and challengeses are nothing new. one of my priorities as chairman has been to help address those challenges and attract high
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quality commissions and support staff. to that end i have worked to see two major pieces of legislation, the v.a. choice and the vamplet a. mission act signed into law this congress that included extensive improvements. however those improvements will not be nearly as effective as they could as the h.r. professionals are not operating at the top of their game. the committee has found several instances where some staff working in v.a. medical facilities had substandard educational and one hole lacked a college degree and relevant work experience. the v.a health act would establish standardized metric performance standards to ensure transparency and to aid the
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committee in our efforts. it would provide congress with a copy of those standards and perform performance metrics as well as require the assessment of them. . . i am grateful to the sponsor of the v.a. health act , my colleague and friend, congressman mike bost of illinois. mike is chairman of the subcommittee on disability assistance and memorial affairs and a tireless advocate for veterans and their family, and i might add a veteran himself. i thank him for his leadership on this bill and urge my colleagues to join me in supporting it. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. takano: v.a. hospitals establishing leadership erformance or v.a. help act. due to performances and licensing requirements, human resource professionals working in the health care industry must possess a unique set of skills and qualifications. human resource professionals working within v.a. must develop -- fust further develop their skills while learning to leverage the many hiring institutes, budgetary concerns and other resources in a way that can compete with the private sector's financial incentives. the v.a. help act is an effort to assist v.a. in finding the unique talent it needs to fill these health specific human resource officers by requiring v.a. to establish qualifications and standardize performance metrics for each human resource position within v.h.a. by further defining the human resource positions within v.h.a.
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and standardizing performance metrics, v.a. will be more able to -- will be able to more easily attract, access and retain qualified resource officers. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized. mr. roe: at this time i'd like mr. boston of- to illinois. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. boston: thank you, mr. -- mr. bost: thank you, mr. speaker. and mr. chairman. when our heroes transition from the military they deserve to have access to quality health care and services. unfortunately, the v.a. continues to fall short on the promises due in part to failures in human resource officers. this issue hits close to home for me after the v.a. national
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center for patient safety surveyed the marion v.a. medical center in my district. the survey showed a decline in key factors such as communication between management and staff and reporting problems so management. the v.a. committee's oversight subcommittee staff then visited marion in order to get the firsthand look at the issues at the facility. during that site visit, multiple employees raised concerns about poor management, poor communication, distrust between leadership and management and the lack of accountability. despite several efforts to address headquarters leadership to address these problems, limited actions have been taken and my office continues to receive complaint. the common thread throughout has been the issue in the human resource department. h.r. management is critical part of delivering quality health
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care. h.r. is responsible for recruiting and retaining highly qualified professionals and the current status quo within the v.h.a.'s h.r. offices cannot continue. at's why i introduced h.r. 5854, the v.a. help act, with representative sinema. this bipartisan straightforward legislation instructs the v.a. secretary to establish qualifications for h.r. physicians within the v.h.a. and to set performance metrics for these positions. i urge members of the house to support h.r. 5864 to ensure that our nation's veterans are being provide the best possible care from the v.a. employees. i thank the chairman of the committee, chairman roe, and the ranking member, mr. takano, for supporting this and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from tennessee reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i have no further speakers, i'm prepared to close, and i reserve. mr. roe: i also have no further speakers and am prepared to close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i urge my colleagues to join me in passing h.r. 5864 as amended and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized to close. mr. roe: i urge all members to support h.r. 5864 as amended and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5 64 as amended? those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative -- mr. roe: i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this measure will be postponed. for what purpose does the
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gentleman rise? mr. roe: i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5938 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5938, a bill to amend the v.a. choice and quality act to direct secretary of veterans affairs to establish a va cancy and recruitment database to aid in recruitment of the arms forced to establish and implement a training and certification pam -- program for intermediate care technicians in that department and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from tennessee, mr. roe, and the gentleman from california, mr. takano, will each control 20 minutes. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. roe: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. roe: i rise in support of
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h.r. 5938 as amended, the veterans serving veterans act. this bill is sponsored by my friend and fellow committee member, congressman gin fer gonzalez-colon for from puerto rico. i'm grateful for her hard work and leadership on this bill on behalf of the nation's veterans in puerto rico and across the country. the veterans serving veterans act contains two provisions to help alleviate staffing shortages at the department of veterans' affairs medical facilities and create unemployment opportunities for service members separating from the armed forces. irst, it would expand v.a.'s recruiting database to include information about v.a. -- soon members who fit v.a. needed skills. we all know that all of the things -- all other things being
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equal, veterans prefer being seen and treated by their peers and this would create a pathway for that to happen more often while addressing the serious recruitment issues that continue to hamper v.a. medical facilities coast to coast. i encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman gentleman is recognized. mr. takano: i rise in support of h.r. 5938 as amended, veterans serving veterans act of 2018. veterans exit the military with the highest quality of education and experience in their respective fields. we along with the private sector have worked diligently to ensure service members are able to translate their skills to the -- to private industry. however this bill take ours efforts a step farther by allowing v.a. to create a searchable vayvay cancy and recruitment database containing each vacancy and the
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corresponding military obligation code or skill that corresponds to positions. the database will allow interested service members to opt in to be included in the database so v.a. may begin recruit, transitioning -- recruiting transitioning service members to fill vacant positions before their discharges are complete. in addition to the creation of the database, the bill also allows the secretary to create a pilot program to train service members that served as basic health care technicians while serving in the armed forces to to be trained as intermediate care technicians at v.h.a. by creating a pipeline from service to bedside, v.a. can better treat the nine million veterans that depend on its services. i appreciate representative the hard work for on this bill and urge my colleagues to support it. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from tennessee.
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mr. roe: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield three minutes to a member of the veterans affairs committee, ms. jenniffer gonzalez-colon and before i yield to her, i want to tell you about this young woman, she has -- she represents the island of puerto rico and before one of the hurricanes hit i called her on the phone just moments before the hurricane, i was amazed i even got through. following that we led a group, i came too visit the hospital and the island of puerto rico and the passion that she shows for the people she represents and the passion she shows for veterans is second to none. i wanted to pass that along. i saw something in this young woman down there i had not seen before i visited her beautiful island. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from puerto rico is recognized. miss gonzalez-colon: thank you, mr. speaker, and thank you, mr. roe, for visiting the island. this is the first time ever a
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committee from veterans affairs from this house of representatives vied the island, first time ever. i thank you for that, your leadership, and your commitment and the ranking member for doing so in the last month. i speak -- i rise today to speak in support of my bill, h.r. 5938, the veterans service vet -- serving veterans act of 2018. this bill seeks to alleviate chronic staffing shortages that currently affect the department of veterans' affairs and hinders the ability to serve our veterans in an effective and timely manner. this issue never fails to come up in those meetings with veterans reciting -- residing in puerto rico and it's often discussed by my colleagues here in the house. h.r. 5938 seeks a remedial option to this issue by doing two things. first, amending section 20 of the choice act of 2017 to include the military occupation specialties of soon to be discharged service members that can respond to vay can positions
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at the v.a. in the recruit dageta base as well as service members contact information and the date of discharge. inclusion into the database is completely optional for those service members. if included, they'll potentially be matched for vacant positions at the v.a. that correspond with the kills they acquired with the department of defense. second, the bill will also are require the v.a. to implement a program to train and certify former department of defense health care technicians as intermediate care technicians, i.c.t.'s, to address the large demand of health care providers at the veterans health administration. these technicians trained by d.o.d. have difficulty gaining employment in their field after separating from the armed forces due to the lack of a certification. at the same time, the v.h.a. has a significant shortage of providers. the i.c.t. program has a high
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satisfaction rate and helps fill this void. service members are a remarkable asset of -- on transitioning from the department of defense. we should do everything we can do to foster this position and facilitate opportunity to our men and women in uniform to serve our veterans. i need to thank again chairman roe for his leadership. for me it is an honor to serve on this committee with this man that has this commitment and working in a bipartisan manner with ranking member wolf, ranking member takano. thank you for your support. it is an honor to improve so many bills like this, and their leadership and assistance in moving this bill forward makes us all proud. so i urge all my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back.
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the gentleman from tennessee reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. >> i have no further speakersing i'm prepared to close, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i have no further speakers, i'm prepared to close. mr. takano: i ask my colleagues to join me in patsing h.r. 5938 as amened and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from tennessee is recognized to close. mr. roe: i once again encourage all members to support h.r. 5938 as amended and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5938 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? . . mr. roe: i move to pass the bill as amended. the clerk: h.r. 5974 a bill to direct the secretary of veteran
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ffairs to use medical on-waste facilities and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee and the gentleman from california will each control 20 minutes. mr. roe: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative daze to revise and stepped their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. roe: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise today in support of h.r. 5974 as amended, the department of veterans affairs creation of n-site treatment of general or perhaps the most creative of naming of a bill the v.a. cost savings act fment this bill would require v.a. to identify facilities that could benefit and end those facilities and
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.nstall medical waste the centers for disease and control consider the waste management to be a best practice. however, only a relative small percentage of v.a. medical acilities have installed facilities. and v.a. e making a could achieve considerable savings of taxpayer dollars that could be used to fund other v.a. initiatives and others could use a method that is safer and more environmentally friendly. this bill is sponsored by congressman denham. i applaud the gentleman for his
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creativity in coming up with an acronym. i encourage my colleagues to support it. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. takano: mr. speaker, i rise in support of this bill, the department of veterans affairs improvement n-site d certainly act known as the v.a. cost savings act. the funding surrounding v.a. are evidence of the need for creative cost savings measures. i must thank representative denham in championing one such solution. it simply asks v.h.a. to review its waste disposal system and
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whether this would result in cost savings. if so, then the facility is required to have onsite disposal. and this bill would require v.h.a. to ensure they are having the most effective method. thank you to representative denham and i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of the measure. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california resevers. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: i yield to two minutes to the gentleman from california, mr. denham. mr. denham: i thank the chairman and ranking member for their support the-v a. cost savings enhancement act. this improves care for our veterans and ensures that the a.'s is using the ratest
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technology. and this will result in a cost savings within five years. system-wide this will save millions of dollars each year and directly improve safety and health care for our veterans. in addition to the savings, it cries sees readiness and prevents the spread of brings the d this v.a. in line. likewise in the event of an earthquake or wildfire which we saw in california, transportation, infrastructure can be compromised and prevent harsardous waste going through a city. we need to make sure that this
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s handled onsite in a disaster site and creating this is preventing an outbreak and keeping it up and running. our veterans deserve the highest quality of care. his technology improves crisis readiness is more efficient and more environmentally friendly than traditional medical waste disposal. this will samb millions of dollars per year and improve care for our veterans. we support h.r. 5974 and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee resevers. the gentleman from california. mr. takano: i have no further speakers and i am prepared to close and reserve. mr. roe: i have no further speakers and prepared to close.
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mr. takano: i ask my colleagues in joining h.r. 5974 and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from tennessee. mr. roe: at this time, i want to thank both minority and majority staffs for the hard work they have done on these eight bills. we have shown that he we can work in a bipartisan way and close many loopholes that no one ever attended when a spouse has lost their loved one to be free -- to move along with a cable bill or lease and other issues that we have dealt with today and i want to thank, mr. takano and mr. walz and the staff on both sides for the hard work they have done on all of these bills. and the committee will continue to move forward with other bills later in the year.
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i encourage all members to support h.r. 5974 as amended. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and support h.r. 5974. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. the chair will recognize for . ecial order speeches the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of
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the minority leader. gar mr. speaker, thank you very much for the opportunity to address the house. as i often do in these evenings, special order hour, i try to
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first lay out what it is, what is the purpose, what is the goal, what is the value in what we're trying to accomplish. and i find myself always hashingening back to a quote that i saw many years ago and then more recently found etched in the marble at the f.d.r. memorial here in washington, d.c., and comes from franklin delano roosevelt and he talked about what he was trying to accomplish and what america aut to accomplish and his words are equally important in the great depression and the years thereafter. he said the test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much, it is rather we provide
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enough for those who have too little. kind of what we're all about, as democrats. and that's why we found the tax cut, the republican tax cut, which no democrat voted for last december, so profoundly troubling. hat are tax cut, on top of the 2001 and 2003 republican tax ts added a trillion -- added $2 trillion to the wealth of the top 1% of americans. legality let me say that say that once again. f.d.r. was once clear in his test of policy. he said the test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abuppedance of those who
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have much, it is whether we provide enough to those who have too little. 2003 republican tax uts together with the december 2017 republican tax cuts, which no republican -- no democrat in the house of representatives oted for, added $2 trillion to he wealth of the top 1% of americans. i suppose that would be ok if the 99% had somehow seen their wealth grow. it didn't happen. and, in fact, what we have seen in the last decade since the great recession is that the
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great middle class of america d the poor have seen no real income growth. in the last couple of years, yes, there has been a wage increase, about 2%. totally consumed by inflation, which was slightly more than 2%. no real income growth. so what's happening here is that a democrats, are proposing better deal for americans. yes, those words are similar to what f.d.r. used. but we are proposing a better deal for americans, not one that makes the rich:er, although that would be fine if the rest of americans could also become richer.
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but that's going to take a change in public policy. and that's what we are proposing to do, because our public policy going forward is going to be for the etter deal american people. we're proposing, as we go into this election year, that we push aside the republican proposal, which is essentially a better deal for the superrich, and we want to bring about a better deal for the people. and here are the three major elements of that deal. we want to lower our health care costs and prescription drugs for the american people. we can do this. unfortunately, our colleagues on the republican side of the aisle are going exactly in the other
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side. we have seen the cost of health care in america skyrocket. we have seen the cost of drugs skyrocket. we want to end that. one of the things we want to end is what the republicans are now proposing is that we go back in america to the bad old days when if you had a pre-existing condition, you could not get health care or you would have to pay a small fortune to get a small nurns policy. no, we don't want that. but that's what our republican colleagues are trying to give us, a return to the insurance discrimination where if you have a pre-existing condition, you cannot get health care at an affordable price and couldn't get it at all.
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. . issue one. the cost of drugs. the 2001 to 2003 improvement to medicare part d provided prescription drugs at a reduced cost to seniors, all good. a clause was written into that that prohibited the federal government from negotiating drug prices. for the million, tens of millions of americans on medicare. and so we've seen the cost of prescription drugs soar. we've seen the stories about a ug that was acquired by some ripoff person. who then took the cost of that drug from a few dollars per pill to several hundred or several thousand dollars per pill. so that's point one. point two is, i'm going to go down to point three because i
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want to spend time on point two. what we want to do is to clean up the corruption of politics in washington and across this nation. just recently the treasury department said that the -- i believe it was, yes, indeed. the n.r.a. didn't have to reveal who its contributors were through its dark money program. and similarly, no other dark money p.a.c. across the united states had to reveal who their contributors were. citizens united opened the flood gates to hidden money. secret money. millions upon millions of dollars pouring into campaigns to influence the effect of those campaigns. so we want to deal with citizens united, we want to deal with this problem of corruption in our political system and there are many ways we can do it but until we deal with that, we're
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going to continue to see more and more legislation that benefits the rich at the expense of the working men and women of america. now, let me go to this second one here. and grow ourcrease a omy and jobs through infrastructure program rebuilding america. that'll be the central focus of what i want to spend this evening on. so as we talk a better deal for the american people, we'll be talking about health care issues, we'll be talking about corruption and ending the dark money, and we will also talk about rebuilding the infrastructure for america. and creating jobs. so as we go into this, why is it important? why is infrastructure important.
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i suspect many of you remember just more than a year ago that the greatest waterfall in all the world was created at the oraville dam in california. just a few miles upstream from my district on the feather river. yes, an infrastructure failure. the oraville dam spillway was about to give way, just to the side of this creating a 30-foot wall of water because the main spillway had collapsed. i suppose if you're interested in waterfalls this was quite an event. but it was dangerous. 200,000 of my constituents had to immediately evacuate the cities of marysville and ewe ba city and live oak and -- and yuba city and live oak and other small communities in that area for fear that th infrastuckture project would fail.
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well, it did, but not totally. for the folks in seattle, washington, or anybody traveling north on interstate 5 from washington state to british columbia. turned out it was a tough day to get there. this is the interstate 5 bridge. i suppose if you had pontoons or water wings you could stay on interstate 5. just one example of the thousand, tens of thousands of bridges across america considered to be unsafe, structurally unsound. this one proved it. similar bridges in minneapolis, minnesota, the twin cities area, resulted in the death as that bridge collapsed. infrastructure. american infrastructure is, according to duke university in
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a study they published a couple of years ago, ranks in the d's. i think we do have one c. what is it here? that's going to require glasses to try to find the one c in our infrastructure system. oh, yeah, here it is. ports. our ports are a c-plus. and the rill systems. well the private rail systems are a b. the rest of them are d's and f's. roads. bridges. dams. on and on. sanitation system. water systems. all of us have had the problem in michigan. with the water system there. it's repeated in california up and down the central valley of california with water systems that are contaminated in multiple ways. as they are in michigan. what are we going to do about it? well, we have the good fortune of an opportunity presented to s by our democratic leaders.
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let me start someplace else. let me start with a couple of examples that can be done if we were to make it in america. take for example an american success story of making it in america. the bridge in new york they did it right. they did it with u.s. manufactured steel. it was a $3 ppt 9 billion project. 7,720 american jobs created. now out in california we do things a little differently and not always better. you've heard of the san francisco-oakland bay bridge. they decided chinese steel would
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be cheaper. turned out it wasn't and there were thes of american jobs that didn't happen. it was $3.9 billion over budget s that chinese steel was used. ,000 jobs created in china to produce steel that was badly elded and flawed in many ways. so we have a choice. you can make it in america as new york did, or have it made in china as california did with the oakland-san francisco bay bridge. not our proudest moment and for you that are not aware, i'm a californian. was the lieutenant governor when this disaster was going on. screamed and yelled and jumped up and down said, what in the world are you doing? but it's cheaper.
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upposed to be 10%. cheap is not always better. an example of what could be done if we were to make it in america. this idea of making it in america actually started with steny hoyer. our minority wip -- our nert whip. he's renewed his program that he and i worked on beginning in 2010. and yeah, this is the way i want to do it. k. over the years we've talked about make it in america, the ways it can be done, policies and the like. this monday minority whip steny hoyer reenergized the make it in america. i think it's 2.4 or make it in america .40.
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so encourage entrepreneurship. by ensuring access to workplace benefits like health care and retirement security and promoting -- providing a more, stronger growth to businesses. with ideas and successful businesses. just came across one of these earlier today, i was talking to a sprend out -- a friend out in california, phil wyatt a ph.d. guy, worked out of university of california's santa barbara for some time. and he came across a way of using a machine to analyze what's in something. chemical analysis, analysis of buy y logical components and the like. started a company called wyatt
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technology. it's an analytical machine used all around the world. used in health care, used in biology, it's used in chemical analysis and the like. the company is an american company. an entrepreneur that developed this country. tells me there are 88 straight quarters of profitability and no way in hell is he going to allow the chinese to steal it from him even though his equipment is broadly used throughout the world. a great success story, wyatt technology. so where did it come from? it was an entrepreneurial program. we need more entrepreneurials. we need more entrepreneurs that are out there, developing new business like phil did several years back. they cab do it. they're going to need support from their government. they need sound tax policy. they need the educational and research that's going on at universities.
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and they need to be able to accept the risk of starting a new business. whether it's a high tech business or maybe it's somebody that wants to go out and work at a taco stand. but they ought to be able to have their health care and they ought to be having their retirement security available to them as they go through that time. so that's one of the things that mr. hoyer has talked about as he renews the make it in america plan. we're going to hold infrastructure for a few moments and pick up the third element in his plan which is education ties directly to what i talked about ith mr. wyatt. wyatt's new, his business is almost more than a decade old, actually came out of the university of california santa barbara where he was a professor where he was doing research and
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so it's the educational system. not at the high level. not only at the high level. but also all the way down the line. promoting pathways for career opportunities. a lot of this is something you might find in the creesh and technical education field where a fellow learns to be a tissue or a woman -- learns to be a welder and then says, i can start my own welding shop. i can become my own boss. and so they do. or maybe it's -- it's somebody who learned hair styling or cosmetology, cosmetics and decides they want to open their own shop. so if they're able to have portable health care if they have their retirement benefits, they can run the risk of starting their own business. and so the training programs and the educational and research all fit into this focus on education. so mr. hoyer has outlined that
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as the second element. the third element in the renewal of the make it in america plan that he and i worked on in the beginning of 2010 and continued working on these many years is a focus on infrastructure. as i said earlier, as i talked about the failure of our basic infrastructure systems, water, sanitation, bridges, highways, and reservoirs and dams, is this problem. also this opportunity. as i said with this report coming out of duke university where they rated the infrastructure systems and -- as did the society of civil engineers, it's a fact that if we are building our infrastructure system, for every dollar we invest in infrastructure, we'll be able to
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create 21,671 jobs. and for every dollar we invest, for every billion dollars, we'll create those jobs. for every dollar we invest we'll improve the economy by $3.54. so the return on that $1 is 3 1/2 to $3 -- one. and besides that, the bridges won't fall down and the dams won't crumble. so this one is prnt. -- important. repairing and rebuilding our aging infrastructure. and it gives us the opportunity innovate in the infrastructure of the future. well, as mr. hoyer wants to talk about the infrastructure of the future, i want to talk about, for my remaining time here, the infrastructure of the past. let me find this one here.
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yes, here we go. you may be aware that america is a a nation that exports strategic national asset. it's our petroleum products. for fracking and other reasons, we are now an export nation. when it comes to crude oil, gasoline, diesel, and, above all, natural gas. we have succeeded in turning this around from an importing nation to an exporting nation. and some of these statistics that to an opportunity a could rebuild, re-energize critical national infrastructure . we don't often think about our maritime industry as being
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infrastructure. but it really is. it's the sports, to be sure. and we often talk about ports. we alk at that -- talk about intermodele from the ship to the port to the trail, to the train and rail and then on to the highways. all true. but we often ignore the ship itself. so here we are. the future of american ship in theg actually resides export of oil and natural gas. by 2020 the u.s. is expected to be the world's third largest exporter of l.n.g. liquefied natural gas. 225 l.n.g. vessels are expected to be added to the world fleet by 2020. hm. those are big ships. little picture there of one.
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due to the eroded capacity of american shipyards, not one, one, nada, none of those 225 l.n.g. ships, vessels, will be built in american shipyards. nless there's a law that equires that just a small part of that export of l.n.g. be on american-built ships. similarly -- oil. i don't have that up here. but none of the oil that will be exported from the united states will be on american-built ships unless there's a law. and so are you surprised that we're proposing a law called the
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energizing american ship building. it's a piece of legislation that i've introduced to deal with a critical infrastructure, the ships that america once had. o, 225 new l.n.g. vessels, currently 70% of those orders are going to korea and the rest the -- and the rest to china. maybe a few to japan. none to the united states. so the legislation called energizing the american ship building industry, introduced by a elf, h.r. 5893, introduced few weeks ago. it requires that a certain percentage of the liquefied natural gas and crude oil exports be transported on united states-built ships and american flag vessels, crewed by american
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mariners. from the captains to the engineers to the seamen. american men and women on these american-built vessels. a similar bill was introduced in the senate by senator wicker. and that bill also does exactly the same thing. senator kasey, republican, democrat in the house, mr. hunter, mr. courtney, mr. whitney, two democrats, two republicans, introduced the legislation in the senate, one republican and one senator have introduced the very same legislation. bipartisan, bicameral, and, by god, we ought to do it. what happens if we were to do it? well, let's look at some of the very simple opportunities that exist. instead of china and korea and japan, building the ships for the export of their strategic national -- this strategic
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national asset, let's do it in america. let's make them in america. energizing the american ship building act. introduced in the house and in the senate this year, and if we were to pass this legislation, we're talking at least 50 new ships built in america. well, let's see. that's three, six, nine, 12, out 15 of them, l.n.g. ships would be built here in the united states. and when they are commissioned and they're on the oceans, they would have american mariners onboard. providing a strategic advantage to our american defense policy. i'll talk about that a little later. on the crude oil side, well, there would be many, many more on the crude oil side. perhaps more than 30rks probably closer to 35 -- 30, probably closer to 35 ships would be built in the next decade and a half to two decades. providing -- ooh, i don't know,
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maybe 1,500 jobs for american mariners. and we haven't yet been able to calculate the number of jobs in all the shipyards of america. but we know that for san diego, at the shipyards in san diego, they would be building these ships. we know that they would be building these ships in the shipyards of the gulf coast. and in the shipyards on the east coast, particularly in philadelphia. and so these jobs would be spread around at the shipyards, on the west coast, the gulf of mexico, and the east coast. and, just as important, the bill , uld require that the engines the hydraulic systems, the pumps, the pipes, the electronics, those too would also be built in america. we're talking about a major opportunity to make it in america.
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to make it in america once again. so that america can continue to be a major place for the construction of american-built ships. whether those are naval ships, as they are today, required to be built in the united states. or whether they are commercial ships, required at a small percentage of the export of oil and natural gas be on american-built ships with american sailors. bottom line, manufacturing matters. so when mr.ory, -- mr. hoyer, our minority whip, talks about renewing the make it in america agenda, and he talks about the cessity for that to be focusing on infrastructure, we put forward a critical piece of is the astructure
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american maritime industry. just as important as the trucks that travel our highways, another piece of infrastructure, just as important as the trains that travel the rails, another critical piece of infrastructure . just as important as the barges that move up and down the mississippi river system on the ohio, the missouri or the mississippi itself, all of that is infrastructure. as are the airports and the airlines. we ought to start and always think about the fact that we are t in itime nation and tha our infrastructure we consider the american maritime -- we consider the ships, the men and the women that are on those ships. now, this is a national security issue.
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transcom, responsible for moving american military supplies around the world, has stated categorically that unless we revive our american maritime industry, unless we have sailors and captains and engineers on ships that are able to transport our military wherever they need to go around the world, we're going to be in a world of hurt. earlier today i was talking to one of the officers of liberty maritime, one of the american shipping companies, owners of ships, that will -- ships that will soon be transporting a brigade of marines -- excuse me, men and of reserve women from the united states to europe as part of our european
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defense issues. so it becomes important that we deal with the infrastructure of the united states and that we do so keeping in mind that these that fulfill bs his important policy position. this is the value, that as we go about our legislative work here, we keep in mind that the test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much, it is whether we provide for those who have too little. and among those who have too little are the working men and women of america. and if we carry out this infrastructure challenge, if we make it in america, if the steel is american-made, if the
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locomotives are american-made, and there's a marvelous example of what can be done with public policy that says, if we are going to build locomotives for the amtrak system, on the northeast corridor from washington, d.c., to boston, that those locomotives will be american-made. 100% american-made equipment. interestingly, when this was part of the american recovery act back in 2010, a bill put forward by democrats and president obama, a requirement for $700 million or $800 million be spent on american-built locomotives. 00% american-made. a german company said, ooh, $700 million, $800 million,
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locomotives, american-made. we can do that. and so in sacramento, california, siemens, one of the great manufacturing companies in we make, well, let's see, we make not locomotives, but we do make cars for the transit systems. we can do locomotives. and they did. and just this last week i got off one of the amtrak trains from new york city, walked past a gleaming locomotive, brand new . and on the side it said, siemens . and i'm going, that locomotive was made in sacramento, california, just outside my district, by a german company with american workers, american steel, american wheels, american engines. made in america. how did it happen?
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because congress, with democrats in control and a democratic president, said, we're not going to talk about make -- making america great again. we're going to actually pass a law that says this money will be spent on american-made locomotives. and so it was. and now that plant is continuing to expand as they produce cars for transit systems all across this nation. f.d.r. had it right. and we're going to follow. we're going to make sure that the laws of this nation actually provide for the working men and women, for those who don't have a job, an educational program. job training programs. career development programs in community colleges and high schools.
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apprenticeship programs. so that the men and women of america can participate in the revitalization of the american infrastructure system, where that is a highway -- whether that is a highway, an interstate freeway, an airport, a dock, a port, we're going to make sure that the american workers have a chance not only in building the infrastructure but in using the steel and the concrete and the other elements that go into these infrastructure projects, that those are also made in america. so that that infrastructure program flows way beyond just those who are pouring the concrete, but to those who are making the cement and making the manufacturing plant that will develop the cement.
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this is where we are and we want to make sure that tax policy doesn't do what the republicans have repeatedly done. 2001, 2003 tax cuts and again in the 2017 tax cuts that have ansferred $2 trillion of american wealth to the top 1%. that's shameful that that's actually happened. and all the while, the rest of americans have seen virtually no improvement in their economic situation. tax policy critically important. policy that requires that when we spend your tax dollars that your tax dollar is spent on american jobs. in american factories. but in american -- putting americans to work in what we all make it in america agenda.
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so keep this in mind. mr. trump, this is how you make america great again, by making it in america. so we can work with our republican colleagues, as we are with our ship bileding program, the energizing american ship bileding act. democrats and republicans understanding together that it is public policy, it is the laws that we write that set the pace for economic growth and spread that growth out across the great american population. so to everyone, everyone can participate in the rebuilding of america's infrastructure, whether it's a ship at sea a port that's being developed, an airport a highway, or a railway, water system, sanitation system. we must write into all those laws that when american taxpayer money is used, it is spent on
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american manufacturing and american workers. so we'll make it in america. and america will make it when we follow these kinds of wise public policies. keeping in mind there are task -- that our task is to make sure that we always focus not on those who have much, but rather on those that have too little. and so with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2017, the gentleman from california, mr. rohrabacher, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. rohrabacher: i ask unanimous consent to address the house and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized, without objection. mr. rohrabacher: let me just note that american made is only important as there are americans actually in the jobs. who is the friend and who is the
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enemy of american workers today? certainly the party that is permitting massive flow of illegal immigrant into our country in order to take the jobs that are being created is not a friend of the american working people. let us take a look at why americans have prospered. we have prospered because yes, we have technology, we have jobs, let us also -- but it's also because we have not permitted this massive immigration that now seems to be flowing across and has been for the last 10 and 20 years. if we have industries, if we have industries that are going to succeed and jobs that are going to be created, we must first control our borders so that all of the jobs that we hear about being created are given to americans, not to people who come here illegally. and it is unfortunate that the -- that that part of the debate on how illegal immigration has been bringing down the quality of life, taking jobs away from americans, that has not been
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part of the debate that we've heard over the media. fact, last week we had an example where the -- the democratic party members here one unable to support a bill the floor commending those brave souls who are defending our border and trying to stem the flow, the massive flow of illegal immigration into our country. they couldn't even get themselves to back that. now i went to an i.c.e. facility, which is the group in our government that actually runs facilities and helps us control this massive flow into our country and they -- the people there, yes, there were over 300 being held. they were going to be returned. they were doing a good job for us. and the fact is, in california, the democratic party has gone so far overboard they won't even permit local law enforcement, they have actually outlawed,
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they call it the sanctuary state law, they won't even let local governments permit them to use their own law enforcement to cooperate with federal authorities in order to deal with illegal alien criminals. now something is wrong here. we can hear all this talk about attacking the republicans as if all the tax money that was saved in this tax bill went to rich people. no, that's not the case. and what is also not the case is the very jobs being created by such programs are going to foreigners who are here illegally, unless we do something about it. so with that said, i'd like to get into the issue that i really would like, that i was intending to discuss today and it has everything to do also with american prosperity. american prosperity didn't just happen. i call this the fight to save america's patent system. we americans are blessed to be
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part of a nation where average people who live right and work hard can expect safety, a decent standard of living, and opportunities beyond the dream of those who just struggle to survive in so much of the world. which is also why we have to control the borders. because we do have high standard of living in this world and we have this high standard of living that's for average people. it's not just a gift from god. but it is also a result of fundamental policies and laws that have governed our land, including immigration law, i might add that prevent this massive flow of illegals into our country that we have been having to deal with. policies were put into place by brave, hard-work, forward-looking patriots over the years who struggled to create this new country, the united states of america.
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and they put in place a fundamental laws that were aimed at protecting the rights of each and every person in the country. one of those rights which is often overlooked, was delineated in article 1, section viii of the constitution. in fact, considering the fact that the bill of rights was added to the document as a package of amendments it is the only place in the original body of the constitution where the word right is used. this is part of our basic law of the land that mandates that writers and inventors have the right to exclusively control their creation for a specified period of time. that's in the constitution. and that specified period of time which through most of our history was 17 years. 17 years for our inventors to control and profit from what they have created.
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benjamin franklin probably inserted this into the constitution without much fanfare. yet it has been a factor that has made all the difference. ordinary americans have lived good and decent lives here not necessarily because we have worked harder, and because people work hard all over the world, but we have prospered because not only do our -- have our people worked hard, but they have had the technological edge. we have multiplied the impact of every hour of labor with machines and equipment that existed only as a result of the genius of our people. progress was shared by all because we have nurtured our inventors, protected their intellectual property rights, and permitted them to profit from their genius. our standard of living as a people became the envy of the world and all this can be trace
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to a strong, fair, and honest patent system. i've got good news. american inventors and the folks who are so often taken for granted are deeply appreciated by the new trump administration. secretary will burr ross and the new director of the united ates patent office and andre iankue, i guess is 40u you pronounce that, are making sure america's greatest asset, our inventors and innovator, are protected. this is of course a reversal of what's been going on in recent years. the united states patent and trademark office or the u.s. p.t.o. is the federal agency tasked with the job of protecting america's new ideas and investments in innovation nd creativity.
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over the years, there have been 58 different men and women leading this agency. our newest u.s. p.t.o. director, shows the promise to be perhaps one of the best in that long line that extends back more than 200 years. the director has a long history of innovation in his work as an engineer at hughes aircraft company and his legal career that focused on intleblingchal property litigation he assured me -- he has assured me personally that ehe will fight to protect the intellectual property of our inventors and demand that accountability and transparency are hallmarks in the patent office under his watch. his positive commitment to refreshing -- to refreshing -- that is to make sure that we have this transparency and the transparency and accountability that he's talking about is a refreshing contrast to past
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office leadership. most of the colleagues and most of my fellow americans have rarely noticed the conflict that's been quietly raging here in washington for the last three decades. it's been an ongoing struggle with major impact on the security of our country and the well being of the american people. yet few members in congress are even aware of how critical this fight is and because the fight is usually fought in legal-ese, the american people are unaware of the issues being determined. hat i am talking about is an ongoing clandestine attack on america's patent system by powerful, multinational corporations. their aim has been to gain a free hand to use any technology with no worry of compensating
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the inventor of that said technology. american companies and american workers have succeeded by being on the cutting edge and a notch above foreign comp decision -- competition. this is because our innovators have been proteched by the best patent system in the world yet we hear these calls globally and in collusion with domestic power brokers demands that we harr monoize our system with the rest of the world. if there is any harr monoization it should be the rest of of the world rising up to our long held standards which have been instrumental in enabling our way of life and our country's greatness. we absolutely should not lower america's standards. but that is exactly what a powerful coalition has been pushing for and in 2012 with the american in-- with the america invents act they finally were able to undermine significant
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protections of our patent system. the implications of that law are just now becoming evident. so for three decades, legislation aimed at weakening america's patent protection has been pushed and repushed, whittling away and restructuring with a goal of diminish the rights of our inventors. this establishment thinks these are people who are just in the way. the anti--- the anti-patent juggernaut cabal even managed to change who will be issued a patent. up until 2012, up until that law, for more than two centuries, the actual inventor of a new technology was legally considered the rightful owner of the invention and thus designated as the recipient of the patent for that new technology. this long standing, commonsense policy was shifted by the 2012
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bill so that now, not the inventor but the first entity to file for the patent gets the patent. hear that again. the actual inventor doesn't get the patent. in an age of hacking and predatory corporations, this is a disaster in the making. even even when we lost the legislative fight to protect our investors, and our inventors. even as we lost ground in that fight to protect our inventors, there was even less awareness of a change in the way they were doing business inside the patent office. there has always been a strict guideline directing the decisions and actions of the professionals and civil servants in the patent office. approval of a patent application was not left up to the whims of those making the decision.
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if an application met the requirements, objective criteria and proper procedures were followed, well, if that appened, the patent office was mandated to do his or her duty, not to think how they should feel about the economic or societal changes that might be brought about when a new technology is introduced or what groups would benefit and which ones wouldn't, if this new technology was patented. i am not certain what precipitated the power play. but in 1994, changes began happening inside the patent office itself. even as overt legislative campaigns were taking place to weaken our patent system and they were being launched on the outside. so you had people fighting on the inside or working on the
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inside, and the outside, trying to weaken the patent protection of american inventors. a new procedure was quietly made part of the system inside. it was theoretically aimed at alerting senior patent personnel that a patent with serious consequences was soon to be granted and thus given more intense scrutiny. it was called sensitive application warning system. but as you would imagine, as soon as this secretive new element was added to the patent office procedures, it began to have much more of an impact than supposedly intended. unauthorized and hidden saws rules and determinations were de that had major impacts on the basic business of the patent office. the issuing or the denial of an
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inventor's patent. some patent office officials took it upon themselves to violate the clear legal boundaries that were in place specifically to prevent well-intended subjectivity from running wild. saws had a big impact, much bigger than they ever thought, and it had no scrutiny. so inventors were being screwed from the outside by those legislators mobilized by powerful multinational corporations and by other special interests as well, i might add, and on the inside by an in-the-shadows system that permitted unrestricted consideration, no visibility and no accountability. it took more than 20 years for this to come to light and officially ended in -- ended. in 2015 the saws program was exposed and made public and after congressional hearings and inquiries, the patent office
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announced the program had been retired. as one senior patent office official told me, that program had to go. so it has been an ongoing struggle on the outside and on the inside to maintain the strength and integrity of america's patent system. on the legislative side, there is a bipartisan coalition now led by dedicated representatives like marcy kaptur of ohio or thomas massie of kentucky. they have just introduced h.r. 6264, restoring america's leadership in innovation act of 2018. a bill that will, if we can get it enacted, will undo many of the legislative setbacks of america's patent system that was suffered in the last two decades. i am, of course, an original co-sponsor of that bill and invite my colleagues to join me in co-sponsoring it. and there is a really good news, and here's some really good news
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from the executive branch. secretary of commerce is deeply committed to protecting the intellectual property of american inventors. he's willing to fight the good fight, to protect us against foreign competitors who would steal our inventors' genius and use it against our own hardworking people. secretary ross is working with a new director of the patent is ce, and he himself committed to protecting inventors and creators, both of them with the -- and president trump's guidance and vice president pence's encouragement, they are declaring that the patent system will be totally transparent and fully accountable. i might say the director has just reaffirmed that commitment in a written statement to congress when he stated, and i quote, today the u.s. patent and
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trademark office -- today, at the u.s. patent and trademark office, every action we take is on the public record and is recorded in a publicly available database, end of quote. so there's reason for optimism, that we have turned a corner in the long-term efforts to protect and, yes, claim and reclaim and maintain and repair some of the damages that have been done from both the outside attack of our patent system and the inside, out of line action that were taken without oversight or accountability, like the saws program. it is not appropriate to cover up or withhold information. and it's time to make up for those past errors and to set a path for america's patent office to offer efficient, honest and totally above-board service. the new director has his hands
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full, but he has the right game plan. total transparency and full accountability. and when it comes to innovation and technology, we are with our american president and the vice president and the secretary of commerce and the team over at the patent office, we are together making america great again. so i would ask my colleagues, please, i know this is a complicated issue, we talk to the american people. we know that patent law seems like it should be complicated, but it is not. someone who invents something, that our founding fathers put into place, it is a property right of those people who invent something, to be able -- an inventor to be able to at least for 17 years have control over his or her invention. this has worked well for the united states, it is so sad that for decades now they've been trying to undermine it. but we are reclaiming that today
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, with the trump administration, and a secretary of commerce and a head of the patent office who -- and the vice president of the united states who are dedicated to protecting the rights of our inventors and thus protecting the great standard of living and the safety of the united states of america, which is so dependent on having a technological edge against any competitor or enemy. with that said, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. brady: mr. speaker, i offer a resolution. the clerk: house resolution 1019. s remain so -- resolved that the conference report accompanying h.r. 5515, to authorize
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appropriations for fiscal year 2019, for military activities of the department of defense, for military construction and for defense activities of the department of energy, to prescribe military personnel strength for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, in the opinion of this house contravenes the first clause of the seventh section of the first article of the constitution of the united states and is an infringement of the privileges of this house and that such bill be respectfully recommitted to the committee of conference. the speaker pro tempore: the resolution presents a question of the privileges of the house. without objection, the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. does the gentleman have a otion? pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house
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c-span at 10 a.m. eastern for speeches and new for legislative work. the household a moment of silence in honor of detective john gibson and jacob chestnut. both worship -- were killed at a shooting at the u.s. capitol 20 years ago today. here is that now. observe a moment of silence in the memory of officer jacob
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j. chestnut and detective john gibson of the united states capitol police who were killed in the line of duty defending e u.s. capitol on july 24, 1998. >> washington journal. live every day with news and policy issues that impact you. members of the agricultural committee from both sides of the aisle will discuss how president trump's trade and tariff policies are impacting their bottom line.
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and the kansas republican congressman and the democratic andressman james mcgovern -- be sure to watch washington journal, live by 7 a.m. eastern. join the discussion. tomorrow, testimony from secretary of state mike pompeo on u.s. relations to north korea, president trump's recent trip to the nato summit and his relationship with russian president vladimir putin. he will speak at 3 p.m. eastern on c-span3. and robert lighthizer speaks about the trump administration's trade policies and the 2019 budget request. he testifies before the senate appropriations subcommittee on c-span3.
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>> supreme court nominee brett kavanaugh continues to meet with senators on capitol hill. follow the confirmation process on c-span, and the vote. much anye on c-span, time on c-span.org or listen on the free c-span radio app. earlier, the house debated and passed a bill that would repeal the 2.3% medical device tax imposed in the 2010 health care law. we will show you that debate now. pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. paulsen: mr. speaker and members, today the house will vote on h.r. 184 protect the medical innovation act which ll repeal the medical excise task. the medical device industry is an american success story employing

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