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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  November 16, 2018 8:59am-12:04pm EST

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within the republican party, it because ofivided these competing views of where the republican party should head . the question for him is i think he thinks he has something to is who ishe question going to be listening and what affect that will have. this is going to be a different world five, 10, 15 years from now. go?: does he guest: back to wisconsin. host: does he write a book? guest: i think so. host: my thanks to both of you for the conversation. helping us talk about the 20 years we have seen paul ryan in washington. guest: thank you. host: the house is coming in
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early this morning from 9:00 a.m. legislative session. we will bring you there live coverage on c-span. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2018] the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroifment chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. we come to the end of a week where we have welcomed the newly elected members of the house who will join the 116th congress. we now approach a week during which all americans will gather to remember who we're.
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a nation generously blessed not only by you, our god, but by courageous ancestors, faithful allies, and the best good wishes of people everywhere. people who long for freedom. who would glory in the difficult work of paragraph tisspaive government and who do not enjoy the county we're privileged to possess. bless the members of this assembly and us all that we would be worthy of the call we have been given as americans. help us all to be truly thankful and appropriately generous in our response. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory, amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. "new england journal of medicine." -- pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to clause 1, rule 1, i demand a
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vote on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. the speaker: the question son agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the journal stands a approved. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek recognition? mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order a quorum is not present. the speaker: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question are postponed. the pledge of allegiance will be led by gentleman from illinois, mr. shimkus. mr. shimkus: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr.
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speaker. mr. speaker, representing a rural district in which many small towns rely on one pharmacy to access drugs, has made me the believer in the value of community pharmacists and i also believe in free market and competition. it requires transparency and level playing field. based upon my recent visit to community pharmacists in towns, pharmacy benefit managers, p.b.m.'s, are threatening the sol van hollency of these community institutions by using complicated formularies that result in local pharmacies being reimbursed less for prescription than hire volume big-bobbing pearce. indirect remuneration fees which can create uncertainty and impose a cash flow squeeze that too many times forces independent pharmacists to close their doors or sell their businesses. drug prices are a big issue. we can can help bring down costs by reducing barriers to drug development and delivery while increasing competition through transparency that
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allows everyone to compete on a level playing field. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. at that kango: -- takano: henry has left an indelible legacy as a visionary and as a if i wlan throw pist who loved and supported his community. through his generous and highly successful construction work, he helped build and restore schools and infrastructure throughout the empire of southern california. i knew henry through his love for riverside community college which he attended before moving on to u.c. berkeley. at r.o.c.c. we work to establish a new school for the arts and was henry's
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philanthropy that helped turn this vision into a reality. for most of his life, he was a successful businessman but his dedication to his community set him apart. he served briefly on the riverside city council and he was a devoted supporter of the boy scouts. in fact, he even went on to earn the boy scouts distinguished eagle award, recognizing him for 50 years of his continued service to the boy scouts. above all, what made henry special was his character. he stood up to bigotry and prejudice. i recall him saying to me how misguided he thought it was that a local politician was running a home phobic campaign. this was -- homophobic campaign. this was a bold position to take tate but this statement has stuck with me throughout my life and career as a mark of his character. while henry may no longer be with us, the positive change he created will never be forgotten. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from washington seek
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recognition? mr. newhouse: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. newhouse: thank you, mr. speaker. every year the environmental protection agency honors students across the country for outstanding leadership and environmental achievements with the president's environmental youth awards. among this year's winners is mr. anderson's first grade class. the students at virginia granger elementary school were recognized for their project titled, make soil not smoke. the class create add school garden and learned about the benefits of come posting leaves instead of burning them. they decided to use their project to spread awareness about the benefits of come posting and the harmful effects of burning leaves. the project is important to a community that has experienced firsthand destruction of wildfires. as excitement grew for the project grew, the community joined in by donating exoast --
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come post -- comeposting materials. in one year his students create canned over 200 cubic yards of garden compost. they used demonstration, a parade bloat, and booths at street fairs and farmers' markets to spread awareness. please join me in recognizing the outstanding work the make soil not smoke group is doing for their community. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, i just saw a report that most minimum wage workers need 2.5 full-time jobs to afford a one bedroom apartment. many of us can't imagine deciding being paying rent or buying food. that's a choice far too many americans face. the supplemental nutrition assistance program, snap, helps by providing a small benefit.
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but the farm bill the house republicans passed cut snap by $23 billion. let's remember most people on snap who can work do work. let's also remember that real farmers rely on the farm bill. the longer republicans try to use it for entitlement reform, the longer we hurt those farmers. the american people made their priorities clear at the ballot box. they want to create opportunity and possibility for all our families. here's a radical idea. let's listen to them. and let's follow the lead of senate republicans and democrats who worked together on a farm bill that helps farmers and maintains snap and let's end hunger now. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: mr. speaker, request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, next week we're going to kick can off the holiday season with thanksgiving and reflect on all that we're thankful for in our lives. it also marks the start of the very busy holiday shopping
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season. in an effort to support local shops that make our communities strong, small business saturday takes place on the saturday after thanksgiving. to encourage people to shop small and bring more holiday shopping to small businesses. on this day we celebrate and support small businesses and all that they do for our local communities. there are more than 30 million small businesses in the united states that created 8.4 million jobs in the last two decades. mr. speaker, a small, locally owned business employs our neighbors and contributes to the fabric of our local communities. the small shop movement truly is about supporting our mom and pop shops. whether it's a cup of coffee from a local spot or unique gift for a loved one, everyone has an opportunity to join in and support independent business owners on small business saturday. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from nevada seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one
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minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. rosen: thank you. mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the memory of emily reese, a cherished nevadan, loving mother of three, and a fearless health care advocate who worked tirelessly to put others before herself. she devoted her last year of life for fighting what she believed in. protecting access to quality, affordable health care for those who need it most. her work touched many lives, including my own. emily's compassion and determination new know boundaries. it's those qualities that made her a powerful voice in our community. as we pay tribute to her life, let us never forget to find strength in her words. live life, love life, and impact others. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker.
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i rise today to call on the house, senate, and administration to adopt the disaster relief bill before december 7. in recent months we have witnessed catastrophes that have struck our nation coast to coast from wildfires across california, flooding in the carolinas, and the incredible loss of agriculture in my home state of georgia from hurricane michael. mr. scott: agriculture is the largest and oldest economic driver in the state of georgia. the past few years, farmers have faced low commodity price, unfair trade practices from foreign countries, labor shortages, and low crop yields which have create add strain on their businesses. they have also hurt the surrounding rural economies. hurricane michael made all these past losses pale in comparison. following the storm, the likes of which georgia has not seen in a century, vice president trump administrationp and vice president pence heard from farmers how they went from having the best crops to no crops in a matter of hours.
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this disaster has been heartbreaking and without additional federal assistance, it will break the back of georgia's rural economy. this is not a partisan issue, this is an american issue. i call on this chamber to act now to help these farmers and others across our great nation that are struggling with the aftermath of these disasters. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, it is with a heavy heart that i rise today to honor the memory and extraordinary life of an educator in bucks county, pennsylvania whose dedication to pennsylvania's children made her one of pennsylvania's most prominent voices on education advocacy, policy, and practices. mr. fitzpatrick: dough lore rest mccracken, served as the president of the pennsylvania state association, passed away
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on november 13 following her battle with cancer. she spent the past two decades as a passionate activist to improve education, working to promote p.s.a. initiatives on the federal, state, and local levels. dolores' professional contributions to education are impactful and far-reaching. she worked closely with numerous statewide partners and served on the board of directors at the keystone research center, pennsylvania budget and policy certainty, and the council rock education foundation. she also served as president of the churchville elementary home and school association. for dolores, it always came down on improving the lives of our communities' children and their families. she firmly believed that every child, regardless of the circumstances of their birth, deserves the best education in the world. a a a paralegal by trade, she's survived by her husband, her children, and her grandchildren . may they take comfort in
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knowing dolores' life work will carry on in our student's lives for generations. dolores mccracken is our children's hero. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from arkansas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to house resolution 1142, i call up h.r. 6784, the manage our wolves act, and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 791, h.r. 6784, a bill to provide for removal of the
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gray wolf in the contiguous 48 states from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife published under the endangered species act of 1973. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 1142, the bill is considered as read. the bill shall be debated for one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on natural resources. the gentleman from arkansas, mr. westerman, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. beyer, will control the floor for 30 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arkansas. million westerman: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend and include material on h.r. 67 4. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. westerman: i yield myself such time as i may consume. . this bipartisan bill will accomplish what multiple administrations have been attempting to do for over a what they elisting
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seem uncovered by the endangered species act. the gray wolf has been protected in its original habitat in the western gulf lakes region under the endangered species act since 1974. beginning in 1994, the federal government began introducing the species to the western u.s. by relocating wolves from canada and releasing them in western states. the reintroduced wolf population in the west expanded more quickly than many had anticipated and as a result, western states began to work with the fish and wildlife service to better manage the species. this successful state and federal cooperation led to the fish and wildlife service's first attempt to delist the species under the endangered species act in 2009. litigation activists struck back, challenging the agency's delisting decision and halting
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further agency action at that time. in 2014, the fish and wildlife service, after noting an even greater increase in species population, attempted to once again delist the gray wolf. just as before, litigants immediately challenged the agency's decision. that same year, gray wolves in wyoming and the western great lakes region were relisted by court order, citing be inadequate state management plans. this 2014 order was appealed and in march of last year, the d.c. circuit court of appeals reversed the relisting decision for the gray wolves, but in wyoming only. this underscores the extent to which the fish and wildlife service has been hamstrung in implementing the objectives of the endangered species act. rather than spend its limited resources protecting vulnerable species, litigation activists have forced the agency to continuously defend every action. in this case, despite scientific evidence collected under multiple administrations
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from both sides of the aisle, showing that the gray wolf populations have recovered and thrived, the agency remains bogged down in costly, never-ending litigation. we should be celebrating this e.s.a. victory instead of moving on to the next challenge. this bill you would prevent the u.s. fish and wildlife service from wasting further resources responding to environmental law by affirming its previous rules by delisting the gray wolf. the bill seeks to empower the states to manage their individual gray wolf populations by directing the secretary of the interior to issue a rule to delist the gray wolf in each of the 48 contiguous states and the district of columbia. to ensure that states are provided certainty when developing state management plans, this bill would also exempt the delisting decision from judicial review. i urge adoption of the commonsense bill that we have here and also i you would like
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to reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. beyer: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. beyer: i rise in strong opposition to the bill today. in a world full of lions and tigers entertaining the masses have you ever seen a wolf in a circus? if you love your wolf -- if you love your dog thank a wolf. as a line of poetry, a wolf eats sheep now and then. 10,000 are devoured by men. wolves are historic and vital keystone predators that have en hunted to near extinction in the contiguous united states. under the endangered species act, wolf populations began to rise. however, they still inhabit just a fraction of their historic range and protection under the endangered species act is necessary.
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this bill strips the protections that have allowed the species to begin to recover. prior to widespread human settlement, hundreds of thousands of gray wolves roamed north america. they can be found from the pacific coast to the atlantic coast. today, sadly, the farthest east they can be found is in michigan. some of my colleagues might know i would love to see the gray wolves in virginia someday but for now it's important to protect the fewer than 6,000 we have left in the lower 48. how did we get to only 6,000? as the human population grew in the 19th and 20th centuries they were poisoned, trapped, shot, gassed, every possible way to kill them and their population decline was exacerbated by habitat destruction. removing federal protection opens the doors to further hunting, trapping of wolves. this is based on the part that myths are wolves to dangerous and livestock, humans are far more dangerous to wolves than wolves are either to humans or
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wolves are to livestock. wolves cause less than 1% of livestock loss in the united states. in fact, domestic dogs cause more cattle losses than wolves do. but no one is talking about trapping or poisoning dogs. ironically, research at the washington state university found killing wolves leads to an increase in livestock losses caused by wolves. they avoid people. there are two known deaths to people in the entire contiguous united states in the 20th century. far more americans are killed by bees, dogs, or deer car collisions than by wolves. it's also been proven that agencies cannot -- state agencies cannot successfully manage these species. we have to look at what happens when they were delisted in idaho and montana in 2011. in just two states, hostile state management practices caused more than 3,200 wolves
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to be killed through hunting and trapping. that's half the known wolves in the lower 48. furthermore, targeting wolves is not only cruel and detrimental to the species itsselves, it's also rimental to other species -- detrimental to other species. many people have seen the documentary of yellowstone. before when wolves were eliminated, the explosion of other populations caused an unbalanced ecosystem in the park. when they were reintroduced in 1995, everything changed. they were the keystone predator, the linchpin that held together this delicate balance so the deer and elk populations were managed, vegetation regenerated which brought back species such as birds, beavers, mice, bears. river banks stabilized, plant life thrived and the whole landscape was transformed.
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delisting is best kept in the hands of scientists and we can't allow any delisting decisions happen because of politics, particularly not a species that is so historic, integral, charismatic to the ecosystem it belongs. i urge my colleagues to vote no on the bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from arkansas is recognized. mr. westerman: mr. speaker, i yield five minutes to the gentleman from wisconsin, the sponsor of the bill, who actually lives in an area where the wolves live, mr. duffy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. duffy: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the gentleman from arkansas for his support and coming down and managing our time. this is a bill that's bipartisan and a time where i don't think we see a lot of bipartisanship. and i think the reason you see democrats and republicans coming together and actually the house and senate coming together on this bill is because if you live in the
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northern part of the united states, you know, great lakes and west, you understand that the wolves are a huge problem. and that's why you've seen democrat senators from this region, democrat congressmen from this region and republicans, too, standing together to say, hey, listen, we have to manage these wolves. and so if you live in the suburbs of washington, d.c., it's not a problem. if you live in madison, wisconsin, it's not really a problem. you can make the argument that the pretty -- the pretty little puppy of the wolf, it's so pretty and beautiful and we have to protect it. we did protect it. we put it on the endangered species list. like a lot of government programs, this one worked. and we have protected them and allowed them to recover. we have three times as many gray wolf as was projected to be necessary to take them off the endangered species list. we're coming to hunting season in wisconsin right now, so a
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lot of us wisconsin ithes put on their orange and get their guns and go out to the woods and hunt deer. i have never seen a picture of barack obama in blaze orange to go out and hunt deer. not a great outdoorsman. barack obama's administration was the first one to take the wolf off the endangered species list. donald trump and barack obama agree on gray wolves? they do. i love the gray wolf. protect it. listen. anybody like bambi? anyone like little bear? anyone like your little pet, dogs, cats, cattle? in our communities, here's a picture of one of our gray wolf -- it's hard to tell in this issue. it's a bear. it's a bear. the bear's dead, by the way, because the wolf killed it. here's a picture of one of my farmers from wuven his cattle
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that was attacked by a gray wolf. and so what we're saying here is, why can't we come together, acknowledge the success of a program that the gray wolf has recovered and then acknowledge we should allow our states, then, to manage the gray wolf? you know, some states might say, i want to allow the population to continue to grow, other states might say we want to manage it. if you live in california, you might say, in california, you know, we have a small population, we're going to let that little population thrive and grow, but if you live in wisconsin, northern wisconsin, it might be necessary for us to actually manage this population because it's good for the environment. it's good for the wolves. it's good for the cattle. it's actually really good for our deer population. and so i think this just makes common sense. by the way, some have come out and said, i'm kind of -- talked about on the floor of this -- i am a peta guy.
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i want to protect animals. well, if protecting animals is allowing our states to successfully manage the wolf population, because if you do, you not only protect the wolf but you protect the deer, you protect the cattle and the dogs and the bear, everyone gets protected when you have a balance to the ecosystem. we don't have a balance right now. and frankly, i believe that our states are far more in tuned in understanding the ecosystem of their state than bureaucrats in washington. so i would far rather empower wisconsin and my good friend, collin peterson from minnesota, let minnesota manage the populations because they understand that ecosystem better. i would encourage all of my colleagues to join barack obama and join donald trump and join a few members of congress from minnesota and wisconsin and washington and senators as well to allow us to successfully
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manage our gray wolf population which allows for a healthier ecosystem. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin yields. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield three minutes to my colleague, the gentleman from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia yields. the gentleman from california. >> i thank the gentleman from virginia. i rise in opposition to this bill for a number of reasons but i'd like to specifically say how this undermines science. congress also recognized that scientists, not members of congress, even ones like me with political science degrees, scientists have the necessary expertise to make decisions about species protection and so the e.s.a. requires that the fish and wildlife service make the decisions regarding species listing and delisting. mr. huffman: the law entrusts using vice of scientists
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the best available science and the e.s.a. is credited being one of the most science-based laws on the books. but this bill completely eliminates scientists from the decisionmaking process. it demands all gray wolves be removed from the e.s.a. in the lower 48, and in doing so it short-circuits the science-based process that determines when species are recovered and when protections are appropriately removed. despite years of republican efforts to ignore the science behind the e.s.a., we know it's been a huge success. 99% of listed species have continued to survive. 90% are on schedule to meet their recovery goals, so we should be working to make the gray wolf another one of those e.s.a. success stories, not eliminating the protections that helped put it on a path to recovery. when the gray wolf was listed in the early 1970's, there were only a few hundred left in the wild. since then, scientists have shown that the reintroduction of gray wolves in the northern
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rockies has been a huge ecological and economic success. i was able to see gray wolves in yellowstone with mr. beyer and mr. defazio earlier this year, and to see the ecosystem that's rebounded since their reintroduction. we are on the right track but science shows that e.s.a. protection is still needed. currently, these wolves only occupy 5% of their historic range. only 36% of their suitable habitat tath. while it's encouraging that the wolves are recovering and coming to california for the first time in 90 years, a handful of these animals hardly shows it's time for them to be delisted. instead of enacting a new law to eliminate protections, we ought to be working with landowners, local and state agencies to prevent conflicts so that we and wolves can both thrive. i'd like to point out if american citizens believes an agency does not follow the letter of the law, they have the right to hold the government accountable in court. it's part of the system of checks and balances that must be protected and politically
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driven, species specific legislation like this sets a dangerous precedent for delisting. it opens the door for future partisan attacks on vulnerable species. legislative delisting like this undermines the scientific process fundamental to the success of the endangered species act. scientists, not congress, should make these decisions. i urge my colleagues to vote no and yield back the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i reserve the balance. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: i would say the dangered species act, is based on science and the science has proven this species has recovered and thrived. mr. speaker, i yield three minutes to the gentleman from minnesota, also a co-sponsor of the bill, and from wolf country, mr. peterson.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas yields to the gentleman from minnesota. mr. peterson: i thank the gentleman. i rise in support of the bill. i have to say in my 28 years in this body, i have never seen so much nonsense, misinformation, and propaganda being put out on a bill. we followed the endangered species act. we did what was said. the scientists said that we have recovered and they delisted the wolves. these were scientist that is did it. it wasn't a politician. and the politics in this, you had a group out there, these extreme environmentalist and others that have captured our party went to a judge in washington, d.c., that has no idea what's going on at all and convinced that judge that the wolves had not recovered because they had not been re-established all wait to des moines, iowa. you want wolves in des moines, iowa? i don't think so. and we never had wolves in des moines, iowa, in the first
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place. we followed the law. the fish and wildlife service is on our side. they delisted these wolves. the d.n.r. in minnesota that was managing the wolves and doing a good job before the court intervened politically, and i don't agree with the d.n.r. i very seldom got aa long with them in minnesota. this is one time where they were doing the right thing and they did a good job and the court stopped them and it was politics. it wasn't science. this nonsense that somehow or other we're politically doing his is not true. wife more wolves in my district than any other in the united states. we have twice as many wolves as was required to get the wolves delisted. that wasn't good enough. so i say to people, all you folks that think this is such a great idea, we got a lot of extra wolves, and we will send them to your district, and we'll let them eat some of your fancy little dogs and see how long that goes before your constituents demand you do something about it.
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my neighbor has had four of his cattle killed in the last two years, that killed his german shepherd dog. you tell me that this is not a problem? when we have the population under control we didn't have these problems. this idea that somehow or other you are on the righteous side of scientists and all that stuff is complete nonsense. and i'll have you come up -- you come up to my district and see what's going on. we follow the law. we have the federal agencies that are -- are responsible for this on our side. and it wasn't us that screwed this up. it was that court in d.c. that judge has no clue about what's going on. i tell you to support this bill and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota yields. the gentleman from arkansas. reserves. the gentleman from arkansas reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i'd like to yield four minutes to my colleague -- oregon, mr. defazio. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields to the gentleman from oregon.
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well, i have a few wolves in my district. not enough. i don't know that i'll take mr. peterson's wolves, but we're breeding our own. o.r. 7 made an incredible journey from way up in northeastern oregon all wait down to the california border, went down to california looking for a mate. found one. and those were his first progeny. guess what? we're not having catastrophic predation on cattle in southern oregon. we could accommodate more wolves. there are reasons why cattlele are -- die. my colleague from oregon, he has a picture, it's ugly of a cavalier killed by wolves, it was sad. but that calf didn't get to
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throw up and go to the slaughterhouse. he's the real facts. this is 74% of loss is due to health issues. that is good husbandry. 8% almost, 7.8 is due to weather. 2.7 is two to coyotes, cougars, bear, and dogs. predators. and here we're. look, that's the problem. .9%. wait a minute. we have new numbers. .2%. .2%. is due to wolf predays -- predation. i doubt my colleagues on the other side have gone to yellow stone to see the phenomenal recovery of the ecosystems in yellow stone. we'll hear from, bad for hunters, elk. actually, the elk population is doing very well. but they don't brows all wait down into the streams anymore.
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so now fish have come back and other species have come back because the elk are worried about the wolves. so they stick to the forested areas where they should be. having apex predators is incredibly important to a balanced environment. to say that we have to go out -- fish and wildlife, animal damage control, whatever we call those jerks these days, the federal government has been subsidizing for years the slaughter, indiscriminate slaughter, of predator species under ostensibly to help out the ranchers. when i was a county commissioner we were broke and we went through a list of everything we were doing. what are we doing -- giving this money there? they said that's our match to the federal government to come and kill coyotes. i said why -- what's that about? oh, cheap predays. -- predays.
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horrible, horrible. we don't want these people, we don't want to subsidize it. guess what happened? nothing. nothing. we did not have horrible sheep predays in my county. -- predation in my county. a loft this is based on cut level, historic fear or hate red of -- a lot of this is based on cut level, historic fear or hatred of predators. we can have a healthy wolf population and you can still do good husbandry with cattle. they want to delist the wolf in all the lower 48. we have maybe eight, 12, 10. we don't even know. in my district. which is historic habitat. other parts of the state that have been previously occupied, there are no wolves. a couple of our wolves have wondered down to california. first one there is since we
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were on this campaign to eliminate them all. and the other thing is, science. when you kill the apex predators, then the coyotes predate on the cattle. then you have over population of elk. a balanced environment is good for everybody. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. defazio: these people -- mr. beyer: yield an extra 30 seconds. mr. defazio: they want to unbalance it and delist the entire lower 48. they want to defy good science. and, oh, by the way, what they are doing is solely defensible, we can't go to court because they might find we're not following the law. this bill does a number of things that are really, really short term. it's going nowhere in the senate. we hear messaging today, we could be doing a farm bill. we could be affordable -- there is a whole lot of things. budget for the united states government. but, no, we're here on a talking point for a few idiots.
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thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: thank you, mr. speaker. aim glead the gentleman from oregon is so passionate about wolves this. bill would be fantastic for him and his state. it would allow their state, natural resources folks to manage that wolf. they could release some in portland. they could let those wolf populations get as large as they want to get. but the scientists at u.s. fish and wildlife have said that the species is recovered. and we're talking about letting other states have the opportunity to manage those wolf populations in their states. i wish we were doing a farm bill -- i wish the senate would do a a farm bill because we have already done one out of here. with that i yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from washington, miss madam speaker
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-- mrs. mcmorris rodgers. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you very much. in my home in eastern washington we have been living the real impact of large wolf population force many years. we see the impact on safety. the economic impact it's having on our ranchers. each year we're losing hundreds of livestock to wolves and costing our economy millions of dollars. the gray wolf is recovered. it's time for it to be removed from the endangered species act. the endangered has listed many species -- act has listed many species. this is not about hatred or fear of predators. this is recognizing that the endangered act has done its job and time for the wolves to be delisted. in the fall of 2013 the obama administration announced that the gray wolf is recovered. president obama's fish and wildlife director stated, quote, the gray wolf is no longer endangered or threatened with i.n.s. ticks. as we promise to remove e.s.a.
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protections states like washington or oregon are managing, expanding populations under protective state laws. unfortunately, the gray wolf was not delisted. and in eastern washington, and specifically in northeastern washington, predays on calves has become common. i regularly hear from people that are seeing wolves around their property. people that can cannot defend themselves without it being a felony. eastern washington knows better how to manage our land and wildlife than someone here sitting in a cubicle in washington, d.c. what we're proposing is these management practices would be returned to the state level that. we would allow the people that are closest to the people -- to the land and to the practices to be able to take action that would benefit endangered and nay testify -- native animals while protecting farmers and ranchers and our way of life. i was proud to be an original co-sponsor of this bill because it's important. it's important to our way of life.
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it's important to the people in eastern washington. it's important to our economy. and i want to thank congressman duffy from wisconsin for his work, leadership on this issue that impacts many communities across the country. i yield. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from washington yields. the gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield four minutes to my colleague, the gentlewoman from michigan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia yields four minutes to the gentlelady from michigan. mrs. dingell: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in opposition to h.r. 6784, the manage our wolves act. despite the claims made by our colleagues across the aisle, gray wolves play a critical role in keeping ecosystems healthy and balanced. including across michigan and the great lakes region. at one time great wolves romed roamed in the hundreds -- roamed in the hundreds of thousands. today there are 6,000 gray wolves in existence. just this week the national park service announced that a gray wolf died after being
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relocated from minnesota to michigan's national park. the threat to gray wolves is still real. and they must be protected. the bill before us would remove all protections for gray wolves under the endangered act. it would remove it all. including reissuing a 2011 rule by the u.s. fish and wildlife service that delisted the gray wolf in the western great lakes. h.r. 6784 also seriously undermines the scientific integrity, which is one of the foundations of the endangered species act. it would remove scientists from the decisionmaking process to delist gray wolves. scientists not congress should be making listing or delisting decisions. as a keystone species, these
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animals are vital to the structure and integrity of the ecological communities in which we live. two decades ago, the lush landscape of yellowstone national park was not as we see it today. instead, it was riddled with defoalation, erosion, and unbalanced ecosystem. due to the absense of predators, deer and elk populations were out of control. despite efforts to manage them, they overgrazed the park's vegetation. that all changed when the wolf was reintroduced in the park in 1995. wolves hold together that delicate balance of the ecosystem. once wolves were brought back to the park, the natural balance of the ecosystem was restored. the regenerated forest stabilized river banks leading to less erosion and more suitable wildlife habitat. not to mention wolves reduced the coyote population by as
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much as 50%. the whole landscape was dramatically transformed with the reintroduction of a few gray wolves and the presence can be similarly be felt across the great lakes region. finally, gray wolves not only benefit the ecosystem but they provide significant economic benefits as well. just 10 years after reintroduction, wolf related tourism generated more than $35 million for communities in wyoming, idaho, and montana. mr. speaker, we have seen what the absence of gray wolves can do to the ecosystem. we have seen how wildlife and plant populations suffer from our national parks to the great lakes without a proper predator-prey balance. yes, good process has been made to revitalize the gray wolf population, but there's more work to do. h.r. 6784 would halt and
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potentially reverse the progress that's been made. i urge my colleagues to vote no and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from michigan yields. mr. beyer: mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia reserves. the gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. grothman. mr. grothman: it has been said before, i always try to think of something new. you can't help but notice the number of people who do not want the number of gray wolf delist not live in an area that has the gray wolf. they introduced the gray wolf to northern wisconsin when there was controversy. of course, even then i had a problem with it because people did live up there and i don't think the people say -- there was this judge lived would want the gray wolves wandering around the virginia and maryland suburbs. hey would not want the concern
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walking around out at night with the wolves even though they normally don't attack humans, they would not want the concern out there if they have dogs or other pets around, if they had cattle, they wouldn't want that concern. wisconsin being very typical, i think the gray wolves began in the northern part of the state, are now all the way down to areas like columbia county or sheboygan county, in the southern part of the state and they will, unless somebody does something about it, will continue to go further south and the herds will continue to grow. i ask people that would vote against this bill, think how you would feel if you have a significant number of gray wolves wandering around your subdivision or even one gray wolf wandering around your subdivision and then have more respect for the congressmen who are living with these gray wolves. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin yields. the gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: mr. speaker, we've heard a lot about letting
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scientists make the decision, not letting others make the decision, but right now courts are making the decision on the d delisting of this wolf. we heard testimony that even though it's a bipartisan bill, even though it was people in the previous administration that first suggested delisting the wolf, we heard testimony if you support delisting the support you must be an idiot. i don't think supporting this legislation means you're an idiot or you're trying to message something. i think it means we want to see science implemented. i think it means that we want to let the scientists do their job and mention has been made about yellowstone park. i was actually in yellowstone park this last summer and talked to scientists out there about the big fire in the 1980's and what, you know, many of us know about fire, it is a natural-occurring phenomena and
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it mimiced a huge clear cut in yellowstone national park. after the fire and all this vegetation started growing back, we saw a huge increase in elk herds and deer herds and the wolf population increased right along with that. as a matter of fact, the scientists at the park told me that the greatest numbers of elk that they had happened within about 10 years after the big fire out there. and then the elk -- the greatest population of wolves that they had happened after that. now that the forest is growing back and that ecosystem that forest will burn again, burns about every 100 years, but the science is being applied here. we just want to let states make the decision on how to manage these wolves that the scientists have said are recovered and need to be delisted. mr. speaker, i you ask unanimous consent that our -- i ask unanimous consent that our time be managed by the gentleman from texas, mr. gohmert. the speaker pro tempore:
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without objection. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. beyer: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield four minutes to my colleague, the gentlewoman from minnesota. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia yields to the gentlewoman from minnesota. ms. mccollum: this bill sets several incredible damaging precedents. fundamentally weakening the protections of our nation's threatened and endangered species. the endangered species act is the most effective conservation laws ever passed by congress. the success is due in large part to scientific evidence and the critical analysis of making decisions on the status of the species. the manage our wolf act would remove protections under the e.s.a. nor one of the nation's -- for one of the nation's iconic wildlife species without an opportunity for public participation in the rulemaking process for delisting. even more troubling is this bill would explicitly ban any judicial review of delisting
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gray wolves in both the great lakes and nationwide. no judicial oversight would be allowed for the removal of the science-based protections established under the endangered species act. a species is only listed as endangered or threatened or delisted upon a successful recovery after a rigorous assessment of its extinction. by eliminating judicial review of e.s.a., delisting actions and this legislation removes the ability of the public and the scientific community to participate in the process. access to the court of law is a cornerstone of american democracy and is a fundamental part of our government. the judicial branch is also where the american people can have their voices heard, and they can have a say in our system of checks and balances. stopping our independent federal courts from reviewing
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the actions of federal agencies or of congress violates this access to justice principle. it is simply un-democratic. it undermines the necessary oversight of government decisions. for years, the courts have served as an important forum for addressing disputes over the e.s.a.-related decisions. this legislation's attempt to remove judicial review from the e.s.a. decision has no scientific, no legal basis. it is simply a politically expedient move. by prioritizing politics over conservation, this bill would cause irrepairable damage, the integrity of the endangered species act and sets a dangerous precedent over overriding decisions by the courts. colleagues, we should not support mandating decisions of ndangered species.
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for this reason i would urge my colleagues to vote no. mr. speaker, before i yield back the balance of my time, may i inquire as to how much time i have remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady has one minute remaining. ms. mccollum: thank you. i was recently in yellowstone, as -- it was within the last month and a half. and colleagues, yes, there was a fire in yellowstone. i am from minnesota. i know the moose munches, we call it, around the boundary waters comes back and you can start seeing moose and moose start doing better. the same thing is true of the elk. i saw elk, you know -- i mean, literally right out a car window. they are doing better. but it is also very important to remember what congressman defazio said about how when the wolves are interactive and they're part of the regrowth and the rebirth of our forest
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system that the wolf, by being a predator, happens protect the stream banks and the rest from the elk and other animals from being on the stream banks and pressing them down and that has a big ripple effect on fish and other wildlife in the ecosystem. especially in yellowstone. so i appreciate the gentleman's remarks about yellowstone, but it's just not one thing that's causing the elk to come back healthy. it's the wolf population as well. with that i yield back, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields. the gentleman from texas. mr. gohmert: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. it's important, i think, to note so you get a sense of what the gray wolves have done. in 1987 was when a plan was finalized to restore them to the northern rockies by transplanting the wolves from
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canada into central idaho, yellowstone national -- in yellowstone national park. so in 1995 and 1996, 66 canadian wolves were transplanted with the goal of establishing 10 breeding pairs in each of three recovery zones in idaho, montana, wyoming for three consecutive years. well, guess what, mr. speaker, canadian wolves have done pretty well. in fact, now -- and i think this is largely why the scientists, with the u.s. fish and wildlife, with whom i had any disagreements, but in this , these folks have come out and said, you know what, the u.s. population of wolves of 5,500,
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they've done real well since being transplanted from canada, not the original u.s. wolves, ut from canada, bigger, more aggressive, but there are 3,800 just in the upper great lakes. 8,000 to 11,000 in had alaska, and now 60,000 in canada. as their numbers increase, so do the massive problems. and i appreciated the antidotal information about seeing more elk and moose, and i would suggest based on the rapidly escalating number of attacks that you're going to see more and more elk and moose want to come hang around the cars so they don't get eaten by wolves. so you'll have more and more tourists seeing elk and moose, but their populations are diminishing. in fact, it's rather dramatic
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that wolves eat 20 pounds of meat a day, and elk comprise 92% of the wolf kills during the winter. other prey include moose, ribou, deer, beaver, livestock. in 1995 there were 19,000 elk in northern yellowstone, herd. by 2008 there were 5,000, down from 19,000. the moose herd in the area also dropped from more than 1,000 to somewhere around 100 to 300. i'm sure they'll get to hanging out with the tourists more and more just to keep from getting eaten. at this time i see my friend, mr. gallagher from wisconsin, and would recognize him for such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. gallagher: i thank you. mr. speaker, i rise in support of my colleague from wisconsin, representative sean duffy, and
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his bill, the manage our wolves act. this piece of legislation is critically bornt to my district and the farmers. you see, farming is the live blood of northeast wisconsin. not only do our agricultural products support thousands of local jobs, they also feed millions of mouths across the world. that's why so many of my constituents are concerned about the threat of the gray wolf population to our farms. already, the predatory behavior toward livestock has cost wisconsin farmers millions of dollars in damage. this is why we must pass the manage our wolves act, to delist the gray wolf from the endangered species act, and return control of population management back to the states where it belongs. by doing so farmers will finally be able to focus on actual farming instead of having to spend extra time and money on keeping their livestock out of danger. i urge all my colleagues to support me in this important -- join me in supporting this important piece of legislation. our farmers are depending on it. with that i yield back to my
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colleague. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin yields. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: mr. speaker, i'd like to yield as much time as he may consume to my colleague, the ranking member of the natural resources, the gentleman from arizona. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arizona. mr. grijalva: thank you, mr. speaker. you know, given the fact that the endangered species act has been under unrelented attacks under the trump administration and house republicans, it should come to no surprise being out of session for more than six weeks, force this bill to go to the floor continues the attacks on e.s.a., eliminates judicial review, takes the american people out of public rulemaking process and makes it easier to kill wolves. . however, one must ask my republican colleagues seriously, do we not have more pressing issues to address? children that are still being separated from their families? wildfires are blazing across california. there has been 311 mass
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shootings in our country this year. we have more troops on the -- federal troops on the southern border than we have in syria, afghanistan, and iraq. all patiently -- sitting around and looking for a bunch of ghosts to come around. the u.n. released a climate change report finding that we're in a much more dire strait than we thought. in fact, today would have been a great day to permanently re-authorize the land and water conservation fund, which my republican colleagues have allowed to expire twice on their watch. a bill with 240 bipartisan co-sponsors. instead, we're talking about killing wolves. a bill introduced in september with three co-sponsors n this congress, republicans have introduced more than 100 bills, amendments, policy riders to remove or block e.s.a. protection force individual species or weakening important provisions of a law that is not only hugely popular with the
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american people but also conserves our biodiversity. the bill before us today, h.r. 6784, is a piece of legislation we have seen time and time again to undermine wolf populations in the united states. but this would deliver an even more devastating blow to the continued recovery of gray wolves across the lower 48. congress should not be making decisions on which species to list or delist. we need to be doing a properly funding the fish and wildlife service to implement measures to strike the e.s.a. and protect species and their habitats from permanent extinction. given the fact we're facing an ongoing extension crisis. the e.s.a. has a near perfect record of saving imperiled species. even in the face of massive population growth, haphazard development, and pressure on ocean and coastal resources. over 90% of the species receiving protection are still surviving today.
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e.s.a. works. 90% of the american voters would agree with me. however, despite it's incredible public support and impressive track record, the trump administration and house republicans continue to attack this historic environmental law and the species that it protects. these attacks on one of the most successful and popular conservation statutes in the history of the world are old, they are tired, and they are not fooling anyone. i can say with some confidence that these types of attacks on e.s.a. will not be legitimatized in the next congress. science, budget allocation, and the protection and conservation will return as the prominent criteria for e.s.a. policy. not just the resource extraction industry's singular agenda. i urge my colleagues a no vote on this legislation. mr. chairman, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. gohmert: thank you, mr. speaker. i would reserve at this time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i'd like to yield three minutes to my colleague from oregon, mr. blumenauer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized for three minutes. thank you, mr. speaker. i really have aa appreciated sitting on the floor and listening to this dialogue. because i think that there are some lessons here about getting things right. my friend from virginia, my iend from oregon, have dealt with the ecological benefits of having apex predators to be able to restore ecological balance. i heard the notion of how would you feel if you were reintroducing wolves in metropolitan areas? i just thought for a moment listening in the past people who are overrun with deer in
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virginia suburbs, in maryland suburbs. it's not just messing up their yards, it's killing people. we have several hundred people a year who are killed with collisions with deer. there's problems with chronic wasting disease that having an apex predator helps provide health benefits where you have healthier herds. i have watched the dynamic in oregon. it's complex because there are people who are ranching interests, there are people who are involved in hunting. they want to short circuit it. even in a state as ecologically and animal friendly as oregon. it's a struggle to take a step back weakening the endangered rotection -- species protections, is inappropriate. i would also note, no small amount of irony that in addition to the notion that we should be here re-authorizing
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the water and conservation fund, if we want to deal with animals in the closing hours of this session of congress, why aren't we dealing with a half dozen bills that republicans have refused to allow us to vote on that are overwhelmingly supported by the public and are supported by a majority of our members? it's, i think, doubly ironic that we're concluding what we have republican leadership forcing some of the worst animal welfare records. we lost two republican incumbents with 50 years' service in republican districts who had the worst animal record in congress. i fought really hard to have animal welfare be a bipartisan issue. taking issues like this, forcing people to make false choices that are bad for animals, bad for the
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environment, and frankly, they are bad politics. i hope that we go through this charade, goes nowhere, but deal with the underlying debate here about what we want in terms of ecological balance, animal protection, and rule of law. we'll be bert off if we do that. the species will be better off if we do that. and i think the politics will be -- better off if we do that. the species will be better off if we do that. and i think the politics will be better. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. 3554, an act to extend the effective date for the requirements for small business administration disaster law. the speaker pro tempore: the
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entleman from texas. the gentleman from texas. mr. gohmert: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself one minute. i know there's contention that gray wolves, though they have dramatically exploded from those 66 original wolves being introduced to thousands and thousands now, the contention is, they are not a threat to people. but i would suggest to you that not only have the liberals in the u.s. government seen a need year after year to delist the great wolves, but a college udent family members would suggest when kenton was killed by gray wolves, the gray wolves were a threat to mankind.
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and candice burner, a teacher in alaska, who was killed by jogging, her surviving family members would suggest gray wolves are a threat to people. at this time i would ask unanimous consent that time be managed by the gentleman from arkansas, mr. westerman at this time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: two minutes to my colleague. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. fitzpatrick: i rise today in opposition to h.r. 6784. as this act will block vital protection for great wolves across the nation. protections implemented under the endangered act. h.r. 6784 would direct the secretary of interior to issue a rule removing the gray wolf from the list which would preclude agency decisions on
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wolf delisting and deny citizens the right to hold the government accountable for its actions. there is no mystery about the negative impact that passing this legislation would have on the gray wolf because we have seen it. in 2011 congress used an appropriations rider to delist wolves in idaho and montana. since 2011, over 2,500 wolves have been killed in these two states where the management practices included shooting wolves lured by bait, chasing wolves with packs of hounds, and using steel clawed leg holes. the endangered species act decisions must be proceeded with caution and be bipartisan in these approaches. if there is legitimate dispute over delisting, then delisting is premature. and ill-advised. that's why i oppose this legislation. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: mr. speaker, i have no additional speakers.
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i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i would like to yield one minute to my colleague from oregon, miss bonamici. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. bonamici: the endangered species act was passed to increase protection force and provide for the recovery of vanishing wildlife life. unfortunately in recent years we have seen countless attacks on the e.s.a. and science-based decisions. this bill is no exception. this bill would hastily remove endangered species act protections for all gray wolves in the lower 48 states without a rule making process or the opportunity for judicial review. although the population of gray wolves has started to recover, it is now only 5% of the number that existed historically. scientists are just beginning to understand the role of gray wolves in the larger ecosystem. enlisting and delisting decisions should be based on science, not politics. mr. speaker, there's so many
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more important things we need to be doing today. today instead of undermining the endangered species act, we should be re-authorizing the land and water conservation fund, passing the violence against women act, and the list goes on. i strongly urge my colleagues to oppose this bill, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas. mr. westerman: mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. gentleman from virginia. mr. beyer: i ask how much time is remaining for our side. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia has 1 1/2 minutes remaining. the gentleman from arkansas has 8 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. beyer: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield the remaining balance of our time. as we have heard today our colleagues say that this bill's needed to mitigate human livestock conflict that. claim is not compelling. across the country wolves account for only .2% of all cattle losses. other predators such as mountain lions, coyotes,
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account for significantly more livestock kills. my friend from minnesota talked about his german shepherd -- neighbor's german shepped shepherd killed by wolf. we have small dogs and cats killed in our densely urban area by coyotes and foxes. no one is talking about the them. for example, out of the 3.9 million cattle deaths in 2015, coyotes and dogs combined killed more than 164,000 livestock compared to the 10,000 killed by wolves. that's 16 times as many. not to mention that 93% of all cattle losses are due to disease. in the northern rockies alone, which is where we're talking about today mostly, wolf depravation accounts for less than 1% of livestock losses. 256 sheep and 41 calt over an eight-year period of time. the claims that wolves are responsible for massive slaughter of livestock is a myth used to justify lethal control of these animals.
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instead of the shoot first, ask questions later, there are lots of great farmers promoting nonlethal methods that have been scientifically proven to mitigate conflicts. the solutions to this problem that don't involve unnecessary killing in one of the most iconic and charismatic animals, not just in north american but imagination. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas. as esterman: mr. speaker, we consider this bill and we talk about the science behind it, again we're basing this legislation on science, on letting the scientists do their jobs. and this bipartisan bill is exactly, exactly the type of legislation that will save the endangered species act. the e.s.a. aspires to recover imperiled plant and animal species. the act was never meant to
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serve as a long-term management tool. while my colleagues across the aisle should be celebrating, is this e.s.a. success story? not just once, but multiple times u.s. fish and wildlife service has determined the gray wolf recovered and attempted to delist the species. we know this wasn't a partisan decision because we saw these attempts span multiple administration from both sides of the aisle. ur experts, our very own scientists at fish and wildlife service, have expressed to us again and again that the gray wolf is recovered and ready to be delisted. . instead of letting the fish and wildlife service focus its resource on other endangered species, the courts are forcing them to defend this decision and delay the delisting. we are nearly a decade past the agency's first attempt to delist the recovered gray wolf
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species. to continue to list a species, our own experts have determined is recovered, sends the message that the endangered species act doesn't work. i appreciate the bipartisan support this bill enjoys, and i hope more of my colleagues across the aisle will join us in helping strengthen the endangered species act in the long run by supporting this legislation. with that i urge adoption of this commonsense bill, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: all time for debate has expired. pursuant to house resolution 1142 the previous question is ordered on the bill. the question is on engrossment and third reading of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. third reading. the clerk: a bill to provide for removal of the gray wolf in the contiguous 48 states from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife published under the endangered species act of 1973. the speaker pro tempore: 1-c, further
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proceedings is postponed. the unfinished business is the question on suspending the rules and passing h.r. 5787 as amended, which the clerk will report by title. the clerk: h.r. 5787, a bill to amend the coastal barriers resource act to give effect maps of the john chafe yea coastal barrier: source system for such units and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative -- >> mr. speaker, i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 375. the nays are one. 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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pursuant to clause 1-c, further consideration of h.r. 6784 will now resume. the clerk will report the. the clerk: union calendar umber 791, h.r. 6784, a bill to provide for removal of the gray wolf in the contiguous 48 states from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife published under the ndangered species act of 1973. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on passage of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the bill is passed -- >> mr. speaker, i request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a recorded vote has been requested. those in support of taking a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. this will be a five-minute vote. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 pursuant to clause 8 of rule
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20, this 15-minute vote on passage of the bill will be followed by five-minute votes on speaker's approval of the journal, if ordered. this will be, again, a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the ayes are 196. the nays are 180. the bill is waffed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the question on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the jourm which the chair will put de novo. the question is on agreeing to the speaker's approval of the journal. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. the journal stands approved.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to take from the speaker's table the bill, s. 3554, ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 3554, an act to extend the effective date for the sunset for collateral requirements for small business administration disaster loans.
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the speaker pro tempore: is there objection to the consideration of the bill? without objection, the bill is read a third time and passed. and the most is laid upon the table. -- and the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? mr. chabot: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 10:30 a.m. on tuesday, november 20, of this year. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the house will be in order. the members please take your conversations off the floor.
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the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from michigan seek recognition. >> one minute to address the house. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> mr. speaker, my district, the 10th congressional district of michigan, is the proud home to air national guard base, one of the premiere national guard bases, home to more than 40 national defense and homeland security tenets, including all branches of the military, coast guard, customs border protection. i rise today to commemorate the groundbreaking ceremony for the newest organization, the eisenhower veteran care transition center. when completed, the facility will provide residential rehabilitation, reintegration programs for up to 42 veterans at any time suffering from service related conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder, and more. mr. mitchell: these new
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veterans care center, ensures our wounded warriors receive the care they earned allowing them to continue to live independently in our community. i'm thankful to the leadership including general slocumb, the 127th air wing, and the base commander for working hard to bring this resource to southeast michigan. ensuring the veterans in this area get the best possible care. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one inute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today urging action to extend the national flood insurance program. if congress fails to re-authorize the nfip by november 30, millions of homeowners will be unable to obtain or renew their flood coverage. housing markets will grind to a halt and families will be left
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at risk of financial ruin should a flood occur. congress must put this uncertainty to rest. policyholders need stability. our housing markets need stability. american families also need stability. mr. crist: i urge my colleagues to bring to the floor and to pass the re-authorization of the national flood insurance program as soon as possible. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from utah seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. members, please take your conversations off the floor. he house will be in order.
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mr. bishop: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minutes. mr. bishop: mr. speaker, this week my state lost a friend and statesman. james v. hanson, utah's longest serving member of this body passed away on wednesday. my condolences go out to his wife and the family. during his 22 years of service in the house, jim became the first utahan in history to assume the responsibility of full committee chairman. in 1997, jim was chosen to be chair of the infamous ethics committee, where leader armey said it's one of the most extraordinary trust as body could put in another person. in 2001, jim was named chairman of the natural resources committee. he was a trail blazer not just for utah but me. i followed him in the state legislature, speaker of the house in utah, member of this body. also as chairman of the western caucus which jim founded. finally as chairman of the
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resource committee. i will be forever grateful for the time he took to mentor me in each and every one of these roles. his impact on my life and many others can cannot be overstated. as chairman of the resource committee, jim prioritized wise use of public lands while developing sound energy policies and passing conservation bills. as a senior member of the armed services committee, he defended hill air force base as well as the importance of u.s. military needs. he never succumbed to arrogance, good man, fine leader, cherished friend. he will be missed. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from texas seek recognition? >> address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized for ne minute. ms. jackson lee: mr. speaker, today the court has affirmed the value of the first amendment and provided the credentials back to cnn reporter jim costa. it is unfortunate since taking
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office the president has treated members of the press differently than his predecessors. he constantly disparages it as fake news, derides the press as the enemy of the people and routinely sidgeles out individual members. it's unfortunate because no injury has yet company. because last month, inspired by his devotion to the president, took it upon himself to mail pipe bombs to perceived enemies of the president, including two former presidents and the new desk of the cable news network, secretaries of states, attorneys, and congresspeople. the president seems to reserve his most special and pointed derision for african-american women members of the media. in particular april ryan of the urban american radio networks and cnn, abby phillip of the "washington post," and alcindor of the public broadcasting system. instead, the president decided april risian as a loser. abby phillip stupid. nd accused alcindor as a
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racist. the questions asked of the president were pointed, timely, and relevant. they were protected by the first amendment. i ask the president to stand for the first amendment. and stand against racism. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek recognition? >> permission to address the house. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> the bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision before them glory and danger alike and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it. these words embody the life of officer year odd william franks. officer franks was killed in the line of duty after engaging in the pursuit of a suspect. only 24 years old. officer franks dedicated his life to public service.
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he is the first greensboroo officer to die in the line of duty for 17 years and reminding us that they are brave. we must be thankful to their courage and dedication. please keep his family and fellow officers in your prayers as we remember his life and legacy. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition ? >> permission address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise to remember elena housely, a wonderful young woman from my district who was murdered in the mass shooting. she was a bright, dedicated and inspiring student who was excited to have voted for the first time this year. she was in her freshman year at pepper dine ap had so much ahead
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of her. she was deeply loved by family and friends and her death is a huge loss. over the last week, vigils and marries have been held in her honor. she will never be forgotten. i have committed to her parents that i will do everything i can to address violence in our communities. we will honor her senseless death with action. may she rest in peace. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? mr. carter: permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. carter: mr. speaker, i rise er to recognize warren ch g arch n a student with a disability, warren has been the water boy for the hurricanes football team for the past three
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years. this october, the coach called him off the bench and he ran the ball for the last touchdown in the game against needlewood school. e stood by the team and this touchdown was not only well deserved. he has overcome life's obstacles. we are proud of you. congratulations. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute and revise and stepped my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to honor and thank monterey county district attorney. dean will retire after 40 years of service to our home on the central coast of california. he is the longest serving d.a.
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and longest current d.a. in california. he presided over pivotal case. he fought the rise and fall. enforced environmental policy. established the consumer fraud unit. created an early intervention true answery program to keep kids off the streets and he was a master of keeping a balanced budget. i will be grateful to dean for giving me a chance as a job as a prosecutor. during that time, i was able to learn from him and as i served under him and i count myself lucky to have worked with him on criminal justice issues. i hope dean watches p.g. high school football games. ande know, he has big shoes left a long legacy of public service and safety in our community. we honor him. we congratulate him and i thank him for his service.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from kansas seek recognition? >> i ask permission to address he house and revise and extend my remargs. i rise a heart felt thank you to veterans. this week we celebrate veteran day and honor the sacrifice of each veteran to make sure the freedom and liberty we take for granted. one of my responsibilities is to support the men and women of our military and fulfill the promise we make to them. congress has worked with this administration to provide a record amount of funding for health programs at the v.a. and increased accountability measures and paid special attention to improving the mental health services and opioid problems. we owe our veterans a debt of gratitude. but the best way to do that is
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to ensure they are cared for when they come home. may we continue to honor our veterans this week and always. i yield back. ms. tenney: permission to address the house for one minute and revise and stepped my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. tenney: this past country as we reflected on the bravery of our veterans. new york's 22nd district is home to more than 55,000 veterans and true honor to serve them in congress whether part of the marines, army, navy, air force and coast guard. they have sacrificed greatly to secure the freedoms we have at home. when they come home, it is our responsibility to ensure they receive quality health care, provide them with the tools to start their own business and find educational opportunities. they stood for us and we must stand for them. to all our veterans, thank you
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what you have done. you truly represent the best in america and make a special thank you to every veteran who continues to serve in this great body on both sides of the aisle and with a special thank you to our presiding speaker who has served in our military. and final thank you to all my friends in the marine corps for my dear son captain tray cleary and u.s. naval academy graduate. thank you for your service. we are indebted to you for our service to keep our freedoms and continuing to make this a great nation. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. stivers of ohio for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. he request is granted.
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under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2017, the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. tenney, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. ms. tenney: thank you, mr. speaker. i just wanted to highlight a couple of things. really important issue in my region, upstate new york communities have suffered tremendously from the opioid miss friday:. in 2016, opioid overdoses rose doubled 21% and deaths in broom county. during the most recent district work period, the president signed into law the substance use substance prevention act which gives treatment to patients which included the expanding oversight. this bipartisan legislation directs the medicare payment
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advisory commission to issue a report regarding incentives that lead to overprescription of opioid drugs. this legislation is important in my district because studies have shown that 29% of patients go on to misuse the drug. the federal should enact this important bill is a critical first step in this process. i wanted to recognize, mr. speaker, a very important industry in my region and it's a great honor and tremendous for me for me to represent a place called refer copper company in rome, new york. reveer was founded by the great paul reveer. this country was north america's first copper rolling mill and founded again by our great patriot paul reveer in rome, new
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york. it still resides there over 200 years later. small businesses are the backbone of employment in new york's 22nd district accounting for 98% of jobs created. while people think all the jobs are created by big companies. in congress, we need to make sure that we keep empowering our small businesses creating a fair tax and regulatory environment that allows them to hire more workers and re-invest. too many of our local businesses are held back by skyrocketing health care costs and our regulatory code that requires a team of lawyers to decode just to comply with endless amounts of bureaucracy, something that i have experienced as the owner of a small manufacturing business in upstate new york. the time for debate, a lot of
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plat tudes need to end and employees need solutions. we must make the small tax cuts permanent and i voted for the tax cuts and jobs act which helped our community. we have seen unprecedented amount of gains in our economy. a demrimmer of hope in an area where we have seen very little progress over the several decades because of some of the policies that have been enacted that have hurt our small business community and caused new york to have the highest migration of people. over a million new yorkers have left just since 2010. we must fight to contain health costs and provide for health care, a public health care system but an affordable care system for people who are not able to see our doctors. we must represent everyone and not just the powerful.
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something i did to stand up to the leaders in both peats and the i have stood up and fought for the middle class and fought for the average worker. to a small businesses, i say thank you very much for all you do every day. i know how difficult the fight is, how difficult the struggle is. you are the american dream in our communities and you provide the hope for our future and you provide the most jobs that we are going to see as we grow into the coming years and hope we can keep our economy moving. and so to my small business community, thank you so much for all that you have done in adding jobs and providing responsible employment for our communities, for individuals, for giving hope and people starts. it has been an amazing for me to represent a community that really cares. my community is well known for
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its generosity. i find that our small business community, much like the business i owned, we do so much for our communities. we don't have big profits and we operate at less than profit, but we give to our communities. we provide for the little league teams, for the people who are struggling from diseases that cannot be cured. we provide in greater numbers and big companies can provide a large check, our small business community does what it can on a scale that is much greater by proportion. i'm grateful to the people i have served who do so much to help all of us. i wanted to make sure that our small business community is recognized. often in government, we hear an awful lot about the big businesses, but the small businesses are the backbone of our community and heart of entrepreneurship and i want to say as a small business owner,
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i'm deeply grateful for all the work that you do, the late nights, the hard work of your employees, to put out a beautiful product and helping your local citizens, even across the country. i'm grateful. i wanted to move on to another topic. another issue i wanted to make sure we recognize, in conclusion, i would like to recognize a man named jason gray. last month last month jason gray uprooted his life and traveled to florida to assist in medical relief efforts. what jason gray and his team at the national disaster medical system did to help the most vulnerable florida residents is incredible. he provided on the ground medical help to hundreds of victims devastated by hurricane michael. our community is lucky to have a selfless person like jason
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gray and so many others. i just wanted to give him a special recognition for his willingness to go and help others in need outside of our own state and to really use his skills and his talent to bring relief and some sense of sanity to people who are suffering across -- in the panhandle in the tough parts of florida. i just wanted to say thank you again to jason for what you do to our communities and done for florida. it's a tremendous honor to represent you and my distinct honor to represent you here on the floor of the house of representatives. for that, mr. speaker. i yield back the time. the speaker pro tempore: under
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the under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 17, policy of january -- under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2017,, the chair recognizes gentleman from texas, mr. gohmert, for 30 minutes. thank you, mr. speaker. we're living in interesting times in ways as dickens said, best of times, worst of times. there's never been a country in with story of the world the amount of opportunity and freedom for individuals that's found -- been found in the united states. great omon's israel, wealth there, but there was not the opportunity and the
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individual assets that we have here in the united states of america. it's incredible that even for the nation's poor, obesity is major health issue. that's just unheard of in world's history. t it is deeply grieving to hear that so many of our nation's college students, ollege graduates have been indoctrinated with the notion that socialism is so much better or communism, really is what we're talking about, they call it progressivism, socialism, it's -- you hear
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what they are proposing, it's really more communism. but that that would be a superior form of government to what we have. what those students have not been taught, and it's an normous gap in education, it's an enormous area of ignorance you hose students that can't have socialism or communism without giving up remendous amount of freedom. that was one of the things that scared some people in the soviet union when the soviet union came to exist no more. they had given up so much liberty, the idea that they
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were now free to find whatever job they wanted. they didn't have to just take what the government told them to take. they could find whatever job they wanted. they could be entrepreneurs. and i talked to -- they were scared. because with liberty, with freedom comes uncertainty. but the founders felt that government had always been a threat to people's freedom, to their liberty. and they felt liberty, freedom, . s far superior to security and it's often aa tributed to franklin that -- attributed to franklin that those who would give up liberty for security or safety deserve neither.
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t when you really break down a socialist, communist system, you don't have a middle class. you have a ruling class and you have a ruled class. and that's what we're heading for. and i believe we saw the beginnings of that in this last election when billionaires poured billion -- well, hundreds of millions of dollars into this election like never before. because unlike many of our college students now, they know what happens in a socialist, communist system. you have a ruling class. and you have the ruled class. and, yes, it's true. it's so wonderful that the ruled class basically has the
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same amount of money. they get paid similar amounts. i kind of like the idea of physicians being paid more than most people because that means you draw the best and brightest into that profession. i found that not to be the case as an exchange student in the soviet union back when it was the soviet union. i got a glimpse of their socialized medicine. and thank god, literally, that i lived in the united states and didn't have to be part of a socialized medicine system where the doctors were paid the same amount whether they saw one or two people or they saw the 40, 50 people that were waiting to see them. they didn't care. they were going to make the same amount every day. nd exactly that was what the farmers said at a collective
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farm when i asked in the middle of the morning when they worked out in the field. because mid morning, i worked on farms and ranches in the middle of july like this was. you would normally start at sunup so you could finish by mid afternoon before the sun got too hot. here these farmers were sitting -- thousands of acres out there, i couldn't tell what was cultivated and wasn't. i tried to use my best russian. asked when do you work in the field? i pointed. and they laughed. and i thought maybe i said it wrong. but one of the farmers said, i make the same number of rubles if i'm out there in the sun as i do here in the shade. so i'm here in the shade. that basically explains why the
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soviet union could never come anywhere close to being as productive with wheat, crops, as we were in the united states where people going back to the pilgrims after the first winter, they loved the idea of bringing all into the common storehouse and everybody sharing and sharing alike, until after that first winter when so many pilgrims died. but they found that the idea of private property where people could keep what they produced was just fantastic. they were so much more productive. they worked harder. and it was better for the overall community. but we seem to be slipping into a time when the concept of freedom will be forsaken for bigger and bigger government, more and more government
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intrusion. and people will be -- you have to have, though, a totalitarian government for socialism or communism, either one, to succeed. that's how you eliminate the middle class. you have the ruled class. and you have the rich class. and the powerful class. sometimes they may not have as much money as they do power, but i think the reason we see billionaires pushing us in the direction of socialism, they see themselves in the ruled -- e ruling class and see themselves as being so much wiser. and they see what they perceive should be the ruled class as not being nearly as smart and as invan hollenive as they are. and so things -- as inventive as they are. things will be paradise, it
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will be utopian once you have the billionaires -- i think some people that want to push us in that direction that are not billionaires still have to consider they know so much better than individuals across the country. and we would profit so much ore from having this intelligence being the ruling class and all the rest of us be minions, do what we're told. we never have to decide what job we have. we have been moving in that direction. that's why i think you saw under the obama administration the takeover of student loans. then you will see, i think, in the next couple years, a move toward more and more control over college students. you will see an effort to say, look, let's -- there's so much student debt, why don't we tell these students if you go to the location we tell you, you go take the job we tell you, then
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we'll start forgiving your debt as long as you do what we tell you. there again, we're on the road to giving up a middle class, to giving up our liberty and freedom, and letting there be a ruling class that we will call the government. when i was studying history at texas a&m, i did a research paper on the soviet government. i was intrigued that khrushchev, as premiere of the soviet union, he understood that true communism theoretically did not have a government in existence. true communism from those according to their ability to those according to their need, people shared and shared alike regardless of how hard they wourked, everybody shared equally, but in true communism,
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there is no government. and the premiere, khrushchev, up p a commission to come - they loved the five-year plan for their economy. he wanted this commission to come up a plan to how they could move to ultimate communism when there was no government. there were just the people existing, loving, living together, sharing together without a government. and it didn't take too long. i can't remember a year or two until the commission realized and khrushchev realized in this world you can can never have communism, socialism without a totalitarian government. he disbanded the commission. they never achieved their plan of how they could move into
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ultimate communism with no government. and -- so they moved forward with a totalitarian government. and of course those who actually study real history or no truly socialist communist government has ever succeeded. they always fail. as margaret thatcher said, they fail when they run out of other people's money to spend. but we seem to be moving there. it wasn't lost on some that during the obama administration we had millions more added to poverty and in need of government assistance. we had so many moved out of the middle class into poverty. statement, -- at the same time, president obama himself
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admitted, it's the only time it's ever happened in the history of the united states of america, but under president obama's administration for the irst time in american history, 95% of the american income went to the top 17% income earners. had never happened before. i hope and pray it doesn't happen again. it has been fantastic in the last two years since president trump has taken office, we have seen the economy surge. we heard from president obama that it's unlikely we would hit 3% growth again, that those days were behind us. so the middle class shrunk. the ruling class got more and more power. people were standing in line
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saying, oh, please, master government, give me more of this, give me more of that. and it has been so refreshing to see millions no longer needing government assistance in different areas, that they are getting better jobs. but that shouldn't have been a revelation, because if you look at single mom income when adjusted for inflation from 1965 when it began, that welfare began to 1995 when a work requirement was added by the brand new republican majority der speaker newt gingrich, that single mom income adjusted for inflation for those 30 years
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flatlined. single moms had no increase in income adjusted for inflation for 30 years. in the republican majority 1995 added a work requirement that you couldn't get welfare unless you were able to work, for the first time in 30 years, single-mom income when adjusted for inflation started taking off. seen a graph when by dean at harvard, was there for a seminar would as amazed that reveal that at harvard, but it was amazing. so on the one hand, you had people that say we care more about single moms, so we are going to give them more money for every child they can have out of wedlock.
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and what it did was pull them into a rut they could not get out of. when i was a felony judge in texas, one of the things that really began to deeply trouble me is seeing more women coming before me, single moms for welfare fraud as a felony. i never sent any of those women to prison, i always gave them probation, but the stories were normally very, very similar. and there were number of different races. at wasn't the issue, but the big point that seemed to be repeated over and over was, often they were bor emp d in high school. if you have a baby, you don't have to finish high school, then they would have a baby out of
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wedlock and the government would send them a check and then found out you can't live very well like that. the ones that came before me, most of them would have another child thinking maybe if i can get another check i can get out of this hole and would get a deeper and longer rut that they could not extricate themselves from. i have had great conversations with star parker, who can -- i about the trouble have spoken to sociology classes at texas colleges, and they have jarvis ley college, college done an amazing job in educating. so often it is the first person
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in the family to ever go to college. once that first child gets to college, then their children end up going to major universities. it's a wonderful, great step to help poor people out of poverty. and i heard from students, the most vocal were single moms in their late 20's, some in their 30's, that had realized that i am not going to have a good life if i stay in poverty. they set about to improve themselves through education and it was amazing to hear some of them just adamant, you have got to have a mandatory work requirement. and another saying, and you've got to drug test people that are on welfare. these were african-american
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single moms and one of them was saying, nobody ever drug tested me so i could take government money and spend it on drugs. and they were asserting that we should do things that this congress has never ventured out to do but they were adamant because they had been lulled and enticed into a hole, a rut that they almost did not -- were not able to get out of. a government should not be about luring people into holes or ruts from which they cannot extricate themselves. we ought to be about pushing, encouraging people to reach the greatest potential. and that cannot, will not, does not, has not ever happened in a socialist or communist system.
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you get rid of the middle class. you have a ruling class. and you have a ruled class. now, if you wanted to call it sort of a middle class in the soviet union, they didn't make more money than the rest in rules class but if people had a little bit of power, then people that were part of the ruled class that had a shoe store or a grocery store or some other kind of place where goods or services could be purchased, but especially goods, the store keeper would reserve things in the back to give to people that might have a little power that might help them. but i never forget one morning
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moscow, a ostel in ukranian friend that was staying in our room with me and two others -- there were eight americans in the soviet union that summer, a cleaning lady came in and she saw the ukranian and screamed and ran out of the room. and i said why did she scream? where is she going? he said, in your country you are able to elevate yourself by working harder, making more money, you can elevate yourself. in my country, the only way you can elevate yourself is to step on other people. so she's going to run down and tell people i shouldn't be here. she will step on me. it will elevate her a little bit and that's what we do in our
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country to get ahead. we step on each other trying to get ahead. i said that makes no sense. what's she got to gain by running down and saying that you're here? he said, she'll be elevated for ratting me out. so we're looking at major changes in this country. we are looking at a couple of years where there will be some socialist notions that will be brought here to the floor. but as we saw during the obama administration, the economy doesn't do well. people don't do well. we were moving dramatically in a socialist direction. obamacare was the first step oward total socialized medicine. as i told some of the big phrma
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lobbyists when it passed and some of the big insurance people and aarp that sold their souls to endorse the program, yeah, you are going to make more money that you ever made in the short-term, but by endorsing this program you may have signed your death warrant, maybe down e road, 15 years, you will sees to exist and making next to nothing. but some of the rich folks and some of the big corporate positions, they knew if they made extra billions for their industry in the short-term, they would have a golden parachute and before their industry was destroyed by socialized medicine. aarp, they sold out to seniors
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because obamacare had a $716 billion cut to medicare. and the seniors are feeling it now. but we had a new group of voters come out. they don't understand what happens and either socialized medicine or in a socialized system and they think it's going to be wonderful. well, if you like less freedom, less assets, less opportunity, progressivism, communism, whatever phase you nt to call it, you'll love a social is particular system. we have seen also the courts moving us in that direction and they have taken over more and more and the judiciary is being the least threat to liberty of the three branches. we have allowed the judiciary to
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basically become oligarhs and run america. president is not allowed to make decisions as the constitutions have directed when it comes to immigration refugees. so, it's not just voters. we have seen the courts do their share in moving us toward a socialized system. but here again, like the billionaires, some of these judges, not all, i have been there, been a judge, a chief justice, but some of these federal judges see themselves one day along side the billionaires as being part of the ruling class as we get rid of the middle class and have the ruling class and the ruled class. and my hope, my prayer the
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reason i'm still here in congress, i ran again, is to try to get us off this track. and i deeply regret that we wasted september and haven't done a whole lot this week, but i think the best christmas present that this congress, this current republican majority could give america is obviously, we are out now today until thanksgiving but stay in session through christmas day, through january 1 if we have to and work out some of these issues including money to build a wall where it's needed. that's not only good for america. cuts out -- will help reduce the
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70,000-plus americans that are killed from drug poisons coming from mexico, drug cartels. but it also would be the best thing we could ever do for our neighbors in mexico. they ought to be a top 10 economy in the world. the only reason they're not is because of corruption from the drug cartels. you look historically -- look at what they've got. they have more natural resources than most countries in the world. they have a better location. they are between two continents and two oceans. they got it all going on. and they have some of the hardest working people in the whole world. why are they not a top 10 economy? because of the drug cartels' corruption. the control they have over government. we cut anywhere from $80 billion, some estimates, they
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made that much last year on drugs sent into the u.s. some say they may be making as much from human trafficking, getting people into the united states. they have people pay them to get them into the united states so they can be sent by d.h.s. to a city where the drug cartels need them to sell drugs or be engaged in sex and human trafficking and that's what has been going on through the owe palma years and that's why border patrol said e drug cartels call us their logistics. they get them into our country illegally and ship them and give them the address, our people would send them there. that's being changed under this president. but not but may not be changed for long
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under the new congress. we will see. we owe the people better than we gave them the last two years and hope and pray we're going to come back and not just snap the ball and fall on, it but do some good that we should have done long before now. in the next couple of months. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. does the gentleman from texas have a motion? mr. gohmert: at this time i move that we do now hereby adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands adjourned until 10:30 a.m. on tuesday, november 20, 2018.
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>> and it was my god, i'm 28 years old. this is it. >> sunday night at 8:00 eastern q and a.'s john kasich delivered remarks in new hampshire. he is term limited and ran to gainst donald trump. >> john kasich was a congressman for nine terms. and he senched among other committees, he served on defense and budget and

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