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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  February 26, 2019 5:59pm-8:00pm EST

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i'm encouraged by the strong bipartisan support of the land natural resources management act and which it has received and i compliment my colleagues from both sides of the aisle for advancing this. it's long overdue. i urge all of my colleagues to vote in favor of this bill. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from utah reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: thank you very much. i'd like to recognize for one minute the representative of the district of columbia, ms. eleanor holmes norton, for her comments. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from the district of columbia is recognized for one minute. ms. norton: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i thank my good friends for working together to produce this magnificent lands package. this lands package takes all our precious lands seriously, including our urban parks.
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i particularly appreciate that this bill allows the district of columbia to receive full state grant funding for our city parks. first up is franklin park in downtown d.c. to be rehabilitated with public-private partnership money using federal, local, and private sector funding. this bill incentivizes the private sector to step up and do its part and see that -- to see that our public parks are as good for business as they are for people. the founders of the capital city made sure that the capital would be a city of parks. watch us set an example for urban parks throughout the country by supporting this important legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia yields back the balance of her time.
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the gentleman from arizona reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. bishop: i am pleased again to yield one minute to the gentleman from tennessee, mr. burchett. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for one minute. mr. burchett: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, ranking member bishop, for yielding me this time. the natural resources management act is notable for its bipartisan support and for the conservation of our natural treasures. tennessee's second district, the district i represent, is home to a large portion of the great smoky mountains national park, mr. speaker. the most visited national park in our nation. last year over 10 million visitors enjoyed the park, its wildlife and its beautiful views and vistas. the foothills parkway transverses the park and includes a bridge currently called, creatively enough, bridge number two. senate bill 47 would rename the bridge for the late dean stone, a long-time editor of the daily times in maryville, tennessee. dean advocated for the completion of the foothills parkway that enables so many to view the park and i hope to take my daughter, isabel, and my
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wife, kelly up there shortly -- kelly, up there shortly. bridge two posed one of the greatest challenges to the parkway's completion and has been described as an engineering marvel, mr. speaker, for the construction techniques that minimized its environmental impact. it's fitting that this bridge bear dean's name, not only so we can continue our stewardship of these land escapes, but also so that we can honor the people who pushed us to preserve them and increase their accessibility. thank you, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from utah reserves his time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: mr. chairman, i wonder if i may inquire of the gentleman from utah, as to additional speakers at time? mr. bishop: yes. i have a couple of speakers. mr. grijalva: i'll reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. bishop: thank you. then i wish to yield two minutes to the gentleman from georgia, mr. carter. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes.
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mr. carter: i thank the gentleman for yielding. and thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to encourage my colleagues to support s. 47, the natural resources management act. this legislation includes important provisions for public lands across our nation, but specifically for three national parks in the state of georgia. one of those includes my own piece of legislation, a boundary expansion for the national monument in the first congressional district of georgia. designed by general james ogele thorpe, the fort was built to defend the young colony against attack from the spanish in florida. nine years later, in 1742, the general's design was put to the test. the spanish invaded the georgia colony as part of the war of general kin's ear. the spaniards numbered around 5,000 troops while the general had fewer than 1,000 regular soldiers. native americans and local colonists garrisonned inside the structure.
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the english detected the spanish invasion, waited -- waded into the march and ambushed the enemy troops in the battle of bloody marsh. consequently the battle turned back the spanish and it was the last of their offenses in the colony of georgia. this story, battle and fort is an important moment in georgia history. taught to elementary students throughout the state as a marker of our resolve and a turning point that helped create the state of georgia that we now know. in passing years, specifically with updates in technology, we increase our knowledge of history through new findings. that is exactly the opportunity we have here with fort frederica and why we need this legislation. studies show land just outside the national park boundary was used as a camp ground and even a battle -- battery that protected the area from warships. this bill adjustments the existing national monument to include those locations inside the boundary in an effort to better preserve those locations and continue to learn more about
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this area and the critical advance that unfold -- events that unfolded here in the first congressional district of georgia to create our home state of georgia. this legislation has been in the works for the last 12 years, beginning when the land trust temporarily purchased additional land in 2007. i want to thank the committee for their work on this and -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is given an additional 30 seconds. mr. carter: and i yield back. mr. bishop: or less. the speaker pro tempore: or less. the gentleman from georgia yields back the balance of the time. the gentleman from utah reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: i continue to reserve the balance of our time, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from utah. mr. bishop: you have no more speakers, right? i'm ready to quit. good. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. bishop: with that, mr. speaker, i appreciate those two have come down and spoken on this particular bill, especially when you can say the word
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ogelthorpe all the time. this is a good piece of legislation that will make some solutions and move us forward. it's not perfect. but it actually solves some problems. many of which are parochial. but are significant local concerns. and that's why this package is here. it passed the 63 bills that we have passed in the house, but were sitting in the senate. this has a chance of bringing cloture to all of that. i urge the favorable adoption of this piece of legislation and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: thank you very much, mr. speaker. and i thank everyone who voiced their support for s. 47. i want to, again, before we close and turn to a vote, i want to again express my thanks to my colleagues who helped bring this bill before us today. it's a major win for conservation across the united states. i strongly encourage all my colleagues to vote in favor of this legislation.
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i know -- you know, the american people need to know from this congress that there is opportunities to produce bipartisan wins, whether it's for conservation or public lands , but more importantly, for the people of this country. i think this bill represents that. and i want to extend my appreciation and my thanks to respective staffs on both sides of the aisle for their hard work in bringing this together. as my friend from utah said at the offset of this conversation, and today, it's not a perfect bill. but it is an effort on the part of many of us that came to this with disparate views, different opinions, and opposition to some of the content of it. do as an effort to try to something that reflected common ground. i think this bill reflects common ground. i think it is a win for all of us. and i encourage all my
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colleagues to vote in support of s. 47. and with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arizona yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 47. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, -- mr. bishop: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. bishop: on that i very reluctantly ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. proceedings will resume on questions previously postponed. votes will be taken in the following order. passage of house joint resolution 46, and the motion to
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suspend the rules and pass s. 47. the first electronic vote will be conducted as a 15-minute vote. pursuant to clause 9 of rule 20rks remaining electron -- 20, remaining electronic votes will be conducted as five-minute votes. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on passage of house joint resolution 46 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the joint resolution. the clerk: house joint resolution 46. joint resolution relating to a national emergency declared by the president on february 15, 2019. the speaker pro tempore: the passage -- the question is on the passage of joint resolution. members will record their votes by electronic device. members, this is a 15-minute vote. 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the
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united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 245, the nays are 182. the joint resolution is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentleman from arizona, mr. grijalva, to suspend the rules and pass s. 47. on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: senate 47. an act to provide for the management of the natural resources of the united states and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. members, five-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of epresentatives.] the speaker pro tempore: everybody is here as a guest of the house and any manifestation of approval or disapproval of proceedings is the violation of the rules of the house.
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 363, the nays are 62. 2/3 of those voting having
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responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended. the bill is passed and, without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the chair will remind all persons in the gallery that they're here as guests of the house, that any manifestation of approval or disapproval of the proceedings is in violation of the rules of the house. for what purpose does the gentleman from california -- i mean, from arizona seek recognition? mr. grijalva: thank you, mr. speaker. i send to the desk a concurrent resolution and ask unanimous consent for its immediate consideration by the house. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the concurrent resolution. the clerk: house concurrent resolution 21. concurrent resolution directing the secretary of the senate to make a correction in the enrollment of the bill, senate
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47. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection to the consideration of the concurrent resolution? without objection, the concurrent resolution is agreed to and the motion to reconsider s laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from alabama seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i seek unanimous consent that the committee on judiciary be discharged from further consideration -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman -- members. the house is not in order. the gentleman from alabama. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that the committee on judiciary be discharged from further consideration of h.r. 962, the born-alive abortion survivors protection act, and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: under the guidelines consistently issued by successive speakers as recorded in section 956 of the house rules and manual, the chair is constrained not to
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entertain the requests unless it has been cleared by the bipartisan floor and committee leadership. mr. palmer: mr. speaker, if this unanimous consent request, which would prevent the killing of a living child, cannot be entertained, i wonder what might be. the speaker pro tempore: the chair has not -- the gentleman has not been recognized for debate. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will recognize requests for one-minutes. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. the gentleman from new jersey. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to
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honor sam you ell d. roberts for his lifetime of service to the eople of new york. sam's career began with general motors who severed as the chairman of the local 4 5 education and civil rights committee. in the d five terms county legislator and then the people of new york, 128th assembly district sent him to represent them in albany. the governor tapped sam to serve commissioner on temporary disability and assistance, it
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oversees more than 5,000 workers. he retired from government to serve as a special adviser to serve as the president. throughout it all, sam kept community first and created a positive change that will last for generations. mr. speaker, i ask that my colleagues join me in jam you ell g. roberts as a community leader and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the ouse will be in order. >> mr. thompson: ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, madam speaker. this month, i met with
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representatives from two i rectional institutions thank the representatives for visiting my office and taking the discuss the priorities for their year ahead. they need to increase staffing levels. today, i commend correctional officers and all across our country to protect our the nities to uphold dangers they face. just like our first responders, correctional officers risk their lives. they enforce the rule of law. and dedication and sacrifice goes unnoticed but we owe them a gratitude. let us always thank them for the
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important work they do to keep us safe. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized fosh ne minute. >> i rise today to urge my colleagues to vote yes on a historic piece of legislation, h.r. 8, will require background checks on gun sales in the united states. in 2017, almost 40,000 americans died from gun violence, the highest total on record since the centers on disease control. this is ain epidemic has gone unaddressed at the federal level. boston prayers cannot stop the
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gun violence that terrorizes communities. that's why i'm proud to co-sponsor h.r. 8 to keep guns out of the wrong hands. vote in favor of this legislation tomorrow and ensure safer neighborhoods across america. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> there are seats down in the front. i'm concerned about the residents that have dammingd roads and property. the loss of life during this recent life. and i pray. one group of people deserve to
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recognize. and they are our first responders and emergency personnel. when we are seeking shelter from the storm, the men and women rescue crews and communications professionals are going to work to coordinate a rapid response that will save lives. it is appropriate during these times of disaster, we pray for those who work so hard. i ask all my house colleagues in doing just that and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i'm here to tell the story about gun violence that spans multiple generations and started
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in camden city, new jersey. kimmed ned in 1949, one 13 people. this is the first modern mass shooting. during those horrific events, a 12-year-old boy hid in the closet as his mother and father was slaughtered. and nearly 70 years later in a school in parkland, florida, his own granddaughter, hid in a closet just like her grand father did. carlie is with us today. and i'll end with carlie's words, she said this pain shouldn't be generational. she's right. we must do more for our children, our grandchildren and everyone in our communities. thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> as you know this month is black history month and i'm taking to remember african-americans who made a difference. i rise today to honor one of my civil rights, mr. nellon pelig ht. he was one of the foremost leaders. he worked hard to work hard to change the policies. he devoted his life to the fairness and justice of everyone. he organized protests against whites-only admitance at rocky springs pool and his father
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founded the n arch acp. he led by example and represented the goodness in our community. he was active in his church and worked to ensure that residents had jobs, housing. e served as a lancaster city councilman. it marks three years since he passed away but the evidence for the changes he fought for. i found him as a personal friend and honor to remember him today and highlight the work he did this month. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from connecticut seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today to voice my
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support for two bills that the house will consider this meet. these bills are the comprehensive gun violence prevention bills since the the act was signed into law in 1994. far too often, innocent lives are claimed. 40,000 people die every year. while mass shootingsdom fate the headlines, we cannot to turn a blind eye on a daily basis all over the country. i have lived in a neighborhood where the sound of gunshot was as normal as hearing church bells. i have seen first happened as the atmosphere of violence affects our children. congress has remaped silent on
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this issue. america is ready for back grouped gun legislation. i owe it to the state and i look forward to casting my vote in 1112.t of h.r. 8 and h.r. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> i guess tomorrow, we will find out tomorrow if there is anyone michael cohen hasn't lied to. he lied to three banks and so i guess it will be relevant for us to determine does he lie to his own family, does he lie to members of his family and it will be one heck of an inquiry, he has tangled a web of lies.
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and it appropriate for any member of this body to challenge a truthfulness and have future that contains nothing but lies. that is the story of michael cohen and i can't wait to get to the bottom of things and can't wait to get to the bottom of the truth. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. jarpgd for within minute. >> california's high-speed rail ystem has broken promise after promise, made false claim after false claim. i commend president trump for working to pull back the 928
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million that still authorized that could be reachable and turn this money that could be used for more californians and need to send a bill to the state of california for money this wasted for a project that was required in the proposition that was passed. 9 price has more than tripled and we need to focus on doing the projects that would help move people in the fashion they could use. governor newsome was right there. i know he knows different. let's go ahead and put a stop in this project and fix our highway system or levy system or water system and not send a bill to the other 49 states in this country that in good faith that sent this. put it into good solid projects. i yield back.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? >> ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. it's a shame that the new house ma north instead of fully funding border security passed house resolution 46 which would reverse the president's emergency declaration that secures our border. now in maryland, we have a real problem. we are the second most active state for ms-13 which walks across our borders. we have a huge problem like every state in the union, with drugs, with opiods that walks across our border which isn't secured and we have a problem with human trafficking. if this resolution is passed, i
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hope the president vetoes and we sustain that are veto and finally secure our border. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair announces the speaker's appointment pursuant to 6219 and thed orer of the house of the following member on the part of the house to the executive commission on the people's republic of china. the clerk: mr. mcgovern of assachusetts, chair. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the speaker's appointment pursuant to section 104-b of house resolution 6, the 116th congress, and the order of the house of january 3, 2019, of the following member to serve as co-chair of the tom lantos human rights commission.
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the clerk: mr. mcgovern of massachusetts. the speaker pro tempore: the chair announces the speaker's appointment pursuant to section 2 of the migratory bird conservation act and the ord ore they have house of january 3, 2019, of the following member on the part of the house to the migratory bird conservation commission. the clerk: mr. thompson of alifornia. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. defazio of oregon for today and mr. katko of new york for today and the balance of the week. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the requests are granted.
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under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2019, the gentleman from arizona, mr. biggs is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. biggs: thank you, madam speaker. before i begin i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials on the topic of my special order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. biggs: thank you. it's my privilege to lead this special order tonight as we consider the national debt as a security threat to the united states of america. i thank senator david per sue for his leadership, he has introduced a concomitant resolution in the senate, and i also thank the more than 50 members of this body who are original co-sponsors oto this resolution. i also thank the more than one
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dozen condition servetive groups who have endorsed this resolution an have come to understand that a structural deficit that nears $1 trillion every year and national debt that exceeds $22 trillion, is indeed a threat to our national security. with that, i'm going to yield to my friend the gentleman from exas, mr. roy. mr. roy: i'd like to thank my friend from arizona for his leadership on this matter and appreciate and -- and appreciate very much his leadership on h.res. 149, a resolution recognizing the national debt as a threat to our national security. in february of 2000, the total national debt including intergovernmental holdings was $5.7 trillion. federal spending as a percentage of gross domestic product was 17.5%. today, total national debt exceeds $22 trillion.
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the last balanced budget was signed into law in 1997. and the congressional budget office projects that federal spending as a percentage of g.d.p. is projected to be 0.8% this year. now, congress in february, 2018, passed a budget agreement that busted the previously established spending caps by almost $300 billion in two years. all those numbers don't mean anything to the american people tuning in to c-span right now. they're giant numbers. they're difficult for people to understand and comp rehence. but we're talking about the future of our nation and what we're leaving to our children. we're leaving them with an economy that is anchored by $22 trillion in debt that's going to turn to $25 trillion, $30 trillion, $40 trillion, because this year alone we'll have a trillion dollar deficit with no end in sight. we are making it to where our children can't comprehend what
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freedom is like in this country and what opportunity is like in this country because they're going to have an economy that's weighted down by this body and the senate's irresponsibility. nobody in america balances their budgets at home like this. the state of texas, i'm sure my friend from arizona, our states don't balance their budget like this. nobody looks at the total number of income you've got. and then blows it by 25% or 30%. and then goes to the bank and wonders why they may not give you a loan or help you finance a car. and my concern is that we're allowing this to happen on the backs of our men and women in uniform. we're saying that as a need to defend the united states of america and to spend money, which our men and women in uniform deserve to have the resources necessary as we ask them to go around the globe, we're using that as an excuse to
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continue to bust caps and to bust the limits we put in place to hold us in check. so that $300 billion i was talking about the last two years, about 40% of that -- about 40% of that is nondefense discretionary that road on the -- rode on the back of helping our men and women in uniform have the tools they need. there used to be an adage of guns an butter. we don't have the chose between guns and butter. have we cut butter at all while we increase money for guns? have we epidemic held it in check? no. we have plused it up and continued to bust the caps all while we know mandatory spending, spending on medicare, medicaid, social security, all go up. so the question i want to ask is when are we going to stop? is it going to take placing a debt clock over the chair of the speaker? do we need to have something to
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remind us sitting here in this body what we're going to be leaving to our children? because it is our responsibility what we leave behind to our kids. it's irresponsible when we look at every bill, every one of these bills that comes across our desk, why did you vote no, mr. roy? it was just another half million dollars, another $5 million. that's not how you spend at home. it's time that this body gets serious about spending restraint. it's time that this body recognize as i'm very happy that my friend from arizona has, and i'm proud to join him in saying that this is an impact on our national security, a threat to our national security. when we know right now that the interest on our debt is pretty soon going to eclipse the amount of spending we're spending at the department of defense, that is a threat to our national security.
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we can't sustain it. so when we say now that we're going to spend more money for the tools our men and women need, how are we going to afford to spend those tools in 2030 or 2040 when we're spending more, literally b on interest than we are on what they need? so i am proud to join my friend to make the case here that this is a threat to our national security. i would call on my colleagues to join us. to join this resolution and to call on them to have the same level of resolve, to limit spending, and to make sure that we pass town the greatest country to our kids that the world has ever known. i thank you and i yield back. mr. biggs: thank you. appreciate the gentleman from texas. when he talks about the crowdout effect, that's what we see as one of the threats to our national security. when you look at the spending that is being bloated and plused up and increased, the
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ramifications of borrowing more and more money for an insatiable appetite to spend the federal revenues and beyond, to the tune of almost $1 trillion a year, and it will continue to rise, make no mistake about that, unless we do something, it will ultimately crowd out spending or things like the military. spening for things like transportation and infrastructure. spending for any discretionary item. we're on that fast track today. so i appreciate my friend from texas talking and discussing the crowdout and the impacts on our future and our future generations. with that, it's my privilege to welcome my friend from texas and yield time to representative williams. mr. williams: thank you, congressman biggs, for your
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leading us tonight. madam speaker, the national debt is the single greatest threat to our national security. since 1997, congress has failed to do its job and balance the budget and earlier this month, the national debt reached $22 trillion. for this reason i'm proud to co-spon or congressman andy biggs' resolution to recognize the national debt as a threat to national security. i commend him for introducing this important resolution in the u.s. house of representatives and i also commend senator david perdue for bringing it to the u.s. senate. we must no longer rely on routine debt ceiling increases nor can we risk the devastating effects a growing deficit will have on our military and national security agencies. in an effort to reduce the deficit and regain preresponsible spending practices, president trump laid out his national security strategy that highlights this critical need to reduce the debt through smart, fiscally responsible decisions. while it is clear we cannot undo the past, it is also clear that federal spending cannot continue
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to go unchecked and immediate action must be taken. we can no longer defer to future generations to solve our problem. and to bear this burden. i will continue to support legislation that cuts unnecessary spending and oppose legislation that electlessly adds to the debt. -- that recklessly adds to the debt. i ask my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to get serious and support this resolution. it is time to stop writing blank checks and it's time to stop risking the national security of the united states of america. it's simple. balance your books. in god we truss, i yield back the remainer of my -- we trust, i yield back the remainder of my time. mr. bigs: i thank the gentleman from texas. i appreciate his willingness to take a strong stand on this. i'm morely impressed by his reference to president trump's national security strategy which specifically mentioned a portion of it is to bring our national debt dun. to try to become a better
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fiscally situated nation. and that will help our national security now and in the future. this is exactly what president trump's talking about. that is what we're talking about. that's one of the issues that we have before us today. so i'm grateful to my friend, the gentleman from texas, who has brought that forward and is supporting this important resolution. it's now my privilege to yield time to my friend from maryland, the great congressman andy harris. mr. harris: thank you very much. i thank the gentleman from arizona for yielding time. i thank the two gentlemen from texas for introducing the topic to the american people. this is something every american should be aware of. you know they say a picture is worth a thousand words and every
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american should look at a few pictures about our national debt. this first picture shows, this is a 110-year period from 1930, before world war ii, to 2050, just 30 years away. and it shows what our national debt has looked like as a percent of our economy. and it's pretty striking. for the first 90 years of it, there's one huge peak, world war ii, a world at war. at that time, our debt exceeded the size of our gross domestic product, the size of everything produced in the united states, our debt rose to that amount after world war ii, we spent the next, you know, the greatest generation spent the next 30 years paying down our debt. growing our economy. so that we had an affordable debt, we had a little bit of
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rise in the 1980's and 1990's as we defeated communism, again, a war situation, but then following 2008 and following the last administration we have skyrocketing debt once again to the point where within five years we'll approach the debt we had during world war ii, fighting the largest war this world has fought, and then by 2048, 30 years from now, actually having a debt that's 150% of everything we make in this country. that's the level we see with failing economies, some of the economies like greece, like italy, those ones that have unsustainable debts we're on a clear path to that. now let's talk about the size of our national debt. what we see, and this chart again, this chart goes from
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2010, this is just 18 years, starting from 2010 going to 2028, and this is the interest payment on our national debt because you know, madam speaker, like every american knows if you borrow money, you got to pay interest on it. the fact of the matter is that right now our interest, total interest payment is about $200 billion. madam speaker, every american family knows, every senior who saves for retirement knows that interest rates right now are very low. you don't get -- you go get a c.d., you're getting 1%, 2% return. those interest rates will return to normal and as the gentleman from texas mentioned, we're accruing debt at $1 trillion a year. that by the time we reach 2028, the interest payment on our debt alone due to the increased size of our debt and increased interest rate is going to approach $1 trillion a year. .
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what does that mean? madam speaker, there are a lot of things you have to fund with your -- that government funds. those of you who are interested in the safety of social security, of medicare, medicaid, of federal pensions, they know that we're approaching a zero-sum game. we can't keep this debt going forever. and in fact, this final chart i'm going to show, 10 years starting now, shows the percent spending of g.d.p. so relative to our economy, what our net interest on our debt is, and then other things like medicaid, the children's health insurance program, things that we think are important, defense. the yellow line, the defense budget, nondefense discrerary spending, all these are relatively constant, all of them are going to be crowded out by net interest on the debt. madam speaker, americans understand you can't borrow
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forever. you can't do it on your cars, you can't do it on your houses, you can't do it on your credit cards. and we can't do it here in congress anymore. this threatens our security, when in five years we will pay more interest on our national debt than we pay defending this country. we can't do it, congress has to get its act together, clean up its act, and get our budget in balance. i yield back -- back to the gentleman from arizona. mr. biggs: i thank the gentleman from maryland. and i appreciate his focusing on the interest. because he's right. in just a few short years, we will be spending more of our budget on interest than we do on defense. and then a couple years after that, more on our interest than we spend on medicare. think about that.
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think about where we are headed because of our profligate ways. in the first chart he showed, i was struck as i remembered growing up in the cold war era. madam speaker, i think those of us who grew up in the cold war era remember that contest between us and the former soviet union. and the amount of money spent by both sides. it is dwarfed, it is dwarfed by the spending that we are embarking on today. as a percent of our g.d.p. that's where we are. that's where we've come. and so it continues to be a problem in so many ways, and on so many levels. and with, that it's my privilege now to yield time to my friend from colorado, the great congressman, ken buck. mr. buck: i thank my friend from arizona for yielding and i thank him for his leadership on this
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important issue. $22 speaker, we have trillion of debt, over $22 trillion of debt now. we are accumulating debt at approximately $1 trillion a year . america is financially bankrupt. and if we continue to place this burden on our children and grandchildren, we are also morally bankrupt. we are threatening our ability to react to world affairs, our ability to deal with the dynamic threats that we face in this world. not just land, not just sea, not just air, but space also. we need to balance the budget. but it requires us to make difficult decisions. today. taupe sure a prosperous future -- to ensure a prosperous future. and it requires us to make significant cuts to our discretionary spending.
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, unique amazing characteristics of this place, of congress, is that for some reason we make a distinction between discretionary spending and mandatory spending. my grandchildren don't care if they have to pay back a debt that was created by mandatory spending or a debt that was created by discretionary spending. they don't care. $1 is $1 to them and it should be to us and we should take control of mandatory spending, just as we take control of discretionary spending. since i was elected to congress, i have fought hard against our country's out-of-control spending and i have advocated for a balanced budget amendment to the constitution that would force congress to pass a balanced budget every year. for the economic well-being of our country i am proud to join my colleagues in co-sponsoring
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this important resolution and i would like to thank my dear friend and colleague, mr. biggs, for recognizing our country's serious spending problem before it's too late. and i yield back to my friend. mr. biggs: i thank my friend from colorado, mr. buck. and i appreciate you raising that important issue, that it is an oddity, isn't it, in congress, that somehow we segregate money, right, we segregate money and say, oh, well this money doesn't matter so much. but it becomes fungible when you're looking at the accumulation of debt that we are heaping upon our future generations. i appreciate you bringing that to our attention and reminding us. and i would just say, i appreciate your voting record. because i've watched it closely and you are a man of your word when you say you've been fitting to balance the budget and reduce our deficit since you got here, because your voting record is actually true to that and i appreciate that very much.
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it's now my pleasure to yield time to my friend from virginia, great congressman, ben cline. mr. cline: i want to thank the gentleman from arizona for the time and thank him for bringing this issue to the forefront, madam speaker. i'm distressed by the lack of numbers in the chamber right now . because this truly is the greatest threat to the security of this nation that we face. when i ran for office last fall, i promised the citizens of virginia's sixth congressional district that i would re-introduce four words to washington. we can't afford it. these are four words that have been needed to have been repeated over the last 22 years, as the last time a federal budget with a surplus was signed into law was 1997. and in virginia, where i served
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in the house of delegates until last year, we're required to balance our budget each year. and because we've placed a priority on fiscal responsibility, virginia is frequently listed among the best states in which to do business. in contrast, the federal government has an outstanding public debt of more than $22 trillion. every year since 1997, congress has failed to maintain a fiscally responsible budget and instead has relied too much on raising the debt ceiling. because of this practice, on august 5, 2011, the credit rating of the united states was reduced by s&p from triple-a to double-a+ and has remained at that level ever since. virginia, through its fiscal responsibility, has maintained its triple-a bond rating, one of only a few states to have that honor. not only is the current practice of not passing a balanced budget
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fiscally irresponsible, it poses a threat to our national security. as part of his national security strategy, president trump has highlighted the need to reduce the national debt through fiscal responsibility. and i commend him for it. in september, 2011, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, michael mullin, warned, i believe the single biggest threat to our national security is debt. and that the time, our national debt was close to $15 trillion. now, almost 10 years later, our national debt has increased by $7 trillion, a 46% increase. ladies and gentlemen, i'm proud to stand with congressman biggs, my fellow co-sponsors, and a bipartisan group of national security leaders in support of this resolution recognizing that the national debt is indeed a threat to the national security of the united states, recognizing that deficits are unsustainable, irresponsible and
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dangerous. and committing congress to restoring regular order in the appropriations process, and addressing the fiscal crisis faced by the united states. the future of our great republic depends on it. and with that i yield back. mr. biggs: i thank the gentleman from virginia, mr. cline, for his comments and his efforts and his willingness to stand on this important issue and recognizing and promising to people and responding to that promise. because i can tell you, when i first considered even running for congress, one of the things this tivated me was horrific debt, which i've watched explode even more since i got here. not because i'm here, but in spite of my efforts. to oday we're preparing enter or introduce our
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resolution which will be later this week, senator purdue, his co-sponsors, my 50 original co-sponsors, more than 50 original co-sponsors. and we recognize that as of today, the national debt is more than $22 trillion. you've heard that. can you hear it enough without taking action? the resulting total interest 2019se for the fiscal year is $192 billion. $192 billion. interest does not sleep, it doesn't take a holiday, it doesn't take a vacation. interest accumulates without ceasing, until you pay your debt. our national debt as a percentage of g.d.p. is 104%. the last time a federal budget was balanced and was signed was
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1997. our total federal tax receipts $3.329 al year 2018 was trillion. but somehow, and we all know how, our federal outlays totaled $4.1 trillion, with a deficit of $780 billion. we know how. we know how that happened. we look to each other in this body. the last time congress -- since the last time congress balanced the federal budget in 1997, congress has failed to maintain a fiscally responsible budget and has relied on raising the debt ceiling. how many times have we raised the debt ceiling? it's almost -- it's more than you can count. congress failed to pass a balanced budget for fiscal year 2019 and failed to restore regular order to the legislative process by not allowing
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representatives to offer and debate amendments. when we have regular order, it prevent -- permits the house to separately debate and adopt all appropriation bills in a timely fashion, and facilitates congressional oversight on ederal spending. estimates are medicare will run out of money in 2026. social security in 2034. as my friend from virginia, mr. cline, said, congress' ineffectiveness has caused the u.s.'s credit rating to drop from triple-a to double-a plus. without a targeted effort to balance the federal budget, our credit will surely continue to fall. president trump's national security strategy highlights the need to reduce the national debt through fiscal responsibility. former secretary of defense, james mattis, warned that, quote, any nation that can't
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keep its fiscal house in order eventually cannot maintain its military power. closed quote. director of national intelligence, dan coates, warned that our, quote, continued plunge into debt is unsustainable and represents a dire future threat to our economy and to our national security, closed quote. former secretaries of defense panetta, carter and hagel warned, quote, increasing the debt will in the absence of a comprehensive budget that addresses both entitlements andriev knews force even deeper reduction in our national security capabilities, closed quote. and former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff warned, quote, i believe the single biggest threat to our national security is debt, closed quote. so what must the house do? first, we have to recognize that the national debt is indeed a threat to our national security. we must realize that deficits are unsustainable,
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irresponsible, and dangerous. we must restore regular order in the appropriations process, and we must commit to addressing the fiscal crisis faced by the united states. i mentioned it before, but when you are spending a pot of money and you have limited resources, regardless of how great those resources are, i mean, we've had record tax revenue for the last 14 months. record revenue, more than any time in the history of the united states of america, and we still outspend that revenue. as we do so, we have to borrow money because we've created a structural deficit. so foundationally we put ourselveses in a position where we have to borrow money. when you have to borrow money, you have to pay interest.
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if you have to borrow more money, which we do, you're going to get -- you're going to start couding out what you can spend those limited resources on. who holds our tet? who holds our debt? one of the biggest holders of our debt is also one of our greatest potential adversaries, china. china has been for the last 25 years expanding their military, building a blue water navy, expanding their capacity for ckets and missiles, and also aking in our debt. this places us at risk if we are ever in a conflict which i pray we never are. i hope we never are.
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but if we are in a conflict with an adversary who holds significant amounts of our national debt, we are at risk. we are at risk. and you have to acknowledge that. what has helped us out so far is the fact that the u.s. dollar is the international medium of exchange. in international transactions, economic transactions. we were to lose that, the ability to borrow funds to sustain our unsustainable spending would go away. i bring that back to china. china has ambitions to make its own currency a regional currency of exchange. they would like to replace the
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united states dollar as the international medium of exchange as well. what else is an actual physical problem when you have the kind of debt and deficit spending that we have is that you cannot pay to replace and maintain your internal infrastructure. and we see that today. airports, all of these need maintenance. they need upkeep. they need expansion. we need new roads. we need new highways. but we can't pay for it. because we are going to be in a position of being overextended. that places us at risk because you do need internal nfrastructure.
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it's now my pleasure to yield time to my good friend from florida, ted yoho. mr. yoho: i'd like to thank my colleague, mr. biggs from arizona. this is such an important topic we're talking about, national debt. i came to congress in 2013, admiral mullen said that the biggest threat to america sour national debt. hillary clinton, secretary of state at the time, said she agreed with that. one of the few times i've agreed with ms. clinton. but national debt today is $22 trillion. when i came into congress it was $14.5 trillion. when president reagan left congress it was about $2.5 trillion. it doesn't matter who is in the white house, our debt is going up until this body, congress, addresses our debt. if you do a pie chart of our excuse % of our debt,
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me, 71% of our debt is mandatory spending, 21% is discretionary. discretionary was described to me as the money we have left over at the end of the month after we pay all of our bills. that's discretionary. the interesting thing is in 1964, those numbers were reversed. mandatory spending was 21%. discretionary was 71%. and 29%. so we were a cash-rich nation. we could do things. we could do a space program. we could do the infrastructure bills that we did that this nation needed. today that's flipped around to where 71% of every dollar this government takes in is already spent. we don't vote on that in congress. those are things that happen without us. the only thing is we vote and we shut the government down on that 29%. if we do not address our
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mandatory spending, mandatory spending will address us as a nation. i was on an interview and they said, well, president obama doesn't want to mess with mandatory spending which is social security, medicare, medicaid, interest on our debt, retirement programs for federal mes. and i reminded the interviewer and they said this about president trump, he doesn't want to deal with mandatory spending. i said i understand that. either this president or the next president deals with mandatory spending or mandatory spending will dictate to this nation what we have to cut and those are called austerity measures. all you have to do is look at puerto rico, spain, portugal, greece, where we -- where they had mandatory austerity measures where programs were cut. and they were cut by other governments that controlled our debt. today, about 30% of our debt is controlled by foreign nations. the other 70%, the american
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taxpayer owns, but it would be tradgetoik allow us in this body to allow another nation to say you've got to get rid of that program. that's unconscionable, it's irresponsible of us and if we do not deal with that debt that debt will deal with us. this is something i appreciate you standing up and having this special order. this is something we talk about repeatedly in our district. we have town halls on this. when you look at the discretionary spending, that's the stuff that runs all of government outside of social security, medicare, medicaid, retirement programs. that means the department of defense. that means the department of education, justice, department of homeland security. all the research money that go into our research universities. comes out of the discretionary funding of government. and i'm telling you, as a nation, if we do not address this, this nation will not survive. and history will repeat itself from great countries that have lasted for a period of time,
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they've always come to a demise and it was because they haven't paid attention to the things that are the very basic. and i appreciate you for -- my colleague for bringing this up. this is something repeatedly and if you look at this congress, the democrats have been in charge of the house for -- since january 2 or 3. we don't have a budget. we haven't addressed with anything dealing with debt. but they have spent a lot of time dealing with president trump and trying to remove him from office and finding out reasons that he shouldn't be the president. we as americans need to come together an deal with the debt. i preebt your efforts. thank you. mr. biggs: thank you, i thank my friend from florida for taking give us ome down and his insight on this monumental problem. one of the things that he talked about, madam speaker is that we
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have got to take care of our processes. our procedures. he's right. it doesn't matter whether it's republican or democrat. our processes have been broken. i cannot tell you, i can't even begin to tell you, i've been here a lit overall two years. i bet we've done a dozen and a half short-term spending bills. continuing resolutions. i bet it's that many. seems to be that many. i think we did three government shutdowns. last year. three. i don't know when the next one is going to be. wouldn't surprise me if it was two weeks from now, whenever it is. but the reason we do those things is because our budget process fails. i remember sitting in a meeting and i heard someone say, we've got a 1-year budget plan to
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balance our budget. and i heard somebody else stand up and say i've been here 10 years, 10 years ago i was told we have a 10-year budget plan. so ought to be up to snuff. we ought to be balanced by now. because it's 10 years since that 10-year budget plan. i think it was mr. yes hoe who said that. mr. yoho, i yield back to you. mr. yoho: i came here they said this will balance in five years, this will balance in 1 years. i laugh but i shouldn't be laughing. we should be crying. because here i am seven years and again, it'll balance in 10 years. it will not balance. it's up to us, the members of the house and the senate, because we control the purse strings but we have done a terrible job at it. it goes back to leadership on both sides. this is something that should not be a partisan issue. this is something that, this should be an american issue. because america is at stake
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here. it's in the a republican party or democratic party. the parties, we don't serve a party is what i tell people any district i'm sure you do the same thing. i serve a nation. that nation is the greatest nation on earth. if we dent get our fiscal house in order, this nation will not be the nation that it is. so again, i don't think it'll balance in 10 years. it won't balance in 20 years unless we change the dynamic and they node to change now. mr. biggeds: thank you, reclaiming my time from the gentleman from florida, when we look at that, and the promise is constantly, this is getting to my point. the process needs to get back to regular order. it needs to get back to 12 individual bills. this is what we talked about. 12 individual bills. that go through a process where there's debate. there's amendments. there's discussion. and there's accountability.
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nothing provides more accountability than bills that have single subjects. nothing provides more transparency than bills have -- bills that have single subjects. nothing allows the american people to see what we're doing in congress than single subjects. when you take 12 subjects, which are your budget bills, and you combine three or four of them into a mini bus and six or seven into an omnibus, and you say vote on these things, usually we're given just a short period of time to read those things and analyze them anyway. usually they come in under some closed rule or some highly structured rule. you're preventing a couple of things. number one, we're not going to get to a balanced budget. because ultimately what you're also preventing is accountability. because when american people -- when the american people can see
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how you've voted in a single area, on a single issue, they know whether they agree with you or not. they know whether you should be doing that. and they'll let you know. they gave you the feedback. and that's the accountability that we need if we're going to balance this budget over time and correct our course. now, there is an economic theory , what increasing returns it boils down to is this. analysis really of why decisionmakers make suboptimum decisions. and then persist on the course even after they know it's a suboptimum decision. what typically happens is regimes and institutions are built up, there's feedback, and people persist on that because they're building up regimes and
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stewings and ultimately they propel themselves so far down, they're what we call locked in. exit that path, the cost is so high. that they don't want to exit that suboptimal path and move to an optimal path. i'm here to tell you tonight that as long as we stay on this suboptimal path where we don't have these 12 budget bills, we don't get back to regular order in budgeting, as long as we do c.r.'s and -- and then claim we've done a normal budget path, bills, reated omnibus or mini bus bills. we're not going to be able to exit the path that we're on. and if we're going to sustain this nation, we're going to need to exit the path that we're on. and move to a more optimal path.
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that's really what this resolution is about. it's encouraging people from both sides of the aisle. i'm not blaming one side or the other. i'm just saying if we're going to get this done, everybody in this house has to look internally. everybody in this house needs to say what are we doing with our process? everybody needs to recognize that if we continue with -- on this path, at some point there's no more path to run down. we just saw from a series of speakers and heard from a series of speakers that the numbers go up and at some point you reach a tipping point. and that tipping point says you cannot go forward. and i would rather we move over to a suboptimal path now and pay that price, which is typically a short-term corrective price, and in the scheme of things, it may take longer than just a short term, but we have to move over.
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because if we don't, our choices are taken away from us. and i will tell you that if we would have gotten on the path two years ago, we would have had more choices and more options. but every day we go further down this path, the fewer options we have. until the end. and mr. yoho is correct. all my friends who have spoken tonight were correct. and the more than 50 co-sponsors are here. they're all correct. if we don't do something, it will be imposed upon us. and if it is imposed upon us, we won't have control. we will not be able to handle this in a way where we hurt the fewest people, where we can feather the landing as much as possible, where we can maintain our economic status, where people can still find jobs,
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where people can achieve the american dream that they perceive that they want to achieve. those things get taken away from you. because ultimately this country is built on individual freedom and individual accountability. and if we have to take that horrible measure of receiving something like our debts being called in or we can't find lenders, or the cost of our loans. imagine if the cost of our debt today would just move up a couple of points. imagine what that would look like. and if we can't do this on our own voluntary ligs, of our own voluntary ligs -- volition, of our own volition, we will be subject to someone else's will. and the very essence of the american dream, individual freedom and individual accountability, will go away.
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and why? because that accountability will be foisted upon us by coercive forces. so, madam speaker, i conclude tonight with gratitude to the 50-some-odd men and women who have signed on to this esolution. i implore all this in -- in this body to join myself, to join me, to join senator purdue and those who have signed on and sponsored a companion resolution in the senate. and let's make the hard choices today so that we might preserve the freedoms for our children and grandchildren. and with that, madam speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: under the speaker's announced policy f january 3, 2019, the chair
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recognizes the gentleman from florida, mr. yoho, for 30 minutes. mr. yoho: thank you, madam speaker. my colleagues and i rise today in opposition of h.r. 1. this bill is nothing more than a thinly veiled attack on the american voting system. designed to allow democrats to keep their majority in the house of representatives. and i'll explain and illustrate. as a member of congress, we have a responsibility to ensure that every american vote is counted and protected. especially because our democratic society relies on participation in the democratic process through free and fair elections. and while i support efforts to involve all americans in our electoral process, i cannot support this unconstitutional legislation. madam speaker, let me lay out for you some of the most absurd provisions in this legislation. h.r. 1 creates federal government subsidized elections
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and for the people watching on c-span, if you don't have insomnia, i want you to hear that again. h.r. 1 creates federal government subsidized elections through a 6-1 ratio for government matches to small donor contributions for congressional or presidential campaigns. for the government to give matches, subsidized elections, that means they're taking money from you to go to candidates, hopefully of your choice, but not necessarily. so the donor contributions for congressional or presidential campaigns, which means for every $200 an individual donates, the federal government will take $1,200 of your money, of the american taxpayers' money, and distribute it. additionally, h.r. 1 removes the checks our current voting system has in place to ensure our eligible voters are casting ballots by forcing states,
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forcing states to accept online and same-day voter registration. i don't think that's ever happened before. where h.r. 1 removes the checks of our current voting system has in place to ensure only eligible voters are casting vote ballots by forcing states to accept online and same-day voter registration. with no penalties for ineligible voters. that means somebody can show up, an individual casts multiple ballots or votes, or vote without meeting the current requirements, they will not be reprimanded. there's no recourse. who's going to go back after somebody, after they've already casted their vote, and they weren't an eligible voter? nobody will go after these people. so it can sway elections. that's what h.r. 1 does. by removing the consequences of illegal voting, this bill is in turn encouraging it. it should be doing the opposite.
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you know, the right and privilege of us as american citizens to vote is something we should all garner and protect as american citizens. again, this is not a partisan issue. it's not democrats or republicans. this is an american issue. and i think people would be incensed on all parties. additionally, this bill allows federal employees to take six days, six days of paid leave to be poll workers. so the american taxpayers are going to pay federal workers to be poll watchers. this is something that's always been done voluntarily by our precinct captains, both republican and democrats, in our districts, where politics is always best locally. but the federal government wants to intervene here and say, no, we're going to give you guys six days off. how many people do you think that are federal employees will take six days off? of paid leave? probably a lot. wouldn't you expect? madam speaker, we pay our federal employees to do the job
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, not to be poll workers. that's something the american voting process has done for over 200 years by volunteers that are passionate and care about this country. in fact, federal employees already receive paid leave that they can take for any purpose they choose, including being poll workers, why should the federal government pay, and i want to reword. that because it's not the federal government paying them. it's the american taxpayers paying money out of their taxes, out of their paycheck, that goes to the federal government, that the federal government thinks they know better how to spend that money than they do. so why should the federal government pay to give them additional leave when they can only -- leave that can only be used for this purpose? madam speaker, there are just three provisions outlined in this almost 600-page bill, and i'd venture most people will not read this when it comes up for a vote. while i could further elaborate, i let -- i will let my
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colleagues share their thoughts with you. with that, i yield to my colleague, mr. biggs from arizona. mr. biggs: madam speaker, i thank my colleague for leelanding this -- for leading this special order. and i want to speak to two specific aspects of this. first of all, i rise in opposition here to h.r. 1, the sweeping unconstitutional attack on electoral system that it represents. it would federalize our electoral system and usurp the authority of states and their citizens to manage their own elections by imposing unnecessary and unconstitutional restrictions that interfere with their fundamental democratic rights. h.r. 1 would restrict freedom of speech and undermine americans' constitutional rights under the first amendment by increasing the power of the federal government to regulate and control political speech. it would criminalize a vast range of legal activities, increase government censorship and impose an eer in mouse administrative compliance burden
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-- enormoused a misk compliance burden on candidates -- enormous administrative compliance burden on candidates. it would also weaken important safeguard designed to ensure the integrity of our electoral system and guarantee every american vote is countered -- counted and protected. this could expose future elections to greater risk of cybermanipulation, and mass voter fraud. it could limit the ability of election officials to ensure that only eligible voters' votes are counted and cripple the effectiveness of state voter i.d. laws. i have to speak to an issue that particularly impacts those of us who live in states that have independent redistricting commissions. i live in arizona. many years ago our voters said, we don't want the legislature designing the congressional districts and the state legislative districts anymore. we want an independent redistricting commission. so they voted for it. so we have a five-member board.
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a five-member commission. two republicans, two democrats and an independent. they design the congressional districts. this bill would take that away from them. it would bring back to washington, d.c., after creating an unelected board, that would then design these districts for states. now, i ask you, why would that be better, why would that be better than the independent redistricting commission in arizona that was approved by the arizona voters? it doesn't make sense to me. it doesn't make sense to my constituents. i can tell you that. i mean, we struggle enough. i mean, we struggle enough with the independent redistricting commission with arizona appointees. imagine if we have no connection to the appointees. i'm also always amazed at people who don't get to arizona, don't
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realize the vastness of that state. it's a unique state. seven million people. five million of them in one county. one metropolitan area. one million in another county. and then another million sprinkled throughout this vast state. that takes local knowledge, it takes local experience, to create those districts. there's no doubt about it. the arizona constitution is filled with the cry tearian on how to redistrict -- cry tear onon how to redistrict in arizona. this would esurp the arizona constitution. h.r. 1 is fraught with many, many problems. i've jft gone through a couple of them for you tonight. i thank my friend from florida for his leadership on this, his fight. i appreciate him sharing time with me tonight. with that, madam speaker, i yield to the gentleman from florida. mr. yoho: thank you, mr. biggs. i appreciate your help. i've got a top 10 list here.
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actually it's turned into a top 11 list of the 10 most egregious provisions of h.r. 1. and i want to remind that you the democrats took over at the beginning of the year. we're $22 trillion in debt. they'll say, well, it's president trump's fault. well, we can say it was president obama's fault. they'll say it was president bush's fault. it can go all the way back to george washington, i expect. but the fact is, it's a bipartisan issue that needs to be dealt with. so the 10 most or 11 -- top 10 or top 11 most egregious provisions of h.r. 1, it creates, again, a 6-1 government-match to any small donor contribution of $200 or less in a congressional or presidential campaign. meaning for every $200, the government will match $1,200. so let's look at the facts. where does that $1,200 come from? you go to work, you get a paycheck at the end of the week, at the end of the week, you
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notice that you don't get paid your gross pay, you get paid your net pay. the rest of the money comes to the government and the government is going to use that money when we're 2ds2 trillion in debt, -- $22 trillion in debt, and give out subsidies to you to support, hopefully, your candidate. this has never happened before in our government. and we're at $22 trillion in debt. it does nothing to solve our national debt. number two on the list. creates a new voucher pilot program, a pilot program, and i got to hand it to the dems, they love programs that give out moneys and grants. this voucher pilot program that grants eligible voters a $25 voucher of hard-earned taxpayer dollars to donate to any campaign of their choosing. the federal government has no need to do this. again, they're taking money fro

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