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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Gun Background Checks  CSPAN  February 27, 2019 5:30pm-6:59pm EST

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c-span.org, or listen with the free c-span radio app. >> c-span's "washington journal," live every day with news and policy issues that impact you. coming up thursday morning, we'll discuss the latest developments in the u.s.-north korea summit between president trump and north korea's kim jong un. join the conversation all morning with your phone calls, facebook comments and tweets. be sure to watch c-span's "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern thursday morning. >> earlier today, the house debated and passed a bill that expands background checks for gun owners. lawmakers return thursday to consider a second gun-related bill. that would expand the time background checks can occur from three days to 20. we'll know somehow you the debate from earlier today. it runs an hour and a half. tim
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the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. chairman, i am pleased that today we are considering h.r. 8. the bipartisan background checks act of 2019. we have promised the american people that congress would take steps to reduce gun violence and this bill is a critical first step toward doing so. during the past four weeks, as the judiciary committee and now the full house have discussed the issue of gun violence, i have cited grim statistics. nearly 40,000 americans lost their lives because of guns in 2017. in fact, every day in america on average 34 people are murdered with a firearm and more than 183 people are injured in an attack. gun violence of this magnitude is a distinctly american problem. a country to country comparison is shocking. for example, in 2011 the united kingdom had 146 deaths due to gun violence. denmark, 71. portugal, 142. and japan, just 30.
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the united states that year, about 35,000. a recent study the -- in the american journal of medicine found that compared to 22 other high-income countries, gun-related murder rate in the united states is 25 times higher. even when you adjust for population differences, americans are disproportionately killed by gun violence. almost 25 years to the day after the brady act was first implemented, expanding current background check requirement to cover virtually all gun transfers is one of the steps we must take to address this crisis. under current law, only licensed firearms dealers are required to conduct a background check before transferring a gun to another person. this means that gun shows, online sales and other private sales can completely evade this vital tool for ensuring that guns do not get into the wrong hands. it is time to close this dangerous loophole. this bill would make it illegal for any person who is not a licensed firearm importer,
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manufacturer, dealer to transfer a firearm to any other person who is not so licensed without a background check. individuals seeking to transfer firearm under this measure would be required to visit a licensed firearms dealer to run the necessary background check before the transfer could be finalized. the bill also provides an exception to this requirement, including gifts to family members and transfers for hunting, target shooting and instances of imminent death or great bodily harm. the f.b.i.'s internal assessment demonstrated that checks process through the national instant criminal background check ystem, often called nci -- nics, are accurate. and 90% of cases the background checks are completed within 90 seconds. h.r. 8 will provide an accurate and speedy mechanism to help ensure firearms do not end up in the wrong hands. there's no reason to continue to make it easy for people who are
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legaly prohibited from possessing firearms to acquire them. by circumventing the background check process. h.r. 8 would close this dangerous loophole and save many, many lives. that is why i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this vital legislation today. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time -- the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. today i rise in strong opposition to h.r. 8. the so-called bipartisan background checks act. this is bad legislation that fails to make anyone safer in any regard. i have been listening here and sitting on the floor for just the last few minutes and listening to those who came up and were happy about this bill coming forward today and they mentioned many acts of mass violence and situations that have happened. the sad part about it is they claim this is the answer and the first step. the actuality is it's at best a side step and may actually be a step backwards. and will not do what is being claimed to do. all this legislation will do is burden law-abiding citizens
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wishing to exercise their second amendment rights, including defending themselves from the gun toting criminals this bill does nothing to combat. h.r. 8 foolishly presumes criminals will submit themselves to background checks. ourmans -- members who support -- are members who support this bill deluthsal enough to think that criminals will give crucial to h.r. 8 and go to the nearest gun store to submit to a background check? that's absurd. and most of us will agree that criminals are not going to do that anyway. my concern is what it does in practice. to those who are not criminals. not only is it foolish to think they'll start following the law, this is foolish to think it's going to in men ways make our country safer. . my friend has called for universal background checks but h.r. 8 would not have stopped a single mass shooting. the strategies do, however, share one thing in common. over and over we see issues of mental health and missed opportunities for authorities to intercede. let me just say, mr. speaker, i
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share the concern, and i will share? just a moment actually real things that could make a difference in helping to stem the tide of mass violence in our country. but doing this we have to understand that this bill does not do that, and what may make you feel good may not heal you, and that has to be understood. look at the recent workplace shooting in illinois where the gunman murdered five people. that could have been prevented but not by h.r. 8. all law enforcement had to do was enforce existing law. the gunman was prohibited from possessing firearms. in january, 2014, he was issued an illinois' firearms owner's identification card. that march, he applied to buy a handgun from a gun dealer. five days later he took possession of the gun having inexplicably passed a ackground check. his felony conviction was flagged. they sent him a letter telling him to relinquish the firearm. not surprisingly, the felon did
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not comply. had authorities seized the firearm between march, 2014, february, 2019, they could have saved five lives. aurora, illinois, is not the only missed opportunity to prevent tradgedeefment we know about missed opportunities in parkland, aurora, sutherland springs, virginia tech, and others. the common problem here, mr. speaker, is clear. it's not a lack of background checks. with h.r. 8, democrats refuse to acknowledge human factors leading to these events but republicans have a bill to help law enforcement coordinate responses to mental health concerns and other mass violent threat information. you know what else h.r. 8 doesn't address? the primary ways criminals acquire firearms. last month, d.o.j. revealed nearly half of criminals obtained firearms via theft or black market. the survey also revealed a more .8% of criminals purchased their firearms at gun shows if this bill won't prevent mass shootings and address violent crime what will it do? it will keep law abiding citizens from protecting
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themselves. under this bill, under this bill, mr. speaker, a battered woman with a protection order against her abuser who borrows a firearm for self-defense would be a criminal. it would criminalize the selling of a firearm without a background check to anyone -- to someone with a valid permit, allowing them to possess, acquire, carry a firearm if that person walked into a gun store, they could present that permit and not undergo a nics check. on the other hand, there are solutions to prevent mass violence and crimes. the n.v.p. act directly challenges law, coordination, response. it would reduce the flow of firearms in the black market and bolster law enforcement ability. if reducing gun violence, mr. speaker, is the democrats, mr. speaker, this act is one we should be considering today, not h.r. 8. talk to me or my staff by co-sponsoring this evidence-based, bipartisan
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legislation. unlike h.r. 8, the m.v.p. act could have prevented tragedies such as parkland. unfortunately, mr. speaker, my democratic colleagues, by putting forward this and continuing the same narrative, are not actually interested in stopping gun violence. i take the intent to be good. i do not question the motive. all of us in our life do not want to see the tragedies unfold. ut this is not the way forward. this is another thing put out to the very ones who have suffered, telling them we're helping them while at the same point not telling them the truth about the bill, a bill that guts its own ability to enforce itself, a bill that actually would keep possibly people from purchasing firearms because of an unlimited price of a background check. the questions that i have about this bill, mr. speaker, is not what actually could happen with this. it's what actually will be hurt by this as we move forward. with that i believe they are
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being misled, the victims of mass violence are being misled by this bill, h.r. 8, because it would not have stopped what they have been promised would stop. with that i am profoundly sorry and i ask my colleagues to reject this and support real solutions and i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. chairman, i now yield two minutes to the gentlelady from california, the chairperson of the crime subcommittee, ms. bass. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for two minutes. ms. bass: thank you. mr. chair, i rise in strong support of h.r. 8, the bipartisan background checks act of 2019, which will extend the current federal background check requirement to unlicensed sellers of guns. it is about time that congress takes this issue seriously and i am pleased that this bipartisan bill has been brought to the house floor with the urgency this issue deserves. in recent years, our nation has experienced an increase in mass
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shootings and our nation is appropriately horrified. however, mass shootings are just one symptom of our gun violence epidemic. the daily toll of shootings occurs in communities across our country, on our streets, in our schools, and even in our houses of worship. as one testified before the judiciary committee earlier this month, one year after the terrible shooting that took the lives of 17 students and staff and injured 17 others at her high school in parkland, florida, minority communities bear the heaviest brunt of gun violence in this country. and the impact of our young people is simply unacceptable. every day, 47 children and teens are shot in this country. eight of these young people die, and 39 are shot and survived. citizens across this country, such as diane latticer, who also testified before the committee, are taking it upon themselves to organize and engage in community-based efforts to reduce gun violence and assist the young people it effects. but we in congress must match
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their courage and commitment with action of our own. i support h.r. 8 because it will reduce gun violence by narrowing the avenues for criminals and others prohibited persons from obtaining guns. certainly there is no single change to our gun laws that will prevent every shooting, but enacting measures that will help prevent some of them is clearly the right thing to do. that is why i support this bill and i ask my colleagues to do the same. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from georgia. collins -- the chair: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: this continues the process for those who will receive guns and many of the daily toll we receive are actually coming from those who are already violating laws currently on the books. it's time we enforce those as well. with that i yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, mr. mcclintock. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. mcclintock: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. chairman, h.r. 8 is brought to us by the same groups and politicians who made no secret of their desire to ultimately strip law-abiding citizens of
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their right to defend themselves. now, they can't do that outright. they know that. so they do it through cynical measures like this, which we've a web of laws so intory indicate that sooner or later everyone can be caught up in them. this law affects not just transfer of ownership but any transfer of weapon for a period of time. so suppose you exchange shotguns with a friend on a hunt and then separate for a period of time or you lone a gun to your ex-- loan a gun to your next door neighbor who has been victimized by a stalker or ive a gun to your stepson or great-grandson, under these scenarios, you're guilty of a federal crime. these flaws were all pointed out to the bill's sponsors and none were addressed. why not? i think the reason should be obvious. last october, a 10-year study by johns hopkins and u.c.-davis concluded that california's universal background check law had no effect on gun homicides
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or suicides. none. the purpose of this bill is not public safety. that's just a deceptive facade. its true purpose is to make gun ownership so legally hazardous, so fraught with legal booby traps and draconian penalties that no law-abiding citizen would want to take the risk of gun ownership. most criminals get their guns illegally and are not constrained by laws like this. this is aimed squarely at law-abiding citizens, moving us closer to a society where decent people are defenseless are not. criminals the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. chairman, i now yield one minute to the gentleman from rhode island, mr. cicilline, a member of the committee. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. cicilline: mr. speaker, we have a gun violence epidemic in this country. for eight years we've marked it
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with moments of silence and doing nothing. today that changes with passage of h.r. 8 for universal background checks. we know universal background checks work because since the passage of the brady bill, 3 1/2 million illegal gun sales were prevented. but, of course, there is a huge loophole. millions and millions of gun sales happen without a background check at all. in fact, one in five, 22% of guns are sold with in background check. that means criminals, domestic abusers, people prohibited due to mental illness, can get a gun. this bill changes that. we also know that states that have enhanced background checks have lower rates of gun homicides, gun suicide rates and gun trafficking. this is a commonsense bill to protect the american people from the scourge of gun violence. finally, after eight years of pleading with our republican colleagues to do something about gun violence in this country, to take up a bill, we had a sit-in to try to voice a vote, finally today we are taking our first step to reduce gun violence in this country by passing h.r. 8.
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i final -- finally we will see members of congress standing up to the power of the gun lobby and doing what's right for the american people. i urge my colleagues to vote yes. and with that i yield back. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. i would remind the speaker that we did pass fix nics last year. we did take account into those. those things have been done. we are not moving a bill we don't feel works and we have offered an alternative. with that i yield two minutes to the gentleman from arizona, mr. biggs. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. biggs: without an unconstitutional federal gun registry this bill is impossible to enforce. there is no gun show loophole. federal law is the same regardless of where a firearm sale takes place. federal law requires all firearms dealers to be licensed and to initiate a background check before transferring to a firearm to nondealer.
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regardless where that transfer takes place. as nor nondealers, federal law prohibits a gun transfer to anyone that is not prohibited to possess a firearm. criminals in state prison for firearm crimes get their firearms from nondealers at gun shows. only 6%. online sales loophole, there is no online sales loophole. the federal law is the same regardless how people communicate about selling or buying a firearm. federal law prohibits anyone licensed firearm dealer or not from shipping a firearm to a person who lives in another state unless the seaver is also a dealer -- seaver is also a dealer. h.r. 8 fails to include any realistic exception to the new background check requirements for transfers such as transfers between law enforcement officers outside of their duties, transfer to conceal carry permit holders, transfers
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to museums or licensed collectors, transfers to active duty military and many more. h.r. 8 includes an exception to the background check transfer if the transfer is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm. but that transfer is only allow for the length of time it's necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm but it doesn't even define those terms. what about a false alarm? does it extend to domestic violence fears that the person is not getting attacked immediately? gun rights groups have argued without a definition this provision would only provide protection in this instance where it's likely too late for the victim to make it out safely. finally, h.r. 8 would not have prevented any of the recent high-profile shootings. in those cases, they have passed a background check or stole the firearms they used. my time has expired. thank you. the chair: the gentleman from georgia reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. chairman, i now yield two minutes to the
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distinguished gentleman from california, the chief author of this legislation, chairman of the gun violence prevention task force, mr. thompson. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. thompson: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of my bill, h.r. 8, the bipartisan background checks act of 2019. first, i'd like to thank speaker pelosi and chairman nadler for their support. gun violence is a true national emergency, and i'm glad we are moving so early in this congress to address this crisis. i'd also like to thank my colleagues on the other side of the aisle who recognize the importance of passing this legislation. representatives king, fitzpatrick, mass, upton and smith who stand with over 90% of americans who support universal background checks. this bill will require a background check on all firearm sales and most transfers.
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mr. speaker, i'm a lifelong gun owner. i'm a hunter. i support the second amendment. if this bill did anything to erode the rights of lawful gun owners, i wouldn't support it and it wouldn't have my name on it. background checks work. every day they stop 170 felons and 50 domestic abusers from getting a gun from a licensed dealer. but in some states, those same people can go into a gun show or go online and buy a gun without a background check. this bill will stop them from doing so. some argue the criminals won't follow the law. if that's the case, then why do we have laws against murder? people still commit murder. why do we have laws against stealing? people still steal. this is flawed logic. and don't fall for it. this bill is supported by law enforcement, medical professionals, veterans, gun
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owners, religious leaders, and the millions of americans who took to the streets in support of h.r. 8. i ask that my colleagues support this bill and honor the lives lost with action. no more moments of silence with no action to follow. today your thoughts and your prayers aren't enough. today you can vote yes. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. -- the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield five minutes to the gentleman from colorado, mr. buck. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. buck: i thank the gentleman from georgia for yielding to me. and, mr. chairman, i rise to oppose h.r. 8. a bill that criminalizes gun transfers between law-abide -- law-abiding citizens who have no criminal record and no criminal intent. the bill includes several flawed and unworkable exceptions.
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take the law enforcement exception. it allows the police to transfer a firearm but criminalizes transfers to law enforcement. under this bill, a parent whose child find as gun in a park commits a federal crime if the parent surrenders the gun to police. under this bill, a citizen commits a federal crime if they participate in a local gun buyback program. under this bill, an attorney commits a federal crime when they turn a client's gun over to the police to clear the client through ballistics testing. will criminalizing cooperation with law enforcement make us safer? the majority apparently think so and i think it's crazy. the democrats' bill gives special privileges to the bodyguards of the wealthy elite, like former mayor bloomberg, who is funding the special interest advocacy for this bill. he can afford to hire bodyguards. but average americans who rely on the second amendment as their
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source of personal protection are not given similar protections. nothing should be more offensive to this body than a bill that denies citizens their endowed rights while giving wealthy elites special protections, privileges, dispensations. but that's h.r. 8. take the family exception. the rule allows a vote on an amendment to ensure that transfers between parent and child include step-parents and step-children. what about transfers between a foster parent and foster child? this bill says forest relationships are not worthy of the same -- foster relationships are not worthy of the same respect and equal treatment. each member of this body should be ashamed to vote for this bill that reflects such terrible policy and discrimination. take the good samaritan exception. allowing transfers where a threat of death or harm is imminent. imminent means death is menacingly near. a standard so strict that it's frankly too late to transfer a
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gun once it's obvious a gun is needed for protection. under this standard, it is illegal to loan a gun to a victim of domestic violence for her protection until the transfer is practically witnessing a murder in progress. this standard would also prevent a gun owner who has intermittent suicidal thoughts, a known side effect of certain prescription medications, from legally transferring a gun, his own gun, to a friend for safe keeping. because this bill criminalizes transfers between law-abiding americans, while doing nothing to curb criminals' access to guns, this bill provides the american public with a false sense of security. because this bill includes unworkable exceptions that will mislead people into thinking a gun transfer is legal when it is not, this bill provides law-abiding gun owners with a false sense of immunity. mr. chairman, i urge a no vote on this totally and completely
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unconstitutional legislation that would deprive people of their constitutional rights to keep and bear arms. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentlelady from georgia, a member of the committee, mrs. mcbath. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mrs. mcbath: thank you, chairman nadler, and thank you, mr. speaker. today marks a very pick of toll moment in our fight to prevent gun violence and to ensure the safety of every community across our nation. thank you to the more than 230 of our colleagues who have co-sponsored h.r. 8, the bipartisan background checks act of 2019. thank you to you, mr. chairman, chairman nadler, speaker pelosi, and congressman thompson and congressman king, thank you so much for making gun violence prevention a priority in this
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congress. i am so proud to be an original co-sponsor of this historic legislation. as many of you may know, gun violence is an issue that is deeply personal for me. gun violence prevention and a desire to make meaningful change is the very reason i am here today. in this legislative body, speaking to every one of you. in 2012, my son, jordan davis, was shot and killed by a man who opened fire on a car of unarmed teenagers at a gas station in jacksonville, florida, and my son was only 17 years of age. jordan would have turned 24 this month. after my son's death, i dedicated my entire life to advocating for commonsense gun safety solutions, but it was the shooting at marjory stoneman douglas high school in parkland, florida, last year that finally motivated me to join this
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legislative body. the overwhelming bipartisan support for universal background checks symbolizes the power of advocacy and the incredible power of the survivors, family members and students who have shared their stories as they advocate for commonsense gun safety solutions and demand that we act to address gun violence. today we are truly taking this action. h.r. 8 will ensure that mothers and fathers have one less reason to worry. it will give students one less thing to fear when they walk into a school. most importantly, it will make our communities and our nation a safer place to live and every human being in america deserves such. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on h.r. 8, the bipartisan background checks act of 2019. it is time. and i yield back my time.
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thank you. the chair: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from new york reserves. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield 2 1/2 noins the gentleman from florida. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. steube: thank you, mr. speaker. today i rise in opposition to h.r. 8. this legislation claims to be a solution to gun violence, yet does nothing to actually solve the real problems that contribute to this crisis. as it stands now, this legislation does nothing to make our schools, churches or communities safer. in fact, it only infringes on the constitutionally guaranteed second amendment rights of law-abiding citizens. something i cannot support. this bill will criminalize the private transfer of firearms and make exercising basic constitutional rights impossibleably expensive for millions of law-abiding americans. not to mention it is essentially unenforceable without a national gun registry. but let's be honest, that's where my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to end up. registering firearms so they can take them away. we must stop our nation from falling down this slippery slope. we agree that something must be
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done, but h.r. 8 is not the answer. this legislation would have done nothing to prevent many of the prominent tragedies that occurred in my home state of florida. the shooter at stoneman douglas high school in parkland passed a background check. the shooter at pulse night club in orlando passed a background check. and just weeks ago a man who murdered five women in my district passed a background check. h.r. 8 would have done nothing to stop these violent acts, just like the previous attempts to require universal background checks have done nothing to prevent actual crimes. if democrats were serious about gun violence, they would have voted for my amendment. i filed an amendment in committee that would have required law enforcement to be notified upon the attempt of someone to purchase a firearm and failed a background check. law enforcement would be notified. but instead of supporting policies that curtail illegal possession of firearms, the democrats on both the judiciary and rules committee rejected my proposal. how is that unreasonable? i stand for the constitution, i stand for freedom, and i stand for the second amendment. and that's why i'm not voting for this proposal.
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thank you, mr. speaker. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i will point out that the bill says nothing in this act shall be construed to authorize the establishment directly or indirectly of a national firearms registry. i now yield one minute to the distinguished speaker of the house, the gentlelady from california. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for a minute. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i thank him for his leadership as chair of the judiciary committee, for bringing us to this place promptly. a historic day in the congress of the united states. i thank you, mr. chairman. i thank our distinguished colleague from california, mr. mike thompson, for his relentless persistent leadership to make america safer by bringing forth commonsense background check legislation. he is a gun owner, a veteran, he's been on both sides of the gun. he is a hunter, he is an advocate for the second
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amendment, and as he said, this -- if this did anything to diminish that, he would not have his name on it. i rise in support of this strong bipartisan bill. mr. thompson, and join you in commending mr. king of new york for making this initiative bipartisan from the start. in the previous congress and now. and it is a long overdue, commonsense action to end the epidemic of gun violence in america. let us salute again the persistent leadership of so many in this body and, again, mr. thompson, as chair of the gun violence prevention task force, you worked in a bipartisan way to protect our communities and we're grateful to you for that. but you know, we can do all the inside maneuvering that we want and that is really important and essential. but without the outside mobilization, we cannot enjoy the success of saving lives and making progress. so i want to thank the courageous advocates who are here today in the gallery.
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including march for our lives and moms demand action, and so many more. they have made a complete difference. as president lincoln says, public sentiment is everything, with it you can accomplish almost anything. without it, almost nothing. and thank you for being public sentiment to a point where now about 90% of the american people support commonsense background checks legislation. including many members, courageously, of the national rifle association. this bill is proudly bipartisan because gun violence prevention should not be a democratic or a republican issue. gun violence does not discriminate by party or politics. it reaches into all of our communities, into our schools, our places of worship, our workplaces and our streets and it will require all of our ourage to defeat it.
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last night we were at the occasion to mark the anniversary of the brady bill. many of us, some of us were in congress at the time. many of us admired the work, the courageous work of sara and jim brady to make the country a safer place by reducing gun violence. 25 years ago we enacted the brady background check system, which has denied more than three million sales to potentially dangerous individuals. yet the brady bill does not stop people from purchasing guns from unlicensed sellers without a background check at gun shows and online. we must pass h.r. 8 to close this dangerous loophole and keep our communities safe from gun violence. that's what we are intending to do today. george shaw said, it's a mark of a truly intelligent person to be moved by statistics. and here are the facts.
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nearly 40,000 lives are cut short every year from gun violence. an average of 47 children and teenagers are killed by guns every single day. it's all about the children, the children, the children. we read about the tragic mass murders that have happened in our country. but we also have -- and they stir us to action, hopefully. here it's been they stir us to a moment of silence. .nd now finally to action day,t is -- it's the every every day 47 children and teenagers killed by guns. and again, another figure, harkening back to 90% of the american people want commonsense universal background checks. the statistics spell out the story, but it is the human personal stories that change
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minds. ow moving it was to hear our colleague, congresswoman mcbath, with her generosity of spirit, tell her personal story of losing her son, jordan, can't even imagine carrying that burden. but turning her grief and her tragedy into action and courage, to run for congress, to stand on this floor and share her personal story with us. that takes real courage. . there is no person in this body whose political survival is more important than the survival of our children. we're grateful, again, it young people, parents, survivors across america who have told their stories.
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marched for their lives, and demanded change. this bill delivers that change ensuring that people who are in danger to themselves and others cannot purchase a gun and perpetuate violence in our communities. this week the house will build on this progress by passing another bipartisan background check bill. we must close the charleston loophole that enabled the hate ime at the african methodist piscopal church. that's another part of strengthening the background check. as members of congress again we take an oath to protect and defend the constitution, the american people. to honor that oath torques honor the victims of gun violence and their families, the congress must take real action on this.
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today we must pass this bill and take the first steps towards ending the senseless crisis of gun violence in our nation. again, i hope that all of us will have the courage to save lives remembering no one's political survival here is more important than the survival of the american people, especially our children. i urge a strong bipartisan yes vote and pray that we can can do the right thing and send a clear message to the families of those who have lost their loved ones to gun violence that we have crossed a threshold here today to reduce gun violence in our country and take more steps to improve the safety of the american people. honoring the constitution of the united states, respectful of our hunters and the need for people to defend themselves, but in
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doing so in a way that does not endanger others. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady yields back. members are reminded to avoid referencing occupants of the gallery. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. i agree, i believe facts are are important and strength to tell that. i believe as the chairman just redid that he explained why this bill will not operate because of the very fact that inside the bill itself it does not have a registry, which i will remind the speaker, that the department of justice under president obama said a universal back fwround check bill would not work without a registry and is along the websites of many advocates for this bill. that is one of the areas we look at as we go forward in realizing this is already gutted itself. with that i yield three minutes to the gentleman from virginia, mr. kline. the chair: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for three minutes. mr. kline: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the previous speaker, the speaker of the house, for her remarks,
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reminding us all it is california where michael bloomberg and the gun control advocates have established their utopia of a land without guns. what has it led us to? with the strictest -- some of the strictest gun control laws in the land, we have some of the worst incidents of gun violence in the country. gun control measures do not address the problems of gun violence and this bill will not address gun violence. i rise in strong opposition to h.r. , the legislation is an attempt to h.r. 8, the legislation is an attempt to take away our second amendment rights. my colleagues on the other side of the aisle claim the bill will save lives but nothing in this bill would have stopped any of the recent mass casualty shootings that have occurred in our country. the only thing this bill does is limit the second amendment rights of law-abiding citizens. they'll tell you this bill closes loopholes, however the loophole they believe exists is private gun ownership. and what they really want is to
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regulate the private transfers of firearms. if my neighbor's in trouble and needs to borrow a firearm to protect his family, i should be allowed to loan that firearm to my neighbor. this is not something we should need to go to the federal government to get permission to do. the second amendment does not say that after you get permission from the government your right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. our founding fathers wrote the constitution to protect us from the government and gave individuals the second amendment to protect themselves. i carry this constitution every day on the campaign trail last fall, i carry it with me every day now to remind myself of those protection that is were given to us not by government but by god. this bill's nothing more than an attempt to advance the agenda of radical gun grabbers and lay the foundation for a national gun registration scheme. i urge the house to reject this misguided legislation so we can
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begin having real discussions about ways to reduce crime across this great nation. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. engel: i now yield one minute to the distinguished gentlelady from texas, a member of the committee, mr. garcia. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. miss gar he see ya: i thank the chairman for yielding -- ms. garcia: i thank the chairman for yielding and rise today to express my strong support for this bill, the bipartisan background checks act. since the brady law was enacted in 1994, many american lives have been saved, murders have fallen by at least 32% and our community streets are safer and stronger as a result. but our work is not done. in houston alone we see an average of 550 acts of gun violence per year. too many of our loved ones are lost to senseless gun violence that could be prevented by
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keeping firearms out of dangerous hands. we know expanded background checks work. states require background checks on all handgun sales to be half as many mass shootings as states without the expanded requirements. that is why i'm a proud sponsor -- co-sponsor of h.r. 8. this commonsense bill will prevent private firearm sales to prohibit purchasers and close online and gun show loopholes. while this bill does not cover everything, it is a step in the right direction that will make my district, houston, texas, and this country safer. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: mr. speaker, may i request time for both sides. the chair: the gentleman from eorgia has 11 1/2 minutes. the gentleman from new york has 15 3/4 minutes.
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16, sorry. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i will yield three minutes to the gentleman from minnesota. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. >> thank you, mr. speaker. my name is pete stauber and i was a law enforcement officer for 23 years in the great state of minnesota, city of delute. in december of 1995 at 10:3 p.m. at the intersection of sixth avenue east and fourth street a criminal who should not have had a firearm tried to take my life. i was shot in the head and by the grace of god i survived. a few years after that while on duty in a hostage situation, another criminal pulled a gun on me. face-to-face i was staring down a barrel of a handgun. the suspect pulled the trigger, the gun malfunctioned, and i was in a fight for my life. when it was all over, by the grace of god i was alive.
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the individual's handcuffed. both those individuals were career criminals. back to what i was shot in the head, mr. speaker, i begged the u.s. attorney along with our police department to charge the individual with the felony -- possession of a handgun. by a felon. they didn't do it. that individual was allowed to circumvent our community for another eight years before he was finally put in prison where he belonged. o more harming other people. representative collins' mass violent prevention act gets the countities attorneys and federal attorneys present to prosecute these individuals that have no respect for life. i carried a handgun for 23 years, mr. speaker, as a tool to
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defend myself or somebody else's life from great bodily harm. i support the individual right of law-abiding citizens the right to keep and bear arms. both my wife and i live in rural minnesota. when we need to protect ourselves, when it takes a while for law enforcement to get there, we have the ability. there is nobody i know that wants somebody that is going through a mental health issue or a career criminal or drug dealer to have these. we need to start respecting life . life is precious. from conception to natural death . i am a very proud husband of an iraq war veteran. who understands the value of life. mr. speaker, i rise against this. there are better ways to get mothers and fathers, county
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attorneys, federal prosecutors, local police departments, sheriff's departments to work together to have a fusion center so when a young individual types into the computer i want to be a mass school shooter, there is an instant response. to identify the individual and work through it. i yield the rest of my time. thank you, mr. speaker. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield 1 1/2 minutes to the distinguished gentleman from florida, member of the committee, mr. deutch. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for 1 1/2 minutes. mr. deutch: mr. speaker, we introduced h.r. 8 eight years ago after our friend and former colleague gabby giffords was shot and nearly killed . when she was by our side to introduce the bill, she said speaking is still difficult for me, but i don't think i can make myself more clear. congress must act to make our country safer from gun violence.
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now is that time. we have waited too long to close loopholes that let people easily avoid background checks through private sales. i cried with too many survivors and attended too many funerals. i marched with too many student activists and bowed my head through too many moments of silence. we know strong gun laws work. in the 25 years since the brady law took effect, background checks have stopped more than three million gun sales and saved countless lives. it's time to expand the brady law, time to close the dangerous loopholes. it's past time for congress to take action to save lives from gun violence. mr. speaker, this is not a moment of silence. this is not a sit-in. this is action by the united states house of representatives on behalf of everyone who has pleaded for that action after san bernardino and after southern springs and foothood and is recognized and columbine
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and sandy hook and pulse and everyday gun violence in our communities. and, yes, after parkland. let's represent the 95% of the american people who want us to take this action to help save lives. let's pass h.r. 8. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. before i deal with the gentleman's comments. it is quoted here 95% of the people want universal background checks. when actually put to the voters of maine, the voters of maine rejected it. i understand where they are coming from. on that, with that i yield two minutes to the gentleman from nebraska, mr. smith. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. smith: i rise today to defend the second amendment rights of law-abiding nebraskans. in nebraska the need for firearms is the same today as it was even when the second amendment was enacted before we were even a territory of the united states. rural nebraskans depend on their
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firearms for self-defense and protecting their livestock. they also know how to handle firearms to store them securely, to handle them appropriately, and perhaps to even let neighbors who are able to use them safely borrow them to meet their needs. i have serious concerns the bills we're considering today and tomorrow are going to criminalize this behavior for nebraskans who have done this for generations and won't even know they are breaking the law. should ranch who are lends a rifle to neighbor to address threats from predatory animals face a year in prison and a $100,000 fine? no. should a legally caring farmer injured at work be subject to arrest for handling -- handing his firme arm off before being taken to the hospital? no. these are exactly the situations this bill would create while doing little to address the real problems underlying crime in our society. this is a bad bill and i urge its swift rejection. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i i now
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yield two minutes to the gentlelady from texas, ms. jackson lee. the chair: the gentlelady from texas is recognized for two minutes. i thank the e: chairman and i certainly thank the ranking member for being present here today. . i hold up in my hand pages and pages of mass shootings. thank you to all of those who have offered themselves in this fight. thank you to our chair, mr. thompson, for constant and persistent work, through my tenure as ranking member of the crime subcommittee, it has given me a picture that many have not seen. and that is that we have been fighting for gun safety legislation for almost three decades. it seems that even though mr. cohen is in a hearing right now where facts are being disputed,
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there are no facts to dispute, the fact that people die from the hands of guns. and those who get guns are never regulated. and by no means do i want you not to have a handgun to protect yourself or to enforce gun trafficking laws or to make sure that prosecutors prosecute those for gun possession. but it begs the question, what is the question? the interpretation of the second amendment is no one should prohibit the right to bear arms, and as i stand here today, there is nothing in the underlying bill that is prohibiting that. it is simply giving common sense and dignity to those who died at columbine high school shooting, atlanta shooting, wedgewood baptist church, the lockheed martin shooting, living church of god shooting, northern illinois shooting, santa fe shooting in texas, marjory stoneman douglas high school shooting. it says that you have to have a check, a background check. it closes the gun show loophole. it gives exemptions in the
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issues of domestic violence and sexual assault it. allows families to transfer -- assault. it allows families to transfer, ranchers, farmers to transfer. what more do we want? people have died. are we not going to show that we are committed to saving lives, not to abuse the second amendment, to misuse it, we can bear arms. but the question is, whether or not we will recognize that there are 350 million-plus americans and there are more guns in this country than there are citizens. i beg of my colleagues, stop the mockery. vote for this bill. i yield back. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield two minutes to the gentleman from alabama, mr. byrne. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. byrne: mr. speaker, i rise in strong opposition to this bill. let's be very clear on this. h.r. 8 will not prevent criminals from getting their hands on firearms. what h.r. 8 will do is violate
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the constitutional rights of millions of americans. under this bill, almost every time a lawful gun owner wants to transfer or sell a gun, he or she will have to go through a government-sanctioned intermediary. under this bill, no longer could i let my cousin or my neighbor borrow my gun. if this bill becomes law, overnight millions of law-abiding gun owners could suddenly be subject to federal prosecution. of course we all know that criminals are going to do what they already do. make illegal transfers of firearms. we've heard a lot about how this is going to be the most open congress in history. well, mr. speaker, i filed an amendment that would strip out the text of h.r. 8 and replace it with a nationwide concealed carry reciprocity. mr. speaker, the democratic leadership blocked a vote on my amendment. what are they so afraid of? i guess they think they can shield their members from votes to protect the amendment -- protect the second amendment and protect law-abiding gun owners.
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i have news for the majority. the gun owners of america are watching this debate. they know what h.r. 8 is all about. and they know that this is just a sham to chip away at the second amendment and our constitution. i will oppose this bill and any bill that goes against the second amendment rights of law-abiding americans. i urge my colleagues to join me in voting no and fighting against this assault on the second amendment. and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentleman from georgia, mr. lewis. the chair: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes. mr. lewis: mr. speaker, i want to thank my friend, the chairman, for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of this bipartisan bill. tlanta, chicago, pittsburgh,
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charleston, oak creek, orlando, las vegas and many other places. how many more must suffer? how many more must die? for years the people spoke up, mothers called, fathers cried, students marched. but congress offered a blind eye. today we say to those who begged, pleaded for us to act, that we see you. we feel your pain. we heard your cries. and we are going to answer today, now. we sat in on this floor. i want to thank the chair of our task force, mike thompson, for never giving up, for never
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giving in. for keeping the faith. for keeping your eyes on the prize. we are doing the right thing today. we have a mission, we have an obligation, and a mandate to pass this bipartisan bill that must become public law. today i urge all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to vote yes. it is good. it is the right thing to do to save lives and stop this madness. and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: i'm going to reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from georgia, mr. johnson. the chair: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for one minute. mr. johnson: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.r.
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8. i want to commend the efforts of congressman mike thompson from california for introducing this commonsense legislation. what it simply does is require that all sales of firearms go through a licensed firearms dealer who has to run a background check. current law mandates that all licensed gun dealers before transferring a weapon have to perform a background check. the problem we have in this country is the law so allows unlicensed firearm dealers competing with licensed firearms dealers to sell just as many firearms as a licensed gun dealer, but without doing the background check. that enables criminals and people who should not have weapons to have firearms and that contributes to the proliferation of weaponry on our street in the hands of those who
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should not have it. it produces violence and we're looking to stop the violence with this legislation. and so i ask my colleagues to support it and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia reserves. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield one minute to the gentleman from california, mr. swalwell. the chair: the gentleman from california is recognized for one minute. mr. speaker, today we tell our fellow americans that their children's right to learn without fear, that their own right to dance at a concert, worship at a synagogue, shop at the mall, that all of those ights to come home and to live and love are greater than any other right in the constitution. this bill puts in place an expansion of violent history
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checks on firearm purchases where there were too many gaps before. it will not end every gun violence death in america. but we should try. it also will get rid of this argument that, in states like california and illinois, where you have gun violence, you can no longer say, well, they have tough background checks there, it's not working, well, no, we are only as safe as the loft common denominator. and -- lowest common denominators. and if our states have lower restrictions when it comes to purchasing a firearm, we are only as safe as they are. we will have a nationwide background check that will make sure all of us are safe. we are here, mr. speaker, because of mr. thompson, because of every town and march for our life. keep marching. you got to us this point. i yield back. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from georgia continues to reserve. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, how much time do i have left, please? the chair: the gentleman has 9
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1/4 minutes. mr. nadler: and the gentleman from georgia? the chair: 5 3/4 minutes. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from maryland, mr. brown. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. antonio brown mr. speaker, i rise in support of h.r. 8. this bill is long overdue. for too long congress has failed to end the cycle of gun violence and death that too many families are now familiar with. mr. brown: in 2017 alone, 40,000 people died from gun violence. congress did nothing. last year five reporters at the capital gazette in my district were murdered in cold blod in a mass shooting -- blood in a mass shooting that took place in their news room. congress did nothing. gun violence is a crisis in our communities, a real national emergency that will no long beer -- longer be met with inaction. for the first time since
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congress passed the brady act of 1994, we'll pass a bill in pursuit of our effort to protect our communities and end the scourge of gun violence. the american people overwhelmingly want us to act. and for the people, we will pass universal background checks out of the house as our first piece of comprehensive gun safety reform. mr. speaker, today is only the beginning. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. collins: continue to reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield two minutes to the distinguished gentlelady from pennsylvania, a member of the committee, ms. dean. the chair: the gentlelady from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. ms. dean: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm delighted that we are finally at this day.
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because you know the tide, you know the toll that takes place every day. on average, every day in merica, 342 people are shot, murdered, assaults, suicides or suicide attempts. that means every single day, yesterday, tomorrow, and the next day, and the next day, 100 people on average will die of gun violence, and another 200 or more will literally be wounded, shot, in the crossfire. we know that in 2017 more than 39,000, nearly 40,000 people died of gun violence. all kinds of gun violence. that was an extraordinary uptick in gun violence. i carry with me today the pictures of ben wheeler whose courageous mother testified before the pennsylvania house of representatives in 2014. i carry with me today the son of my dear friend, marge, who died
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of gun violence by suicide. ron. and i carry with me, not by picture, but in my heart, the 16-year-old son of my former student at la salle university who was shot in random gun violence on the city of -- in the city of philadelphia. mr. speaker, i rise in strong support of h.r. 8. and in conclusion, mr. speaker, mr. chairman, i long for the day when orange ribbons are objects sleet -- obsolete and when orange scarfs are fashion statement, not a statement -- scarfs are a fashion -- scarves are a fashion statement, not a sfamente for a cry -- statement for a cry for help. the chair: the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i now yield 1 1/2 minutes to the distinguished the gentlelady from pennsylvania, also a member of the committee, ms. scanlon. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized for 1 1/2 minutes. ms. scanlon: mr. speaker, just two weeks ago in my district,
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six lives, six families were forever changed by gun violence in a six-day period. four people were killed and two were injured in six different shootings. one person was 28. the other five were 16, 17 and 18 year olds. they were teenagers. my heart goes out to all those victims' families. but thoughts and prayers are no longer enough. it is long past time that our actions speak louder than our words. no matter which state we're from, with over 40,000 gun violence deaths last year, every state has been severely impacted by gun violence. the public health crisis has been politicized and weaponized as a means to divide us, despite the fact that it's a crisis that should bind us together. and we must come together. background checks are the foundation of commonsense gun
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policy, and they're supported by the overwhelming majority of americans. our current system fails us in two ways that the bills we're looking at this week are designed to address. under current law, firearms sales can proceed regardless of if a background check comes back within a three-day period, and it doesn't capture all the sales. so this puts an incredible burden on law enforcement, an incredible burden on a.t.f. agents who have to go reclaim guns that are sold despite the owner of the gun not being able to pass the background check, so for too long those in a position to act have failed to do so. but that ends now. i strongly support the commonsense gun legislation in h.r. 8 and h.r. 1112. thank you. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. again agree with the sentiment that we need to actually fashion something that will work.
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unfortunately this for many reasons we've already stated will no. and with that i reserve. . the chair: the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler clorp i now yield -- mr. nadler: i now yield one minute to the distinguished minority leader, mr. hoyer. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. thank the gentleman for yielding. my friend, the gentleman from georgia, just rose and said this on't work. we have risen on this floor time after time after time, after time and had a moment of silence. .ollowed by no action i will tell my friend from
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i want to tell my friend from georgia, as i said time after time we have had a moment of silence. i will tell my friend from georgia it hasn't worked. it has been appropriate, but it has not worked. can can can we guarantee that this will work to make every person safe? it cannot. it will not. but i rise in strong support of doing something. and in this case doing something hat 90% of america supports. mr. chairman, this house is finally going to do its job and take action not just a moment of silence but action to address
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the epidemic of gun violence in our country. after the tragedies at sandy ook, orlando, las vegas, charleston, tree of life synagogue, great mills high the housemy district, under the previous leadership did nothing. it didn't work. after the shooting just down the street at the washington navy yard, the republican controlled house did nothing. three of the victims of that attack were constituents of mine. living in southern maryland. dr. wendy edmundses and wanda wallace are in the gallery, mr. chairman. sister of sylvia frazier, a navy yard shooting victim. montana geimer, daughter ever
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wendy winters, a writer for the capital gazette, which my colleague, mr. brown, just spoke, and mackenzie, a high school student that organized march for our lives rally in anne arundel county. they are here with us today. not to have a moment of silence but to have a moment of action. many of our districts have been painfully affected by gun violence. in saint mary's county, maryland, a student was killed by a shooter at great mills high school and courageous school resource officer there saved countless other lives. in annapolis, five staff of the capital gazette were gunned down in their newsroom. for years the american people have demanded action to address gun violence. after the parkland shooting, just over a year ago, students
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marched in cities from coast-to-coast to demand that congress protect them in the classroom. in the streets, in houses of worship, and in all public gathering places. i, as i'm sure many of you had, had the opportunity to meet with many of the students who participated in the march for our lives and heard the determination in their voices as they spoke about working to achieve a future where students would no longer have to practice active shooter drills. in their schools. i i found their courage and persistence deeply inspiring. now with a change in the majority control, we're bringing to the floor legislation supported by, as i said, nine , including aricans
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majority of responsible gun owners, to expand criminal background checks. haveke sure that those who a criminal past a. past of violence, domestic or otherwise, a -- past of violence, domestic or otherwise, on the no-fly list as they are perceived as possibly a terrorist that they won't be able to buy a gun. does that mean they will not get a gun? it does not. i understand that. as i told my friend from georgia, the moment of silence have not worked. they were appropriate, understand, but they didn't work. we will also be voting this week on legislation offered by our whip, mr. clyburn, to close the loophole that contributed to the horrific mass shooting at mother emanuel a.m.e. church in charleston in 2015.
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mr. chairman, i urge the senate to follow the house and pass the legislation we advance and i call on the president to sign it without delay. mr. chairman, ladies and us lemen of this house, let not have a moment of silence for this legislation. do not let it die. do not let the hope that it provides die. do not let us stand by one more ime and to lament a death of a constituent, a friend, a ighbor, a fellow citizen who dies at the hand of a gun purchased illegally. or by someone who should not have a gun.
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this is not about taking away guns. it's about preventing guns getting in the hands of people who do bad things. -- and we can predict can predict they are a danger to others. let us not have a moment of silence for this bill. let us pass it. let the senate pass it. let the president sign it. let's make an effort at least to stop the carnage. and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. i appreciate it. i appreciate the words of the majority leader. however will i say that in previous congress, this congress did pass fix nics and the stop school violence act and other reasons is probably why the majority leader voted against those bills which they were included. i do agree with him the moment of silence may not have stopped but it did call upon a higher
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power we're fragile human beings involved in tragedies. i remind the folks that this bill will also not do what as many times been promoted for 20 do because many of these mass violence episodes would not have affected by this bill. with that i yield three minutes to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. scalise. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. scalise: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise in strong opposition to these gun control bills that are being brought forward. they are brought forward under the guise of background checks. let's look at what these bills would actually do. we had identified many number of problems with this bill that we were trying to improve and every one of those was shut out, shut out by the democrat majority who wanted to try to stifle the opposing side's debate because they think just saying background checks makes this a good bill. let's talk about what this bill will do to make criminals,
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felons, out of law-abiding citizens. if you loan your gun to a friend under this bill, maybe they are thinking of buying a similar gun to o protect themselves, and they want to go to the shooting range to see if this gun is the right kind of gun to protect themselves, which they have a right to do under the second amendment of this constitution, loaning your gun to that friend and that act would make you you a felon subject to a year in jail. subject to a $100,000 fine. mr. chairman. we tried to fix that. they shut that amendment out. in this bill if you loan your gun to a friend and maybe she's been a victim of domestic violence, and one of my colleagues who is here in opposition to this bill is one of those victims of domestic violence, she had an amendment to fix this bill. to say if she's got a temporary restraining order against her boyfriend who has been beating her, she's afraid he's going to come back tonight, under one of the bills if she goes to buy a
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gun tonight, and the fix nics system isn't working, she might have to wait 20 business days to get that gun. now, good luck if the boyfriend shows up to beat her up that night and she says don't worry, i'm on day eight, i only have another 12 days before i can buy the gun, will you come back so i can defend myself then. do you think that's going to happen? you know what that means to her. so in the bill we said what if you can can loan your gun to her. she goes to you, she goes to a friend, says i know you have a gun, don't have a gun, i'm trying to protect myself because i have a t.r.o. but i know he's going to come back. under this bill you will be a felon. a year in jail. $100,000 fine. we tried to fix that, too, mr. chairman. and they shut that amendment out. that's what this bill does. and oh, by the way, we're talking about law-abiding citizens here. if you go hunting with a buddy and you try to loan your gun to a buddy, they say there is an exemption in the bill, but it's written so vaguely that you not
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only need to bring your hunting partner, you might need to bring your attorney to find out if loaning your shotgun to your friend makes you a felon under this bill. these are law-abiding citizens. these are people who use guns to defend themselves, which is the basis of the second amendment. our founding fathers believed every american has a right to defend themselves because every day on average in this country guns are used by good people to defend themselves against bad people. and it's going to make it harder for them to get access to these guns. to defend themselves. so again we tried to fix some of these problems. let me tell but another problem we tried to identify and fix. if you loan your gun, you will be a felons. - they- the chair: the gentleman is recognized for additional 30 seconds. mr. scalise: we identified areas where law-abiding citizens can become felons. we tried to fix t they wanted that to stay in place. so what is that motivation?
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then we identified another problem. someone who is in this country illegal goes to buy a gun and the system flags them. and it says wait a minute, this person's not even here legally, they are breaking federal law trying to buy a gun, we said we should notify i.c.e. so at least our border patrol agents in the interior can deport them. they blocked that amendment. so now law-abiding citizen can become a felon under their bill, but someone who is here illegally trying to buy a gun in violation of law can't be turned over to authorities. this is a bad gun control bill. we ought to reject it. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i just want to point out the penalty in this bill that keeps being cited is $100,000 is in fact $1,000. i reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i would request of the chairman does he have any
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ore speakers at this time? one more? 'll reserve. the chair: the chair would remind all persons in the gallery they are here as guests of the house and that any manifestation of approval or disapproval of proceedings is in violation of the rules of the house. and members reminded to avoid referencing occupants of the gallery. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the distinguished author of the bill, the gentleman from california, mr. thompson. mr. thompson: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i was asked to talk about some of the outrageous allegations that were made about this bill. the chairman already cleared one up and that's the $100,000 fine that we're hearing from the other side.
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it's $1,000. as was pointed out. we also heard that this isn't constitutional. well, the constitution is pretty clear, individuals have a right to bear arms. nobody's disputing that. as a matter of fact it was settled in the heller vs. the district of columbia, but also in that opinion was justice scalia's remarks that stated that government also has a responsibility and right to regulate firearms. that's all we're doing. we're saying that people who were felons, domestic abusers, dangerously mentally ill, danger to themselves or others shouldn't be able to have guns. i don't think anybody can dispute that. and how do you find out if you don't do a background check? my friends on the other side of the aisle said this won't -- we heard it 100 times this. won't work. we have been working on this for 6 1/2 years. ever since sandy hook. we have pleaded with the other
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side to work with us. have a hearing. what are your ideas? absolute silence from them. absolute silence. this does work. we know that licensed dealers stop the sale of firearms to 170 felons every day. 50 domestic abusers every day. because they are required to do background checks. but in some states that same individual can be found to be prohibited, walk outside and go to a gun show or go online and buy a gun without the benefit of a background check. that is wrong. countless speakers from the other side of the aisle said this wouldn't have stopped this crime, this wouldn't have stopped this mass shooting, this wouldn't have stopped that mass shooting. well, my friends, if that's your standard, if you will only support a bill that will stop every mass shooting, that will stop every death by a firearm, that means you want to get rid
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of all guns and no one on this side of the aisle is saying that. mr. nadler: i yield the gentleman additional minutes. mr. thompson: the only way you can ensure there will never be another person murdered by someone with a gun is to do away with all guns. we have recognized that from day one. numerous speakers have said, just today on this floor, this will not stop every death. but it will stop some. and it's certainly worth pursuing. i urge your aye vote. i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. collins: i thank you, mr. chairman. is this now, mr. chairman, the final speaker? mr. nadler: i'm prepared to close. mr. collins: we're prepared to close as well. mr. speaker, before i close, i would like to say that i agree with the statement from the gentleman just now that there may be ones turned away, but there's only 60 a year prosecuted for what is a crime. this doesn't address that. with that, i yield the remainder
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of my time to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. budd. mr. budd: i thank my friend from georgia, mr. collins. for allowing me the time and, mr. speaker, thank you as well. so i rise today in opposition of h.r. 8, and want to lay out a couple of reasons for my opposition. but before i do, i think it's important to acknowledge how polarizing this debate has become over the last several years. more specifically, i want this body to know that as a human being, as an american, as a father, when i see the heartbreaking news of a mass shooting like the one we saw just 54 weeks ago in parkland, that it just breaks my heart. with that being said, this bill that we're voting on today would not have done anything to stop that tragedy from happening. nor would it have prevented any of those recent mass shootings. the 19-year-old murderer in parkland passed a background check. the man who murdered 26 innocent people at first baptist church in soggetter lind springs also passed a background check,
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although he wouldn't have the air force had passed along his criminal information like they were supposed to have done. and the evil that took place in sandy hook wouldn't have been stopped by this bill either. the killer used his mother's guns to kill her and 26 others. they were bought legally. mr. speaker, the simple fact is that criminals don't abide by the law and this would only create traps for law-abiding gun owners. however, there are actions so that we can take, actions that we can do, that would make meaningful strides in combating the violence we see today. one example of something we can do to improve information sharing between law enforcement officials across this country -- the chair: the gentleman had suspend. -- will suspend. mr. budd: to close i want to say -- the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. budd: i disagree with the policy of this bill. with that, i close. the chair: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from new york. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, i yield myself the balance of our time. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. mr. nadler: mr. speaker, we've heard the other side here say
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that some people lie on the forms, they're not prosecuted. that may be. and maybe law enforcement ought to prosecute more people. but that doesn't negate the necessity for the bill. it doesn't negate the fact that too many people who shouldn't have guns, who are mentally unstable, who have committed crimes, who are abusers get guns because they buy a gun at a gun show or not from a registered gun dealer, and therefore do not have to undergo a background check. everyone who gets a gun should have to undergo a background check. with the few exceptions we put in the bill. mr. chairman, h.r. 8 is legislation that's long overdue for passage by this body and for enactment. so that we can take a critical step overwhelmingly supported by the american people to protect us from gun violence. we have had too many moments of silence, too many expressions of sympathy, too many deaths. 39,000 deaths from guns last year.
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but little action here in congress on this issue. today we act. i urge my colleagues to vote in support of this vital bill, to start taking back our streets from the killers, to start blocking people who shouldn't have them from having guns, save > its house expands background checks. republicans offered a final mendment that had an amendment immigrant tries to buy a gun. it could follow from three days to 20. ollow the house at 9:00 a.m. >> prime time schedule, beginning at 8:00 proximate cause, testimony from michael
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cohen, president trump's former attorney relating to the campaign. powell span, jerome looks at the u.s. economy and governors from five u.s. territories testify on the state of their u.s. territories. watch c-span 2 of president vietnam. sit to and president trump and north korea's greet each other and start the summit talks and watch the u.s.-north korea summit on crmp span.org or listen with the c-span radio app.
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>> c-span's washington journal every day wrl issues that impact you. coming up on thursday morning -- >> earlier today, president trump's former lawyer, testified before the house oversight and reform committee relating to the 201 presidential campaign. we'll show you his opening statements and the highlights rom today's hearing. mr. cohen: members of the committee, thank you for

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