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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  March 26, 2019 11:59am-3:55pm EDT

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look like. i -- sbibblet -- accountability system would look like. i have a lot of questions. i have a question with regard to your department's decision not to any longer work with state officials over the redress of victims of for-profit colleges. this particular question was prompted by a letter that my attorney general in the state of new jersey sent to your department several months ago asking why suddenly you are not collaborating with them and sharing information with them that they could address the eligibility of students who -- >> we're going to leave this program but a he reminder you can watch all of our programs online at c-span.org. the house is about to gavel in. they'll be debating and voting on whether override president trump's veto of a resolution that would terminate his national emergency declaration
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for the southern border. both the house and senate would need a 2/3 majority to override the veto. take you live now to the floor of the house here on c-span. the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend to enrequest lee, community of hope a.m.e. chump -- tony lee, community of hope a.m.e. church. the chaplain: let us pray. almighty god, we come to you with a spirit of humility and gratitude. we come with the reality zage --
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realization that this is the day you have made and we will rejoice and be glad in it. we thank you for the opportunity we are afforded to serve the least of these and the responsibility to remember the forgotten and lifted down ready toen welch ask this day for courage to do the hard things and the vision to see beyond ourselves. empower the members of this house to make a difference. let their efforts be expressions of your grace, reflections of your love and justice and manifestations of your love. it is our prayer that when our time on this sphere is over, that the works of this day will speak for us and we will hear you say, well done, my good and faithful servants. lord, hear our prayer. in jesus' name, amen. the speaker: thank you, reverend lee. the the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house her approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentlewoman from illinois, ms. underwood.
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ms. underwood: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman from maryland, mr. brown, is recognized for one minute. mr. brown: thank you, madam speaker. let me begin, madam speaker, by wishing you a very happy birthday on behalf of the 435 members of the united states ouse of representatives. it's my honor to introduce reverend tony lee, founder and senior pastor of the community of hope a.m.e. church. he's a pillar of our community in prince george's county and the entire region. not just as a faith leader but advocate for those in need. i have had a long-standing relationship with him, partnering on a wide variety of issues including domestic violence, building trust between the community and law
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enforcement, tackling poverty, and moving forward on social justice issues. and during the month of january and february, we worked together during the government shutdown serving working families struggling to make ends meet. i have had the privilege of working -- worshiping at community of hope many times over the years. the name of the church reflects its character. a community where we live and raise our families, we pry prey and teach hope as a critical ingredient necessary for faith in our daily lives. he's a preacher who speaks to people in the language they understand. he draws people into church who would not otherwise do so. going into every neighborhood and going down every street. reverend tony lee is the son, proud parents orlando lee and nancy t. lee who are joining us in the capitol today. i yield back, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 further requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania eek recognition?
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>> to address the house. seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i read with dismay this morning that the justice department and the currents administration has decided to continue to treat the affordable care act as an unconstitutional wrong committed by the house and the senate and signed into law by the last administration. i can't believe that they are taking this position. this has been a long national strugglele, and we have gone through, we have had this debate, we have had this discussion, we have had this fight. and to say now that it continues to be unconstitutional the way that they said all along, we don't need to do this again. we have tens and 20 millions of americans with pre-existing
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conditions that depend on the workings of the affordable care act to keep covered so that they don't have to file for bankruptcy when they get sick, so that they can move from job to job without worrying about their health care coverage. let's not do this again. i urge my colleagues here in the house to reject that idea that the a.c.a. is unconstitutional. mr. cartwright: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: madam speaker, request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i rise today to speak about the essential role community health centers play in neighborhoods throughout the nation. america's health centers serve 28 million patients who have the greatest difficulty accessing health care. this includes 24.9 million low-income patients, 3.5 million patients in or near public housing. 1.4 million homeless patients.
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nearly one million patients who work in agriculture. and 6.2 million uninsured patients. madam speaker, community health centers are located in areas of high need and opened to everyone regardless of insures status or ability to pay. congress recently made historical investments to the health center program which increased access, expanded services, and improved quality. health centers also play an important role in rural america where the need is great but services are often scarce. and each year community health senters generate approximately $54 billion in economic activity and save the health care system an estimated $24 billion within our most underserved communities. madam speaker, we must ensure that all americans receive the services they need regardless of where they live and community health centers do that. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from oregon seek
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recognition? >> request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. mitts bonna neachy: thank you -- ms. bonamici: thank you, madam speaker. climate change is not a distant threat. it's a reality. in the pacific northwest our families and communities are facing acidic oceans, unhealthy smokey air, decreased snow pack, droughts, and extreme weather patterns. recent reports from the intergovernmental panel on climate change and the u.s. global change research program make it clear. human activity is contributing to climate change and the science supporting these reports is convincing and alarming. but there is hope. we have the opportunity, and in fact the imperative, to take action that will protect our planet and grow our economy. i am honored to serve on the house select committee on the climate crisis, and i will work with my colleagues to reduce emissions, to transition to
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100% clean energy, to create good-paying jobs, and rebuild our nation's infrastructure in a sustainable and resilient manner. invest in clean and efficient transportation systems and support frontline communities, particularly communities of color and low-income communities that have often faced a disproportionate share of the burden of our past inaction. the future of our planet and the health of our communities depend on the actions we take today. for our children, our grandchildren, and future generations to come, let's not wait. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. collins: madam speaker, over the past few weerks i have released the traints scripts of the interviews from peter strock and bruce osh to apparent wrongdoing at the f.b.i. and d.o.j. i have said i would make additional transcripts from the
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investigation public and here today to keep that promise. as i stated in our transcripts are pertinent to congressional investigation, but the 115th congress ended the investigation was closed, copies were shared with certain members of congress. mr. speaker, i request that the link, dougcollins.house.gov forward slash papadopoulos so the american people can review the transcript george papadopoulos. i will continue to release as many transcripts as people. americans deserve transparency. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from illinois seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. saturday, march 23, we celebrated the ninth anniversary of the passage of the affordable care act which has expanded health insurance to over 20 million people in the last five years. miss underwood: the quality
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health insurance remains unaffordable and out of reach for far too many americans. today i introduce the health care affordability act to help fix that and reduce premiums for americans who purchase private health plans through the marketplace. my legislation would cut premiums by hundreds or thousands of dollars per year for more than 10 million people. it does this by increasing the tax credits people get to make premiums more aforthable and allowing more people to -- affordable and allowing more people to qualified for tack cret credits. this would say consumers would not pay more than 8.5% on premiums h a tip ake -- a tip akal family of four pays $3,200 per month. a tip akal 60-year-old couple in my district making $ 0,000 pays over a third of their monty income for marketplace congress of the my legislation will reduce their monthly preums by over $1,700. this legislation moves us
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forward by making lower cost coverage available to at least nine million uninsured americans while reducing premiums for additional 10 million americans. i encourage my colleagues to join me in making quality health insurance more affordable by co-sponsoring this important legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to commend the u.s. recognition of israel's sovereignty over the golan heights. now is a critical and appropriate time for the united states to formally recognize the golan heights as part of israel. as a time when iran and terrorist workses, including hezbollah, are using the turmoil created by the civil war in syria to expand their presence in the regions, it's clear they hope to seize the golan heights to launch attacks against israel. mr. perry: recognizing israel's
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sovereignty over the golan heights is vital to the security interest of the united states and israel. i co-wrote a letter last december to secretary pompeo outlining the critical nature of recognizing israeli sovereignty over the golan and encouraging the administration to do so. this recognition should have occurred under several previous administrations, but the strong leadership needed was not present. i am glad we finally have a president that is taking the necessary steps to foster stability and peace in the middle east. i applaud president trump and his administration for issuing the proclamation recognizing the golan heights as part of the state of israel. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. our nation is the land of promise and the land of opportunity. we open our doors to the tired, to the poor, and to the huddled
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masses, and for dekes we have opened our doors to liberian refugees fleeing-vicious civil wars and ebola. the liberian community in my home state is the hardworking bedrock of our health care industry, they are parents, children, brothers, sisters, workers, business owners, and taxpayers. in 1999, they were given a special immigration status in the united states, deferred enforced departure, or d.e.d., they worked legally, they pay taxes. but currently have no pathway to citizenship. madam speaker, if you are here legally, play by the rules, and contribute to your community, you should have nothing to fear. but if we don't act by march 31, the liberian community's d.e.d. status will expire. it will subject our friends and neighbors to deportation and our community is terrified. since its enexception, d.e.d. has been a bipartisan issue, both republican and democratic presidents have acted to extend it for two decades. now it's our turn. this week we have the chance to
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send a legislative fix to the president's desk and i urge all of us on both sides of the aisle to do the right thing, the humane thing, and keep our liberian community here in their homes in the united states of america. mr. phillips: i yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from alabama seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to recognize the 50-year career of deborah r. mcbride, bet attorney as debbie. she was born to clarence and mary mcbride in washington, d.c. after graduating high school moved to birmingham alabama to attend birmingham southern. during her senior year in college she came to capitol hill and lined up a job with former democrat congressman bill nicholls and worked as a case worker until his death in 1988. she stayed on with the office of alabama's third congressional district until dr.er was elected in april of
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1989. she continued to work as case worker as well as scheduling office manager. in 1996, bob was elected although a democrat, she continued to work for him through his three terms during casework, serving as office manager, and taking on coordinating tours and flags. mr. byrne: -- >> a like before she stayed on to work for me and continuing her role. she has continue been with me since day one f. you polled the third congressional district she would be more popular than me. she has institutional knowledge that can cannot be replaced and i know i will miss her very much. she has the heart of gold. we won't be the same without her. please join me in thanking debbie for her uncoifered service to the people of alabama and her country. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from arizona seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is
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recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, the department of defense published a report revealing the dire impacts of the president's unlawful emergency declaration. mrs. kirkpatrick: it threatens to steal nearly $150 million of urgently needed arizona military construction funds, critical to the security of our nation, and the well-being of our men and women in uniform. and military families. both military bases within my are on the list that could be directly affected by these cuts. and i'm here today to say, no way. i represent a border district in southern arizona and we don't want the expensive, ineffective wall. we want our military bases funded. 59% of americans reject this
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emergency declaration. i will continue to take action to block this brutal decision and fight to protect arizonans from the drastic consequences of this dangerous, unlawful declaration. thank you, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you. i rise today to congratulate the medical center for being named the number one critical access hospital in the united states for 2019. this medical center, part of the illini health, serves more than 13,000 residents and countless more folks in southern minnesota. the medical center has found positive ways to improve affordability and increase successful patient outcomes. even when faced with serious health challenges, patients can thrive when they have access to affordable and conveniently
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located health care. all americans deserve access to quality, timely medical care. i'm very pleased that residents in brown county and surrounding areas in southern minnesota have such a fine institution of medicine to provide them. congratulations to the medical center and thank you for serving our community. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous -- consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to commemorate the life of dr. joaquin gonzalez figueroa. he was born in laredo -- in san antonio, and moved his family to laredo, texas. from an early age, he knew that medicine was going to be his calling and devoted himself to academics. he graduated as valedictorian from his class in high school. then attended the university of texas andujar vard medical school where he received -- and harvard medical school where he
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received his medical degree. after graduating, he served his country as first lieutenant with the u.s. army medical corps before returning to laredo and practicing medicine. the doctor made a dramatic impact to education, not only in laredo, but across the state of texas and also in health care. mr. cuellar: he will be fondly remembered for his commitment to education, health care and a career that changed the way of life of so many people. he is survived by his wife, barbara, and his children, patricia, barbara, francisco, ricardo, jorge, carlos, gabriella, and again, survived by so many grandchildren and so many great-grandchildren. i thank you for this opportunity honor the life of dr. joaquin. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition?
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>> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. carter: madam speaker, i rise today to recognize the girl scouts' 107th birthday, which was celebrated earlier this month. this anniversary is important to women everywhere, but particularly to the first district of georgia where the girl scouts were founded. in 1912, juliet gordon lowe started meeting with 18 girls who played basketball, hiked, camped, studied foreign languages and worked to help people in need. with these women, the seeds were sewn for a movement which now includes 2.6 million girl scouts in 92 countries and 50 million alums. with their motto of being go-getters, innovators, risk takers and leaders, the international organization has made an enormous impact in the lives of young women in their
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107-year history. a testament to their work includes alums aboard the international space station, members of congress, artists, athletes and so much more. thank you to the girl scouts for making our world a better place to live and for encouraging young women to always push the nfl. -- envelope. congratulations for the success of the first 107 years and i wish you the best in the years to come. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from washington seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to pay tribute to two law enforcement officers in my district. police officer benito chavez was injured in the line of duty, protecting our community in a senseless act of violence, after a car chase last week. he has only been with the police department for eight months, so he has many years of service ahead of him.
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i'm happy to note that he is hope holm with his family and his wife -- he is home with his family and his wife and we wish him for a speedy recovery and hope he will be back on the job soon. on a much sadder note, the whole eighth district mourn the loss of a hero, deputy sheriff ryan thompson, who lost his life in the line of duty on march 19. it is heart scombran -- heartbreaking. he leaves behind his wife and three children. i send my deepest condolences to his family, his friends and his colleagues who have been hit hard by this tragedy. we will be forever grateful for his service to our community and to our state. we all owe such a debt of gratitude to officer chavez, deputy sheriff thompson, and all law enforcement professionals who put themselves at risk every day to keep our communities safe. thank you. i yield back the rest of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to
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address the house for one minute, to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, this week we celebrate medal of honor day. dedicated to the recipients of america's highest military honor. today there are just 72 living medal of honor recipients. the 10th district is home to one of these. allen j. lynch who was awarded the medal of honor in 1970 for his actions in vietnam. while serving as a radio telephone operator near the village of myon, sergeant lynch risked his life to move three wounded comrades to safety and single-handedly defended their isolated position for two hours against advancing and superior enemy forces until they could be safely evacuated. lynch's eider: sergeant lynch' service did not end in vietnam. he spent his entire life serving his fellow veterans with the federal veterans administration, as well as the illinois state government veterans department. in an interview he said, quote, there are many service members,
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first responders and citizens who serve this country above and beyond, who are never recognized for what they do. we hold the medal of honor for all those men and women who have never been recognized for the great things they did. my friend, allen lynch, is a true american hero, and a role model for us all. on medal of honor day we reflect on all those who have acted above and beyond the caffle duty and the hard-fought freedoms we enjoy because of their duty and sacrifice. with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek to be recognized? >> to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to recognize two great constituents of mine, mason dority, and eli scott -- daugherty, and eli scott, on winning the 2019 c-span video documentary competition. their documentary, what it means to be an american, citizen accountability and government, highlights how the united states
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can constitution intended to instill power with the american people and how corruption in our system of government diverts power away from those very individuals. like these impressive 11th graders from imagine international academy of north texas, i too believe power must rest with the people. working together, we can bring real change in washington. madam speaker, i ask my colleagues in the house of representatives today, join me and congratulate mason daugherty and eli scott in their achievement. with, that madam speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from new hampshire seek recognition? ms. kuster: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to add to my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. kuster: thank you, madam speaker. the truth is, i believe there is common ground within our caucus and within the congress as a whole on how to improve access to health care for every single american.
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we can all agree that we must reduce the cost of the health insurance and prescription drugs and we must protect millions of americans with pre-existing conditions. that's why i'm so excited this week to work with my colleagues on the energy and commerce subcommittee on health and the new democratic coalition, to put forward proposals that will make a real difference in the lives of families in new hampshire and all across this great country. arlier this month, i joined my new colleagues in pushing efforts to strengthen the affordable care act and continue the path toward affordable, accessible universal health care coverage. today i'm excited that we're putting our ideas into action by introducing this pivotal health care bill. access to affordable health care has long been a top priority of mine. i was proud to unveil solutions over politics in the last
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congress. we cannot turn back the clock on the progress we've made. the time to improve health care for all is now. thank you, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i wish to address the house for one minute and to add on to my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, on april 2, just a few days from now, we'll observe equal payday in the united states. this commemoration represents the amount of time into this new year a woman must work to earn as much as a man earned in 2018 alone. mr. carson: as long as this continues, we are effectively telling our wives, our daughters, our mothers, and every woman in our life that they are inherently worth less. i don't believe this.
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i don't believe my colleagues do either. which is why i encourage everyone to support the paycheck fairness act when it comes to a vote tomorrow. this bill represents a major step toward closing the pay gap, ensuring employers pay women what they're due. in the process, we'll grow our economy by putting more money in americans' paychecks and helping families thriving. i'm honored to support this lenl -- thrive. i'm honored to support this legislation for my daughter, for the hardworking families in my district, and for women across america who deserve a fair wage for honest work. i yield back, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from virginia seek recognition? without objection, the gentlewoman from virginia is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, today in america women still make only 80 cents on average for every $1 a man makes.
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and that disparity is even greater for women of color. women are the sole or co-bread winners in 2/3 of american families with children, so when we pay women less, we hurt american families and we hurt our economy. the pay gap isn't a myth. it's math. ms. wexton: for a woman working full time, the current wage gap represents a loss of more than $400,000 during the course of her career. tomorrow the house of representatives has a real opportunity to tell women in america that they deserve equal pay for equal work. tomorrow, we can send a message that when women succeed, america succeeds. let's bring america into the 21st century. let's pass h.r. 7, the paycheck fairness act. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from texas seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. ms. jackson lee: madam speaker, i want to speak openly to my friends and colleagues, take a moment to look to your right as you come into this body, to the memorial that was put together by the parkland students and other gun victims. it will pain your heart and move you to action. it acknowledges that 722 people die every week from gun violence. it acknowledges that teenagers may lose their lives and has a form to indicate which teener -- teenager is next. and it has flowers, and it says stop killing us. every member of congress should walk by today that memorial and commit themselves to be decent and to recognize and do decent things that we should have gun safety legislation. i rise as well to say that
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women who are not being paid, who are supporting families, need the paycheck legislation that i will be supporting tomorrow. and i also say that this country must not accept behavior by a president as a norm, and the mueller report anti-facts must be had -- and the facts must be had, and we must do it quietly and respectfully and we must have hearings to tell the truth. i'm outraged come interesting a state that was a poster child for the persons without health care, that this administration would try to implode the affordable care act. we're going to fight it. we're going to try to sambt lives of our children and provide health care for all. i yield back. he speaker pro tempore:
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the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of march 18, 2019, the unfinished business is the further consideration of the veto veg message of the president on the joint resolution h.j.res. 46, relating to a national
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emergency declared by the president on february 15, 2019. the clerk will report the title of the joint resolution. the clerk: joint resolution relating to a national emergency declared by the president on february 15, 2019. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house on reconsideration pass the joint resolution? the objections of the president to the contrary notwithstanding. the gentleman from oregon, mr. defazio, is recognized for one hour. mr. defazio: madam speaker, for the purpose of debate only i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentleman from missouri, mr. graves, ranking member of the house committee on transportation and infrastructure, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. defazio: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material on the veto message of the president of the united states to the joint resolution h.j.res. 46. e madam speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. defazio: madam speaker, today we will vote to override the president's veto of congress' bipartisan action to terminate his so-called national emergency declaration. the bottom line is that this emergency declaration is nothing more than an end run around a majority, bipartisan majority, of both the house and the senate, in complete disregard of our constitutional system of separation of powers. there is no doubt that we have a broken immigration system. and comprehensive reform should be a subject of congressional deliberation. but today in particular we have a new crisis, it's a humanitarian crisis. but the president has said that this wall will solve that problem. and he also says that this is
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about drugs. let's talk about that, if we could. .ere we have walls are static very old technology have been used for many, many, many centuries. but as we note most recently when the french built the line, the germans went around it in 24 hours. similar to what the president is proposing. he wants a wall on part of the border. if the problem were people illegally crossing, they would cross in other areas where there is no wall. but that's actually not the case. he says that this will stop the flood of people who are coming to the border. these are not the historic people who were crossing the border legally to come to the united states for the purposes of work and to recommit funds home. or those who were illegally smuggling drugs through remote areas.
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this is a humanitarian crisis. this is recently in tijuana of a flood of people coming, actually to -- two areas where we have always wahls and fences and wanting to surrender to the border patrol and claim asylum. or coming to places where we don't have walls and fences and searching for border patrol agents so they can claim asylum. so a wall is going to do nothing to deal with the humanitarian crisis. we need to take a more nault approach to that. secondly, says it's about drugs. makes a big deal about this is contributing to the death of the opioid crycy, fentsal. the chinese are shipping in fentanyl in other ways, not across the mexican border, maybe we ought to do something about that. we have tried with walls to prevent the smuggling of drugs. the drug smugglers are creative. they have used rather primitive devices. that's the cana put. they have used -- catapult.
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they have used drones. tunnels. we found out in the trial of elchapo guzman, that the preferred route is not some remote area that is unwalled but actually to come across at the legal border crossings here. and it's such a big business it's like they can can modify a semitractor-trailer, put in a fake floor, and send 10 in a day. we only inspect one out of 10. so therefore they get nine through. they lost one truck. millions of dollars worth of drugs in a truck. they don't care. it's a multibillion dollar business. we need new tools and technology at the legal border crottings, in particular we need that so we can scan 100% of the vehicles. we have to bring in the equipment, hire more personnel. these are very expensive undertakings. instead we're going to waste money on a static wall which won't stop the drugs. even more than that, the coast guard, former commandant of the
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coast guard, testified that they have actionable intelligence they think on about 80% of the maritime drug shipments targeting the u.s. mostly from central america. some from other asian pacific areas. nd they can only act on one -- 1/5 of the actionable intelligence. they don't have the personnel. they don't have the ships. they don't have the helicopters. they don't have the tools they need to interdict those maritime drug shipments. so we're going to waste money on a stupid static wall. meeb while -- meanwhile, the drugs will flood in on a maritime basis or through the legal border crossings. now, last year the republican -- this is supposedly a crisis. and somehow it wasn't a crisis when the republicans controlled the congress up until the beginning of this year. they refused to appropriate funds for the wall. and then the president shut
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down the government for 35 days. longest government shutdown in our nation's history. 00,000 people in either denied coming to work or had to work without pay. finally, the president agreeed to open the government with a short-term continuing resolution. and he said that lawmakers should come up with a comprehensive border security proposal. well, congress did that. bipartisan group delivered compromise legislation rejected the proposed 3w0rder wall -- border wall as ineffective. alternatively it made effective robust investments in border security. congress overwhelmingly passed the legislation. the president agreed to sign it. then he issued a national emergency declaration to raid funds from other departments to secure funding for a border wall. congress has repeatedly voted against. as already said he's made it about drugs. the wall will be ineffective.
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he's made it about the humanitarian crycy, the wall will be ineffective. how is he going to pay for it? well, he's going to take money that the department of defense was, was going to spend on high priority military construction projects, which will ultimately undermine the training, readiness, and quality of life for our men and women in the armed forces. in 235c9, general robert neller, commandant of the marines, has detailed that the unplanned, unbudgeted shift of funds to deploy troops to the southern border last fall has forced him to cancel or reduce training exercises, delay urgent repairs, posing an unacceptable risk to our armed forces training and readiness. and then he's also going to take, ironically, drugs, money from the d.o.d. drug interdiction program. which will further inhibit the capability of d.o.d. from effectively interdicting drug shipments in favor of a stupid static wall.
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this emergency declaration also violates a number of existing laws, military construction codification act, only authorizes the secretary of defense to reallocate funds for construction projects during a national emergency if the project is necessary to support a use of the armed forces. our armed forces are not responsible for en-- enforcing our immigration laws and using these funds in this way is in violation of existing law. the administration would need to seize thousands of acres of property by imminent dough wine maine to bill build the wall. this is the party of private property rights? 2/3 of border property needed to build the wall is needed by private parties or relevant states. in 1952 the supreme court held in youngstown sheet and tube that president truman's declaration of national emergency, even in the midst of an international armed conflict, did not permit him to
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unilaterally seize private property. it's unlikely that this thing will get built anyway, but we're going through this process. because of this likely illegal overreach, the house passed a bipartisan resolution to terminate the national emergency declaration, even the republican controlled senate passed the resolution with 12 republican senators breaking with the president. with the president's decision to override this resolution, we must send a strong, clear message to the president, we live in a constitutional, representative democracy the president and his administration cannot ignore congress and existing law when they don't like our actions. we must stand up and defend our constitutional system, separation of powers, and articlele 1 of the constitution of the united states. with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i rise in support of the president's
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veto, house joint resolution 46. keeping our nation secure should be this president's very highest priority and it is this president's very highest priority. with president trump there is no question that he has and he will continue to carry out this priority. i support his efforts to build a wall on the southern border to protect our country. he's very clearly laid out the case for a declaration for a national emergency. there is a crisis at the border. crisis that could have been addressed much sooner or even prevented for that matter. the open border policies in the last administration compounded this growing problem. we're seeing the highest rates of illegal immigration since 2007. in february, there were more than double the number of illegal migrants coming into this country as compared to last year. border patrol has apprehended over 268,000 individuals since the beginning of this fiscal year, that's a 97% increase
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from the previous year. schools, hospitals, other services have become overcrowded, the american workers have been hurt by reduced job opportunities and lower wages. at the same time human and drug traffickers are thriving. in many of our communities notorious ms-13 gang has grown. we have seen tragic cases of crimes committed by illegal aliens who have been deported multiple times. in my own home state of missouri, an individual who was previously deported returned here illegally and charged in several violent incidents. he's now suspected of murdering five individuals, or five americans. that should never have happened. these kinds of tragic and preventable, i might add, events are happening across this country. that is the very definition of a crisis. last congress, we enacted legislation to deal with the devastating opioid crisis because it is, in fact, also a crisis.
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we can and we must do more to slow the flow of illegal drugs into this country. the men and women who put their lives on the line every single day to secure our borders deserve all the tools they need to do the job. including a border wall. through president trump's proclamation and his he veto of house joint resolution 4 , he's acting decisively to finally address this crisis under the authority provided him by congress. provisions the president will use under title 10 explicitly provide the president with that authority. the president is well within his legal authority that congress has provided him. that's the bottom line. i urge my colleagues to stand with the president, stand with law-abiding americans, and law-abiding immigrants, and establish this veto. with, that i'd reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon.
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mr. defazio: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler, chairman of the judiciary committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. nadler: i thank the gentleman for yielding. madam speaker, i rise in strong support of overriding the president's veto of h.j.res. 46. one month ago the house passed a bipartisan resolution to terminate the so-called national emergency declared by president trump. the senate has like-wise voted in a broad bipartisan basis to reject that declaration, leading president trump to issue the first veto of his presidency. i'm convinced that the president's actions are unlawful and deeply irresponsible. a core foundation of our system of government and of democracies across the world going back hundreds of years is that the executive cannot unilaterally spend taxpayer money without the legislature's consent. the president shredded that concept when he declared an emergency after he failed to get his way in a budget negotiation. and as he often does, he announced his intention to ignore congress in plain sight for all the world to see. meanwhile, hundreds of americans are starting to receive letters from the federal government
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demanding entry into their land. soon our fellow citizens' backyards may be seized in order to build a medieval border wall that congress and the american people do not want. the senseless diversion of military resources to the southern border has also created concern about our troops' combat readiness and their ability to implement other key priorities. the administration 'poo -- appears to be deciding on the fly which military construction projects they're planning to raid. leaving our men and women in uniform and everyone else who might be affected in a prolonged state of uncertainty. this type of chaos and confusion is the inevitable result when the president ignores the express will of congress. the judiciary committee recently held a hearing to discuss the national emergencies act and to be -- and to begin considering reforms of abuses of this power. i was heart understand by the enthusiasm on -- heartened by the enthusiasm on both sides of the aisle for these efforts. but these longer term reform efforts should not detract from our responsibility to address what the president is doing right now. president trump's invention of a
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so-called national emergency to suit his political goals and to get around congress' refusal of funding request is intolerable. and i will be proud to cast my vote to override his veto. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: members are reminded to refrain from engaging in personalities toward the president. the gentleman from oregon reserves. the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, at this time i would yield two minutes to the gentleman from arkansas, mr. crawford, who is also the lead republican on the rail subcommittee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. crawford: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the gentleman from missouri for his leadership on this issue. today the house will vote on whether or not to override the president's veto, preserving the emergency declaration regarding the ongoing crisis at the southern border. i'm glad we finally acknowledged on a bipartisan basis that there is in fact a crisis on the southern border. my friend from oregon mentioned that this humanitarian crisis exists and i couldn't agree more. ere's also another crisis --
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there's also another crisis at the border. there's been a 295% increase in apprehensions of illegal immigrants crossing our southwest border from beyond mexico. particularly guatemala, honduras and el salvador over the last 10 years, roughly. there's been 266 arrests of criminal aliens in the last two fiscal years alone, and these include criminal aliens charged or convicted of assault, sex crimes and killings and those are hardly victimless crimes. in 2017 more than 70,000 americans died of drug overdoses as meth, heroin, cocaine and fentanyl are flooding across the border and i would say probably the families of those 70,000 would argue that we certainly do have a crisis attributed to the problems at our southern border. since fiscal year 2012, c.b.p. has seized more than 11 million pounds of drugs between ports of entry. that's compared with only four
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million pounds at ports of entry. make no mistake, there is a crisis at our southern border. since october of last year, illegal crossings have spiked. in february alonet month president trump declared the -- alone, the month president trump declared the emergency, 76,000 people illegally crolsed the border. the -- crossed the border. the border patrol closed some borders. we need a border wall. the customs and border protection commissioner put it best when he said, this is clearly both a border security and a humanitarian crisis. the president attempted to remedy this crisis by declaring the emergency, an action well within his statutory authority and constitutional obligation. to protect our country. i urge my colleagues to oppose this veto override and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon. mr. defazio: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, -- to the gentleman from new york. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. espaillat: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, madam speaker.
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president trump continues to push for his useless, immediate evil wall. along the southern board -- medieval wall along the southern border, despite a bipartisan vote in the house of representatives and the senate to reject this poorly invoked emergency declaration, which would rob taxpayers and funds from other programs. congress has asserted its authority but the president is using every tool he has in his tool box for his pet project. let me remind the american people, there is no emergency in the -- on the southern border. there is no emergency, madam speaker, in the -- on the southern border. or anywhere else that warrants this wall. the head of the u.s. northern command, who is responsible for troops on the border, testified that border crossings do not pose a military threat. the refugees arriving on our border are families, mothers, fathers, with their children. they're willingly turning
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themselves in to request asylum from the violence and harassment from gangs they face in their home countries. no wall, no matter how high is built, would change that reality. madam speaker, this is nothing more than a naked power grab. if my colleagues on the other side of the aisle truly stand for limited executive power, i expect them all to vote to override the president's veto today. madam speaker, there is no emergency on the southern border. thank you, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, at this time i would yield mr. mitchell from michigan two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mitchell: thank you, madam speaker. thank you, mr. chair. most americans, maybe not everyone on the other side of the aisle, won't deny we have a crisis at the border. some of my colleagues actually recognize the crisis. including the humanitarian
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crisis. last year i voted for a bill that would have fully funded the wall and averted the government shutdown. to no avail. my choice this term would have been to pass the six noncontroversial bills and then pass a continuing resolution for the department of homeland security so, we continue to work and negotiate on a resolution that would not put us at this point. yes, the president declared a national emergency. speaker pelosi then proceeded with a resolution condemning president trump's emergency declaration. which was a messaging bill by the democrats. voting for it would have been plain politics, which many in this chamber chose to do. voting today without the votes to override is yet another messaging bill. yet another game of politics, which i will not support. i agree with my colleague on the other side of the aisle. it is a constitutional question. and constitutional authority, determination of that, is something left to the courts to decide. something the supreme court
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should decide, and not a partisan whack job in the house of representatives. if congress wishes to narrow and define more clearly the national emergency act, we should do so. and in fact i'm happy to participate in doing that. however, in the interim, we still have the issue of securing our border. it will not go away. the crisis is not going away. as my colleagues over here have indicated, it continues to be a growing problem. so why we don't spend time in addressing that, rather than one more messaging vote, which appears to be the trend right now in the house, since january, befuddles me. i urge my colleagues to vote no on the resolution to override the stree and i urge my colleagues -- the veto and i urge my colleagues on the other side of the aisle, let's get to the job of dealing with the issues of the american people. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon. mr. defazio: i yield two minutes to our colleague from texas, mr. castro. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. castro: thank you, madam speaker. i first want too i say thank you to my colleagues -- to say thank
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you to my colleagues in the house, republicans and democrats, and also in the united states senate, who voted to terminate the president's emergency declaration to build a border wall across the u.s.-mexico border. there is a humanitarian crisis at the border, but there isn't anvation and there's not an emergency -- an invasion and there's not anmental of the sort that the president speaks of. what we have here is an act of constitutional vandalism. the president trying to take the power away from the house of representatives and the u.s. senate, the executive trying to steal the power of the purse from the congress. and if congress allows this to stand, 15, 20 years, 30 years from now we will look back upon this as a time that gave both democratic and republican presidents incredible power to ignore congress and completely go around this body to do the things that they will, in terms of domestic politics. there are landowners in texas that are going to lose their
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land. this is the largest federal land taking of texas land, i believe, in history. many people in texas will lose their land. many people will have their land values devalued. some of them very significantly. because of this. military construction projects in texas are also at stake. $265 million worth of texas military construction projects. at joint base san antonio, which includes those in my district, $76 million. at fort bliss, over $50 million. over $42 million at fort hood. the red river, 71.5 million. in galveston at the naval reserve, $8.4 million. gone. because the president has decided, and this congress will have submitted to his will, to go around congress and unilaterally from a border wall -- build a border wall. even those who support a wall
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should agree with us that this is not the way to do it. congress funded over $1 billion. yet the president has gone around them to do more. i hope my colleagues will stand with us and override this veto. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, at this time i would yield two minutes to the gentleman from california, mr. mcclintock. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mcclintock: thank you, madam speaker. for 43 years the president of the united states has had the statutory authority granted by congress to declare a national emergency and to reprogram unobligated military construction funds to meet that emergency. 58 times previous presidents have invoked this authority to address such matters as civil unrest in sierra leone and burma. only when this president invoked his authority for the 59th time, to address the most serious
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national security risk our country has faced in our lifetimes, the collapse of our southern border, do we now hear protests from the left and its fellow travelers. madam speaker, under our constitution the congress appropriates money but cannot spend it. and the president spends money, but cannot appropriate it. he spends it according to laws given to him by congress. in this case, congress appropriated funds and delegated to the president precisely the authority to spend those funds that he is now exercising. whether congress should have delegated this authority is a separate question that no one has raised in 43 years. but while that authority exists, the president has both a right and a duty to use it to defend our country. we also hear protests from the -- that the president's act will divert money from our military projects. listen to what these people are saying. they care more about defending the iraqi border than defending
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our own. such people should not be entrusted with the defense of our country. i stand with the president who is acting within our constitution to defend our nation and against the radical left in this house that would dissolve our borders entirely if given the chance. history warns us, the nations that cannot or will not defend their borders aren't around very long. let that not be the epitaph of the american republic or the constitution that created it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon. mr. defazio: i yield myself such time as i may consume. just in response to the gentleman. if he had been listening, he might have heard the gentleman from texas listing bases in texas which are going to lose funds for critical military construction probablies, yet he launches off into some fantasy that we're db -- something about iraq. i didn't even quite get that part.
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also that we're proposing open borders. i don't know anyone on this side of the aisle who is proposing open borders. we're proposing effective, 21st century border security, for the real threats to america, like drug importations through our legal ports of entry, and a maritime drug imports that we can't intercept because we don't have the resources and we're wasting money on a stupid static wall. with that, i yield two minutes to the gentlelady from california, ms. barragan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. bargbarg thank you. my colleague -- ms. barragan: thank you. my colleague on the other side of the aisle said this was a partisan whack job. yet congress has come together, which is rare to see these days, on a bipartisan basis in the house and on the senate to vote to terminate this alleged crisis that's happening at the border. this is a constitutional issue, this is about the separation of powers, this is about congress' ability to appropriate money and the president saying, we want something, congress doesn't give
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it to him, and him going around congress. . again, this is not a partisan issue. this should not be a partisan issue. my republican colleague in the senate said, and i quote, never has a president asked for funding and then had congress not provide the funding just to have the president come right back to use the national emergencies act to get around congress. this is a dangerous precedent. this is not a messaging vote. again, on the house and the senate side, on a bipartisan basis, our colleagues are arguing today that we should stand with the president. i ask you, stand with the constitution. stand with the constitution. let's override this veto. a wall will not stop the drugs that are coming in the majority through the ports of entry. a wall will not stop migrant who is are coming to present themselves for asylum legally
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at the ports of entry. and a wall will not stop the inhumane treatment that migrants are receiving at the ports of entry. let's work together on a comprehensive immigration bill. let's work together to address this problem, not to fund a . ll with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, the president made it very clear that the wall is critical to address both national security and the humanitarian crisis. d.o.d. issued a fact sheet of the universe of projects that have not been awarded and they total more than what is needed. they total a little over $12 billion. just because a project is listed doesn't mean that the funding will be used. they only need $3.6 billion.
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i might add, too, that if the fiscal 2020 -- fiscal year 2020 bill is enacted on time and as requested, there is going to be no military construction project that's going to be delayed or cancelled. with that i would like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. abraham. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. abraham: thank you, madam speaker. you know, the president, he has a duty to protect our borders and our people. he has the constitution and the law of the land on his side to declare this national emergency. democrats have blocked the appropriations for this border security, but they had no problem when president obama built 130 miles of border wall. when they play political games, 76,000 people alone in february streamed across our borders, but the united states has endured because we are a land that believes in the rule of the law.
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turning a blind eye to this law and opens borders sends a wrong message to the american people and our laws. madam speaker, i am a country physician that has unfortunately been in emergency rooms and in funeral homes with the families of those that have died of illegal opioid overdoses. and when we play political games with american lives and merican families, shame on us. 85% to maybe 95% of these illegal opioids come across the southern border where we have no fence, we have no barrier for these illeem people to bring these -- illegal people to bring these drugs in. we got to secure this border with a wall. let the president secure our border. let the president protect our people, and let's vote against this veto override.
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i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon. i would yield myself such time as i may consume. i was just looking up most of the deaths many due to fentanyl and the fentanyl, of course, is all produced in china. some of it is shipped via u.p.s., fedex, and the international postal service. and we lack the screening capability to deal with that. much of it does go to mexico and is then smuggled into the s., but it's not the classic myth of these are people carrying backpacks, you know, through remote areas of the desert where if we only put up a wall the wall would stop them from getting the drugs into the u.s. if people paid attention to the extraordinary trial of el
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chapo guzman in new york, which i did, there was testimony after testimony after testimony, he's bringing and they, his successors, are bringing the drugs through our ports of entry because they deal in volume and sophistication. and what are we going to do? we are going to build a medieval wall over here while they continue to flood this country by modifying pickup trucks, passenger cars, semis to smuggle humans and drugs into the united states of america. border patrol is understaffed. border patrol does not have adequate technology. they only screen a very small percentage of the vehicles coming through. sometimes 6%. sometimes it's as high as 8%. wow. then, you got a 92% chance if ou are el chapo guzman or some other scum bag cartel from mexico getting a product in a
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sufficient way. why pay someone with a backpack when you can use it that way? or you can use u.p.s. or fedex. if you are chinese you can go online and find chinese selling fentanyl and find out how to get it into the united states. why are we not addressing that? it's coming in here through many, many different ways, and this wall will do nothing, nothing to deal with that. with that i would reserve the balance of my time. oh, here we go. i would yield such time as she may consume, i think customaryly one -- customarily one minute to the speaker of the house.
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the speaker pro tempore: i yield one happy birthday minute to the speaker. the speaker: i rise to join my colleagues to uphold the constitution and defend our democracy once again. the house and the senate came together in great unity and bipartisanship to pass congressman joaquin castro's resolution to reject the president's lawless power grab. yet, the president chose to continue to defy the constitution, the congress, and the will of the american people with a veto. at the birth of our democracy and revolution and the war, thomas payne wrote that that times have found us. once again, the times have found us to defend our democracy. the times have found us to restore the founders' vision of balance of power, checks and balances, co-equal branches of
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government, and restore congress' role as article 1, the first branch. article 1, the legislative branch. and the times have found us to honor our oath to support and defend the constitution and protect the american people. we all know that the heart of our constitution, the beauty of it all is that we have a system of checks and balances. our founders did not want a monarchy. that's what they had rejected. they wanted a democracy, co-equal branches of government to act as a check on each other. this congress of the united tates acted to honor the constitution, our responsibility to protect and defend by passing legislation in our appropriations bill showing how in a bipartisan way congress would protect our borders. we understand our responsibility to do that.
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we don't take that responsibility lightly. we take it seriously. even when the legislative -- even when the president disagreed with us, he should have accepted the bipartisan, bicameral decision to proceed. he had taken pride in our shutdown of government for about one month because he didn't get his way on the border. after one month, bipartisan, bicameral action by the congress sent him a bill just almost exactly like what he rejected in the first place. and he decided to reject congress' wisdom and congress'
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acting with its authority to otect our borders in a serious, effective, values-based way. so we don't take this vote here today lightly, even when the legislative branch disagrees with the executive, we respect the office the president holds and it's his right to veto legislation. but when those decisions violate the constitution, then we must be -- then that must be stopped. many of our colleagues from across the aisle joined last month to defend our democracy by passing congressman castro's privileged resolution. that happened in the house. that happened in the united states senate. we call on all of our colleagues to simply show that the same measure of respect for our constitution today. we take an oath to the constitution, not to the president of the united states. we take an oath that we must honor. the choice is simple between
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partisanship and patriotism, between honoring our sacred oath or hypocritically and consistently breaking that oath. i urge a strong bipartisan yes to override this veto and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: members are reminded to refrain from engaging in personalities toward the president. the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, i just need to point out that according to the customs and border protection, there were more illegal drugs that were captured in between those ports of entry than they were at the ports of entry. in 2012, there were 11 million pounds of illegal drugs that were seized in between. again, in between those ports of entry as opposed to four million pounds at those ports of entry. you know, this is exactly why the wall is needed so that we
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funnel that illegal drug trafficking to those ports rather than in between those ports of entry, and it's time congress gave those individuals that are on the border risking their lives to protect the united states, give them the tools they need and that is a border wall. with that i want to yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from alabama, mr. rogers, who's also the lead republican on the committee on homeland security. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. rogers: thank you, madam speaker. i thank the chairman for the time. today, i rise in strong support of securing our borders. there is a crisis at the southwest border that can no longer be denied. have g demographics changed our border patrol agents. women and children are overwhelming border patrol facilities and undermining staff. this is 800% higher than fiscal
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year 2013. customs and border protection statistics indicate that border apprehensions are on pace to hit a 10-year high. human smugglers are exploiting loopholes in our broken immigration system and using children as visas to gain entry into the u.s. further, drugs are pouring through our porous borders. as you just heard the chairman mention in fiscal year 2018, customs and border protection seized almost 900,000 pounds of drugs at the border, the majority of which were seized between the ports of entry. that includes approximately 2,000 pounds of fentanyl of which equals a lethal dose for the entire united states population. to address this crisis, we need an all-of-the-above solution to border security that includes manpower, 21st century technology, and a barrier. with this approach we will stem the flow of drugs that are destroying our communities.
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we will stop smugglers from crossing desert with innocent children. border security used to be bipartisan issue. i've been on the homeland security committee since it was established as a select committee after 9/11. not one time in the history of that committee has there been any partisan dispute about the need for a barrier at the wall until donald trump became president and now it's a toxic issue. i stand by president trump to keep americans safe and encourage my colleagues to do the same. vote against the effort to override the president's veto. i thank the ranking member and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from oregon. mr. defazio: i'd reserve. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. i don't have any more speakers so i'm prepared to close if the gentleman is the same. mr. defazio: i have no further speakers on our side. so, then, let's -- what is the order of closing? i believe -- do i get to close?
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from missouri is recognized. mr. defazio: wait, excuse me. i'm reserving. what? yeah, right. yeah. so you go ahead and close. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from missouri. mr. graves: thank you, madam speaker. madam speaker, despite the majority's blind objection to anything this president does, the facts are clearly there to show that this is a real crisis. president obama agreed when he requested emergency funding in 2014 to deal with the crisis on the border. and when he declared a national emergency because of the transactional drug traffickers. since fiscal year -- transnational drug trafficers. since fiscal year 2012, customs and border patrol has seized four million pounds, as i pointed out earlier, of drugs at ports of entry. but more than 11 million pounds of drugs between those ports of entry. nearly three times as many drugs are seized in between those ports. many of our colleagues on the other side of the aisle recognize the need for a border
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wall. they voted to authorize the wall in 2006 and again they voted to authorize, under president obama, in 2013. last year, we passed bipartisan legislation to address the growing impacts of opioids on our communities. drugs that continue to flow into our country through our southern border. make no mistake, the opioid crisis is real. earlier this month the centers for disease control issued a report noting that deaths from fentanyl have increased from 1,663 in 2011 to 18,335 deaths in 2016. this is an increase of over 1,100%. there was bipartisan agreement that there was a drug-related crisis. but now suddenly some are calling this a manufactured crisis. the national emergencies act has been on the books since 1976, and has been used dozens of times, but now suddenly some are calling it unconstitutional.
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the national emergencies act is clear. it's absolutely clear. the president has the authority to act. the president is using the authority congress has given him. and the president stood firm, understanding the gravity of this crisis, and issued his first presidential veto. i stand with him and urge my colleagues to sustain the president's veto on house joint resolution 46. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from oregon. mr. defazio: may i ask how much time remains? the speaker pro tempore: 8 1/2 minutes. mr. defazio: oh, i won't use that much. ok. thank you. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i'd like to have a quote here from someone who i think is quite prominent. when you go under, you go around, you go through it. what they need is more man power and more technology. that was the acting chief of
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staff for the white house when perhaps he was a little more independent as a member of the united states congress. that was august 25, 2015. i would ask, what's changed since then? well, he now works for the president. that's a change. donald trump, during his campaign, was real hard-line on immigration, but he kept forgetting to mention immigration in some of his speeches. so his staff came up with a knew momic. they said, well, he's a builder. if we say wall, he'll remember it. and the president did. it was just an after thought. it was, how are we going to get him to give his hard line on immigration during his campaign speeches and get crousing -- rousing going? let's use the wall. the wall then became, you know, a life unto its own. as a campaign promise. not as something that's effective. as we've talked about before, the drugs, you know, use a
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catapult, use a drone, tunnels really, and of course illegal order crossings. this is, you know, an end conclusion to a campaign promise for his base, but not what's in the best interest of the united states of america. in terms of preventing the shipment of illegal drugs. i don't know where the gentleman came up with that new statistic, three times as many drugs were intercepted out the ports of entry. unless he was using the coast guard, which he may have been. because the coast guard intercepted more drugs than every other agency of the federal government combined. in the maritime realm. unfortunately, as the form commandant of the coast guard said, -- former commandant of the coast guard said, we can identify 0% of the intel, -- 0% of the intel, 80% coming in
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in the maritime basis. the coast guard's doing a great job with inadequate resources. in the bipartisan compromise, they got some additional money for air and marine assets, they could use a heck of a lot more. why don't we get that 80%? why don't they have resources to get that 80% that they know about, and then let's get -- better intel and get the extra 20% and let's scan 100% of the vehicles coming into the border. i've been at the board when are through intuition, a border patrol agent found drug smuggling. i happened to be there today. guy drove up to the border, he had a birthday cake and a bottle of tequila on the seat. the border patrol guy said, hm, something suspicious. take the truck over there. they scoped out the gas tank,
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they found big blocks of drugs in the gas tank. what was -- was that because we had sophisticated technology, when the guy pulled the truck up we could use that technology? no. it was the intuition of the border patrol agent. i said, how did you know to go and, like, really search through that guy's vehicle? he said, well, there was nothing on his key ring. there was only one key in the ignition. he was a throw-away. the cartel was probably paying him $10,000 or something to drive that stolen or purchased pickup truck across the border, concealing drugs. the human element caught that guy. there aren't enough border patrol agents. they have openings. they are not adequately compensated. they weren't paid during the shutdown. but they were still working at the border. they're the first line of defense. but they also need new technology. and we can't install that technology to scan 100% of the vehicles coming through unless we invest a lot of money in improving the border crossings,
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because we'll have trucks backed up 100 miles back into mexico because of the amount of commerce that comes across. so what are we going to do? we're going build a stupid static wall over there and over there and we're still going to let probably 85% of the vehicles go through without applying technology. guzman sitting in his jail cell is probably just shortling over this. he's saying, boy, are those americans stupid. why don't they get the technology they need to scan the cargo that we're hiding in very sophisticated ways in tractor trailers, in pickup trucks, in individual passenger vehicles, why don't they intercept the drugs that are coming in through the oceans? they even know about, and they're not intercepting them. no, we're going to build a dumb wall. and by the way, when the republicans were in charge, we had a vote on that and it failed. if this was such a crisis and such a great idea when the republicans controlled the house, the senate and the white house, why didn't they make it a priority?
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well, they didn't make it a priority because they thought it was a stupid idea. but now it's a political thing. this is the victory for the president. it excites his base. it energizes his base. he has to have it. so he declares a national emergency. the emergency is political. it's not national security. it's not drugs. we have a humanitarian crisis at the border. yes, we do. and what is a wall going to do about that? they come to the border, they stand there and they say, we want to apply for asylum in the united states. if they come across in a remote area, they hope they come across a border patrol agent, because they want to surrender at the moment right there and get some shelter and get medical care. they're now organizing bus loads to come up from guatemala and honduras. we're not dealing with the root problems down there, and we're not dealing with the smugglers who are now hiring very nice luxury buses as opposed to the old ride on that killer train that people used to take to come up with smugglers who would
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often rape them, kill them, rob them, whatever else. now they've converted to, let's put them in a luxury coach and they'll have rest stops and everything else. this has become big business. why aren't we doing something about that? the wall will do nothing about that. nothing. why, why, why are we going to waste billions of dollars on a medieval fortress that won't work? i urge my colleagues to vote and override the veto of the president of the united states, restore the integrity of the congress of the united states, and the appropriations process under article 1 of the constitution of the united states. with that, i yield back the alance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the previous question is ordered. the question is, will the house on reconsideration pass the joint resolution, the objections of the president to the contrary notwithstanding? under the constitution, vote
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must be by the yeas and nays, pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20rks further proceedings -- 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives. madam, pursuant to the permission granted in clause 2-h of rule 2 of the rules of the u.s. house of representatives, the clerk received the following message from the secretary of the senate on march 26, 2019, at 9:21 a.m. that the senate passed, senate 863. signed, sincerely, cheryl l. johnson. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on a -- on which a vorded vote or the yeas
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and nays are -- recorded vote or the yeas and nays are order, the house will resume proceedings on the postponed questions at a ater time. for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? mr. grijalva: thank you, madam speaker. i move the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 1388. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 1388. a bill to take lands in sonoma county, california, into trust, as part of the reservation of the lytton rancheria of california and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arizona, mr. grijalva, and the gentleman from california, mr. cook, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona. mr. grijalva: thank you again, madam speaker. and i ask for unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous materials
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on the measure under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. grijalva: madam speaker, i yield myself as much time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. grijalva: thank you. along with dozens of other california tribes, the lytton band of pomo indians had its relationship with the federal government terminated in 1958. resulting in the loss of federal -- of its federal status and all of its tribal lands. the tribe's federally recognized status was eventually restored but its reservation lands were not. as a result, with the exception of a small parcel of land that congress provided for gaming in san pablo, the tribe has been left essentially landless and without reservation. h.r. 1388 will address that issue by taking approximately 511 acres in sonoma county, california, into trust as part of the reservation of the lytton
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rancheria. of the 124 acres of the land, the tribe plans to build housing for its members, as well as governmental and community facilities. another portion of the land is currently being used for you will you will -- culture and the tribe continues to develop more of the lands for the same purpose. in response to local concerns, the tribe has agreed that the lands will not be used for gaming. this is provided in the text of the legislation, as well as in a binding mem ran dusm agreement with -- man ran dumb of agreement with the -- memorandum of agreement with the board of supervisors. the tribe has also entered into agreements with the local school district and the local fire department. additionally, the tribe is working with the city of windsor to assure appropriate water and sewer hookup. by directing these lands be taken into trust, the united states will ensure that the lytton rancheria will finally have a permanently protected homeland on which they can once again live as a community and
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plan for the future. an identical bill passed the house last congress by voice vote and i urge quick adoption of this legislation as well. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. . mr. cook: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cook: thank you. h.r. 1388 would provide for the acquisition of a number of acres of noncontiguous land in trust for the benefit of lytton rancheria. the lands located in sonoma county next to the town of windsor are the subject of a fee-to-trust application filed by the tribe with the department of interior in 2009. neither the obama nor trump administration has provided a
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reason why the tribe's application has not been approved in the last 10 years. the tribe has testified that it intends to use a portion of the land for tribal housing while the rest would support the diverse range of economic development, including plans for future resort and winery. i notice everyone paid attention to that last word. an identical measure passed the house in the previous congress and it has been reported twice by the committee on natural resources, though not in the current congress. i urge adoption of the measure and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: madam speaker, at this point i don't have any further request for time and would inquire whether my colleague and friend, mr. cook, has any remaining speakers on
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his side. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. cook: i yield back the balance of my time. mr. grijalva: thank you. i yield back the balance of my time, madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill, h.r. 1388. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. mr. grijalva: madam speaker, on that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor say aye -- all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? mr. grijalva: thank you, again, madam speaker. i move the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 2 97. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 297, a bill to extend the federal recognition to the little shell tribe of chippewa indians of montana, . d for other purposes the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arizona, mr. grijalva, and the gentleman from california, mr. cook, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona. mr. grijalva: thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and tend their remarks and include extraneous material on the measure under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. grijalva: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. grijalva: h.r. 297 will extend federal recognition to
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the little shep tribe of ippewa tribes in -- little shell tribe of ship with a tribes in montana. this will help control the land, water, resources as well as the ability to govern and protect the health, safety, and welfare of its members. the little shell tribe has resided in montana for well over a century and has long been recognized as a tribe by the state of montana. the tribe is a political successor to the signatures of the treaty of 1893 under which a large area of the land in the state of north dakota was credited to the united states. -- was ceded to the united states. while the federal government has federally recognized two other tribes that are successors to the signatures of the treaty, the little shell have been left in limbo. the little shell tribe has repeatedly petitioned the
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federal government for federal recognition, first in the 1930's and 1940's under the indian reorganization act and later starting in 1978 through the department of interior's recognition process. however, despite their long and well-documented history, they were deprived of their rightful federal recognition each time. h.r. 297 finally extends recognition to the little shell tribe, making all federal laws and regulations of general applicability to indians and indian tribes applicable to little shell and its members. federal recognition of the tribe enjoys broad support in montana, including support from the governor's office, the montana state legislature, the surrounding counties and cities, and from all the other federally recognized montana tribes. recognition of the little shell is long overdue. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on h.r. 297. thank you, and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. cook: i yield myself such time as i may consume.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. cook: thank you. h.r. 297, sponsored by congressman gianforte, would extend federal recognition to the little shell tribe of chippewa indians of montana with federal recognition, the little shell tribe and its members will be eligible for all services and benefits provided by the federal government to indians because of their status as indians. a previous version of this bill passed without opposition in the last congress. thanks in large part to the gentleman from montana, who has been a tireless advocate of recognizing the little shell tribe and whose work has been instrumental to bring this legislation closer to the finish line. i would like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from montana, mr. gianforte. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. gianforte: i thank the gentleman for the time.
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madam speaker, i rise today to once again provide the little shell tribe of chippewa indians of montana with the overdue federal recognition that they deserve. the little shell tribe began petitioning the federal government for recognition in the 1930's. over 80 years ago. last year, the little shell tribe of chippewa indians restoration act passed this chamber unanimously. it was the first time that the bill providing federal recognition to the little shell tribe passed either the house or the senate. following the passage in the house, however, the uncontroversial bill hit a roadblock in the senate. today, we begin take up their worthy cause as we pass this bill. i'd like to thank chairman grijalva and ranking member bishop for their continued support. this congress should provide the little shell tribe with the federal recognition it deserves, particularly after
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eight decades of dedicated efforts. hopefully my colleagues in the senate will recognize the importance of this legislation. i urge a yes vote on the bill. thank you, madam speaker, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from arizona is recognized. mr. grijalva: thank you, madam speaker. i have no further requests for time, and want to extend our appreciation for his work on sponsoring the legislation. it is -- it passed unanimously, as he indicated, and no reason why we can't do that again today. and with that i yield back the remainder of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california. mr. cook: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 297. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed -- mr. grijalva: madam speaker, on
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that i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. oceedings will resume on questions previously postponed. votes will be in the following order. objection of the president to the contrary notwithstanding. the motion to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1388 and the motion to suspend the rules and
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pass h.r. 297. the first electronic vote will be conducted as a 15-minute vote. pursuant to clause 9 of rule 20, remaining electronic votes will be conducted as five-minute votes. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the question of the house on reconsideration will pass the joint resolution h.j.res. 46 relating to a national emergency declared by the president on february 15, 2019, the objection of the president to the contrary notwithstanding. in accordance with the constitution, the yeas and nays are ordered. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 248 and the nays are 181. 2/3 of those not responding in the affirmative, the veto of
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the president is sustained and the joint resolution is rejected. the veto message and the joint resolution are referred to the committee on transportation and infrastructure. the clerk will notify the senate of the action of the house. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentleman from arizona, mr. grijalva, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 1388 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 1388, a bill to take lands in sonoma county, california, into trust as part of the reservation of the lytton rancheria of california, nd for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote -- five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or
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commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 404. the nays are 21. 2/3 of those voting having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. he house will be in order. he house will be in order. he house will be in order.
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congress, please clear the ell. he house will be in order. the house will be in order. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? the speaker: madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to speak out of order for whatever time i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized. the speaker: madam speaker, our founders envisioned a people's use -- the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order.
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the speaker: thank you, mr. lewis. this is very important. we're going to observe the 40th anniversary of c-span. you ready for that? are you braced for the excitement? if that's not enough for you, oday is my birthday. no, no, no. no singing. o singing. thank you so much. i will convey those good wishes to c-span as well. madam speaker, our founders envisioned a people's house that would be transparent and accountable to the american people. the very first house sessions were made open to the public, the very first house sessions.
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so that the american people could see our debates and have their voices heard. i rise to honor an institution that powerfully honors that legacy, ensuring that our sessions can be a town hall for the nation. the cable satellite public affairs network, c-span. since its founding 40 years ago, c-span has offered tens of millions of americans a front row seat to democracy. training its unblinking eye on congress and the campaign trail, presidents and parliaments, and so much more. we all know c sman is a pill lar and beacon of unbiased reporting, an institution so committed to objectivity and impartiality that it's founder never once uttered his own name on the air throughout 33 years of interviews, round tables, and lectures.
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thank you, brian lamb, for your ervice to our democracy. c-span has not only exposed our public debate, it has enhanced our discourse and in doing so enriched our democracy. shining a light on government to keep our leaders honest and accountable, educating and informing the public to gavel to gavel coverage, book tv, heroin mystery tc, c-span radio, the video library, and interactive resources such as the c-span bus. let's hear it for the c-span bus. renewing the promise and purpose of our american democracy, a government of, by, and for the people. in its first speech -- if the first speech, this is the first speech ever televised by c-span, our former colleague, then representative al gore, spoke prescient words about its
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pouter. al gore said, the marriage of this medium and our open debate have potential to revitalize representatives' democracy. offering a solution for the lack of confidence in government. our country has been strengthened by c-span's progress to deliver on that promise. revitalizing our democracy that is people can have confidence that this institution works for the public interest. on behalf of the house of representatives --dy want to tell you some c-span stories about what children have said about what they have seen when they have watched congress in session, but i'll save that for another day. on behalf of the house of representatives, thank you to founder brian lamb, and the entire c-span family for your enduring contributions to the public debate and to our american democracy. congratulations on 40 years.
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i'm pleased to yield to the distinguished leader mr. mccarthy. mr. mccarthy: madam speaker, i want to thank the speaker for yielding. i also want to wish her a very happy birthday. . now, many of us here and across the country were first introduced as a child to how government works through our turday morning cartoons on "schoolhouse rock: i am just a bill on capitol hill." c-span has taken the education and turned it into experience. and over the last 40 years, c-span has ensured the country experienced some of the most consequential and memorable moments that transpired right here with this body. on the 50th anniversary of the civil -- selma civil rights march, john lewis reminded us of the quiet dignity of the 600 americans who put their lives on the line that this nation
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might live up to the promises made in its founding documents. as john lewis said, our country will never, ever be the same because of what happened on this bridge. c-span was there. at the height of the iraq war, sam johnson, a vietnam veteran, a p.o.w., gave a powerful salute to our soldiers and taught us an important lesson about patriotism and service before self. we are better as a country because of the example sam johnson set. c-span was there. throughout these 40 years of experiences that have changed the culture of history, from the contract with america to the election of the first woman speaker, it even captured the light-hearted moments of humor that can make their way into times of very serious debate. c-span captured it all. this is important because of the rise of the internet and
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the new media environment has only reinforced the need for c-span's unfiltered coverage and unbiased programming. now more than ever, people must be able to form their own opinions. they need objective coverage, access to balanced analysis and the opportunity to debate their views with others in good faith. c-span does just that. madam speaker, james madison believed that representative government did more than cater to individual interests. he said one of its key advantages was that it refined and enlarged the public view about the common good. for the last 40 years, c-span has been an irreplaceable tool for accomplishing madison's vision. i know i speak for the whole house in congratulating c-span for four decades of coverage. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman yields back. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentleman from arizona, mr. grijalva, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 297 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title. the clerk: h.r. 297, a bill to extend the federal recognition to the little shell tribe of chippewa indians of montana, nd for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 403. the nays are 21. 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from california seek recognition? ms. lofgren: i send to the desk a privileged report for filing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the
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clerk will report the title. the clerk: report to accompany house resolution 245, resolution providing for the expenses of certain committees of the house of representatives in the 116th congress. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the committee on armed services be discharged from further consideration of s. 252 and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 252, an act to authorize the honorary appointment of robert j. dole to the grade of colonel in the regular army. the speaker pro tempore: is there an objection to consideration of the bill? without objection, the bill is read a third time and passed and the motion to reconsider is laid on the table.
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for what purpose does the gentlewoman from north carolina seek recognition? ms. foxx: thank you, madam speaker. i ask unanimous consent that the committee on judiciary be discharged from further consideration of h.r. 962, the born alive abortion survivors protection act, and ask for its immediate consideration in the house. the speaker pro tempore: under guidelines consistently issued by successive speakers as recorded of the house rules and manual the chair is constrained not to entertain the request unless it has been cleared by the bipartisan floor and committee leadership. ms. foxx: madam speaker, if this unanimous consent cannot be entertained, i urge the eaker -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is not recognized or debate.
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the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey -- the gentlewoman from new jersey ise? without objection, the gentlelady is recognized for ne minute. mrs. watson coleman: mr. speaker, i rise today to call out a growing insidious threat to women. there are bills in at least eight state legislatures that would outlaw abortions if a heartbeat can be detected. typically, this is about six weeks of a pregnancy, though it can be earlier.
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six weeks before many women even know that they are pregnant, effectively taking away their right to choose whether or not to begin or expand their family. these laws are cruel. they are also in direct violation of the supreme court's decision in roe v. wade, a precedent that has stood for over 45 years. and that's the point. mississippi governor bryant recently signed into law one of these bills, and he did so knowing it was unconstitutional. he even admitted he was signing this bill for his own religious reasons, knowing that it was likely to be challenged. he wants to go to the supreme court because he wants credit for trying to overturn roe v. wade. but the women of this country will not go back. we have fought tooth and nail to obtain our rights in this country. those who believe women will give up their right to control their own bodies will quickly
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learn that that is sorely mistaken. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i seek unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. . >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to speak out against the plague known as anti-semitism. we witnessed it in charlottesville, we suffered through the killings at the tree of life sin nothing in pittsburgh, mr. speaker, and saw it again recently here in congress. anti-semitism is a condition that has afflicted our world for many centrist and ranges from written and spoken words to the mass murder of six jews in the holocaust. each of us must speak out and condemn it in clear and uncertain terms whenever it appears, mr. speaker n knoxville my late father, mother, and i along with our good friend helped build our -- with our own hands a memorial to the six million. just a few months ago i traveled to israel and saw
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firsthand how the holocaust affected the jewish people and thousand they create add new and dynamic democratic state in the meet meet. mr. burchett: as i heard someone say yesterday, israel is an owe kaycies of democracy in a conflicted region. support for israel is not a jewish issue, it is an american issue, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, the truth is, support for one of our nation's staunchest allies and anti-semitism they can cannot coexist. as we remember the holocaust and protect the democracy of israel, let's join together in condemning anti-semitism in whatever form it appears, whether in our neighborhoods or here on the house floor. mr. speaker, i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the president of the united states. the secretary: mr. speaker, i am correct directed by the president of the united states to deliver to the house of representatives a message in writing. for eaker pro tempore:
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what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to honor an exceptional dentist, army brigadier general shan k. bagby. the first african-american army dentist to be promoted to the rank of general. mr. payne: he's the first ever african-american to serve as chief of the army dental corps. he was born in norton, new jersey. when was 8 years old, he went to the neighborhood health clinic and met a african-american dentist. that visit more than 40 years ago inspired him to become a
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dentist himself. when general bagby graduated from columbia high school in maplewood, new jersey, also in my district, he went to rutgers university to study physics. today he's a rising star in the u.s. army. he is an inspiration to young people across the country who dream of becoming a dentist. i ask my colleagues to join me o honor brigadier general shan bagby for his service to our country. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from georgia is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today with a heavy heart to commemorate the life of dr. lloyd derby iii. he was a georgia 12 native and lifelong resident of vidalia,
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georgia, and the lasting impact he leaves behind on behalf of the local community, his friends, and his family will be remembered for generations. with the deep love for our nation and strong passion for serving others, his many years as a u.s. navy lieutenant, prominent dentist, and instrumental political figure speaks volumes about his character. mr. allen: he was a former chairman of the republican party, district chairman and member of the state g.o.p. board, and a delegate to the 1972 and 1976 republican national conventions. additionally he served as chairman of the friends of the natalie campaign during the tenure as u.s. senator. he was the first republican senator from georgia elected since the reconstruction era. lloyd derby was a man fashion gnat about his faith, cherished his local community, loved his wife of 60 years, and his
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entire family beyond measure. his passion was to help those give back a smile who otherwise could not help themselves. robin and i send our heartfelt condoences -- condolences and prayers to all his family, friends, and community on a life well lived. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from iowa seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute, revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the entlelady is recognized. >> this past winter iowa and the midwest experienced record snowfall with freezing temperatures. the ground has remained frozen which kept the snow from falling into our soil, from melting into it, then the rapid warming over march 12 to march 14 along with heavy rains resulted in mass flooding and
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devastation across iowa. particularly in my district of southwest iowa. the flooding has resulted in hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars ining ainging a urel losses, destroyed homes, schools, small businesses, medical centers, and has caused significant damage to public infrastructure that is vital to these communities. entire small towns such as hamburg in fremont county and pacific junction shown here in mills county are under water and are facing irreparable damages. communities are without sanitary water. miss axne. the flooding is still ongoing. we have yet to see probably some of the worst of it. i'm grateful that the president declared a disaster emergency declaration to support efforts to guarantee public safety and rapid recovery. but given the impact of this flooding and it was mainly in smaller rural communities, the assistance needed to ensure these communities can recover is dramatic. i have requested the house
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appropriations committee to fund additional disaster supplemental support. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. is there any further requests for one-minute speeches? there being none none, under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2019, the gentleman from california, mr. garamendi, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. i thank you, mr. speaker. i've got a couple things i want to do today and i'd like to start with a very special celebration that occurs every spring. this is the sikh community's annual historic cultural and
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the ous celebration of punjab region and today it's celebrated in communities throughout india, the united states, and around the world. it's an annual festival celebrating the spring season and it's of great significance to the sikh religion. t commemorates the creation of kasala, a fellowship of devoted sikh, founded in 1699 and celebrates the community, prosperity, and continued progress in the year ahead. so it is springtime, so we celebrate this very important event in the sikh community. i also want to talk about another event of the spring, one that you just heard a moment ago, from our colleague, miss axne of iowa, when she talked about the flooding that
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is occurring. as chairman of the senate subcommittee, house zpheet of the armed service committee of readiness, the question for the u.s. military is very, very clear. is the u.s. military ready for climate change? recent events indicate that there is considerable doubt. just this last year hurricanes florence and michael caused bills of dollars of damage -- billions of dollars in damage to camp lejeune and leveled much of the air force base. a photo might be better than my words. in describing the destruction at continuedle air force base. essentially this key air force base located on the panhandle of florida on the gulf coast was wiped out. we don't yet know how much it's
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going to cost to rebuild it. we do know that the air force is trying to sustain operations there and i'm told that by may they will be out of money to be able to sustain operations. we know that there's probably three $3 to $4 billion of damage at this air force base alone. keep in mind that this base is located literally on a sand spit adjacent to the gulf. when hurricanes come through, estruction is sure to occur. every marine knows this place. camp lejeune. it, too, was hit by a hurricane , not the winds but the deluge that came with the hurricane. flooding wiped out a large portion of the base.
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as you can see a tree did something that no marine would ever want to have happen, that is take out their barracks. but this base, too, sustained substantial damage. as a result of the hurricane and the flood that was precipitated by the hurricane. this is also a $3 to $4 billion event. the rebuilding of camp lejeune and tindle raises a serious question for those of us who must decide on the appropriations. should we even return to these locations which we know are going to be hit once again? and perhaps multiple times in the future. if we decide to return and spend the $3 billion to $4 billion to repair each of the bases, how will it be done? will it be done in the recognition that there is
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climate change? that the hurricanes will be stronger? the deluge even more? we must always build for resiliency. now, this isn't the only place that the military has sustained significant risk this year. i'm from california. and i know wildfires. and camp pendleton on the far side of this continent, another marine base, based evacuation of the family housing units when fires occurred in the hills above camp pendleton. naval air station point ma goo and the marine corps mountain warfare training center in the sierra nevada mountains also had to be evacuated as wildfires came down into those areas. addition, beyond camp
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lejeune, beyond tindle air force base, we know that our coastal installations and their vourneding communities are already experiencing significant flooding as sea levels rise. e army's ronald reagan ballistic missile defense test site in the pacific is threatened by sea level rise and is not expected to exist in 20 years. the navy's principal atlantic base, norfolk, hampton roads, and the naval academy are already experiencing flooding. we know that melting polar ice in the arctic region has already opened up new sea lanes and new routes and competition for resources in the arctic ocean. yet today it appears that the department of defense has not eveloped a systemic strategy
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for ensuring our u.s. national interests in the arctic and indeed the protection of our bases, key military bases here in the united states and around the world are prepared for climate change. i want to give you one more example. it was actually opened in a discussion a moment ago by my friend from iowa. now, this is not iowa. this is an air force base across the river from the photo you saw a few moments ago of the flooding in iowa. it's on the missouri river. this happens to be the strategy ir command's basic center. this is our nuclear weapons system. more than half of the base was
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under water and more than half of the base today is not operable. six years ago u.s. air force knew that this strategy air command base was subject to flooding, and indeed the flooding six years ago had come up to the edge of the runway. last week it inundated the runway and half of the base. . so back to my question. is the u.s. military ready for climate change? it would indicate from these few examples that the answer is no. so what are we to do about it? well, the united states military is one of the largest employers in the world. it is also one of the largest consumers of energy. the d.o.d., department of defense, owns millions of acres of global real property,
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including over 550,000 facilities valued at well over $1 trillion. and the department is uniquely situated to enhance its readiness and resiliency through effective energy policies, programs, and structures that are resilient in the face of climate change. installations, bases are where we generate the force, where we train and sustain them, and in many cases house critical operational missions, such as the strategic air command. ne way to enhance readiness is to consume less. in fiscal year 2017, the department of defense consumed over 85 million barrels of fuel to power ships, aircraft, combat vehicles, and
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contingency bases at a cost of nearly $8.2 billion. in many cases, through contract vehicles, energizing savings performance contracts, these energy savings and resiliency enhancements can be made at no upfront cost to the department of defense. in contested environments, such as afghanistan, syria, iraq, better fuel consumption extends the range and mitigates the risk to our military. the resupply of energy is one sft most dangerous things -- of the most dangerous things and resupplied convoys are targeted. naval vessels are vulnerable during at-sea replenishment. and for those land-based sites in remote locations, supporting
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contingency operations around the world lower fuel and water consumption rates are essential readiness enabler. helping that facility to maintain a lower profile at far less risk. it is essential that our bases and our facilities recover quickly from extreme weather events and from energy disruptions that impact mission capability. section 335 of the fiscal year 2018 national defense authorization act required the department of defense to report on the effects of climate change and on the department's proposals for mitigating those plans. we have that report in hand, nd only days after we received it, camp lejeune was flooded, tyndall was wiped out and now offet is flooded.
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we're not happy with the report that the military sent to the house armed services committee and the subcommittee on readiness. because that report did not meet the congressional reporting requirement that we sent to the department to describe future focused mitigations necessary to ensure mission resiliency. we're not going to stop. the military is going to come back to the committee and we're going to hammer home the necessity of resiliency. the necessity, as every boy scouts know, be prepared. and what do they need to be prepared for? certainly for their missions, whatever that might be. whether it's the strategic air command or the marines or the air force, but also to be prepared for the inevitable effects of climate change.
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now, to ensure that the military can perform its the nal defense mandate, department of defense, must, -- for for the climate change. the climate change adaptation road map that department put out noted that rising global temperatures, changing prescription patterns, climbing sea levels, and extreme weather events will intensify the challenges of global instability. hunger, poverty, and conflict are the inevitable results of climate change and the effect on communities all around the world. climate change will likely lead
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to food and water shortages, pandemic diseases, disputes over refuges and resources. and destruction by natural isasters across the globe. not only are these climate-related events impacting installations and base readiness, but they are lso creating more frequent request for military support for disaster relief and humanitarian assistance. and so both active duty service members, national guard personnel, and reserve personnel are increasingly responding to assist communities in impacted events here in the united states and around the world. climate change presents a myriad of readiness challenges, both here at home and abroad. .t's not only a future threat
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by the events of this year and last week, it is an event here and how. it is a threat today, and it is impacting the resiliency of our installations and our operations and is seriously impacting the readiness of the department of defense to meet its challenges all around the world. so we have our hands full, making sure that our military is ready in the era of climate change. now, if i might, madam speaker, change subjects and pick up another issue that is before us today. joining me in this discussion will be mr. parne from the beautiful state -- payne from the beautiful state of new jersey. in just a moment, mr. payne, let melee out what we're going to talk about -- let me lay
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out what we're going to talk about here. house democrats laid out new legislation to protect people with pre-existing conditions and also to lower health care costs. now, we know that over the last two years president trump has declared war on health care, and the democrats here in this house and in the senate intend to address that by lowering health care costs. last night in a federal court, president trump radically expanded his monstrous war on america's health care, asking the court, not only to strike down protections for people with pre-existing conditions, not only asking the court to strike down protections for people with pre-existing conditions conditions, but also to eliminate the varied last protections and benefits provided in the affordable care act. if president trump gets his way
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texas vs. u.s. lawsuit, he would destroy the ban on lifetime and annual limits of care. he would destroy the medicare expansion and the tax subsidies that make health insurance affordable for millions of americans. now, on the very first day of the 116th congress, the house democrats voted to throw the full legal weight of the house of representatives against what president trump is attempting to do in the texas vs. u.s. lawsuit. thanks to that vote, the house counsel has been able to intervene as a party in the lawsuit to argue on behalf of the health care of american people. but more than 190 of my republican colleagues stood behind the president in his
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brutal assault on american health care. now, unlike my colleagues on the republican side, today the democrats in congress are introducing legislation to protect pre-existing conditions and make health care more affordable act. we're taking another step forward to deliver on our promise to reverse the last 10 years of our republican colleagues' effort to sabotage the affordable care act and to lower health care costs that american families need. there are three parts to the legislation. lowering health care insurance premiums with strengthened and expanded affordable assistance, expanding the tax credits that make health care insurance more affordable to more middle-income families, and making them more sustainable to all of those who are eligible.
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point number two strengthens protections for people with pre-existing conditions. curtailing the trump administration's effort to give state waivers to undermine protections for people with pre-existing conditions. and weaken the standards for essential health benefits. third, stop the insurance companies from selling junk health insurance policies. and finally, reverses the g.o.p.'s health sabotage as they have driven up premiums and uninsured rates. we know we will have our hands full to get this passed -- past the senate and to the president's desk. but we hope, as this debate develops, as time goes by and americans realizing what they're losing as a result of the efforts of the trump administration and many of my republican colleagues to deny them the health care that they deserve as americans, that we will ultimately be successful
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in this legislation and that we will get the president to see clearly what he's doing to the american people as he promotes, defends, and attacks americans through texas vs. the u.s. lawsuit that's currently under way. so with that i'd like to ask my colleague, mr. payne, if he could join us with his comments. mr. payne: thank you, congressman garamendi, for your leadership and for bringing us together today on two very, very important topics. i have come to know you as a leader on issues that are impacting the american people, and from california to new jersey, you have demonstrated a concern for all people of this
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country and your constituents and to that i am grateful. today, the second topic on the democratic agenda for people and protecting conditions -- pre-existing conditions is both timely and important. yesterday, the trump administration unleashed another assault on the affordable care act. in federal court, the trump administration said that it agrees with the lower court's decision to overturn the affordable care act. after campaigning on the premise that he would work to improve health care, president trump wants to eliminate protections for people with pre-existing conditions. president trump wants to end the provision that allows young
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people to stay on their parents' health insurance plans. president trump wants to bring back junk insurance plans that take people's money but refuse to cover their medical expenses. why? because that's what will help -- will happen if president trump wins in federal court. it was not that long ago when the federal law allowed insurance companies to discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions. insurance companies could charge people with pre-existing conditions extremely high rates and refuse to cover them at all. the affordable care act eliminated legalized discrimination against people with pre-existing conditions. but now that the trump administration is fighting to bring health care
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discrimination back, well, there is no going back. more than 200,000 people in new jersey alone purchased their insurance through the affordable care act marketplace and have pre-existing conditions. nearly five million new jerseyans who get insurance through their employment could be harmed by the trump attack on the affordable care act's protections for people with pre-existing conditions. new jerseyans and all americans deserve protection, not discrimination. in my district, 16,000 people alone with pre-existing conditions would be at risk of coverage loss or premium increases. if they have the trump administration's -- if they have
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the trump administration successfully roll back the affordable care act. let me touch on the effects of this on women for a second. the affordable care act's protection for people with pre-existing conditions prevents insurance companies from charging women a higher premium on the basis of their being a woman. keeps insurance companies from charging women a higher premium on the basis of them being a woman. now, that is not something that they had very much of a choice in at birth. so it is -- it is immoral to hold that against them. when the trump administration is trying to do -- what the administration is trying to do
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would result in women facing significantly higher health insurance premiums simply because they are not men. that wasn't right before the affordable care act and it sure isn't right now. let me be clear, the trump administration wants to put the lives at risk by undermining people's acts -- access to health care in this nation. and let me be clear about this. i will keep fighting along with the gentleman from california to ensure that all americans' health care is protected. that is is the -- that is the least we can do in the position that our constituents have given us this task to be their voice in this house. and sir, i just want to once again commend you for always
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being timely in bringing these issues to light for the american people and for all the country to see that we here in the house of representatives do speak for them. i yield back. mr. garamendi: reclaiming my time, mr. payne, thank you very much, you're far too generous in your comments toward me. you are constantly here joining in these discussions and putting forth the interests of your constituents in your district in new jersey and across the wider america. thank you for raising those issues and particularly for pointing out the issue of pre-existing conditions as it affects women. before the affordable care act, every woman was considered to have a pre-existing condition. and indeed they were charged higher premiums. that's not the case with the affordable care act in law but if the texas case is successful if the president is successful
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in his arguments before the court and it is carried on, then those protections for women, more than 50% of the american population, will be gone. and beyond that, the expansion of the medicaid programs, those, too, will be gone. for people with pre-existing conditions, people that have diabetes or high blood pressure, their protections will be gone. so the effect on the pre-existing condition and particularly this case that the president has put his full support behind, it is an egregious attack on the health care and well being of americans. you so well pointed that out. thank you so much for doing that. mr. payne: thank you. mr. garamendi: thank you, mr. payne. there are a couple of other things i do want to speak to today. today, the house armed services full committee had before it the
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acting secretary of defense as well as the chief of the -- the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. and issues were raised during that committee hearing about readiness. specifically about the efforts of the president to circumvent the constitution of the united states and to take unto himself the appropriation power which is clearly laid out in the constitution as the power of congress. article 1, section 9 of the constitution clearly says that there shall be no money taken to the treasury except by appropriation law. that's the power of the purse. that's given to congress. and the founders were very clear that if the president would have not only the power of carrying out the law, but also the power
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of appropriation, that is money to carry out the law, that we would have a completely different system. in fact, we would have an imperial presidency. they didn't want that. and they wrote very clearly into the constitution that no money shall be taken from the treasury without an appropriation. now the congress acted on this issue. acted on the issue with an appropriations bill and did not -- congress did not agree with the president. and instead of the $5 billion, $6 billion the president wanted for his border wall, congress said no. and provided $1.3 billion for border security including some fences in some locations. very clearly, congress said no to the president. and congress appropriated money for a specific purpose. no sooner was that legislation
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signed by the president than the president attempting to assert the power of -- to usurp the power of congress and to appropriate for himself some $8 illion by manipulating the existing emergency laws that allow the declaration of emergency and money to be spent for that emergency. ok. that's what he wanted to do. be clear in understanding that this is the attempt by the president to appropriate money. in an unconstitutional and, i believe, illegal way. now it's not just a constitutional issue. it is also an issue of readiness for the military. we're talking about tens of millions of dollars to rebuild
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offatt air force base, the home f the strategic air command. we're talking about $3 billion to $4 billion to rebuild camp lejeune. one of the two major domestic bases for the u.s. marine corps. we're talking about $3 billion o $4 billion to rebuild tyndaa air force base in florida. home of the f-22 fighter jets and the new presumed home of the ew f-35 multitask fighter. so. we should ask, if the president s able to divert $6 billion to
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$8 billion from the military construction account which we call milcon, and use it for his border wall, where are we to find the money, the $3 billion to $4 billion to rebuild tyndall, the $3 billion to $4 billion to rebuild camp lejeune, and all the other bases in the united states and around the orld that face climate change? where are we going to get the money? if you happen to be a deficit hawk you'll be excited about the prospect, it's going to be borrowed money. and the way in which the budget and appropriations process works here, critical programs that the military has deemed essential for the readiness of our agreedy and congress has to that, authorized and appropriated money for that
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purpose, those programs will be delayed. and we'll simply increase the deficit to do it so that the president can fulfill his campaign promise of a big, beautiful border wall. last week, i was in jordan on a military mission to look at our troops there, to look at the situation in syria and iraq, also i was in iraq. and specifically went to look at a program that the u.s. avernment had funded to build modern 21st century border security program for the jordan military and the jordan government. over 300 miles between jordan and syria in the most violent , t of the world with isis
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with refugees, with military weapons, with drugs, all of that. spent $345 million of taxpayer money building a 21st century border security system. a system that involves observation techniques of many kinds, a system that involves observation towers at appropriate locations along that 300-plus mile border. and quick response teams to go where there was an incursion across the border. and by all accounts, from our own military, from the jordan military, it is effective. now, the president wants $8 billion for 150 miles of fence and walls.
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there's a better way. as democrats we have been calling for this better way for months and months and in fact, in the legislation that the president signed it is the better way. it's not a big beautiful wall with trump written on it. it is in fact, a virtual system. similar to what we built in jordan in the most dangerous place in the world. and it works. so we need to be very careful there because that is $8 billion that will not be available to make our american military installations all around the world ready for the task that they have before them. and so, as we ponder this issue, so as we go through the appropriation process this
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spring, and so as we fight this constitutional battle with the president, over the founding -- founding athers mothers' and fathers' understanding of what an imperial presidency could become if they have appropriation power as well as the power to execute the law, they said no. the president cannot have that power. as we fight this fundamental constitutional issue, we should also keep in mind that there is a better way to protect our southern border, or any border, for that matter. and it is essential that we spend the money that we have appropriated for the military to protect their readiness and in so doing, protect the security and safety of america. so we will have this debate and so this debate will hopefully
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result in the american public understanding what they should have learned in grammar school about civics and about the separation of power. unfortunately, our president seems to have missed that class. we're not going to let it go. this is not a democratic or republican issue. this is an american onstitutional issue. so let us proceed. let us proceed in full understanding of what is at stake here. the rebuilding of the bases, yes. more importantly, the very fundamental notion of the separation of powers that is inherent in the constitution and by the way, which every member of the house of representatives, every senator, and every general , including acting secretaries of state, have taken an oath to defend and uphold the constitution. and we all do well to read article 1, section 9.
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and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. >> i rise to recognize the defabo family, constituents of mine in pennsylvania who run harvest home farms. they were recently honored with pennsylvania's first-everly polled conservation a-- first-ever leopold conservation award for demonstrating excellence in environmentally sustainable farming practices.
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richard defabo, his wife, lynn, and their sons dole and dane work hard seven days a week. their days are long and as richard says, it's a family effort that only works because everyone pitches in. in richard's words, it all tarts with the health of the soil. less runoff means cleaner creeks and rivers which leads to cleaner air. it benefits the whole community. you need to protect those resources or there's not going to be anything left for the next generation. ms. wild: congratulations to the defabo family, not just for this award, but for their dedication to being responsible stewards of the earth and for the powerful example they are setting. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. under the speaker's announced policy -- the chair lays before the house the following message. the clerk: to the congress of
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the united states, section 202-d of the national emergencies act provides for the automatic termination of a national emergency unless within 90 days before the anniversary date of its declaration the president publishes in the federal register and transmits to the congress a notice stating the emergency is to continue in effect beyond the anniversary date. in accordance with this provision, i have sent to the federal register for publication the enclosed notice stating that the national emergency declared in executive order 13694 of april 1, 2015, as amended by executive order 13757 of december 28, 2016, is to continue in effect beyond april 1, 2019. sigma lishes cyber enabled activities originating from or directed by persons located in whole or in substantial part outside the united states continue to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the united states.
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therefore, i have determined that it is necessary to continue the national emergency declared in executive order 13694, as amended by executive order 13757 with respect to gma mishes -- significant malicious cyber enabled activities. signed, donald j. trump, president of the united states. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. mr. estes is recognized for 60 minutes as designee of the minority leader. mr. estes: thank you, mr. speaker. on march 21, our country and the world celebrated world down syndrome awareness day. this afternoon, i'm happy to lead my colleagues in recognizing this important day and all of the contributions individuals with down syndrome make each day to families, businesses, schools, and
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communities. from brothers and sisters to employees and business owners to artists and models, people with down syndrome have an incredible impact on every part of society. they deserve our support, understanding, and full acceptance. thankfully there are many groups and programs that have made it their mission to support those individuals with down syndrome and their families. as kansas state treasurer, i advocated for passage of the federal able act and led the effort to implement it in kansas. you know, it's kind of one of those things that several years ago i didn't necessarily expect i was going to be standing here today, so i was going through the process of how do we lobby, how do we make sure that a good program gets passed through the federal legislative process that benefits so many people, and then having to take that initiative in my home state of kansas and work through the
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legislature and making sure we implemented it to help people's quality of life and enable to live the lives they wanted to live and make it more beneficial to them. you know, this important law created tax savings accounts, tax-free savings accounts for individuals with disabilities to cover expenses like health care, education, housing, and transportation. you know, it's important for parents raising a child to be able to help provide their care. obviously, the concern on the part of parents is that over years, particularly as parents age, they want to make sure their children, in some cases when they are in their adult life, are able to enjoy the life they want, the life that they deserve, and these -- the program like able was able to help make that dream come true. you know, these programs are similar to the 529 college savings programs, to health savings accounts, and individual retirement accounts.
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you know, the able programs give people with down syndrome and other disabilities the opportunities to live the life they deserve. the kansas able act went into effect in january, 017, and i was proud to be part -- 2017, and i was proud to be part of that effort because it's the right thing to do you know, in congress i've been humbled to work with organizations like the national down syndrome society to build upon progress of the able act. last year, i was honored to receive the 2018 national down syndrome society impact award and look forward to supporting their mission in this congress. this year, i'm also honored to be on the honorary committee for accept able gala hosted by the global down syndrome foundation, an annual event in washington, d.c., that supports lifesaving research and medical care for children and adults with down syndrome. back home in kansas, i'm also inspired by groups like the arc
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of sedgwick county which supports individuals living with intellectual disabilities such as down syndrome. justs a these groups supports people with down syndrome it's my hope in congress we can do the same thing. i look forward to discussing this more today o, but at this time i'm happy to yield to lept tiff -- representative peet stauber from minnesota. - pete stauber from minnesota. mr. stauber: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in honor of world down syndrome day which was thursday, march 21. one of the greatest blessings in my life is my 16-year-old son isaac who has down syndrome. each day he brings join to our lives, and i am so proud of everything he has accomplished. world down syndrome day is an excellent opportunity to raise awareness about the challenges
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that down syndrome brings, but it's also a chance to celebrate just how incredible people with down syndrome truly are. it absolutely breaks my heart, just breaks my heart when i hear some people say that they would rather get an abortion than have a child with down syndrome. the sheer ignorance of those individuals is disheartening to me. they do not see what a blessing all of god's children are, even if they are different, and that is unfortunate for them. if they met my son isaac i know they'd have a change of heart. when we talk about disabilities, i want us to talk about the abilities of those like my son isaac instead of focusing on what they can't do, let's focus on what they can do. the limit to what people like isaac can accomplish is not
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determined by their condition but by how we -- but by how much we love them and give them the empowerment so they can navigate the world of work, education, and public life. as isaac's dad and now as a member of congress, i am committed to strongly advocating for the inclusively of those who live with disabilities and the protection of their lives always. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back. mr. estes: thank you, representative stauber. you know, it's important for us as representatives to actually stand up for what we think's important and obviously as parents we all care about our children. we want to make sure they get the best opportunities that they can. and as elected representatives, one of the things that -- one of the reasons i ran for office
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was to make sure that we could have an impact and make sure we can make a difference in people's lives and, you know, when i look at the role of the federal government, one of the things that's most important for us is making sure that we can help those individuals live out the life that, you know, is embedded in our constitution and in the declaration of independence and having the right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness. people having that opportunity to live and enjoy all the blessings of this great country. you know, we can talk a lot about different issues and there's obviously lots of us here in the halls of congress that want to talk about some of those issues. one of the next speakers is my good friend from arkansas, representative french hill, who wants to weigh in on this subject as well. mr. hill: i thank my friend from kansas. appreciate him organizing an opportunity to come to the house floor and talk about this important issue. as the father of two children,
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i've been committed to policies for a safe and enduring future for all kids and understand we have to ensure the protection of kids no matter what their walk in life, particularly those with developmental disabilities. and, mr. speaker, over 200,000 in the united states live with down syndrome. one in 792 babies born with this genetic disorder. and while there have been great advances in medical research and public policy to enhance the lives of those affected by down syndrome, there's still much work to be done. individuals with disabilities face many challenges, and i understand the need to ensure access to vital services and medical equipment to support independent and active lives. this is critical to help effectively live with downs. getting our kids the proper development path at a young age helps them ensure they will be
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healthier adults with a bright future. for over 20 years, i've watched with such pleasure young people begin to build that proper developmental path at access academy in little rock or easter seals academy at riverdale. as a former member of the board of directors of kansas children's hospital, i saw firsthand how important it was that parents are given the tools they need to keep their children healthy and this is particularly important for families that have a child with a disability. back in 1990, president george h.w. bush signed the a.d.a. into law, the americans with disabilities act, and i was proud to have been working on president bush's staff at that time. it was an amazing piece of legislative work that brought this congress together that has
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benefited thousands and millions of americans and families since. so i look forward to working with my colleagues to build upon that legislation so that all americans can reach their full potential no matter what challenges they face. and i continue to support efforts that provide services to individuals and families that are impacted by down syndrome. regardless of political ideology, i think we can all agree, every single child deserves protection. and when i think about the kids over the past two decades that i watched grow up who had incredibly nurturing parents that got them on that developmental path in the right way that sacrificed so they had that opportunity to talk about what my colleague did in the pursuit of happiness, when i see them smiling at workplaces when i visit in conway, north little rock, little rock, that
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they have a job, that they're out working, that they have that self-sufficiency and excitement of the work they do and it gives me such a warm feeling to see their success with all the hard work they've put in to that pursuit of happiness. finally, mr. estes, i have to say, and i don't think it should be left unsaid today, that a right to abortion should not extend to children with traits deemed undesirable or inconvenient. would we throw away a life so casually if the child had the wrong color eyes or offtexture hair? of course not. if a child does not fit the physical ideals of the parents, they should be treated with the same degree of medical attention, love and care as any other child. as a proud catholic and proud pro-life member of congress, i
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believe we need to value life. so i thank my friend from kansas for hosting this important event today to talk about down syndrome and the love we have for our american citizens that live with down syndrome and the affection we have and support we have for their families and i yield back to my friend from kansas and thank him for his invitation. mr. estes: thank you, representative hill. it's tremendous to be able to work with representatives like you, that have a goal to focus on, how do we make life better, how do we provide opportunities for individuals. you touched on a sad part in society today, where so many people seem to think that it is right that just because of some particular trait that the parents don't necessarily like, that they're able to kill
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individuals because of that through abortion. you know, when we're talking about down syndrome and the awareness of that, it's a sad fact that we've got to address this issue. we've got to address that. extreme discrimination in some individuals. that want to impress upon those people who may have down syndrome, even before they have a chance to live a life, you know. in the united states, 2/3, 67%, of by bys diagnosed with down syndrome while in the room are aborted. in countries in europe, it's even worse. in france, the rate is 77%. in denmark, it's 98%. in iceland, it's nearly 100%. where late term abortions are allowed if the baby has a deformity which includes down syndrome, to yet a cbs news article. in a society where down syndrome
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individuals can have a wonderful quality of life and pursue their dreams this discrimination needs to be brought to light. we live during a time when there's so much medical innovation. so many opportunities. so many brilliant things that our doctors are developing. we need to make sure that we capitalize on that innovation, make sure we allow people the opportunity to live a full life and live the opportunities that they enjoy. this innovation unfortunately has been used to -- by individuals to determine the sex, determine if the child is healthy, determine if the child has certain traits, and in some cases, for positive reasons, to determine whether there's some medical necessity to operate while in the womb to make sure that that individual that child, enjoys quality of life. however, we need to make sure
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that that testing process never gets corrupted, never gets used in a discriminatory way. and is never used to justify abortion. it's a sad fact that we're seeing so many things being talked about in an abortion arena nowadays. so many people beating that drum. we've got to stand up in our country, we want to be able to stand up for people's rights and we want to be able to stand up for opportunities for babies to live and have the opportunity that -- to live a life that we all enjoy as well. you know, i would now like to allow another one of my fellow colleagues the opportunity to speak and talk about this very important issue. so right now, the gentleman from texas, representative babin. mr. babin: thank you to my great
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colleague from the state of kansas. thank you for having this. mr. speaker, on march 21, we celebrated world down syndrome awareness day. what an appropriate thing to celebrate as individuals with down syndrome make incredible contributions to society every single day that should be acknowledged and appreciated. and i for one am thankful for all of those with down syndrome that i have had the great pleasure and honor of knowing and learning from. with the rise of prenatal screening tests across the united states, the number of babies born with down syndrome every year has significantly decreased. and while we do not know the exact number of down sin drem children who are aborted each year, it is estimated that approximately 2/3 of children diagnosed in the womb are aborted. 2/3.
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2/3 of children. who would go on to make a significant impact in this world are murdered before they're given a chance to even -- to be able to have that opportunity. iceland in particular has almost completely eradicated down syndrome births. statistics show they have an almost 100% drop in the termination rate of down syndrome children. france has a 77% termination rate. while denmark is at 98%. i pray that the united states will reject the idea that down syndrome children somehow are less than other children. as a society, we should move away from any idea that advocates killing any child in its mother's womb. as a pro-life congressman, i believe that all life is valuable, especially the lives of those who cannot speak for
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themselves. aborted down syndrome children are just that. they're children. who have their own hopes and dreams for a future and live a long, healthy life. to take away their right to life is inconceive to believe me and jab hornet. i will continue to -- and abhorrent. i will continue to fight for legislation that protects every single unborn child, regardless of whether or not they have an extra chromosome. i thank you and i yield back. mr. estes: thank you, representative babin. i appreciate those words. you know, us as fellow colleagues have such an important role trying to work on how do we bring forth those american principles and opportunities for everybody. thank you very much. you know, in recent months, we have seen politicians from
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states around the country embrace late term abortions and openly discuss infanticide. individuals with down syndrome would be among the most severely impacted by these tragic policies. to help respond to that, my colleagues and i have repeatedly called to bring forward the born alive abortion survivors protection act for a vote. this straightforward bill would require health care practitioners to give the same care to a child who survived a botched abortion just as they would any other newborn child. currently, the bill has 182 co-sponsors. unfortunately, a vote on the bill has been blocked 21 times now by the majority. however, as we rise to commemorate world down syndrome day, i call on my colleagues once again to consider this bill and any other one that would protect life and support those with down syndrome.
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you know, there's 250,000 people in america with down syndrome. they live healthy, productive, happy lives. just like you and i do. and want to have the same hopes and dreams and goals. we need more awareness of what a dige know soifs down syndrome really means. it means that a child simply has an extra chromosome and that nothing else about their life is different from you or me. they have so much to contribute to this world and they deserve that chance. last year, i had the chance to meet david eagan. he's a felllow working for the national down syndrome society, previously worked for the house ways and means committee. when i met him, he told me how much he wanted to help others with down syndrome, accomplish anything they wanted to do just as he has done in his own life and career. i'm -- excuse me.
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i'm inspired by people like david and i want to thank my colleagues who join me today for this special order recognizing world down sin drem day. i look forward to working with congress to support those with down syndrome and with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. does the gentleman have a motion? mr. estes: move to recess until tomorrow at 10:00. i move to adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands adjourned until 10:00 a.m.e as
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consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. defazio: madam speaker, today we will vote to override the president's veto of congress' bipartisan action to terminate his so-called national emergency declaration. the bottom line is that this emergency declaration is nothing more than an end run around a majority, bipartisan majority, of both the house and the senate, in complete disregard of our constitutional system of separation of powers. there is no doubt that we have

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