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tv   U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives  CSPAN  October 29, 2019 11:59am-2:00pm EDT

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,ould you support decoupling separating work from health care so that people get health care whether they work or not? ,eople do not choose to be sick right? why is it that they have to work before they have health care? why can't they just have health care? i am a member of the high life radio team and we have a lot of audience here in the d.c. metropolitan area who are interested in this health care, especially immigrants from ghana. work? health care link to guest: >> watch the rest of it online at c-span.org. u.s. house about to gavel back in for legislative business for the day. lawmakers will plan to debate a resolution officially recognizing the armenian genocide. they are also expected to work on bills dealing with u.s. public lands and sanctions
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against turkey. now to live coverage of the u.s. house here on c-span.
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the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by our guest chaplain, rabbi evan hoffman, congress regation anshe sholom, new rochelle, new york. the chaplain: o lord, grant them the wisdom to draft laws that best serve the interests of the american people. o lord, in a time of polarization an rank rouse dispute, we beseech thee to help
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our elected officials to maintain decorum, civility, commonality of purpose and a sense of shared american investment. guide our representatives so that they might serve in the eyes of the citizenry as role models of reconciliation and cooperation. we pray that in a future time, the prophets words might be said in reference to this congress, restore your judges as in days of old, your counselors as at the beginning. bless our nation with peace and prosperity, our citizens with health and happiness, and our national institutions with strength and stability. may this be your will and let us say, amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the chamber her approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1, the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance will be
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led by the gentleman from north carolina, mr. budd. mr. budd: would everyone including our friends in the gallery join us. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: without objection the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, is recognized for one minute. mr. engel: thank you, madam speaker. i rise today to thank my dear friend and constituent rabbi evan hoffman for giving the opening prayer today. rabbi hoffman has led congress regation anshe sholom in new rorblee, new york, since 2012. he graduated yeshiva college sue ma cum laude where he received laude. cum
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he's an accomplished author, as well as the editor of english language publications for talmud israeli. he's an -- he was raised in new york and is an avid new york mets fans. he and his wife are the parents of two wonderful children. i want to thank my friend for the wonderful prayer this morning. thank you, madam speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain up to 15 requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? without objection. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to applaud the house approval of the veteran treatment court coordination act legislation led by congressman charlie crist of
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which i'm a proud co-sponsor. directing grants, training, and assistance for communities to establish and operate veteran treatment courts. in 2008, bowel city court judge robert russell established the very first veteran treatment court in the nation. today there are over 400 such courts. mr. higgins: these specialized courts provide veterans, many battling substance abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder with a tactical path to avoid jail and take command of their future. at their side, fellow veterans who serve as volunteer mentors as well as judges an professional staff who cap connect these warriors with veterans administration benefits. support for these courts allows the nation to give veteran what is they have given us, freedom and peace. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? without objection the gentleman
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is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. congratulations to president donald trump for receiving the bipartisan justice award for his historic success on criminal justice reform at columbia's benedict college. this is another example of president trump's promises made, promises kept, accomplishing what former administrations failed to achieve. also proving the importance of doing what's right and focusing on issues truly affecting the american people. it is always exciting for south carolinians when president trump visits. my wife, roxanne, and i were grate to feel welcome president trump at the columbia airport at intringdale with the governor and first lady, the lieutenant governor and her husband, and senator scott. i'm grateful for benedict college president for her dedicated service. in conclusion, god bless our troops an we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman s recognized for one minute. mr. langevin: mr. speaker, in rhode island and across the country, the manufacturing industry employees americans in high-pay, high-skilled jobs while driving innovation and bolstering our national defense. unfortunately, manufacturers in my home state informed me they can't find enough qualified candidates to fill job openings and their current work force is aging. this is something that is facing manufacturers across the country. to address this challenge aye been a strong advocate for career and technical education. yesterday i introduced the career attainment in manufacturing excellence act. this bill which hasst a companion to one in the senate helps train new workers, provides funds to retain
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retiring employees long enough to train their replacements. our nation's manufacturers are a cornerstone of our economy. i'm proud to introduce this bill in national manufacturing month. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today to recognize the club of jacksonville, florida, celebrating 100 years of service and camaraderie within our northeast florida community. members are often leaders who join together to make a positive impact on others. for a century they have made a difference in the lives of many through their annual charity projects and numerous scholarships for students including $25,000 youth
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leadership grants each year. mr. rutherford: since 1933 they have sponsored the ocean marathon swim, a .5 mile swim competition for members of the american red cross at jacksonville beach. among their many charitable works include building homes for those in need, working with the salvation army in christmas time and mentoring local disadvantaged folks in jacksonville. i congratulate them for 100 years of lending help where none is available. with that, mr. chairman, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: thank you, mr. speaker. i -- >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to highlight a critical piece of legislation that my colleagues and i are currently marking up next door. the college affordability act.
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for too many students across our nation, the dream of pursuing higher education remains out of reach. rising tuition costs and financially debilitating loans prevent young people from reaching their full potential and that is simply unacceptable. that is why we are working to provide relief for students through the college ain orderability act. this re-authorization, the higher education act, restores federal investments in public college, increases the value of grant opportunities and makes student loans easier to pay off. nothing should stand in the way of the success of our children's educational opportunity, especially not the fear of crippling loverple debt. with that, mr. speaker, i'm on my way back to the committee room to continue our work to make higher education accessible and affordable for all students. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from north carolina seek reck snigs >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker.
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i rise today to recognize lexington, north carolina, native sara davis for recently becoming yellowstone national park's first chief female ranger. this is a huge milestone in our davidson county community -- and our davidson county community could not be more proud of her. over the past two decades, sara has held various leadership roles including at north carolina's own guilford courthouse national military park and also blue ridge parkways. sara is well suited for this position as she becomes the 18th chief ranger in more than 100 years of yellowstone national park. when asked to describe our leadership qualities, the superintendent said, she's an outstanding leader with a track record of high performance, strategic thinking and collaboration. mr. speaker, please join me in congratulating sara davis of lexington, north carolina, on her new position at yellowstone national park. we wish her the best of luck. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for
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what purpose does the gentlewoman from massachusetts seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of house resolution 296, that commemorates the armenian genocide through official recognition and remembrance. more than 100 years ago, an estimated 1.5 million armenians were massacred by the ottoman empire. there is no argument that this undeniable crime against humanity occurred. ms. clark: it is not an opinion or interpretation of events, it is fact. yet despite the overwhelming consensus of historians and scholars, there are those who would deny the awful truth that this was a yenside. to those i would say if you do not recognize the darkest pages of history, you will never fully learn the lessons they hold.
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so today i stand with my constituents from across my district, but particularly from watertown, massachusetts, home to a thriving armenian diaspora community, to urge this house to pass house resolution 296 and recognize this crime against humanity for what it was. a genocide. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one many -- for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize october asierman american heritage month. mr. thompson: i'm proud to co-chair the congressional german-american caucus with my good friend and colleague, congressman bill keating. the mission of the caucus is highlighting german contributions to our country. this past summer, cookman keating and i introduced house resolution 446, a bipartisan
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resolution recognizing the importance of the alliance between the united states and germany and to underscore our shared commitment to democracy. the resolution reaffirm ours support of the wunderbar initiative together which brings together 200 partners nationwide to celebrate jerman american contributions to culture, arts, science and more. today there are more than 250 million americans of german descent living in the united states. i would like to urge my colleagues to join congressman keating and i in supporting h r. 446 and celebrating our long-standing relationship with germany as friends and allies. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlewoman from florida seek recognition? >> by direction of the committee on rules i call up house resolution 656 and ask for its
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immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will read the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 51. ouse resolution 656. resolved, that at any time after ading of this resolution the chair can declare the house in the committee of the whole house on the state of the union. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. general debate shall be confined to the bill and amendments specified in this section and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on natural resources. after general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the
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committee on natural resources now printed in the bill, modified by the amendment printed in part a of the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution, shall be considered as adopted in the house and in the committee of the whole. the bill, as amended, shall be considered as the original bill for the purpose of further amendment under the five-minute rule and shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended, are waived. no further amendment to the bill, as amended, shall be in order except those printed in part b of the report of the committee on rules. each such further amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the house or in the committee of the whole. all points of order against such further amendments are waived. at the conclusion of
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consideration of the bill for amendment the committee shall rise and report the bill, as amended, to the house with such further amendments as may have been adopted. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, and on any further amendment thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or ithout instructions. section 2, at any time after adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill, h.r. 1373, to protect, for current and future generations, the watershed, ecosystem, and cultural heritage of the grand canyon region in the state of arizona, and for other purposes. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. general debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and
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controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on natural resources. after general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. it shall be in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the committee on natural resources now printed in the bill. the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered as read. all points of order against the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute are waived. no amendment to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in order except those printed in part c of the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution. each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the
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house or in the committee of the whole. all points of order against such amendments are waived. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the committee shall rise and report the bill to the house with such amendments as may have been adopted. any member may demand a separate vote in the house on any amendment adopted in the committee of the whole to the bill or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill and amendments thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or ithout instructions. section 3, at any time after adoption of this resolution the speaker may, pursuant to clause 2-b of rule 18, declare the house resolved into the committee of the whole house on the state of the union for consideration of the bill, h.r. 2181, to provide for the withdrawal and protection of certain federal land in the state of new mexico. the first reading of the bill shall be dispensed with. all points of order against
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consideration of the bill are waived. general debate shall be confined to the bill and amendments specified in this section and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on natural resources. after general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. the amendment printed in part d of the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution shall be considered as adopted in the house and in the committee of the whole. the bill, as amended, shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended, are waived. no further amendment to the bill, as amended, shall be in order except those printed in part e of the report of the committee on rules. each such further amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be
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subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question in the house or in the committee of the whole. all points of order against such further amendments are waived. at the conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the committee shall rise and report the bill, as amended, to the house with such further amendments as may have been adopted. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, and on any further amendment thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 4, on any legislative day during the period from november 1, 2019, through november 11, 2019, a, the journal of the proceedings of the previous day shall be considered as approved, and, b, the chair may at any time declare the house adjourned to meet at a date and time, within the limits of clause 4, section 5, article i of the constitution, to be announced by the chair in declaring the adjournment. section 5, the speaker may
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appoint members to perform the duties of the chair for the duration of the period addressed by section 4 of this resolution as though under clause 8-a of rule 1. section 6, each day during the period addressed by section 4 of this resolution shall not constitute a calendar or legislative day for purposes of clause 7-c-1 of rule 22. section 7, each day during the period addressed by section 4 of this resolution shall not constitute a legislative day for purposes of clause 7 of rule 15. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from florida is recognized for one hour. ms. shalala: mr. speaker, for the purposes of debate only i yield the customary 30 minutes to the gentlewoman from arizona, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. during the consideration of this resolution all time yielded is for the purposes of debate only. i ask unanimous consent that all
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members may have five legislative days to revise and . tend their remarks the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. shalala: mr. speaker, yesterday the rules committee met last night and reported house resolution 656, providing r consideration of h.r. 823, the colorado outdoor recreation and economy act, h.r. 1373, the grand canyon centennial protection act, and h.r. 2181, thele chacko cultural heritage protection act, each under a structured rule. the rule provides each bill with one hour of general debate equally vided and controlled by the chair and the -- divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on natural resources. the rule makes in order 13 amendments total, 10 republican
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amendments and three democratic amendments. the rule also provides each bill with a motion to recommit. finally, the rule provides recessing instructions from november 1 through november 11. i rise today in support of the in this rule h.r. 823, h.r. 1373, and h.r. 2181. these important bills recognize the need to protect unique and irreplaceable american landscapes. public lands that belong to all of us. not to the highest bidder and not to any individual representative or party. president theodore roosevelt once said, of all the questions which can come before this nation, there is none which compares in importance with the
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great central task of leaving this land even better land for our desendants than it is for us. and that is what these three bills attempt to do. they represent the culmination of years of locally driven efforts. these bills protect some of our most iconic lands and resources. h.r. 823 is the result of collaborative efforts among a diverse set of local stakeholders with a shared interest in providing long-term protections for public lands in colorado. the bill build on earlier proposals to protect roughly 400,000 acres of public lands for the benefit of the people of colorado and all americans. h.r. 2181 would withdrawal lands within a long-standing 10-mile
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buffer zone around the chacko cultural national historical park. this withdrawal would protect an ancestral site for the pueblo and tribal communities. it would prevent damage to previously undiscovered cultural resources. chako cultural national historic park, a unesco world heritage site was the hub of trade and culture for thousands of ancestral peblans -- puebloians from 1850 to 1250 a.d. lastly, h.r. 1373 would permanently prohibit new mining claims on approximately one million acres of public land surrounding grand canyon national park. the crown jewel of our national park service. of course not counting
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everglades national park or biscayne national park in south florida. in south florida we are all too familiar with what can happen if we fail to protect our most vulnerable and most unique lands and waters. whether the everglades, big cypress, and the miami river, or the grand canyon, chako cultural national historical park and public lands in colorado, we have a deep obligation to conserve and restore these lands and science tells us as the climate crisis intensifies these efforts have never been more urgent. mr. speaker, i proudly support these historic steps forward. let us pass these bills. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentlelady from arizona is
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recognized. mrs. lesko: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank representative shalala for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. lesko: energy and mining are critical drivers of the american economy and the quality of life. these industries create thousands of well paying jobs. united states cannot reach or sustain our potential without developing our natural resources. but today we are debating three bills that put american energy, american quality of life, and the american national security at risk. it seems just yesterday that i was here at this very same podium speaking much of these same words. in fact, it was just last month.
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at that time i spoke out against bills banning offshore drilling. now this majority wants to pass sweeping bans on even more domestic natural resources. this time they want to ban american energy from colorado, new mexico, and my home state of arizona. as i said last month they want to ban it all. and american families, including arizona families, will pay the price. h.r. 823 withdraws areas in colorado from mineral development. this bill particularly impacts its third congressional district , represented by congressman scott tipton. 65% of the lands affected by this bill are in his district.
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yet this bill does not have his support. nor the support of any of the republican members of the colorado delegation. similarly h.r. 2181 withdraws federal lands in new mexico from resource development. it also terminates all nonproducing oil and gas leases on those lands. finally, h.r. 1373, i believe, is a misleadingly titled land grab that deals with land far outside the grand canyon. i believe it is deeply misguided. arizona currently produces $6.6 billion in nonfuel mineral which is makes it the second largest state in the production of minerals in the united states. yet, this bill would permanently
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lock up about one million acres of public land in arizona, hampering the economic potential of my state. the area impacted by this bill lso contains the largest tract of uranium deposits in the country. restricting access to these deposits puts our national security at risk because we have to rely on foreign countries to provide us uranium. it is also important to note that much of the lands affected by this bill are in arizona's fourth congressional district, represented by my good friend, ongressman gosar of arizona. yet mr. gosar has expressed very clear on stoigs this bill. these three bills ignore the economic benefits of domestic
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energy production, energy development brings high paying jobs. facility -- facilitates manufacturing and investment and prvidse government revenues. energy development in the united states also makes energy more affordable for everyone. the average salary paid in the natural gas and oil development fields is $113,000 a year. and the energy industry supports 300,000 jobs. domestic oil production has allowed americans to spend 28% less in fuel, resulting in arly $1,000 in savings per family in 2018 alone. to my constituents, that's a lot of money. i believe in an all of the above energy approach. in my home state of arizona this is the reality and a necessity.
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we have to rely on multiple and diverse energy sources to ensure affordable and reliable energy. i support nuclear, hydroelectric, coal, sun, wind, and other alternative sources and i also support domestic oil and natural gas production. and all of the -- an all of the above approach like that in arizona would benefit american families and their quality of life. in contrast, the bans that the democrats propose would harm the u.s. economy, threaten our national security, and increase energy prices and rates on consumers. i urge opposition to the rule and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from arizona reserves. the gentlewoman from florida is recognized. >> i have no further speakers and i'm prepared to close.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentlewoman from arizona is recognized. mrs. lesko: thank youing mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. lesko: if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to the rule to make in order a resolution to prevent any moratorium on the use of hydraulic fracking on federal lands unless authorized by congress. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert into the record the text of my amendment and any other extraneous material prior to the vote on the previous question. this resolution would affirm that states should maintain primacy for the regulation of hydraulic fracturing and prevent any president from imposing a ban on hydraulic fracturing. in recent weeks, many of the democratic candidates for president have pledged to ban hydraulic fracturing in the united states. a campaign promise straight out
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of the keep it in the ground playbook. this widely used practice is often vilified by extreme environmentalists and propobets of the green new deal, in fact -- proponents of the green new deal, in fact, hydraulic fracturing is heavily regulated by the states and regulated by stringent laws through the the country. american households have benefited significantly from the shale gas revolution. after the introduction of hydraulic fracturing techniques, u.s. gas bills fell by $13 billion collectively every year from 2007 to 2013. all the while, natural gas production using fracking is driving emissions reductions resulting in -- driving lower emission reductions resulting the lowest emission levels in a generation.
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n fact, methane emissions have decreased 15% since 1990 as natural gas production increased ver 50%. the sust leading the way in energy production in the energy sector. in 2017, u.s. carbon emissions reached the lowest level since 1992 and per capita emissions reached the lowest level since 1950. also, banning domestic oil and gas production will return the u.s. to a time when we relied on foreign countries for oil and gas. remember the 1970's? we d not want to put our country in national security risk. and i am ready to close. mr. speaker, in closing, the bills before us today are
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harmful to american jobs. american quality of life and american security. the message underlying these bills is the false notion that domestic energy production is harmful. i cannot disagree more. domestic energy production creates hundreds of thousands of well-paying jobs, lowers electricity bills, and prevents us from being dependent on foreign actors. utilizing america's natural resources is a commonsense step for america's energy future. america must be able to utilize its natural resources for our economy and for our national security. we should encourage an expansion of domestic energy production, but instead, my democratic colleagues in the majority seek to limit them. mr. speaker, i urge no on the previous question, no on the
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underlying measure and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields. the gentlewoman from florida is ecognized. smazz layla: with all due respect to my distinguished colleague and friend from arizona, these bills recognize that some places, lands that belong to coloradans, to arizonans, to the ancestral pueblo peoples, belong to all americans. and they're just too precious to ex-ploit. ms. shalala: i'd like to close once again by yetting our conservation president, tedy roosevelt. we have fallen heirs to the most glor rouse heritage a people must eceived and each one do his part if we wish to show the nation is worthy of this good fortune. today, mr. speaker, we are doing our part.
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mr. speaker, i urge a yes vote on the rule and the previous question, i yield back the balance of my time and i move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back the balance of her time. the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair the ayes have it. >> i call for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from arizona. the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts rise? >> by direction of the committee on rule us call up house resolution 655 and ask for its immediate considering. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will read the -- the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house calendar number 50rk house resolution 655, resolved, that upon adoption of this resolution, it shall be in order without intervention of any point of order to consider in the house the resolution, house resolution 296, affirming the united states record on the armenian genocide. the resolution shall be considered as read, the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the resolution and preamble to the adoption without
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intervening motion or demand for the division of the question except one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking member of the committee on foreign affairs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized for one hour. mr. mcgovern: for purposes of debate only i yield the cust mir 30 minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. burgess, pending which i yield myself such time as i may consume. during consideration of this resolution all time yielded is for purpose debate only and i ask unanimous consent that all members be given five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mcgovern: on monday, the rule committees met and reported a rule, house resolution 655, providing for consideration of h.res. 656 under a closed rule. this resolution also povidse one hour of general debate controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on foreign affairs. mr. speaker, this rule is about u.s. leadership.
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standing for human rights. and whether we're going to turn a blind eye to atrocities even if they took place 100 years ago. h.res. 296 is a resolution formally recognizing and memorializing the armenian genocide. let me say it is about time. 1.5 million armenians died at the hands of the ottoman empire and the emerging nation of turkey over a century ago. tens of thousands of armenians were violently expeled from their ancestral homelands. these truths are important. acknowledging them is important. yet the united states has only tinkered around the edges of recognizing this reality. some of our nation's closest allies already have. 31 nations in fact. couldn'tlies -- countries like can dark italy, france, poland, germany. even russia recognized the
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genocide. mr. speaker, here is a map of those nations. and you can tell that the united states stands out. i say that with great sadness. white house statements and congressional resolutions over the years have referred to mass atrocities and other euphemism bus nothing in recent times has fully recognized it by calling it what it actually was, a genocide. and we need to speak the truth, mr. speaker. 49 of our 50 states have formally recognized the armenian general scythe. but the federal government has not. this is a dark stain on our human rights record . the united states should stand four square for human rights. anything short of that sends exactly the wrong message to abusers around the globe. mr. speaker, i represent a congressional district in central massachusetts. it is the home to the oldest armenian community in america. the first armenian orthodox
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church in america was built in worcester, massachusetts, my hometown. people still worship there today. when i was first elected in 1996, we had rows and rows of pews filled with survivors of the armenian genocide sitting at the front of the church in our annual remembrance of the armenian genocide. sadly, almost two years ago, the last of our survivors, rose, passed away. i've learned so much from this community. and to those who insist that now is not the time for us to recognize the armenian genocide i have to ask in return, when will it be the right time? when the last survivor of the genocide passed away? those who want the world to forget, those who want to deny genocide, believe that history will be erased with the last eyewitness to yenside -- to genocide. i must be honest, as many political leaders have proclaimed never again over the year the armenian community has
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been left to wonder when never again will become enough is enough. the united states will join the ranks of many nations, parliament, and institutions that have fully recognize and commemorated the armenian genocide. we will speak out clearly in favor of human rights. and finally we'll say loud and clear that enough is enough. mr. speaker, as we acknowledge this genocide from 100 years ago, i'm glad the house is separately considering h.r. 4695 on suspension this week. this bill recognizes the blood being spilled today in northern syria. because of turkey's ruthless aggression, hundreds of civilians have been killed, thousands more have been displaced. ered wan's government has targeted the kurds, one of our strongest and most courageous allies in the fight against isis. what is going on there can only be described as ethnic cleansing. instead of standing up for the people who have fought alongside u.s. troops in syria, president trump gave turkey the green
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light to try to wipe the kurds off the map. the president even complimented president erdogan, calling him a friend, a tough man, a hell of a leader. last week, nine days after the president first announced sanctions against turkey, he unilaterally lifted all the sanctions against turkey. nine days. are you kidding me? never in my life did i think i would see the day when a president of the united states would pave the way for a nation to systematically slaughter our allies. remove sanctions from a country -- removing sanctions. while putting u.s. troops stationed abroad in harm's way all while giving russia not only a pr victory but control over a territory that just days after was safe, secure, and free from isis terrorists and assad's murderous regime. standing youp for human rights is not a democratic or republican issue, it's an american issue. this congress must still be capable of speaking with one voice against genocide and
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crimes against humanity, no matter when they took place. so i urge all of my colleagues to support this rule and the underlying resolution so we can show the world that we still are. with that i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank mr. mcgovern for yielding me the customary 30 minutes. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, today we consider a resolution to once again assert the position of the house of representatives with respect to the armenian genocide that occurred between 1915 and 1923. this resolution cites previous united states recognition of the killing of armenians, including in 1951, 1975, 1981, and 1984.
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numerous resolutions have been introduced in the house and senate that did not pass both chambers. in addition, congress has twice designated april 24 as national day of remembrance of man's inhumanity to man. specifically referencing armenia. the united states has clearly indicated its support of the armenians. while there is historic precedent for recognizing the armenian genocide, passing such a resolution today could complicate the situation with a nato ally. and previously this has resulted in protests at and around the air base that have affected our men and women in uniform who were stationed there. while the desire to recognize the armenian genocide is laudable. these events took place over 100 years ago. it remains unclear why we are urgently considering this resolution. the committee on foreign affairs
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did not conduct a hearing or hold a markup before we voted last night in the rules committee to bring this to the floor today. representative schiff introduced this resolution on april 8 of this year, 2019, so we are left to wonder why we wait until there are 11 legislative days until expiration of the continuing resolution to fund the entirety of the government of the united states on the discretionary side why we are willing to suspend that to consider a nonbinding resolution. democrats continue to bring to the floor legislation that is either not urgent or has no chance, no chance of passing the senate and becoming law. there are bipartisan policy areas in which republicans stand ready to wrk with democrats -- work with democrats for the benefit of the american people.
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most pressing issue, of course, is the continuing resolution expiration. while the house did pass 10 of the 12 appropriations bills, they were constructed largely without republican input on the appropriations committee resulting in highly partisan provisions that actually prevented any republicans from being able to support these resolutions -- support these bills when they came to the floor. one of the most important appropriations bills providing funding for the department of homeland security, has not received consideration by the full house. we are facing a humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border. that is real. that is right now. this situation got so bad in the early summer that congress had to pass a supplemental appropriation bill to last year's appropriation just to provide the basic necessities for those in the customs and border protection custody.
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while this temporary funding influx helped alleviate the number of people in our border facilities and the office of refugee resettlement shelters, it did not make any policy changes which would actually address the root cause of this crisis. if democrats are unwilling to provide funding to secure our border, we should consider disincentivizing people from making the dangerous journey in the first place. there are people who die along the way. others are seriously injured or become ill. and still the others become victims of human trafficking. additionally, the cartels are profiting bigtime off these vulnerable individuals, taking a cut from 2/3 of southern border flows. the penalty for not paying off the cartel is death. rather than incentivize this
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type of activity, could we not focus our efforts on combating the drivers of irregular migration from el salvador, guatemala, and honduras? we could also send a message if you come to the united states without legal documentation you will not be permitted to remain here indefinitely. to change this congress could pass a bill to reform our asylum laws and provide more resources to clear the backlog of immigration cases, a backlog that is approaching one million cases. another area where congress could be spending our valuable time is discussing solutions or the cost of prescriptions or o pharmaceuticals. there is bipartisan consensus that we could cap out-of-pocket costs for our seniors in medicare part d. this is a policy we can and should draft together. in fact, we had a bipartisan energy and commerce and ways and means request for information on
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the topic of restructuring part d last may. if we work together in a thoughtful, bipartisan, bicameral manner on restructuring the part d benefit, the president would sign that legislation. he has even said that is a top priority. and our constituents would see lower out-of-pocket drug costs. but what did we get? we get h.r. 3. speaker pelosi's partisan drug pricing bill which sidelines achievable drug pricing policies that were in the works prior to the release of h.r. 3. additionally, last week marked the one-year anniversary of president trump's signing the support act into law. this legislation provides realistic solutions that span the breadth of the opiate crisis from prevention and treatment to education and enforcement. this legislation will improve treatment for those with substance use disorders, fight deadly fentanyl, bolster the
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efforts of our agents at the international mail facilities, and provide vital resources for new and innovative alternatives for the treatment of pain. in a time when our country seems so divided, congress was able to put political differences aside and put patients first to find solutions to address this crisis. as it stands now the support act is another tool in the toolbox for communities and federal agencies to successfully combat the opioid epidemic. we could be having discussions on how to build on that success and ensure timely and effective implementation of the support act so we could continue to help those affected by the -- more than 130 american overdose deaths each and every day. instead, we are spending our time considering a nonurgent, nonbinding resolution.
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american consumers are concerned about their online privacy. the passage of california's consumer privacy act has led to a patchwork of state privacy laws that do not reflect the theity that the internet -- internet doesn't know state lines. we need one national standard. perhaps consider federal preemption and promote a cross border data flow as american businesses seek to do business at home and abroad. you could even argue that e-commerce is the reason that the founders drafted the commerce clause in the first place. again, republicans stand ready to work with democrats, but we have not been invited to engage in any substantial discussions. congress could also pass and must pass the united states, canada, and mexico agreement on trade, the usmca. this was negotiated to replace north american free trade agreement.
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this agreement is possibly the most impactful policy that congress could pass this year. the administration has negotiated with canada and mexico over the past two years to produce the best trade deal possible. the usmca increases market access for american exports. it levels the playing field for the american worker. and brings important intellectual property protections into the 21st century. millions of jobs and billions of dollars worth of trade are waiting on the passage of this bill. speaker pelosi brought the usmca to the floor today, it would pass before the week's out. unfortunately, the democratic majority is slow walking this usmca and doing harm to our nation's farmers, workers, and small businesses. there is no reason to continue to delay a vote on this
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agreement. in addition, securing the usmca would give the united states additional authority with the ongoing negotiations with china. providing full appropriations for the federal government, addressing the humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border, working to lower prescription drug prices, and provide continued support to combat the opioid epidemic, negotiating a strong federal privacy law, and passing the usmca are all urgent policy priorities that could receive bipartisan support. and yet we are delaying action on these necessary measures to consider a nonurgent, nonbinding resolution that simply reaffirms what has remained clear united states policy regarding armenia. i hope my fellow democrats on the rules committee and in the house of representatives will
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soon prioritize legislation that will help the american people. with that i urge opposition to the rule and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: mr. speaker, my colleague from texas talked about a lot of different subjects in his opening remarks. i have to say that i'm a little bit disappointed, more than a little bit. i'm disappointed and somewhat offended at the implication that this is not an important matter. let me remind him that 1.5 million armenians died at the hands of the ottoman empire and the meerging nation of turkey. let me remind him of the countless, hundreds of thousands of people had had -- who had to flee because of that oppression. let me also remind him it is not the official policy of the united states government. if it were, that map i showed you would have included us as a nation formally recognizing the
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armenian genocide. my friend may not think it is important, but as somebody who cares deeply about human rights, it is important that we respect historical accuracy and that we respect the truth. i don't know if the gentleman was in the rules committee last night when colleague from california, anna eshoo, movingly and tearfully talked about her family's experiences during that ime where she lost ancestors and her parents came to the united states to try to have a better life. i don't know how we can just brush this off. this is not a big deal. it is a big deal. it's a big deal to the armenian americans. and it is a big deal to anybody who cares about human rights in this country. with that, mr. speaker, i'd like to yield one minute to the gentlewoman from florida, the distinguished member of the rules committee, ms. shalala. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentlewoman from florida is recognized for one minute. ms. shalala: thank you, mr. mcgovern. mr. speaker, i rise to support the resolution affirming the united states record on the armenian genocide. this resolution is long overdue. 1.5 million armenians and housands of maronites, melkites,, assyrians, and others. mr. speaker, my grandparents left the ottoman empire to escape that genocide just ahead. but their relatives were not as lucky. i remember my grandmother's tears as she spoke of their rmenian friends and the many marinites and melkites who were slaughtered by the armenian empire. i remember the tears an suffering of our armenian
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neighbors and the many members of other communities whose tears i could not erase. as a child i could not erase those tear bus for them i proudly support this resolution. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i'll reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i yield to the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. after decades of struggle this house will recognize the armenian genocide just in time for the last few survivors to see it. we should have recognized the
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genocide but we didn't because we were told we had a great alliance with turkey. earlier this month, turkish forces shelled near and deliberately bracketted american bases. americans fled in unseemly haste. great ally. it has been a great alliance for turkey. we defended it from communism in the 1940's, defended them from the soviet union for decades and provided them with $23 billion in aid. it is critical that we counteract turkey's genocide denial because genocide denial is the last act of a genocide. first you obliterate a people. then you seek to obliterate their memory. finally you seek to obliterate the memory of the obliteration. because genocide denial is also the first step in the next genocide. when hitler's cadres wondered if they could get away with the holocaust, he was able to assure them, who today speaks of the
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anilings of the armenians? and we must recognize this genocide to remove the stain on america's honor because up until now we have refused to acknowledge truth and we have been silent all in an effort at appeasement. the fact is, many other countries have recognize that genocide, including belgium, canada, greece, italy, argentina and germany. and when france had the courage to pass a genocide recognition resolution, they were threatened with a boycott of all their exports. in fact, what happened was a four-fold increase in french exports to turkey. the only thing worse than unnecessary appeasement is appeasing a power that will not actually respond. today, germany is a great and prosperous democracy, a great ally of the united states. where would germany be if to this day they denied the holocaust?
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turkey will be a great ally of the united states and a prosperous and modern nation only when turkey recognizes the first genocide of the 20th century. i commend the gentleman for bringing up this rule and for answering the question, why this is so important to do this today. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i yield one minute to the gentlewoman from california, ms. chu. the speaker pro tempore: the yom is recognized for one minute. ms. chu: i just returned from armenia where i went to the armenian genocide museum. i cannot get the pictures i saw out of my mind. armenian women and children murdered, in mass graves. armenian leaders hung as examples to others. armenians forced on long death marches without food or water.
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there were 1.5 million armenians killed in this genocide in 1915. i saw documents of many who had witnessed it, including u.s. diplomat henry morgenthau and yet over 100 years later, the united states has never officially acknowledged it. this vote to finally acknowledge the armenian genocide should have come sooner, because of people in my district like joseph. when i met him he was 104 but from his wheelchair he told me about the many family member he is lost in the genocide. people passed away before he could see this day. he didn't forget them and neither can we. for the sake of him and so many others, i urge my colleagues to vote yes on this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the jerusalem ease time has expired . the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from
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new jersey, the co-chair of the congressional caucus on armenian issues, mr. pallone. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. my colleague from new jersey, and thank you, mr. mcgovern, for bringing this rule up today. i rise in support of the rule to bring up the armenian genocide resolution. as judy chu said, and i just came back from armenia at the same time, we were at the genocide memorial, i was there a few years ago on the 100th anniversary of the genocide with our two armenian members of congress, anna eshoo and jackie speier. and i have to say it was unfortunate for us, we were proud to be there for the 100th commemoration but we still were very upset over the fact that the united states had not recognized the armenian genocide in recent years. and of course this has been a goal of the armenian caucus an armenia diaspora for over 30
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years that this day, this historic day would finally occur. i want to thank the speaker of the house of representatives, nancy pelosi who made this day possible. this resolution is important. it commemorates the victims of the armenian genocide at the hands of the ottoman turks over 04 years after it took place. foor long, congress failed to recognize the indisputable fact that the ottoman turks perpetrated the first genocide of the 20th century. this crime against humanity would serve as the blueprint for other generalsides in the nazi concentration camps and massacres in poland, germany, and eastern europe and more recently in boss neea and ru wan dasm today we'll finally acknowledge what historians have documented with clear evidence, that the capture and slauth over armenians an others was a genocide. the passing an of this of this resolution is an important step in raising awareness and showing
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that we have a commitment to human rights and the dignity of every human life. in the words of george santayana, those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. we will not cover up past atrocities nor turn our back when ethnic or religious minorities are threatened in the 21st century. we must urge turkey to come to terms with its own history and look beyond the thinly veiled film of denial. we must urge turkey to join the rest of the world in recognizing the sanctity of human life even if it's someone who doesn't look like you, speaks a different language or attends a different house of worship. turkey has a long history of repressing ethnic minority, including the kurds, who they are killing as we speak. many of the kurds are their muslim brethren. i'm also a strong supporter of the bipartisan turkey sanctions bill that will also be considered this week.
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it is unfortunate it took the abandonment of our allies in northern syria to get to this point uebim ease planned parenthood -- i'm pleased to see we are working across the aisle to push back against the bully that is president erdogan. we cannot trust the turkish, russian, or syrian governments to uphold peace and protect innocent lives in the region. we must stand up to authoritarian leaders like erdogan, putin, and assad to defend our regional partners and innocent lives. i want to thank chairman schiff, the sponsor of thisres. louis, chairman engel, and other members of the congressional caucus for their support of strong leadership and their work to get this passed. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: if we defeat the previous question, republicans will amend the rule to suspend the ongoing impeachment inquiry until we achieve operational control of our southern border.
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as i previously stated, we are experiencing a humanitarian and security crisis on the southern border. in august, customs and board brother text apprehended over 64,000 individuals who lacked legal documentation to enter this country. apprehensions are on a track to reach over one million individuals attempting to cross into the united states along our southern border this fiscal year. the house should prioritize securing our southern border and stemming the flow of irregular migration over a politically motivated impeachment inquiry. until operation of the border control is achieved, the house should suspend the impeachment inquiry. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to insert the text of my amendment in the record along with extraneous material immediately prior to the vote on the previous question. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: i have to say to the gentleman from texas that
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again it is frustrating to hear his comments. i mean, we're talking about a the tion recognizing armenian genocide. 1.5 million people were murdered. and i think it's generally a bipartisan resolution. i want to commend not only chairman engel and chairman smith who is a republican, for their testimony before the rule committees, i want to thank congressman schiff who is the main author of this, but our colleague on the rule committees, congresswoman lesko, you know, came out very strongly in favor of this resolution. but if there's ever -- it would be nice if there were a couple of moment here's that didn't always have to be politicized. i think this resolution should be one of those moments. this is important. this is serious. and we shouldn't bring politic into a resolution dealing with
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the recognition of a genocide. i obviously have a different opinion how people should vote on the previous question. having said that, i'm happy to yield 1.5 minutes to the gentlewoman from california, ms. sanchez. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for one and a half minutes. ms. sanchez: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of this resolution to recognize the armenian genocide. this tragedy is one of the most painful moments in our world's history. we owe it to the more than two million victims and their descendants never to forget. it is heart breaking that some choose to deny our past rather hand to -- rather than to learn from this painful moment in history. it's an insult to millions who died and millions who risked their lives to escape violence. dena'il is tulle easy. it's harder to face the truth and facing the truth is the right thing to do. when we rewrite the darkest chapters of our history, we open
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the door to them happening again. the united states cannot be complicit in that denial. i urge my colleagues to send a resounding message to the world that we stand with the armenian community. we will not forget, we will not obscure. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i yield myself a minute. mr. speaker, i would just point out that this congress has acted on this in the past. house joint resolution 148 passed in the 94th congress. a joint resolution to designate april 24, 1975, as a national day of remembrance of man's inhumanity to man, passed the house april 9, 1975. then again joint resolution 247 from the 98th congress.
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to designate april 24 as a national day of remembrance of man's inhumanity to man passed the house 10 september, 198 4. i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. mcgovern: it is frustrating to hear my colleague to dismisthis. there has not been a resolution calling this a genocide and outlining all the facts before. i urge my colleagues in a bipartisan way to support the underlying bill, reject any attempts to try to politicize this process. and again, you know, it is -- we do this out of respect for those victims of the genocide, for the survivors, for the armenian american community, for the armenian community all over the world and we do it because the united states of america is supposed to be committed to a very high standard of human
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rights. i mean if we stand for anything, we need to stand out loud and four square for human right, to not appropriately acknowledge a yenside only paves the way for future thoughs and dictators and authoritarians to commit similar atrocities believing that somehow the united states, the most powerful country in the i hope we have strong er way. bipartisan support on this resolution. i'm happy to yield 1.5 minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: i appreciated the gentleman's courtesy and words. for years, we have danced around this. it is complex in terms of the relationship. but denying genocide has not helped those issues.
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look at what is happening with the kurds today. failure to acknowledge this horrific episode is a burden for us all. standing up for human rights, acknowledging the truth, giving a sense of closure and sole ace to the people endured this horrific activity and making sure that we are united in our opposition to those genocides. and sadly, unless and until the turks own their history, acknowledge, they are not going to be able to move past it. this is a chapter that needs a spotlight shown on it. i appreciate this formal acknowledgement by the house of representatives. i think it's a first step towards healing and it's an important step towards preventing tragedies like this
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n. -- in the future. i look forward to its passage on the floor of the house. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. mr. burgess: may i inquire how many additional speakers -- i yield the balance of our time. and i do feel obligated to point out, the gentleman had said that he did not want to see this issue politicized. i would just simply note that this resolution could have been brought to the floor and likely passed with a bipartisanship. the difficulty is we are spending time on a rule bill when we have some pretty important things out there hanging over us. one of those is funding the
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entire federal government and the other is to somehow resolve this question of impeachment that has bogged down this body for months, if not years. so, mr. speaker, as i previously outlined, there are other important time-sensitive priorities. once again, we have 11 legislative days before the continuing resolution expires. in place of a nonurgent, nonbinding resolution, we could be typeding a way to make sure the government remains open and americans receive benefits and paychecks on which they depend. prioritize the needs of the american people and urge a no vote on the previous question and no on the rule and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized.
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mr. mcgovern: the gentleman wonders why we didn't bring this up under suspension of the rules. there was a concern by democrats and republicans on the foreign affairs committee that we might not have the votes needed to pass it. the government of turkey employs very well paid lobbyists here in washington and they have been working quite diligently trying to defeat this. so i hope we have a vote that is overwhelming. but we don't know. secondly, i don't know why the gentleman would object to bringing this up under a rule. it gives more time for members on both sides of the aisle to be able to speak on this. we had a lot of democrats on our side and others who are going to speak when the underlying bill comes up. i don't quite get it.
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let me say for the record, this is not the official policy of the united states. if it was, president trump would publicly acknowledge the armenian genocide. i'm not picking on president trump, the same thing could be said about president obama. this isn't the official policy. if it was, we wouldn't be here. and it is somewhat disappointing that the gentleman doesn't quite appreciate how impactful this is and how important this is. mr. speaker, the horrors of human rights abuses can be mind numbing, whether they occurred 100 years ago or happening today in syria at the hands of erdogan's government. i get it. it's easy to turn away and see he loss of life and maiming of
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humans. it can turn your stomach and break your heart. but we must not lose our capacity for outrage. hat 1.5 million armenians died at the hands of the ottoman empire should outrage all of us. formally recognizing this genocide is the right thing to do. i wish we took this step long ago. but it is always the right time to do the right thing. so i urge my colleagues, let's speak with one voice and join some of our closest allies in recognizing the armenian genocide and remove this dark stain on the record of the united states of america. i say this all the time, but at the core of our being as a nation should be upholding a high standard of human rights. we should always be counted on
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to speak out when people's human rights are being denied and should be counted on to adhere to historical accuracy. this happens. and it is time that it become the official policy of the united states of america to recognize that it did happen and call it for what it was, it was a genocide. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to vote yes on the previous question, rote yes on the rule and vote yes on the underlying bill. i yield back and i move the previous question on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the previous question -- the question is on ordering the previous question on the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. mr. burgess: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise.
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a sufficient number having arisen having risen, the the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. by electronic device. pursuant to clause 9 of rule 20, this 15-minute vote on ordering the previous question on house resolution 854 and adoption of the house resolution 655 if ordered, ordering the previous question on house resolution 656 and adoption of house resolution 656 if ordered. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 224, the nays, 189. the previous question is ordered. the question is on adoption of the resolution. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the yeas have it. mr. burgess: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. . this is a five-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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