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tv   FOX Friends  FOX News  June 22, 2018 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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surveillance video showing the suspect pulling in and out of the tight spot four times before finally giving up and taking off. don't try that at home. have a good day, everyone. lynyrd skynyrd on the blaze. todd: get ready to rock. bi, everybody. ♪ ainsley: today we remember our friend and beloved fox news commentator charles krauthammer. he passed away after a long fight with cancer. steve: last night here on the fox news channel, "special report" ended their program with that empty chair. where he sat for more than a decade. brian: pulitzer prize winner. across the political spectrum. he got vice president mic pence weighing in already. tweets long remembered for eloquence, triumph and hardship and
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steve: krauthammer leaves behind his wife robin and son daniel. he was 68 years old. brian: some times you write a book and when a book comes out, you want it to be successful. for us, i think we benefited the most when he wrote his book. because we got a chance to see him countless time because the book stayed number one, top three. going to keep this going. he came back and forth, which wasn't easy. a number of times. we had a chance to interview him at length, talk to him for a long time. weave got to see what the
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d.c. bureau saw on a daily basis. his insight. his kindness and his intellect. ainsley: all these pictures were taken at a book signing or book party that we had at fox to congratulate him on his success. the things that matter, three decades of pafingses, past times and politics. just the title alone is wonderful. things that matter. i'm sure it will hit the charts against. "new york times" best seller list for 40 weeks. number one for 10 weeks. steve: it sold a lot because people loved what he had to wright write. we loved to have him on our program. we put together just a little bit with him with us on this day after he died. steve: charles krauthammer, get his book, it's fantastic i read it twice. >> i write in the book one of the reasons why i shifted is because on foreign policy the democrats changed. i didn't. they don't want targeted solutions. they want to take stuff over. congratulations on your book. brian: thank you very much. >> challenging me right up
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there brain brian i am not challenging you. >> if you are a columnist you get on the curve. books scores. like a basketball game. i'm in the corner, the clock is running down and i go for the three-point shot. brian: charles krauthammer thanks so much all your areas of expertise. >> except baseball. ainsley: in the letter that he issued a few weeks ago or i guess it was two weeks ago, right? he said he leaves life with no regrets. sad to leave this life but leaves with knowledge that he lived the life that he intended. grateful to play a role in conversations that have helped shape this nation. steve: and the typical charles krauthammer earn to a common question people would say so, how do you become a columnist? he would go first, did you go to medical school. which he did. ainsley: good luck. steve: you know, we all got to interview him and i got to admit, even though we have done this for a very long time, he is one of the few people who when you are going to ask him a question,
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you are worried whether or not it's a good question. ainsley: that's right. is he so brilliant. steve: is he going to think that's a dumb question. you know what? at the end of the interview he was always so polite and so kind. whatever we asked he loved to ena. ainsley: he had an older brother that he was with constantly, he said. he said his dad wouldn't take second-best. he wanted to learn everything that he could. he said the first time did he a tv interview dad called him afterwards and said well done son, did you great, but why didn't they call you doctor? because you went to medical school. you earned that title. they called him mr. krauthammer. brian: when he came out clear to everybody he was in a wheelchair. most people did not know for years that he was. it was a tough decision when they did the hour special with bret because i knew after that everyone would know. and for a while he went to great pains to make sure people just listened to -- what he was saying not what he was going through since
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the age 263. ainsley: he said he was never going to let himself get -- i knew instantly as soon as i hit the bottom of that swimming pool that i was going to be paralyzed. i made a decision, i'm not annual emotional person. i remember him saying that in that special with bret. i'm not an emotional person. i'm not going to have victim mentality i'm going to get my work down. steve: paralyzed neck down spent his entire wife in a wheelchair. outside a washington nationals game one night walking up and suddenly this van zooms by. had to step back and said to peter doocy who was that. he goes that's charles krauthammer. he just about ran over us. he didn't really about run over us but he could drive. brian: they had a moment of silence at the nationals game yesterday. ainsley: he went to harvard and went to middle school.
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defer for a while. went over the pond and met his wife at oxford. they came back here and have a done son. steve: we have a lot of images from his life and it was a great life. we will share those with you in about 20 minutes. brian: if charles krauthammer was on our couch he would be talking about immigration and showdown on our nation's capital not only politically will you been our border. postponing critical vote on immigration bill. first it was today now it is next week. ainsley: first lady made a surprise visit to a detention center down in texas. steve: that's where griff jenkins joins us live from with the very latest down i in mcallen. >> the first lady braved vicious storms down here. they continue today, to be with the migrant children in the shelter behind me. she came with the hhs secretary. and she met with not only the children but also the staff here. here's what she had to say after that visit. >> we all know they are here without their families and i
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want to thank you for your hard work, your compassion and your kindness you are gives them in this difficult time. >> the weather prevented her from making a stop to visiting border patrol. the media made much of the jacket she was wearing, the rain jacket i really don't care, do you on the back of it after the visit, i was able to go inside this center and speak with dr., ceo of the shelter. here is what he had to say about the first lady's visit. >> yes, she wanted to learn about new hope emergency shelter. more important she wanted to spend time with the children. you will could seat joy on the children's faces. you could seat joyce on mrs. trump's face and it was very owb to m obvious that real connections were made. >> visit comes guys as the pentagon announces some 20,000 unaccompanied children will be housed military bases in both texas as well as arkansas.
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similar to a move that president obama made in 2014 when he housed some 7,000 children in a similar manner. but that didn't stop minority leader chuck schumer from questioning the move. take a listen. >> the department of definition has been asked whether it can house 20,000 unaccompanied children between now and the end of the year. how will that work? president trump hasn't taken care of the problem not by any stretch of the imagination. >> then there is that g.o.p. bill on immigration which got pulled from the floor because they didn't have the votes, the compromise bill as it was put forth by leadership. they are going to try to work out their differences over the weekend, perhaps, and bring it back for a vote next week. guys? steve: when the first lady was down at that facility, is that one of the rooms that has those chain linked cage fences that were used in the detention centers. >> not at all.
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the children are not in cages at the shelter here. what happens once they are processed they are picked up because they have crossed illegally and then put through the processing process. and then, according to their agreement with hhs the children are cared for in centers like this. the first lady wanting to make sure they are okay and wanted to spend some time to sort of connect with them as you heard from the doctor. ainsley: sounds like she did go in and see the kids and picked some up. we didn't see the video of that they don't allow cameras to see the kids? they don't want to be identified? griff: that's right, ainsley. they are not allowing cameras inside. we were told about a conversation the first lady had with some of the children in the classroom. she was talking to a group of boys. she said be nice to each other. be kind to each other. and, of course, you saw in that clip with dr. american flag they made for her visit. they were very glad she was here. brian: doing a great job telling us the real story at the border. back in washington two bills
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goodlatte mccall bill not many thought it would pass got 194 votes. the compromise bill had trouble. i am not sure what is in it. can we get clear on that. all right. let's just vote on this friday. they said well, wait a second, would hav we have so may questions let's vote on it next week. so-called compromise bill voted on next week. steve: i understand the night before last, 10:00 at knight somebody realized hey, we made a typo. remember, the bill had, i told ainsley about this yesterday. the bill had $25 billion for the wall, right? somebody accidently made it $125 billion for the wall. so they had to go back and redo the bill. it just goes to show you portions of it were put together quite quickly. brian: it has daca on it. it has the keeping the voice via levels at the same rate and
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25 billion in aadvance for border funding not necessarily for the wall but the president would take that if it does get through the house next week what chance does it have in the senate? steve: right now it does not have enough votes. ainsley: hand it over to jillian who has headlines for us. jillian: that's right. a manhunt is underway for a man who threatened to put a bullet in the president's head. u.s. marshals call sean christie a clear and present danger to law enforcement in pennsylvania. his father called the secret service after he threatened the president on social media. he also said he would shoot anyone who tried to arrest him. christie has a history of threatening government officials, including former alaskan governor sarah palin. 25 embassy workers have been sikhened in mysterious health incidents in cuba. state department confirming the latest patient was recently evacuated from the country. those workers reporting symptoms similar concussions or brain injuries. one has been sickened in china and more tested.
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cuba has denied any involvement. the wife of israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu fighting back against fraud charges. he she is accused of misusing $100,000 in official funds to pay for meals at the prime minister's residence. yesterday we told you she was arrested. she was not. she denies any wrongdoing. attorneys calls the charges baseless and delusional. one step closer to a formal sitdown between president trump and russian's president vladimir putin. national security advisor john bolton heading to moscow next week to start preparing for the potential meeting. the two presidents met during summits in 2017. this would be their first stand alone meeting it could happen as soon as july. possibly in austria it would be around the time the president atnsdz th attends thel nato summit. brian: one huge story after another. it never ends. steve: we are remembering the life and times of
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charles krauthammer with the people who knew him best. charlie hurt sat next to him on the panel for a long time. is he going to join us to honor charles' memory next. >> my job to call folly. you are betraying your whole life if you don't say what you think and you don't say it honestly and bluntly. ♪ ♪ i'm about to start the nature's bounty hair, skin and nails challenge. so my future self will thank me. thank you. i become a model? yes. no. start the challenge today. and try new tropical citrus flavor with collagen. nature's bounty.
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who's already won three cars, two motorcycles, a boat, and an r.v.
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i would not want to pay that insurance bill. [ ding ] -oh, i have progressive, so i just bundled everything with my home insurance. saved me a ton of money. -love you, gary! -you don't have to buzz in. it's not a question, gary. on march 1, 1810 -- [ ding ] -frédéric chopin. -collapsing in 226 -- [ ding ] -the colossus of rhodes. -[ sighs ] louise dustmann -- [ ding ] -brahms' "lullaby," or "wiegenlied." -when will it end? [ ding ] -not today, ron.
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♪ ainsley: charles krauthammer, conservative voice shaped american politics for generations has passed away at the age of 68. steve: today we remember his life and legacy with the people who knew and worked with him all the time. brian: one of them is "washington times" opinion editors, fox news contributor, common sight on our channel charles hurt. he joins us now. this is so odd not only do you lose charles krauthammer his influence. lost him for a year and couldn't wait for him to compact because he had a year of physical challenges. we got that letter last week he said i lived the life i intended. we all hope to get to that point when we get to that point, right? >> yeah. absolutely, brian. that note, it was -- the thing about it that was so charles was how direct it was. steve: right. >> it was so clear. and he didn't want to leave any ambiguity about anything.
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it was just absolutely perfectly crystal clear just like every single one of his arguments. every one of the points that he ever made on "special report" panel or anywhere else on tv or in his columns. oh my goodness. the columns, i think about being a young man, young boy growing up in a small town in southern virginia. we got newspapers. we got "the washington post." the number of times my father would rip out a column by charles krauthammer and send it and. steve: read it, charlie. >> or send it to me in college. it was funny. years later when i think it was the special that bret baier did about him. that was the thing, charles' greatest goal was to write columns that parents would rip out of the paper and send to their kids in college. it was so powerful. ainsley: what was that like, charles, when you are sitting next to him. you are like my dad used to send your articles to me in
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college. >> oh, it was incredible. i would almost have to plug my ears so i just wouldn't repeat whatever it was that he said because whatever he said was just golden. and yoand it could never be improved upon. you couldn't disagree with him because of who he was and how he put things. steve: you would like right over there and there would be one of those faces from mount rushmore sitting right next to me. charlie, the thing about him and his political point of view which is unique though is when he first went to washington, he went during the carter years. he wound up being a speech writer for democrat vice president walter mondale and eventually became one of the most prominent voices in conservative radio and television and writing. becaus>> because he had a heart. what was it that winston churchill said if you are not liberal when you are young, you have no heart. if you are not conservative when you get older, have you no brain. well, that was charles krauthammer. he had a giant heart.
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he was so generous. he was such a gentleman. undeniable intellect and the thing that i love the most about him. you know, with his book. the title was things that matter. and if you could say anything about him his greatest wisdom is in politics or in life. charles krauthammer understood the things that matter. and that was what made it so powerful. and obviously, you know, we are all sad and we are all -- we will all miss him. but i think the greatest thing that you could do to celebrate charles' life today would be to get his book and read it there are amazing columns in there but then go to a baseball game. steve: indeed. ainsley: you have a wonderful name charles hurt. a name to live up to. steve: thank you, charlie. brian: president trump blasting democrats for not supporting republican immigration bills saying dems, quote, won't vote for
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ainsley: we have quick headlines for you. if you want to eat, you have to work. according to the farm bill that passed the house. if it goes into law it would require food stamp recipients to look for a job or work 20 hours a week. set food and farm policies for the next five years. it now moves to the senate. another piece of legislation would keep president trump off the 2020 ballot unless he releases his tax returns. the rhode island state senate passing that bill this week. the president says he cannot release his tax returns because is he under an audit. the bill now headed to the state house. brian? brian: it's time for the top moment of the week arguably. life, liberty, and levin is
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10 clock sunday. until you get to that show have you mark levin on our show. mark, i don't know if you heard but the number one topic this week has been immigration. so, what's your thought on the compromise bill from what you know? it seems like this chaos reigning on capitol hill. >> you know, i don't understand these compromise bills. we have to compromise in order to secure the border? have you ever heard anything like that in your life. newscast icialg. it's a public health issue. these people are coming to america because we treat them well. but they are not coming through the legal ports of entry. they are going around them in order to skirt the law so our law enforcement says we have to figure out who these adults are. maybe that little girl the guy is dragging across the border maybe that's not his little girl. we have to figure all these things out thousands of times a day with tens of thousands of people and somehow america sucks. i don't buy into that. brian: people say don't separate women and children. i get that now the president signs the executive order. going to keep them together. then they say it's not right
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to keep them together in a holding area. so what is the answer? just letting them out, giving them a court date and giving them a path to citizenship? is that fair to everybody else that's doing it the right way? >> look, i want to get very serious about this. when is the last time the democrat party or media mouthpieces proposed anything about securing out border? kudos to the president of the united states. he comes into office. he sees a problem. clinton, the democrats, they have this 1997 consent decree with a liberal judge and liberal ninth circuit and the judge says you cannot keep these illegal alien kids more than 20 days in detention. and democrats running around there is no such law. well, of course there is. there is a consent decree. the president signs an executive order which the left mohammed says it's going to challenge and probably successfully, why? because the ultimate goal is open borders and to let these people in illegally. brian: there is a theory out there and the president presented it in his rally this week in minnesota. he said the economy is doing exceedingly well.
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the north korea summit is grading very high. he is on a bit of a roll. the ig report, the russian investigation has hit a pothole for democrats. and now the exposure of their 514 page michael horowitz report under questioning is really exposing maybe a master plot, everything that he indicated earlier seems to be coming out. at the very least a lot of controversy. he believes that's why this immigration debate raged. do you see a connection or coincidence? >> i absolutely do. the timing is not coincidental. it's intentional. look, if the democratic party and the media in this country cared about this issue so much, why did they ignore it for 10 years? why did they egg four fund barack obama? why did they ignore it under bill clinton? why did they ignore it under george w. bush? when you bring this up what the media says well, wait a minute, they weren't fully enforcing the law like donald trump is fully enforcing the law. i don't even understand what that means. brian: here we are looking at these hearings and seeing the report and seeing these questions. why don't we know the names of these doj lawyers.
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why don't we know the names of fbi agent. what do you mean they are witness number one and client number 2? why is that. mark meadows exposed two more names and we are going to get a couple more. the ig report says peter strzok had a couple text messages that talked about a master blot what's going on highest levels of the fbi was corrupted where the hillary fbi agents. that aren't any and that should tell you everything you need to know. brian: mark levin i will be watching. hopefully you won't wear a tie because i like that look. that look in particular. >> you can bet on that. brian: and i will. you just heard mark levin's take. even more fallout from the fallout report. watch him sunday at 10:00. not good for the fbi. we're going to find out a lot more. plus, bret baier looks back at the remarkable life of charles krauthammer as we
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remember our colleague this morning as he passed away yesterday. >> do you think you will ever stop writing? >> no. i intend to die at my desk. >> really? >> i would like to. i'm not sure i can arrange it. [laughter]
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thank you to all involved in opdivo clinical trials. maybe not. maybe you could trust you won't have to actually talk to your neighbor. are you watching the game tonight? or... ...you could just trust duracell. ♪ brian: today and all day and for a long time we are going to remember our friend crosswalk. ainsley: bestselling author inspiring mstles people with his insight and wisdom across the political spectrum. steve: "special report" host bret baier shares this emotional tribute to his very good friend. >> it's my job to call a folly a folly. >> charles krauthammer, columnist, author, and fox news commentator lived his
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life telling others exactly what he thought. >> you're betraying your whole life if you don't say what you think and you don't say it honestly and bluntly. >> it was that quality that brought charles to fox news channel during brit hume's tenure as anchor. >> not a man designed for television. you look at him not a potential tv star. in fact he became a huge star. even i would say a mega star on this channel. it was the shear force of his intellect and the power of his thinking. and, on top of that, there was a gentleness about him personally that if he disagreed with you, you know, you never felt attacked, you know. he just disagreed with you. >> always unspoken on the panel that he was always the leader because of his delivery his intellect. >> "special report" stage manager was on set with charles every night for years. >> it was kind of an ongoing joke on the panel that bret baier has a signal when people need to wrap up, 30. bret puts his arm out. and charles is on the show forever.
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we always laughed that i don't think he paid attention to that. if he had something to say he was going to say it no time constraints were going to control him on that. >> born in 1950s new york to jewish parents that left world war ii era europe, charles father raised his son to value the pursuit of knowledge. >> his motto for us is i want you to know everything. i want you to learn everything. you don't have to do everything, but you have got to know everything. he thought that was part of life. >> the family lived in montreal and summered at their cottage in long beach, new york. >> it was a paratypical childhood. my brother and i were inseparable. he always insisted i be included and i got used to be around the big boys and taking the slings and arrows. that's how you get toughened up. >> as a senior in canada he became captivated by journalism. he applied to medical school to appease his family and was accepted to harvard. but krauthammer put off attending and enrolled at oxford instead. it was there that he met
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fellow student from australia, robin trethway who would later become his wife. charles reversed course and headed back to the u.s. to attend harvard. >> why did you choose psychiatry? >> i was looking for something half way between the reality of medicine and the elegance, if you like, of philosophy. so psychiatry was the obvious thing. >> it was there that one unexpected moment, a tragic diving accident changed charles' life forever. >> it just hit at precisely the angle where all the force was transmitted to one spot and that is the cervical vertebra which severed the spinal cord. >> when did you realize that the accident was life altering? >> the second it happened. >> despite his permanent paralysis, charles astounded his professors and classmates by graduating on time near the top of his class. ultimately he decided the field wasn't for him. a career reversal he joked
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about on fox decades later. >> i'm a psychiatrist in remission. doing very well. i haven't had a relapse in 25 years. >> in 1978, krauthammer headed to washington, d.c. for a government job. >> i thought once i'm in washington, isn't that where they do politics? one thing will lead to another. >> robin encouraged him to follow his dreams. he soon landed at the left-leaning new republic magazine just as the reagan administration took office. >> so help me god. >> krauthammer found himself agreeing with the new president and questioning his own feelings about the democratic party. >> i ended up supporting just about every element of the reagan foreign policy. >> months after reagan's re-election, krauthammer penned the phrase the reagan doctrine in a provocative "time" magazine column and the name stuck. >> he created the reagan doctrine. nobody had heard of it. charles put together a piece and dubbed it. i have read it many times. and it just holds up so
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well. charles discovered then that there really was a lot to reagan. >> but it would take years before charles fully embraced domestic conservative ideals. >> it took me about a decade. i was skeptical of tax cuts. i was skeptical of smaller government at the beginning. then by the end of the 1980s i had been begun to change. in 1985 his son daniel was born and two years later charles won the biggest honor in journalism, the pulitzer prize. [sirens] >> it was the events of september 11th, 2001, that brought a more forceful tone to his commentary and a regular spot on the "special report" panel. over the years, charles became an audience favorite. >> the big estherer that we make is to lose the damn war because we refuse to recognize hot enemy is and what it requires. for god's sake why do you have to talk about that. the morning is over. the chiva is done. if you are a conservative you should be optimistic. i think it will snow in hell
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before doj is going to go after her. we all were expected it. it didn't happen. that was the dog that didn't bark. >> despite all his accomplishments, awards and high profile endorsements, krauthammer was always humble and at times uneasy with the influence his words held. i think about it but find it worrisome. when i was totally unknown i could say anything i damn well pleased. >> that included when his opinions reached presidents. >> read krauthammer column in the post. is he a brilliant man. >> you know, when you get praise from president clinton and you are from my side of the aisle, that means that my career is done. i mean, i'm toast. >> krauthammer's high standards for political leaders were bipartisan for president obama. >> when i think he has done just about everything wrong. >> to then candidate donald trump. >> this is the strongest field of republican candidates in 35 years. you could pick a dozen of
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them at random and have the strongest cabinet america has had in our lifetime. and instead all our time is spent discussing this rodeo clown. i don't think i have ever heard such a stream of disconnected ideas since i quit psychiatry 30 years ago. >> as far as charles krauthammer, i'm not a fan of his. i think he is a highly overrated pundit. he is wrong on so many things. >> charles krauthammer, who by the way in candidate casino put his first money. >> i saw that i couldn't believe it thank you, charles, i'm going to make you look good, charles. >> in recent years as the took office. he didn't shy away from trademark blunt, unabashedly critical analysis when it came to president trump. >> presidents don't talk like this. they never have. this is what it sounds like when you are living in a banana republic. >> charles had other loves aside from politics. he played chess and was an avid baseball fan. >> i grew up playing the game. i loved to play the game.
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>> and loved nothing more than seeing his washington nationals play and win. >> glory. with the white house on fire the congress in chaos, and the world going to hell in a hand basket, we need happy news like this. this is why god created baseball late on the sixth day. >> friends at fox news channel remember that quick whit and charles love for talking to anyone. >> "special report" has a lot of people that come in and watch it and they were always in awe of charles and always very apprehensive about approaching him. and i would always say, please, go say something to him. he would love to talk to you and he was always so friendly to everyone. >> in 2013, krauthammer released a book "things that matter." and summed up the survivor's spirit that has guided much of his life writing, quote: the catastrophe that awaits everyone from a single false move, wrong turn, fatal encounter, every life has such a moment. what distinguishes us is whether and how we ever come
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back. >> there is an element of that in everybody's story. their low point. do you want it enough and are you lucky enough? that's a party of it too. >> in mid june krauthammer announced that he had been diagnosed with cancer and doctors had given him just weeks to live. writing: i leave this life with no regrets. it was a wonderful life, full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. i am sad to leave. but i leave with the knowledge that i lived the life that i intended. >> do you think you will ever stop writing? >> no. i intend to die at my desk. >> really? >> i would like to. i'm not sure can i arrange it. >> crosswal krauthammer was 68 s old. >> what a pictures little boy growing up. ainsley: what a blight man.
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brian: tonight at:00 you will see an hour special of charles' life leading up to his book which really applies here and you realize how familiar you miss his commentary on what we are going through on daily basis. you always think to yourself what would charles think? i think when he thought in terms of the president. when he thought the president was right. he would comment. when he thought he wasn't, he wouldn't be afraid to get comment and get blasted in return. he kind of liked it. ainsley: we heard from so many of you asking where he is over the last year. i know there is people on my parent's street always ask me when i go home where is charles? he was diagnosed with cancer about a year ago and had some complications after that surgery after they removed the tumor in his abdomen. had lots of complications. looked like it was getting better. the cancer returned a few weeks ago. the doctors said you don't have long to live and that's when he penned the letter. steve: sad end. what a full life. charles krauthammer was 68. ainsley: rest in peace, our friend.
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♪ ♪
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visit sleepnumber.com for a store near you. jillian: good morning to you. welcome back. we have quick headlines now. a convicted cop killer will soon walk free. robert hayes is getting parole after serving 44 years behind bars. according to the "new york post" he could be released as early as july 24th. hayes shot and killed sydney thompson a transit petroleum trt patrolman. jump ago turnstile. this comes two months after her man belle got parole in new york. both men, members of the black liberation army. troopers say the man trapped in a burning car after it explodes, look at this, body cameras rolling as 1,000 rounds of ammo go off inside the vehicle. the nevada highway patrol
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troopers pulling the driver to safety. is he expected to be okay. that's a look at your headlines. i will send it to you. steve: thank you very much, jillian. new fallout from recently released inspector general report causing a ripple effect inside the fbi. embattled fbi agent peter strzok who texted that he would stop donald trump from becoming president apparently has lost his security clearance. this as we learn that three of the five fbi officials targeted for anti-trump bias were all part of the mueller probe. what? here with reaction founder and executive director of turning point u.s.a. charlie kurt. not surprising that peter strzok would lose his security clearance. he was escorted out of the building a few days ago. >> he should have been fired instantaneously when this stuff came out. this goes to show there is unelected unknown group of bureaucrats at very, very high level of government agencies that have unlimited
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political power. what what if we wouldn't have unearthed these documents. what if the heros in congress such as devin nunes or mark meadows wouldn't have went through this one believable effort to get these documents. this all would have been labeled a conspiracy theory. >> steve: steve so we know about five employees at the fbi had these anti-trump texts. how many others are there? they didn't catch. >> right. and how much other behavior is there that any logical conclusion can say there is probably deleted documents and reappropriated assignments that went against this president time and time again. this should exonerate the president completely when it comes to the mueller probe. remember, this is the very institution that started the entire fake dossier that ended up launching this investigation. steve: charlie, the fact that rod rosenstein will not release the stuff that congress wants to see just so they can figure out why did this get started in the beginning because it does look to many on the political right and you mentioned a couple of names that have been at the forefront of this, it t. looks like the fbi has
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redacted a bunch of stuff because it makes them look bad. they are not going to hand them over the documents because it started on flimsy -- a flimsy premise. >> no one should be above the law. what you are seeing here is a level of government bureaucrats and agents that allow their political bias to get directly into their work. when they get challenged they say how dare you challenge our work or the integrity of the fbi. the thing i found most disgusting about the ig report one sentence after all these findings the integrity of the fbi is still intact. are you kidding me? exchange gifts in exchange with reporters. text messages with senior levels of the fbi agents, no, no. don't worry we will stop it. the integrity of the fbi is still intact? i don't think so. the president of the united states was corrects in firing comey last spring and this mueller investigation should be ended completely and totally. steve: all right, charlie kirk, have a good weekend. the first lady making a surprise trip to the border. the media focusing on that coat. >> it was impossible to think that that is aimed at
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the people she just saw. it's more, i think, likely, maybe the person who she is married to. steve: well, diamond and silk have some thoughts about that. they join us live coming up. good morning to you, ladies. take your dog to work day and brian's dogs rocky and apollo are at work ♪ who let the dogs out ♪ your digestive system has billions of bacteria but life can throw them off balance. re-align yourself with align probiotic. and try new align gummies with prebiotics and probiotics to help support digestive health.
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♪ ♪ >> it was impossible to think that that is aimed at the people she just saw. it's more, i think, likely, maybe the person who she is
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married to. >> she is a model. she sort of knows the power of clothes. >> she does. >> the media choosing to zero in on the first lady's outer wear bearing the words "i really don't care. do you?" >> brian: instead of focusing on visit to texas facility that houses immigrant children, when which she spent a great deal of time in. steve: here to weigh in are diamond and silk. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> good morning. steve: the cover of the "new york post" today says has the first lady gone rogue and it says flak jacket. first line says is this a message to her husband or the press or an inadvertent wardrobe choice. ladies, what do you think? >> we believe this is a message. this is what we call a diss to the media. >> that's right. >> all of these hollywood elites that say the most salacious, vile and vicious things about the first lady and our first lady. the one thing that we love
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is that your actions speak louder than your words. and this first lady went down to the border to check on these children. she does something i don't even think any of the other first ladies that tweeted about it did anything like this. she did that and that's what we should be focused on. >> and instead of talking about it. she was being about it. brian: here's what the president said. he tweeted this out i really don't care, do you, that's the quote on the jacket written on the back of melania's jacket refers to the fake news media. melania has learned how dishonest they are and she truly no longer cares. so there's your explanation. >> absolutely. and we need to stick with that and we need to focus on bigger and better things. steve: ladies, don't you think because she was going on an important mission to go down and see the facility down there, it was a mistake even to put it on because we were winding up talking about did it mean this or did it mean that rather than she went to seat kids. >> no. >> no. it wasn't a mistake. >> what she did is just proved a point just how dumb
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the left really is to be focusing on a jacket and wording instead of focused on her actions what she really did. >> right. ainsley: they apparently came from zara like 39 bucks. let's go on and talk about your movie. i understand you are making a movie. what's it called and tell us more about it. >> okay. it's called dummy crats. we know the president is draining the swamp but now it's time for us to expose the swamp. you know that these democrats have got to be dumb when you are upset with a sitting president for following the laws that the previous president has followed. this movie is going to expose the hypocrisy, expose some members of congress. >> that's right. brian: working for their own -- can't wait for the credit. thanks. ainsley: thanks, ladies. brian: straight ahead, geraldo rivera and judge jeanine both here live coming up but separately. ainsley: big band is going
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they came back and moved to washington for charles krauthammer and amazing heartening for me to think one of the deepest thinkers, one ever the smarteddest people in the country could still say baseball matters, sports matters whether you are in contention or not he wanted to be part of it the first time i interviewed him was for a special probably in 1988. i saw him, back page of "time" magazine i said can we try to book this guy charles krauthammer he wrote this unbelievable story. we booked him and he was on satellite. i did not know the extent of his intellect and his background and obviously what he would become. ainsley: loved baseball and
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went to baseball with bret baier for one of his specials. he grew up playing baseball with his older brother. he was very close to older brother. older brothers a lot of times don't want little brother hanging out with them. he said he always had older friends and brothers. played baseball. steve: he was a genius. when he would come on the program, always a little intimidating but nonetheless he was always a good sport and good humor and he always answered all of our questions in a very charles krauthammer way. watch. steve: charles krauthammer, get his book it's fantastic. i read it twice. >> i write in the book one of the reasons why i shifted is because on foreign policy the democrats changed. i didn't. they don't want targeted solutions. they want to take stuff over. congratulations on your book. brian: thank you very much. >> challenging me right up there. >> i'm not challenging you. >> if you are a columnist you get graded on the curve. selling books they keep scores. it's like a basketball game.
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i'm in the corner. the clock is running down and i go for the three-point shot. brian: charles krauthammer thanks so much we went to all your areas of expertise. >> except one. except baseball. brian: by the way, charles krauthammer, i asked him afterwards unbelievable how well your book is doing. probably tired of promoting it. >> no. first time since my accident can i keep score. looking to win every day. what was it 40 weeks on the best seller. ainsley: 40 weeks on the "new york times" best seller's list. very difficult to get on that list he was number one for 10 weeks in the row. steve: we all went to his book parties. one hosted by the channel here in this building. i took my wife. i said charles, i would like to introduce to you cathy. and he goes come on over here, i want to meet the mother of the great peter doocy. ainsley: he is so nice. steve: which goes right there. ainsley: talk about someone's children. you are right though. he was intimidating. so smart and when you talk
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to someone that brilliant you are wondering are they thinking you are so stupid. i asked him if i could take a picture. we meet presidents and celebrities all the time. asking him to take a picture was a little intimidating. he was so sweet. kimberly and i were at that event with steve and his wife. we were so proud of him and so bright and to be in his presence was such an honor. steve: i got so many text messages and people who are my friends who are watching who miss minimum. brian: all these issues immigration. what's the president going to do. ainsley: we need him. brian: you think to yourself what would charles say? charles hurt was on earlier. how smart he always was to answer before krauthammer. he would always put the period on things. you don't want to be the person who finishes up. what he said. steve: don't follow kids or animals. ainsley: watches on tv for different reasons. some it's personality but
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with him we wanted to hear what he was going to say because it was going to resonate and pretty spot on. steve: we're going to continue to remember the life and times of charles. and we have got that great report that bret baier has been working on for the last couple of years, actually. incapsule lating his life. we will play that for new 25 members. ainsley: dana perino says watch for his son. his son is so bright and spitting image of his. we are remembering his wife and son. brian: daniel. steve: meanwhile, in other news. ainsley: immigration showdown the house postponing the vote on the compromise yesterday. steve: they don't have the votes yet. first lady made a surprise visit to detention center for migrant children down in texas. brian: griff jenkins has been braving the weather and trying to get to the bottom of this where the reality and rhetoric is. hey, griff. >> good morning, guys. the first lady braved that raging storm yesterday and flooding to come to this shelter behind me where
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children are kept in classrooms in beds. not in cages, while they care for them and try to figure out what to do with them. she was accompanied by the hhs secretary. she met with the children and the staff here. here's what the first lady had to say after her visit. >> we all know they are having -- they are here without their family. and i want to thank you for your hard work, your compassion and your kindness you are giving them in this difficult time. >> her second stop was cancelled. she was going to visit border patrol. as she departied she was wearing a jacket that the media has made much of. it said on the back i really don't care. do you? well, after visit we were able to go inside this shelter and see an american flag that children made for the first lady and speak with dr. kurt, who is the ceo at the shelter. here is what he had to say about the visit. >> yes, she wanted to learn all about new hope emergency shelter. but, more important, she wanted to spend time with
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the children. you could just see the joy on the children's faces. you could see the joy on mrs. trump's face and it was very obvious to me that some real connections were made. >> the visit comes as the pentagon announces some 20,000 unaccompanied children will be housed in military bases in texas and arkansas. it's similar to a move that president obama did in 2014 when he housed 7,000 children and, you know, i asked dr. senske when i was in there about how different administrations have tried to tackle this crisis. here's what he had to say. >> every administration is trying to do the best that they can in a truly difficult situation where sometimes there are no easy answers and sometimes even no good answers. >> and then, of course, the situation back in washington the g.o.p. leadership punting on that vote on friday because they don't have the votes. they are going to have to try to work their differences out and maybe we will get a vote early next
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week. we have to find out, guys. steve: once they whip enough members into line. griff, thank you very much. you saw some of those images from inside one of the detention centers that we have seen a lot offer the last week where some of the children were housed, you know, it looks like a cage. apparently one of these -- the compromise bill would end family separation. also, there would be $23.4 billion for border security. and then there would be a six-year special status for the dreamers. now, here's the thing. if a future congress decides, you know what? we have been allocating the $25 billion over time, let's stop doing that. then the special status for the dreamers stops. brian: great idea. those are the type of triggers people want. they want special editions for agricultural workers. that's what jeff denim you wanted. a republican who really pushed for this vote. if it gets through the house it's going to be a struggle in the senate. i would think that steve
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scalise with all his skill and the respect he has, along with the president working the phones, they will get a vote if it's a good bill. the other thing that i think is the biggest joke that we're not addressing it wasn't president trump's idea to have everyone leave from central and south america in june and well up at the border. somebody has to deal with this issue. it doesn't matter who the president is. if you don't like his policy, is he also open to your policy rather than just criticizing his. he is trying to send a message to the other countries. this is not the way you do it because this is a country that has rules and laws. the port of entry will be one thing. we can both laws. we can't let everybody in that wants to be here. these are not, like it or not, these aren't our kids. show them compassion. but it's not like he is doing this to the people of idaho or texas. these are people from another country and now people are saying that they are more important than people in our country who are paying taxes and who have needs as well. ainsley: he just wants to make sure we vet who is
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coming across the border in case it's ms-13. brian: did you see the story about the 6-year-old that was found in the middle of the dessert whoever was escorting him to our border left him. and our border patrol went over to mexico and grabbed the 6-year-old. ainsley: many cases might be safer. know where they are put them in the right families put them with their moms and dads. steve: some problems with the immigration system in our country right now. by the grace of god something will happen in congress one way or the other and they will address them and fix them otherwise, we will just be right back where we started from. unfortunately, which is not good. all right. it is about 7:11 in new york city. jillian joins us on this friday. jillian: good friday morning to you guys and to you at home as well. get you caught up on the news. lasers grow egg threat for our military. planes flying over the south china sea have been hit by the beams more than 20 times in the past few months. flashes appear to come from chinese fishing boats and can temporarily blind pilots.
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so far there have not been any reports of injuries. it comes as defense secretary james mattis preaches to visit china for the first time next week. president trump's chief economic advisor will return next week. larry kudlow will be returning after suffering a heart attack earlier this month. the white house says is he expected to make a full recovery. today president trump is expected to be joined at the white house from angel families to discuss the border crisis. at his rally in minnesota this week, the president promised to stand up for families who have lost loved ones to illegal immigrants. >> as your president i will always fight to protect american families. [cheers] >> i will always fight for an immigration system that dengegdz our borders and takes care of our sovereignty as a nation. >> president has stood with angel families in the past inviting the parents of ms-13 gang victims for the state of the union address. and big news about roseanne.
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>> you can't live in the past, dan. when things are gone, they are gone forever. forever.ains. jillian: well apparently not so much. abc is launch sag spinoff of the show without roseanne. original cast members will all be a part of a series called the conors. the roseanne reboot was cancelled last month after a racist tweet from the star. roseanne issued a statement saying in part that she wished the best for everyone involved. that's an interesting move. brian: i don't know if you could replace her. how do you replace the star of a show? jillian: great question. big question. ainsley: we will see. time will tell. steve: she wanted to make sure all the people who worked on the crew and the actors. ainsley: remained at work. exactly. steve: meanwhile, straight ahead on this friday. ainsley: today we are remembering our friend charles krauthammer, his life, his legacy with the people who knew him best. a.b. stoddard joins us to share her memory coming up next. >> i thought once i'm in washington, isn't that where they do politics? i ended up supporting just about every element of the
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sober so sorry for your loss. i know you were good friends are women h watch on "special report." you told producers have wept over the moments shared whim. i remember the things told me the many i can't recall and the fact there won't be any more of them. what are your thoughts this morning? >> ainsley, thank you for having me. i am feeling incredibly sad as i have for two weeks since we got the letter that charles sent to the public saying that he had a final battle that he wouldn't win with this cancer that had not been there a month before but that had
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returned. but i really relish the opportunity to talk about him because there won't be anyone else like him. and everyone of us who was around him and had the privilege of being friends with him feel so incredibly blessed to have known him. he was not only as wise and as brilliant as everyone has talked about and people know from his great works. but he was inherently decent and joyful and warm and he really loved people. he was infectious person to be around. he was the person, the magnet in the room everyone wanted to hear what he was saying. they wanted to keep him talking he was so willing to engage in anyone with conversation anything from dogs to space travel to baseball to politics to medicine he was so much more than the great work that will carry on. which is why i really hope everyone will watch tonight
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at 9:00 when fox is running a documentary on him and buy his book if you don't have it i encourage everyone to spread charles around and keep him with us because his legacy is that important. ainsley: you are right about his intellect. he carried us through the elections. we all wanted to hear what he was going to say and would stand silent because we wanted to hear his opinions. any special memories or moments that really stand out? >> charles was very funny. you have heard a lot of us who were on the panel with him every week talk about how he would bust us up laughing at the commercials. he was very -- a good dead pan. so you didn't expect it at all he also was really besodded with fatherhood. that is what stood out the most in our friendship because we spoke so much -- he always asked about my three children and he spoke so lovingly and in reverence
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of being daniel's father. daniel looks exactly like his dad. they are very close. what charles did in spite of his diving accident at 22 confining him to a wheelchair. what he did was live a full life, as full a life as he could to provide the closest bond that he could from a wheelchair. and the things that he and daniel shared, a love of books, of movies. of sports. the tales he told me of that will be my most cherished memory. ainsley: a. brrr, thank youb., r being with us. look who janice found in the keurig corner. that is lynyrd skynyrd. they're gearing up to perform for us live on all-american concert series ♪ sweet home alabama
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♪ jillian: hope you are having a good number so far. time for news by the numbers. first $3 billion. that's how much the eu imposed in retaliatory on u.s. goods. targets things like jeans, harr buy davidson motorcycles and bourbon. the eu says they had no other choice after the president trump imposed air force on steel and aluminum. 1,000, that's how many new words were added to the ax ford dictionary. new words include spoiler alert. >> binge watching and microaggression. interesting choices. and finally 36 years, that's how long elvis' private jet has been sitting on a runway in new mexico. sold last year for $430,000.
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the owner returned it and now it's back up for auction. ainsley? ainsley: thank you so much. this southern rock band is behind free bird the most requested live song in history. brian: i just wish it was longer. [laughter] brian: farewell tour is happening this year and most importantly here to rock on the plaza this morning. [cheers and applause] brian: gary, first off what does it mean for you that we are actually wrapping up this for now. >> we are just not going to tour anymore. we have been touring so long that this is our farewell tour. we will be around. we are going to do a cd and play here and there. but i have gotten bad health. my heart is bad. brian: you look great. >> i'm faking it. we're not going to tour anymore. steve: regarding free bird being the most requested song in history. how many times would you say
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have you done that? >> oh, god. i don't know. steve: give us a number. >> whenever i first started with skynyrd in 87 because i always felt like my brother was the only one that could sing it. came off after alabama man have you got to sing free bird i goes no way. ronny was a writer and singer he would want you to do it and i have been doing it ever since. ainsley: ricky, how did you come together as a band? >> oh my goodness, jacksonville, florida. gary, ronny and allen started the band right around 67. steve: named after your gym teacher. >> his gym teacher. >> kept kicking us out for having long hair. it wasn't that long then. >> touching your eyebrows and we finally named the band after him. brian: johnny the band's decision to get back together 10 years right after the crash. can you bring us through that moment that made that decision possible? >> well, gary called me and we actually met in
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jacksonville and all the survivor members of skynyrd was there. when they asked me to be a part of it it freaked me out. i was a skynyrd fan too, folks. i grew up around the music. after we went into rehearsal i knew it was the right thing to do it's been 31 years this year. brian: unbelievable. [cheers] brian: country music today they get pushed back on so-called new country. when you guys came out with southern rock, was there push back from traditional country musicians? >> i don't know, man. we learned from the beatles. [laughter] and. steve: what do you mean you learned from the beatles. >> saw them on ed sullivan that did it for me and other garage bands. >> skynyrd always had country. we grew up on country music. and then discovered the beatles. janice: what's the key to longevity. >> my brother is a poet for
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common people those songs still stand the test of time. ainsley: sweet home alabama is the favorite in the south, especially. >> everywhere, girl. what are you talking about? ainsley: i grew up in the south. >> new york city. tweet about alabama or what? [cheers] ainsley: one of those songs when it comes on in the bar or at a party, everyone in the room is singing it at the top of their lungs. what's the story behind that song. >> we were traveling to alabama a lot. >> roll tide! >> in multiple shows and we love, you know, the towns and the -- all the country try side we drove through. we kind of did a joke about neil young, he was one of our favorite artists. he was in canada talking about the south. so he told him we didn't need him around. and there was some political stuff in there way back then about lawless. of course we said boo boo boo. and a few other things.
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but we just love the state you, so we wrote about it. brian: that's right. so by the way this tour, marshall tucker, jason aldean and who else is going to be on the kid rock? >> we have kid rock. we have had bad company out with us. jamie johnson. we are just bringing in a bunch of people. steve: you don't have to waited for that actually see them live. they will take the stage and be performing live. lynn night or dalynyrd skynyrd. >> can she travel with you. janice: yes. ainsley: we do love you, janice. the house is postponing a crucial vote or a solution to immigration. do we really need more people in this country? what do you all think of that? that's what michael wants to know. the former national security spokesman and is he going to join us live. steve: mick mulvaney just used a cheese pizza to explain government waste.
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life telling others exactly what he thought. >> you are betraying your whole life if you don't say what you think say it honestly. >> it was that quality that brought charles to fox news channel during brit hume's tenure as anchor. >> this is not a man designed for television. look at him and not a potential tv star. he became a huge star i would say a mega star on this channel. and it was the shear force of his intellect and the power of his thinking. and on top of that. there was a gentleness about him personally that if he disagreed with you, you know, you never felt attacked, you know, he just disagreed with you. >> always unspoken on the panel that he was always the leader because of his delivery, his intellect. >> "special report" stage manager mary pat denard was on set with charles every night for years. >> it was an ongoing joke on the panel that bret baier has a signal when people need to wrap up like in 30. bret puts his arm out. charles was on the show forever. we always laughed that i don't think he paid
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attention to that one -- if he had something to say, he was going to say it no time constraints were going to control him on that. >> born to jewish parents who left world war ii era europe, charles raised his son to pursu purr pursue knowledge. >> his motto i want you to learn everything. you don't have to do everything but you have got to know everything. he thought that was part of life. >> family lived in montreal and summered at their college in long beach, new york. >> it was a paratypical childhood. my brother and i were inseparable. he always insist that i be included, so i got used to be around the big boys and taking the slings and arrows. that's how you get toughened up. >> as a senior in miguel university in canada he became captivate by journalism. he applied to medical school to appease his family and was accepted to harvard. but krauthammer put off attending and encontrolled enrot oxford instead. it was there that he met
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fellow student from australia robin trethway who would later become his wife. he reversed course and headed back to the u.s. to attend harvard. >> why did you choose psychiatry. >> i was looking for something halfway between the reality of medicine and the elegance, if you like, of philosophy. so psychiatry was the obvious thing. >> it was there that one unexpected moment, a tragic diving accident changed charles 7 life forever. >> it just hit at precisely the angle where all the force was transmitted to you one spot. and that is the cervical vertebra which severed the spinal cord. >> when did you realize that the accident was life-altering? >> the second it happened. >> despite his permanent paralysis, charles astounded his professors and classmates by graduating on time, near the top of his class. ultimately, he decided the field wasn't for him. a career reversal he voked aboujokedabout on fox years lat.
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>> i'm a psychiatrist in remission doing well. i haven't had a relapse in 25 years. >> in 1978, krauthammer headed to washington, d.c. for a government job. >> i thought once i'm in washington, isn't that where they do politics? one thing will lead to another. >> robin encouraged him to follow his dreams. and he soon landed at the left leaning new republic magazine, just as the reagan administration took office. >> so help me god. >> krauthammer found himself agreeing with the new president and questioning his own feelings about the democratic party. >> i ended up supporting just about every element of the reagan foreign policy. >> months after reagan's re-election, krauthammer penned the phrase the reagan doctrine in a provocative "time" magazine column and the name stuck. >> he created the reagan doctrine. nobody had heard of it. charles put together a piece and dubbed it and, you know, i have read it many times and it just holds up so well. i think charles discovered then that there really was a
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lot to reagan. >> but it would take years before charles fully embraced domestic conservative ideals. >> it took me about a decade. i was skeptical of tax cuts. i was skeptical of smaller government at the beginning. then by the end of the 1980s, i had begun to change. >> in 1958 his son daniel was born. two years later, charles won the biggest honor in journalism, the pulitzer prize. [sirens] >> but it was the events of september 11th, 2001, that brought a more forceful tone to his commentary and a regular spot on the "special report" panel: over the years charles became an audience favorite. >> the big estherer we make is to lose the damn war because we refuse to recognize hot enemy is and what it requires. for god's sake why do you have to talk about that. the morning is over, the chiva is done. and if you are a conservative, you should be optimistic. i think, you know, it will snow in hell before the doj
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is gonna go after her. we all were expecting it. it didn't happen. that was the dog that didn't bark. >> despite all of his accomplish maniesments, awards. he was humbled and at times uneasy with the influence his words held. >> i think about it and i find it worrisome. the reason is when i was totally unknown, i could say anything i damn well pleased. >> that included when his opinions reached presidents. >> read charles krauthammer's column in the post that he is a brilliant man. >> well, you know, when you get praise from president clinton and you are from my side of the aisle, that means that my career is done. i mean, i'm toast. >> krauthammer's high standards for political leaders were bipartisan for president obama. >> when i think he has done just about everything wrong. >> to then candidate donald trump. >> this is the strongest field of republican candidates in 35 years. you could pick a dozen of them at random and have the
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strongest cabinet america has had in our lifetime and, instead, all our time is spent discussing this rodeo clown. i don't think i have ever heard such a stream of disconnected ideas since i quit psychiatry 30 years ago. >> as far as charles krauthammer, i'm not a fan of his. i think is he a highly overrated pundit. he is wrong on so many things. >> charles krauthammer, who, by the way in candidate casino put his first money -- >> -- i saw that i couldn't believe it thank you, charles. i will make you look good, charles. >> in recent years as the republican administration took office, charles didn't shy away from his trademark blunts, unabashedly critical analysis when it came to president trump. >> presidents don't talk like this. they never have this is what it sounds like when you are living in a banana republic. >> charles had other loves aside from politics. he played ches and was annual avid baseball fan. >> i grew up playing the game. i loved to play the game. >> and loved nothing more
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than seeing his washington nationals play and win. >> the glory. with the white house on fire, the congress in chaos, and the world going to hell in a hand basket, we need happy news like this. this is why god created baseball late on the sixth day. >> friends at fox news channel remember that quick whit and charles' love for talking to anyone. >> "special report" has a lot of people who come in and watch it. they were always in awe of charles and always very apprehensive about approaching him and i would always say please go say something to him. he would love to talk to you. and he was always so friendly to everyone. >> in 2013, krauthammer released a book, things that matter. and summed up the survivor's spirit that has guided much of his life. writing,: the catastrophe that awaits everyone from a single false move, wrong turn, fatal encounter, every life has such a moment. what distinguishes us is whether and how we ever come back. >> there is an element of
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that in everybody's story. their low point. do you want it enough? and are you lucky enough? that's a part of it, too. >> in mid june krauthammer announced that he had been diagnosed with cancer and doctors had given him just weeks to live. writing: i leave this life with no regrets. it was a wonderful life full and complete with the great loves and great endeavors that make it worth living. i am sad to leave but i leave with the knowledge that i lived the life that i intended. >> do you think you will ever stop writing? >> no. i intend to die at my desk. >> really? >> i would like to. i'm not sure i can arrange it. >> charles krauthammer was 68 years old. steve: you know, charles krauthammer's loss to america, the national conversation is dwarfed, of course, by the loss to his family and his friends and, of course, this morning our thoughts and prayers are with his son daniel and his wife robin.
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ainsley: absolutely. god bless you all. we can learn more about charles krauthammer, his life tonight on "special report." brian: also there is going to be a special at 9:00. meanwhile,. steve: the house is postponing a crucial vote for immigration. michael anton has a new op-ed about this issue that is causing a stir. is he going to join us next. brian: plus geraldo rivera is going to be here. judge jeanine is going to be here. harvey levin starts his brand new season on his brand new series first guest magic johnson but first he is going to be with us right before we are done and before we go to the concert. ♪ working for a living ♪ living and a working ♪ this is what they're giving ♪ because i'm working for a living
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arrested 20120 trying to to turkey. pizza is not for dinner anymore. the office of management and bucket director using to explain government waste. >> if you make a cheese pizza, it's governed by the food and drug administration. if you put a peperoni on it that's governed by the usda. >> and by the way that was incredibly said. [laughter] i think you should put that on television. jillian: what about the other topics, the cap net was discussing waste and reorganization. a look at your headlines. send it back down to you, brian. brian: the president loved that here we go with number one issue on his desk today immigration. the showdown on capitol hill. the house postpones crucial vote on compromise. our next guest has a new debate to talk about. in a new "the washington post" op-ed creating quite a stir he asked why do we need
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more people in this country anyway? here to answer that is the president's former national security spokesperson himself research fellow hillsdale michael anton, michael, are you saying we have enough people? we are out of room? what do you mean? >> i'm saying that's the fundamental question that ought to drive the debate. we are not really having a debate. we are having a kind of argument where one side says if you are good, you just want more immigrants then if you don't you are bad and evil and let's shut down all discussion. we need to have a discussion about what's best for the country, what's best for american citizens. as president trump said on the campaign trail and hats repeated ever since and is he totally right if why don't have a border we don't have a country. if we as the people who elect our representatives don't get to decide what's best for our country and who can come here. we don't have a country. that's the question we ought to ask and we don't get to ask it. brian: you are saying right now president labor market what is best for our workers and what is best for our country. labor market in particular some say yes, we need day workers. we need more people in the
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workforce. what do you say? >> i think certain aspects of the business community are always going to say that because the higher the supply of labor the less in wages they have to pay. one of the reasons president trump got elected we had a 20-year or even longer track record, depending on what studies you look at at working class wages, middle class wages stagnating or falling behind. right now thanks to the trump economy we have low unemployment rate. i say use that low unemployment rate to tighten the labor market and raise wages for people who have not been getting ahead in years. they deserve a raise. they deserve a boost. these people falling behind deserve a boost and inyou creasing the supply of labor keep wages low it benefits big business but doesn't benefit workers. brian: people say you have to show a heart. what do you say? >> i say the united states has a huge heart. look, the country is less than 250 years old. we have welcomed millions and millions of people over the course of that time
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including my own ancestors. the united states is the most generous country with regard to immigration throughout its history in the history of the world. we have got to have limits or we don't have a country. brian: michael, thanks so much. appreciate it. >> thank you. brian: coming up straight ahead we change gears actor cynthia nixon running for governor of new york and she makes it clear where she stands on immigration. >> i think we need to abolish ice. that seems really cleared. they have strayed so far from the interest of the american people and the interest of humanity that we need to abolish it. brian: wait until you hear what else she says about president trump and it's take your dog to work day. i am the one that listened. rockie and apollo are here for the first time sings they were puppies. what has their life been like? they will tell the true story exclusively on "fox & friends." ♪ ain't nothing but a hound dog ♪ crying all the time ♪ well, you ain't i visualize travel rewards.
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upgrade online now. brian the last time we saw rocky and apollo was take your dogs to work day and they were just puppies. we did not know how big they would get. steve: fast forward to today and they got big. brian: rocky and apollo have agreed to appear on "fox & friends" after two and a half years of negotiation. jillian, bring them out. these are the great pyrenee pyrenees. these are great pyrenees brothers. i don't know if the entire breed is like this but they ared friendliest, kind es dogs. steve: today is take your dog to work day invented in 1999 by pet sitters international to encourage businesses to allow employees to bring their dogs to work one day a year and today is the day.
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brian: although dogs don't usually get up at 3:00 in the morning. i had to literally wake them up like they were out last night drinking. ainsley: how do you put them in the car? do you a v. a big suburban. brian: i grab their back legs and they jump in. steve: wheelbarrow. >> we knew they would be big. i didn't think they would be this big. they just didn't stop growing. ainsley: why did you decide on great pyrenees. >> we came out of losing a burmese mountain dog. we didn't want to get the same one to replace it something like it. steve: big. >> the girls in particular, kirsten, caitlin and brian went to work and found this breed. found a great breeder in virginia. they said well, since rockie is deaf, i know since apollo is deaf. would you take his brother? we were getting rockie already. yeah, why not. we don't -- we forget that he is deaf. that apollo is deaf. he comes, different hand signals. they hang out. we were told after a year the brothers would fight.
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it's two and a half years. they are still buddies. jillian: they love each other. steve: what are you going to do later with take your dog to work day. take them over to the ice skating rink? brian: steve, what i'm going to do is send them back in the doocy limo. i have to do radio after this. ainsley: i will pay money. i want you to walk out there on sixth avenue and see people's reaction. >> please do. they are beautiful dogs. puppy face. all over your sofa. >> cotton tail. the thing is they try to pretend they are not on the couches when we go to bed. kind of gives it away when there is a blap county sitting there. ainsley: what are personalities. >> extremely kind. even like children they do not attack other dogs. they are great. steve: a fleet of roombas at your house. >> absolutely. ainsley: that's all right. they are beautiful. >> steve: take your dog to work day. brian: i did. now they get to go home. ainsley: coming up, the supreme court ruling that
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you will have to pay more taxes when you shop online now. stuart varney is going to tell us what this means for your shopping future in the next hour. in four unique varieties. when did you see the sign? when i needed to create a better visitor experience. improve our workflow. attract new customers. that's when fastsigns recommended fleet graphics. yeah! now business is rolling in. get started at fastsigns.com. that i served. of the fact yeah! now business is rolling in. i was a c130 mechanic in the corps, so i'm not happy unless my hands are dirty. between running a business and four kids, we're busy. auto insurance, homeowner's insurance, life insurance policies. knowing that usaa will always have my back... that's just one less thing you have to worry about. i couldn't imagine going anywhere else. they're like a friend of the family.
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>> today we remember our friend and beloved fox news commentator charles krauthammer. >> if you could say anything about him, greatest with him whether politics or life, charles krauthammer understood. >> the compromise bill. >> the first lady made surprise visit. >> apparently lost security
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clearance. >> a group of bureaucrats that have very limited power. steve: take your dog to workday. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ steve: what's his name, if you
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would like to watch stream go to fox and friends/concert. ainsley: where is brian? we asked him to take his dog. steve: he wanted to take his dog and transported to their house an somewhere there we really can't see it. ainsley: he walked out of the
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shop. come back, brian. ainsley: if you see something odd in new york, no one knows. >> i remember when they got the poop scooper law, you don't have to look your step every time you walked. steve: we are remembering, geraldo t life of charles krauthammer, giant on this channel and conservative circles and before that he was a democrat and he was one of the speech writers for wallet -- mondel. >> and he was to articulate, so thoughtful in commentary and he was so patient like we always disagreed but he was so patient with me. you know, he didn't treat me as if i was mentally impaired. he really let me say what i had to say. he was just a wonderful guy. quick story, i had for my back
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surgery about six months ago i was diagnosed at university of san francisco and the doctor i had was his roommate at harvard and was at the party where he jumped in the pool and his life changed and any time i feel sorry for myself when i'm limping or swimming like that, i think about charles and everything he endured and overcame and it didn't affect his commentary forks bitterness at all about what faith had dealt him. he would be so sorely missed. i remember in washington, d.c. when i was bending down to talk to him and at certain point you must be uncomfortable, you don't have to stay with me. a guy is totally conscious of his conscious, the example he set, every word he said was thoughtful. i thought he was so fair, eloquent and eloquent in his reasons. ainsley: he had a way to debate without letting it, you couldn't
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tell in his voice that he was upset. very measured. i will always admire that about him. >> so different than me. [laughter] steve: it's got to be daunting, there you are geraldo rivera, one of the most famous journalists in the world and if you're debating charles krauthammer, he's one of the mount rushmore. >> he's the mount rushmore. he was bullet proof in so many ways and so rare because there was civility and along with massive intelligence, people will remember that civility, the fact that he had such great manners. he had -- in that elegance he was willing to hear the other
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argument and tear it apart if he had to. ainsley: there's a picture of steve and there's another one with brian. he was an incredible guy. i remember in the bret baier special he talked about when he jumped in the pool he knew instantly what had happened and at that moment even from the get-go, he wasn't going to have a victim mentality. if there's anyone who could, he had every right to. his changed -- life changed dramatically. >> that's one of the many lessons, but i think people who have in anyway been disabled to look at the life that he led, to look at the impact he had, to hear his words still resinate. i remember his last couple of books were compilations of commentary and just read -- you read them almost like a novel and you see the argument and there's the beginning and there's the heart of it and then he has a nice tag line or conclusion. he was one of the greats.
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he really will be missed. we always say when a colleague passes, he will be missed, all the rest of it, the fact of the matter that charles krauthammer's words will live and that will impact us. if you're in journalism school now, you want to know how to frame an argument, check out charles krauthammer's books. steve: something that you and charles would have spirited argument over would be immigration debate. yesterday the house voted on the goodlatte bill, didn't get enough support from the republican party. now it sounds like the leadership has got another bill that they are working on compromise bill but still don't have enough votes because for one reason or another there's not snuff stuff to appeal to republicans. where does this go? one of the provisions to stop
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separating families. we see the cage rooms in texas in southern border, they break our hearts but something has to be done and right now it looks like it's up to congress. >> i have to say three quick things. first of all, whoever the chief of staff for the first lady should be fired for allowing her to wear that jacket to the border. noble gesture, she wore a coat that gave critics, the president something else to talk about to deflect the fact that she had gone to see with her own eyes her situation. a staff error, a rooky mistake. steve: got us talking about the wrong stuff. >> the wrong stuff. our viewers have to know that. i believe that we were in many ways way too slow to recognize the emergency on that border and i think that we potentially at "fox & friends" and i bear this burden myself, we were too slow to recognize the hideous nature
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of this policy that separated children from their parents. steve: nobody knew until they saw images. >> images that we haven't seen nearly enough of, the mournful whale of children, we dropped the ball and i apologized for it, we should have spoken out sooner because why? this is a real issue, the border security is a real issue, we need to secure our borders but we don't do it by doing something so obscene, we don't endure child abuse. ainsley: how do we do it? >> for right now there's an emergency, we need emergency housing on our side of the border to put parents and their children undocumented families -- steve: the president is reaching out to pentagon. >> on that bill, the compromise bill, shame on the democrats for not supporting it because it is everything that i need. here is what i need, i need the families not to be separated, i need the dream act, the
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1.8 million that the president -- normalized, legalized status immediately and i want the $25 billion that chuck schumer and luís gutiérrez have promised for the border wall. i wanted the democrats and democrats say they wanted it because they perceive because of the president's errors with the unaccompanied minor and because of the criticism and everything else directed at president trump specifically that they have come to the conclusion that it is better for democratic party to pass no immigration bill so they have that issue going forward in november. i also fear that the republicans say, no, this immigration issue work for us and where does that leave the american people, the people at the border in kind of never, neverland where we will not resolve the issue because both sides perceive this to be
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on political -- steve: we all want something fixed. >> even when i was with the president, i said, make it easy, forget about all of the other stuff, chain migration and lottery this and that. dream act, wall, families together. let's -- it's a one pager. the republican compromise bill is a good bill and i don't even think there's enough republicans to pass it. if i were the president i would call chuck schumer, whoever he talks to and say, hey, come on, man, let's fix. if you don't want to fix it i will say you don't want to fix it from now until november. ainsley: good to see you. steve: we don't know where our brian did go. ainsley: with the dog. steve: jillian have you seen where the dog went? jillian: we will have update in a minute. let's get you caught up on news that we are following manhunt
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today, sean christy, a quote, clear and present danger to law enforcement in pennsylvania. his father called secret service after he thereatened president on social media and christy has history of harassing officials including former governor sarah palin. in a radio interview attorney general jeff sessions reveals peter strzok no longer has security clearance, last week he was escorted out of fbi headquarters as the bureau conducted a review. and inspector general's report show strzok said he would stop then candidate president trump from taking office back in 2016. we are getting one step close the other formal sit-down between president trump and vladimir putin. the two presidents met during
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summits in 2017 but this would be their first stand-alone meeting. it could happen as soon as july, possibly in austria, when president trump attends nato summit. we will keep you posted. steve: a lot going on. thank you, meanwhile today is deadline day for the department of justice and fbi to hand over documents congress asking for russia probe. if they don't, it seems house speaker paul ryan has a plan. ainsley: supreme court rules, you will have to pay more to shop online and stuart varney says that's actually a good thing. he's on deck. steve: brian will be back because right now he's dropping off rocky and apollo in their big car to ride home. ainsley: look at the reaction on the new yorkers walking by. i work hard to protect this tookus.
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to take care of any messy situations. and put irritation in its place. and if i can get comfortable keeping this tookus safe and protected... you can get comfortable doing the same with yours. preparation h. get comfortable with it.
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>> a major supreme court decision that could affect your next online purchase.
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scotus had ruling that states can now collect sales taxes for things you buy online. ainsley: here with more on what this means for you and pocketbook stuart varney, host of varney & company, what are your take aways? stuart: four take aways, number one the free internet is just about dead. you buy something online and in the future you're almost certainly going to have to pay sales tax. hold on a second. let me go through the list. number two, state governments are going to take in a lot more money. they have been losing 33 billion a year because of the preference for online. that's going to be replaced. number 3, bricks and mortar stores, the shopping mall people, they now have a level playing, this is very much to their advantage. number 4, if you're small online seller, not amazons, the small guys, you will have a problem with compliance cost because now you've got to work out 10,000
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different sales taxes on different items in 50 different states and you have to pay for that compliance. that will hurt you bottom line. brien: who is going to adjust, is the price going to go up? stuart: good question, brian, i think some of the online sellers will lower prices to take a account of the increase in state taxes which buyers have to pay and the amazons of this world, they can afford to do that, they can afford to adjust prices a little bit maybe to take account for that. the smaller guys cannot. steve: the smaller guys, brick and mortar stores in the town i live in, they are going finally because the online sellers for years have had a leg up because in the beginning people weren't doing it. now everybody is. stuart: contentious decision but i'm in favor of it because this preference for online, you don't pay sales tax, back in 1992 to get online sellers off and running, well, they are off and
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running, it's 2018, they are doing very well, indeed, they no longer need the preference. level the playing field. brian: my second favorite channel in the whole world. stuart: that's right? brian: i love espn 2. ainsley: made ultimate sacrifice for you and nation, his family is receiving special gift, a brand-new-mortgage-free house. steve: that is awesome and here is leonard skinner with skinner nation. ♪ ♪
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ainsley: building homes for heros, build, modify and gift homes mortgage free to veterans and to their families and now the foundation is expanding their program to include families who have made the ultimate sacrifice like the family of army sergeant, there's his picture, made ultimate sacrifice for you, first gold-star family to be presented with a new house from this wonderful organization and we
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were there. watch. >> we honor a great husband, we honor a great father, we honor a great man and we honor a great commando. a hero that paid the ultimate sacrifice. >> this is something that my husband and i have dreamt on. we are on the journey. close to buying very first home. so i know he's looking down. >> welcome home. [applause] >> god bless you. >> the home is for herald and how it takes care of the family now and future generation. it truly shows you the american spirit, gold-star families are part of our families as well. [cheers and applause] >> i think this is amazing.
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it's beautiful. >> how do you like it? >> i like it. >> welcome home. [cheers and applause] >> it's a lot. a lot of emotions without him but thanks to this community and god knows thanks to brothers they wrapped their arms around me and my family and although my husband he's not here today physically but his presence is here. ainsley: wow, joining us now the family, natasha pay, her mother yolanda and son marcos and very special founder and ceo of building homes for heros andy. andy called me on the phone and told me about your story, natasha, how has this man from this organization changed your life? >> there's truly no words of what andy and andy helpers and
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all the others good people who took the time out, the time where my life, my kids' life was upside down, you know, so we are in the middle of a pause. it's a beautiful thing that although i wasn't thinking about my next steps, what i was going to do next, where we were going to do next, people like andy and the volunteers that come along with andy, his team, thinking about me and my family. he didn't know me for a can of paint and that heart is pure. he understood the hurt, he understood what we lost as a family, the void that's missing that's my husband so that in itself should explain how amazing andy and all of the beautiful people that i've met through andy has meant to me and my family. ainsley: the husband was the love of your life and goes to fight for our country and doesn't come home, tell me what happened? >> we were coming back from soccer practice.
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ainsley: all american family. >> yes, regular. my son here marcos and our oldest son, middle child, came home regular saturday evening, getting ready to relax and our daughter tatiana was like, mom, i need to run to the van i left my headphones, remember what you dad say, turn the car lights off because you know my battery is going to die and she comes in crying and my other daughter consoles her, i freezed, i called my momma, she comes down and there you have it at the door like any movie, any one scene you already know what's about to happen. you're not ready. that's when we got the worst news that changed our lives. ainsley: i'm a momma and i have a daughter, i'm sure you were word about this is going to affect her and your grandkids, what was he like as a son-in-law? it's okay.
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>> he could -- would give you a shirt -- he didn't want any type of accolades or rewards. he was just a kind person even on his worst day was a good day because he was so warm and so soft spoken. i used to ask, how can you be a sergeant in the military because your men and women need to hear you and he would say, ms. yolanda when i'm in military mode, i can do it. he had like an off and on switch. ainsley: gentle giant. >> everybody would march his music, literally. ainsley: andy, they have been through so much, so many ohmingses, he's the dad of 5 beautiful children, not going to come back. you stepped in, what made you
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want to do that and how did you hear about their story? >> if i may, i would like to say something that i think millions across america would like to say is that we all love you and respect you so much and you make the world a brighter place for so many. ainsley: no. this is not about me, andy. >> you help so many veterans and so many families and i believe you helped launch building homes for heros as we went from one to two homes. ainsley: 7 years ago. >> now 30 to 40 homes a year. we couldn't have done it without you. ainsley: our viewers, we crashed your website when we were on sean hannity story and that was one of the first houses you built in florida and you opened up your wallet and you gave so much to the organization and now they are gifting 30 to 40 homes per year. >> per year. ainsley: god bless you. octavia, you just graduated high school. it was special to honor your
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dad? >> it was special, something to remember. after he passed, he passed before my graduation so it was tough so his group had 7 special forces group came together and decided to come to my graduation and honor of mark since he couldn't be there for me. it was really special, it was a regular graduation. ainsley: that's what they do. marcus, what does your room look like? he dropped it. he was playing with it. do you like your new house? >> yes. ainsley: what's your favorite part? >> room. ainsley: andy, website. >> www.building homes for heros.org. thisthis is the beginning of evy day we are honoring memorial day. ainsley: absolutely. >> hopefully together with all of us we are able to do a lot more for a lot more families.
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>> i totally will -- came at a time most needed. thank you. ainsley: thank you, we have a great country, don't we? [laughter] ainsley: we have judge jeanine pirro next. thank you.
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steve: there has been immigration showdown in our nation's capital this week, postonned crucial vote on another immigration compromise bill. brian: will it happen at all as the first lady makes surprise to detention center for migrant children that happened over in texas. ainsley: that is where we find griff jenkins, live on friday night with the latest, hey, griff. griff: good morning, guys, the first lady braved some nasty storms to get here and met with 50 students not in cages accompanied by hhs secretary and thanked staff. here is what she had to say after the visit. >> we all know they are here without their families and i want to thank you for your hard
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work, your compassion and your kindness. griff: weather cut visit short but the media made big deal about jacket she wore as she departed on the back that said i don't really care, do you. when i went inside and talked to doctor and said the first lady connected with the kids and i asked about past administrations dealing with immigration crisis. >> every administration is trying to do the best that they can in a truly difficult situation where sometimes there's no easy answers and sometimes not even good answers. griff: clearly no good answers or easy solutions when it comes the house bill, gop pulled bill for vote today. steve: live griff down in mcallen texas.
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brian: do they have the votes in senate judge jeanine pirro. same judge we see on the weekends. >> because it's not going to pass the senate or doesn't appear to be be able -- look, let me explain something. this is the midterms, on the eve of the midterms this has to be resolved, republicans have to resolve it, get behind the president and get out of his way if you can't support him because the economy is doing well, our safety and security is great, everything is fine in this country right now and they're going to throw this immigration thing and by the way, did you notice the russia luición thing is off the map, so they had to substitute this for it, so get this off the table and move forward. steve: judge, when you're on the program, you're a law and order person, abide by the book, ultimate what happened was over a month ago the president asked
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the attorney general said, let's start enforcing zero tolerance and then fast-forward to where we are right now and people were horrified by the images of the children being separated from their families. >> why is it more horrible under trump than it was under obama? there's nothing new about this, the law is very clear, the decision, you cannot keep children longer than 20 days, the president was following the law. the now the president says, all right, i will keep the kids with their family and the issue is where do we put them? first of all, we are not anation that has open borders, you come to this country if you're invite today this country, if you apply like everyone else. when i was a judge i used to swear naturalized citizens, they loved it and swore allegiance and waved the american flag. you have people coming here entitled to come here. i want you to feed, clothe them,
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bathe them and give them cash. no. steve: we have to change the laws and that's where congress comes in. were we have the house, senate and the oval and they better figure it out. but then again paul ryan couldn't figure out health care after 7 years. ainsley: this administration is changing it and putting new parents back with kids but you won't hear on all the other channels. let's talk about charles krauthammer. >> he was one of those people and he was on my show several times, he was one of those people who was so smart, he had the last word. scary smart, scary, measured, balance. he was intellectual giant and he was someone who was kind and gracious for years. he was so pleasant and always so accommodating and for my show it's saturday night, live, he was willing to come on, i was
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impressed with the man. brian: would he be like with trump in year 2 now, they had friction early on. >> yeah. brian: how do you think he would be handling president trump, what are the types of things, immigration, things aren't cutting party lines as much in. >> they aren't cutting party lines, we are a country of law and order, charles krauthammer like the rest of us recognize there's limit and we have to be compassionate and that's what the president has done this week. he has shown more compassion than obama and the ones before. we need to get through to 2018. to answer your question -- [laughter] brian: by the way, the president tweeted out, buy your new book. >> i walked in. thank you. >> he just did it this morning. ainsley: we will be watching dwhrow week and there's a -- you
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this weekend. >> i'm guessing that's not a tiki torch. >> so i was blessed to carry this for the olympics. harvey interview with magic johnson, hard to tell who is taller. [laughter] steve: le in order skinner with give me three steps. ♪ ♪ [ director ] action!
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brian: nba hall of famer johnson sits down with harvey with the season premier of objectified.
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>> i want to take you back to the day that you got diagnosed because testify a routine blood test. what went through your mind? >> i was lining up everything and when i was going to die, i was lining up getting a will together, getting everything in place, right? steve: the host of objectified harvey joins us from hollywood. harvey, i remember that day. it was awry -- a rivetting special. thanks to medicine he has lived a long time. >> what you have to understand too, this was 1991 when he was diagnosed. you know what, you're right, for many people it was a death sentence and magic knew that and he felt that he was going right down that road to die, went to his wife cookie and he talks about this, how he said to her, look, you can leave me, this was
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extremely difficult obviously for him and then to play it out in a public stage. he did not want to do that press conference that you're talking about which everybody who was around remembers and he talks about who convinced him to do it, who sat with him and said, you have a huge platform here and you can make a difference and it will also help you and he talks about this woman who turned everything around for him. ainsley: that's a good message for anyone watching that's going through a horrific time or fighting their health issues or going through a divorce or whatever it is. thanks for reminding us of that. we do have a clip on what's going to be in the special that will air this weeknight. the object. we will get your reaction. >> i'm guessing it's not a tiki torch that you have in the backyard. >> no, it's not. i was so bless today carry this for the olympics for salt lake
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city and i carried it in la. steve: wow, that's one of his prized possessions. ainsley: he got to keep that? >> harvey. >> yeah, these objects, the point of the show, just to remind people the point of the show is we look at building blocks of people's lives to find out where they got today and we do it through objects they chose to keep that are meaningful to them, when you think about magic johnson you think about carrying the torch to olympic gold medal and to me one of the most awesome things he said i wanted to take you to this room and i wanted my kids to move out and i can use the room. he walks me into this room. i've never seen anything like it. the hardwood floor that the lakers played, the tiffany trophies and the way the blow glass in italy?
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he has the entire team in blown glass and it's the most awesome room and, you know, it opens people up and so they can talk. >> we will watch objectified not this week but next week right after. >> no, it's this sunday. ainsley: it was going to be but we will do charles krauthammer. >> i didn't know that. >> breaking news. ainsley: i've just decided. [laughter] steve: we will step aside, leonard skinner, sweet home alabama next.
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>> good morning, everyone, day of reflection on the life of charles krauthammer, other big headlines, republicans get documents and the fisa order, we
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will find out, will republicans pas immigration bill or will they move out like the president is saying, great line-up, major headliner, we will see you 9:00 to noon, folks on friday. >> i'm sure you heard the news, leonard skinner. ainsley: swinging sweet home alabama. >> take it home, guys. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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we're on a mission to show drip coffee drinkers, it's time to wake up to keurig. wakey! wakey! rise and shine! oh my gosh! how are you? well watch this. i pop that in there. press brew. that's it. look how much coffee's in here? fresh coffee. so rich. i love it. that's why you should be a keurig man! full-bodied. are you sure you're describing the coffee and not me? do you wear this every day? everyday. i'd never take it off. are you ready to say goodbye to it? go! go! ta da! a terrarium. that's it. we brewed the love, right guys? (all) yes.
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>> how great was that? one of the biggest, best crowds. have a great weekend. lynyrd skynyrd, you guys are awesome. >> bill: the reaction today coming in from all corners of the country after the passing of our friend and our colleague charles krauthammer. he died yesterday at the age of 68 two weeks after writing an eloquent letter to us all stating in a way only he could. my final verdict. my fight is over. that fight ended today but not without a lot of reflection. good morning, everybody. it's friday and i'm bill hemmer. a big welcome to you. whole new show and formt. blasts off like a rocket ship. >> a lot to talk about including this.

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