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tv   Fox and Friends Sunday  FOX News  June 30, 2019 3:00am-7:00am PDT

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they just, they give them free rein. and, ed, you've been in situations like this before, the u.s. tv pool often gets shoved aside when these dictators come in and say we want it the way we want it, and you've got nothing to say about it. but the american team fought back hard. ed: that's right. we are now at the top of the hour in the united states, six a.m. eastern time. we've been watching these historic pictures and moments at the dmz. president trump meeting directly with chairman kim jong un. pete: john, thank you very much, and we will continue to be lye on the ground -- live on the ground including with our own tucker carlson. he was in south and north korea with the president earlier and joins us live on the phone. you've got a big interview coming up this week, tucker, thanks for hanging in there with us. you were there on the ground. walk us through what you've seen this morning. >> well, it was amazing, actually. the sight of it all, of the
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meeting at the border crossing really does feel like the end of the earth. i mean, it's very lightly populated, the whole dmz area is big. and is so in the end, our president met with the north korean leader basically with very, relatively few people watching. they kind of almost, almost from a movie scene met after walking toward one another, you know, actually to board, they shook hands. i think it's all on tape. and then kim said, trump, no american president has ever stepped over, and both of them came back, kind of stood there about 3 feet away from us, and talked. kim struck me as, he's a hard character, there's no question about that. maybe a little, a little off his
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game. i don't think he's surrounded by people he doesn't control very often. wheezing like an emphysema patient, not a healthy guy. but basically he struck me as kind of self-contained. trump was about as happy as i've ever seen him, i mean, because it, you know, it really is something that hasn't been done before and probably would not have done without him and his very different style of governing and thinking. so, yeah, it was amazing. i heard john roberts mention that that the behavior of the north korean security staff and the media, and it's hard to oversee how aggressive they are. after the two met, they went together into a fairly small room to meet, and we followed right behind them. and a scuffle broke out of some kind. i'm not even now sure exactly
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what happened, but the thuggish north korean security guys -- all of them armed, by the way. they're not allowed to bring guns into this part of the dmz, but they all had them, started pushing both american reporters and also white house staff including the press secretary. i think they started to panic because the leader is going into tight quarters with all these people around them, and they really overreacted, and there was a shouting match between the secret service and the north koreans which periodically remerged. anyway, it was intense. jedediah: it's jedediah here. we're obviously operating anything a very different political world. you see trump talking about the role of social media, that he puts this tweet out, kim jong un
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sees it, and he's claiming it generates this unpress e departmented, historic -- unprecedented, historic meeting, are you optimistic that this could generate some actual results when it comes to denuclearization, when it comes to human rights violations within north korea that concern so many americans in terms of our relationship with them? can we count on any results here, or is is this going to be something that's just a matter of optics? >> well, i think, you know, everyone's got kind of an incentive to move this forward. i know that president presidento was there, by the way, i should have added that. he wasn't originally on the schedule, for the south korean president to appear with the north korean leader who i think, again, actually -- [inaudible] but it helps domestically. there's a lot of support in south korea for overtures that might ultimately lead to --
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south koreans want that. and i think, by the way, we talk about sanctions like they're an abstraction, but if you're essentially being sanctioned, they have a massive effect on your gdt and your daily life. they really hurt north korea. so i know that kim, that was the first thing he brought up, like, we've got to get out from under the sanctions. so i guess the point is everybody has an incentive to make things better, and, i mean, it seems to be moving faster than it moved in 50 years toward some kind of more permanent detente. that's my read on it, but, you know, these are volatile people. ed: hearing the voice of tucker carlson, of course. he has an interview that'll be airing tomorrow, 8 p.m. eastern. we're going to get into that more in a moment, but as we get him to reflect on all of this, we have some pictures of you, tucker, as you join us by phone there at the dmz reporting at
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this historic occasion i. really is breathtaking to listen to you sort of lay out how it all unfolded. and i want to tell you that as you were reporting, a high official who shall remain unnamed in this administration just texted me that this person cannot imagine the fear of our secret service agents as that played out. as you report that kim's team was heavily armed and that this was sort of unscripted. so i would like you to reflect a little bit on that in addition to something else you said that really caught my ear which is when you were saying that kim, who we know is sort of a chain smoker, doesn't really take care of his health -- [laughter] he's got these sanctions you mentioned that are hammering his economy, all of this pressure, and you said he was wheezing. talk a little bit about what you saw up close. >> oh, and really close. i mean, it's hard to overstate. and this is just my perception. i don't know if it corresponds to reality, but it really felt
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like we were at the end of the earth in the middle of nowhere with kind of not many people standing in the middle of the street. it was very odd. and i mean, right next to him, right next to kim. i mean, could have touched him, that close. and he was breathing like an emphysema patient. i'm not saying it to be insulting, but he was breathing in a labored way, like he was out of breath. and, you know, even allowing for the historic nature of it, which i'm sure played a role in his breathlessness, my take as a non-physician was this is a very unhealthy guy, very unhealthy. i mean, maybe i'm wrong. again, i'm hardly qualified to diagnose someone's medical condition, but, i mean, that was the first thing i thought, this guy is in very bad health. pete: tucker, do you get a sense that they have a true rapport, there is a trust that could go
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deep enough? maybe it's a relationship that is required in order to circumvent all the institutional barriers to north korea actually walking back the precipice, do you have a sense that sincere? >> oh, i think it is. it's certainly sincere on trump's part. of it's absolutely sincere. he's totally unembarrassed to say i kind of like kim, kju as they call him here, i kind of like him, you know? whatever you think about it, there's never been a president that's been willing to be that blunt. and i think, you know, he's not an admirer of the atrocities he's committed, obviously, but trump, trump thinks he's a confident, scrappy guy, which he is, and, you know, he's very young, and it can't be easy to hold on to third generation power in a country like that
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where the, you know, the ruling class is filled with, you know, 80-year-old generals, and you've got a lot of relatives. i mean, it takes a pretty hard man to keep a hold on power in a place like north korea. so i think trump respects his toughness, he says. that i think that's all real. what's kim's motive in this? i mean, my sense, again, this is, you know, just pop psychologizing, but standing there for an hour watching, i think he was probably a little bit overwhelmed by trump, who towers over him and is a very large man. i mean, you kind of forget that. but standing next to kim, i mean, he seemed to kind of dominate him. and there is a kind of magnetism and, you know, real aggression to trump. so i did, it didn't feel exactly like peer, it felt like maybe an older brother/younger brother situation, that's part of it. but i also think that there are real national interests here,
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and the main one is getting out from underneath some of these sanctions which, you know, makes it really hard to govern a country. jedediah: tucker, just one thing, that's the type of thing that does make some people nervous though. president trump recently made a comment about having a certain type of good chemistry with kim jong un, and that may be true, but when you're talking about someone who has been responsible for so many human rights abuses, does he run a risk with that kind of language of, a, coming off to kim jong un like he's pandering to him to an extent or, b, upsetting an american public that elected a president they want to be tough on those violations and stand firm on american principles in contrast to how the north korean regime is run? >> yeah, i mean, there's no defending the north korean regime which is a monstrous regime. it's the last really stalinist regime in the world. it's a disgusting place,
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obviously. so there's no defending it. on the other hand, you know, you've got to be honest about what it means to lead a country. it means killing people. not on the scale that the northh koreas do, but a lot of countries commit atrocities, including a number we're closely allied with. it's important to be honest about that, and it's not necessarily a choice between, you know, the evil people and the great people, it's a choice most of the time between the bad people and the worst people. that's kind of the nature of life, certainly nature of power. and i do think that's how the president sees it. you know, he's far less sentimental about this stuff and maybe, i think, more realistic about it. i don't agree with everything that trump says, but this is one thing i do agree with, there is a kind of dorm room, like, oh, they're so mean. and it's kind of silly and stupid and not helpful. like, in the end what matters is what's good for the united states. and you deal with bad people a lot of the time in order to help
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your own country. and that's kind of the way some people see this. ed: tucker the, we're showing more pictures of the president first shaking hands with kim jong un and then, apparently, being invited across. as you reported, became the first sitting u.s. president to step on north korean soil. i teed this up before, but can we just come back, i've seen the u.s. secret service all around the world protect american presidents. it's a difficult job, especially in a place like. that what was happening with the secret service, what was happening with the president's staff around him as he was stepping into north korea and as you described it, the security cordon around kim was armed when they weren't supposed to be? >> yeah. i mean, it was -- the whole, people were tense. i mean, tight as a bow string, i would say. you know, there were snipers everywhere, there were, you know, there was a lot of security, next level security. most of which you couldn't see,
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of course, but to ec e tent i could -- extent i could see it, there were a lot of people with fingers on triggers. when you've got right around the two world leaders, you know, i haven't really been in a lot of situations that tense. i mean, i, you know, i thought we were pretty close to something bad happening, actually, at one point. there was a lot of yelling. the secret service was upset, very upset. the north korean security force outnumbered them, i mean, my estimate would be 4 to 1. you know, there were an awful lot of north korean security guards there, and they were, you know, they're brutal people. i mean, they -- i'm pretty sure that they, and i'd have to ask her, but the new press secretary, stephanie grisham -- well, i know she got knocked over, but i think she got pretty badly bruised by them. pete: we've heard that as well.
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>> it was bad. pete: we've got to leave it there. thanks for that firsthand look. we're going to be looking for that interview on monday night. >> i appreciate it. thanks, see ya. ed: remarkable reflections from the dmz. tucker, don't miss his program, 8 p.m. eastern monday night, his exclusive interview with the president of the united states. in the meantime, our coverage continues of the president's historic meetings with kim jong un, all of that coming up, a big show, four big hours. stay with us. has been excellent. they really appreciate the military family and it really shows. with all that usaa offers why go with anybody else? we know their rates are good, we know that they're always going to take care of us. it was an instant savings and i should have changed a long time ago. it was funny because when we would call another insurance company, hey would say "oh we can't beat usaa" we're the webber family. we're the tenney's we're the hayles, and we're usaa members for life. ♪ get your usaa auto insurance quote today.
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great conflict in this area, great, great conflict, and now we have just the opposite. and it's my honor, and it's the chairman's honor, i can say. we work well together. ed: the president becoming the first sitting american president to step foot into north korea, happening right before he held a meeting with the north korean leader, kim jong un. all of this happening while you were sleeping. pete: here to explain the significance, harry kazianas. the significance of a moment like this from someone who studied it so closely. >> oh, my god, it's historic. i never thought two years ago i'd be sitting on "fox & friends" watching president trump cross into north korea, and it's to his credit. irregardless of whether you're a progressive, a conservative, he has the courage to fail. and that is something, a a hallmark of a great president. he could have put that tweet
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out, and kim could have not shown up. and just as he said, the liberal media would be going crazy over it. so i really like that he was vulnerabling he took a big risk, and kim responded. and this is how history is made. this is how things change. we're going to have to see what happens, but i think this is a great day for american diplomacy. jedediah: harry, i'm interested in results, and i'm curious about your input as to whether you think this will actually generate any results when it comes to denuclearization, when it comes to addressing the human rights violations in north korea, or is this just another example we see of some sort of optical illusion, so to speak, where you think everything is headed in the right direction, and you turn around and they're right back to where they were a few weeks ago. what do you think? >> well, look, results matter, and i think we have to remember in the hanoi we were actually a lot closer than what people think. there were reports that they were close to actually gettingly yeason offices open -- liaison
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offices open, but president trump had a big problem. at the same time this was going on, the michael cohen hearings were going here in washington, and it would have been very difficult for president trump to take another risk and literally open himself up to attack and sort of make that gamble of kim jong un. so he east had to get -- he either had to get the big deal or walk away. now president trump is in great position to sort of take that next step with kim jong un, and i think that the north koreans will offer the yongbyon nuclear facility which is massive, actually the crown jewel of north korea's nuclear capabilities, and i think what you'll see is president trump offer to, essentially, stop sanctions, maybe pause them or suspend them for a year, and let's see what the north koreans actually do and if they close that facility. i think that's a way weak go. -- a way we can go. ed: we have talked about the pressure on kim jong un
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personally, because you have the sanctions you mentioned, which have been crippling his economy for some time, so there's pressure to make a deal, and then listen to what tucker carlson was reporting about being up close, and he said this mid 30s dictator was wheezing like an emphysema patient. he's under pressure. >> oh, absolutely. think about this, the north korean economy is only worth $13 billion. the state of vermont has a bigger economy than north korea. i think kim jong un understands the pressure of history's all around him. totalitarian dictatorships like north korea don't last forever. history tells us that. he needs to make some changes, and i think he's hoping president trump can help him do that. pete: briefly, harry, the courage of walking into north korea when you know there are armed north korean guards as well. >> that's guts. i mean, you never know if a tense situation can happen, you have to give the president credit. ed: harry, we appreciate your insight. we're going to stay on top of
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this story all morning. a conservative journalist attacked as protesters clashed in portland. we're going to be all over that story, it's coming up. biopharmaceutical researchers. pursuing life-changing cures in a country that fosters innovation here, they find breakthroughs... like a way to fight cancer by arming a patient's own t-cells... because it's not just about the next breakthrough... it's all the ones after that. priceline will partner with even more vegas hotels to turn their unsold rooms into amazing deals. delegates, how do you vote? (cheering) ♪ yes, y-y-y-yes, yes... that is freaky. (applause)
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simple, easy, awesome. go to xfinity.com/moving to get started. jedediah: we are back with a fox news alert. president trump addresses american troops at osan air base after his historic meeting with kim jong un. >> you're great people, and you're fighting, if you're fighting hard, and just your presence. you have a presence like no other. like no other. so as president, i have no greater honor than to serve as commander in chief of the greatest fighting force on the face of the earth, the united states military. thank you very much. [cheers and applause] jedediah: president trump then boarded air force one on his way
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back to states as we speak. also breaking overnight, chaos breaking out in a press pool at the demilitarized zone. white house press secretary stephanie grisham roughed up by north korean security guards. the new press secretary reportedly getting bruises when the scuffle broke out during president trump's handshake with kim jong un. she was reported lu pushing back against the guards that helped cover the historic meeting. and top democrat chuck schumer now calling on the atf to investigate the mysterious deaths of american tourists in the dominican republic. the senate minority leader saying, quote: given that we still have a whole lot of questions and very few answers, the feds should double their efforts on helping to get to bottom of things. at least 13 americans have died since last june. wow, 13. pete: a big piece of news yesterday as well, there was an
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antifa rally in portland, a number of folks on the sides of that, and there were conservative journalists there to cover it. well, it turns out he got attacked -- ed: one in particular, and he's been someone who's been out there documenting what antifa's been up to. big picture, what in the world is happening in cities like portland? where are the police to defend, you know, we hear so much about journalists and the first amendment, and rightly so. people are trying to document this ridiculousness, and they're getting attacked. and in particular, andy noe has been in the hospital, this has been documented on social media all night long. in fact, we've got a little bit of video from him explaining what happened when he was attacked. watch. >> earlier today and reported it, and nothing was done -- they
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stole my evidence. they stole my go job pro. >> okay, what did they use? >> their weapons and their hands. >> okay. did you black out? >> no. >> okay. >> do you have any blurred vision? >> i don't think so. they threw a milk shake on me. they hit me on the back of my head. ed: you've seen people be milk shaked by activists on the left, all around the world. it's been happening over brexit in the u.k. as well, but in this case it appears that the milk shake had some dry -- jedediah: he's claiming that it had quick dry cement, and this is a journalist who does repeatedly coffer these antifa rallies and protests. and we're now living in a world where you can't go, it seems, as a journalist and cover, because that's his job to cover things, without risking he will be
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assaulted. he has repeatedly been assaulted at different types of rallies. he was tweeting out last night photos of himself battered and bruised as a result of simply trying to cover a protest. last i checked, this is still the united states of america, and journalists should be able to do these things without running the risk of assault. pete: you're right. when a disgusting group like antifa is given the right to hold a rally because it's the united states of america, it's the speech we don't like the most that is allowed to do that, then the reporters and journalists have that same right to peacefully -- no, there's nothing peaceful about antifa. they're a violent organization. but when he gets attacked, where are the police? where is portland? where are people stepping in to say that's not acceptable, that's not a rally, that's an attack, that's an assault. what we see especially in liberal towns, police stepping back almost into a no man's land. i've been in the middle of antifa rallies before too.
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ultimately, you're by yourself. so hopefully, they find who these folks are and. jedediah: and it's apparent that it's gotten worse. we saw that with the occupy wall street movement, there was a lot of concern about people getting injured and what not. i don't care whether the protest is left or right, but you have to be able to end journalists in there to cover things, and i see too often with antifa this type of violence that is outpouring, and police should be ready. police in those cities -- ed: there it is right there. jedediah: -- you need to be on guard to protect those citizens because you have to preserve the american right to cover this, freedom to have press, and also the right to protest. ed: we're going to stay on top of this. it's still unfolding as we speak. it's just a remarkable story. pete: you've gotten op-eds being written about let's expose information of border patrol agents or, hey, we shouldn't give safe haven to people to eat in public places. eat at home if you're a
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supporter of this administration. there is a concerted attempt in public to assault and confront anyone who associates with the president. jedediah: yeah. it's a new norm of where it's okay to harass people, it's okay to get into their face, there's an anger behind it. there's no longer an ability to accept that people have differenting opinions and to leave them in peace. it's a very scary time, when you think about it. pete: eric trump gets spit on, son to have president. jedediah: yeah. people going to campuses, conservatives, and getting harassed. ed: yeah. what do you think about this whole incident? friends@foxnews.com. the president making history overnight as the first sitting u.s. president to go and step foot into north korea. our cover an continues live after the break. ♪ mug. ♪ with accident forgiveness they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. indeed. are you in good hands?
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ed: and we are back with this fox ns alert, the president making history, becoming the first sitting american president to step foot inside north korea. you see it happening right there. the president crossing into the north from the korean demilitarized zone with kim jong un overnight. jedediah: the two holding a brief but historic meeting. this just one day after president trump extended a surprise invite on, yep, twitter. >> nobody knows how things turn out, but certainly this was a great day. this was a very legendary, very historic day. quick notice, nobody saw this coming. and the fact that he was able to
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react so quickly -- pete: and it appears they were able to make progress. the president is reporting that he and kim agreed to restart negotiations over the next several weeks. ed: the president just tweeted a moment ago -- apparently aboard air force one -- leaving south korea after a wonderful meeting with chairman kim jong un, stood on the soil of north korea, an important statement for all and a great honor. pete: let's bring in gordon chang, asia analyst and author of "nuclear showdown." gordon, thanks for being here. you know this subject extremely well. break down the significance of what we saw unfold. >> well, of course, the president going to north korea, also you had our president and the south korean president in the demilitarizedded zone at the same time, that's important. but the real story here as jedediah was talking about is results. what they've done is they've created high expectations, a lot of momentum, but, you know, if they don't get results, there's going to be a reckoning because disappointment is a very powerful emotion. jedediah: let's listen to
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president trump on restarting these talks with north korea and then get your reactionful. >> we just had a very, very good meeting with chairman kim, and we've agreed that we're each going to designate a team, and the team will try and work out some details. and, again, speed is not the object. we want to see if we can do a really comprehensive, good deal. over the next two or three weeks, the teams are going to start working to see whether or not they can do something. very big stop, pretty complicated but not as complicated as people think. jedediah: what do you think, optimistic or skeptical? [laughter] >> i'm, best of times, worst of times. i like the idea of teams, because they need working level talks. we haven't had them for a very long time, and that's the reason why there's no progress. now if kim jong un is serious, you're going to have the day-to-day talk with steve begin, the north korean envoy for president trump. that's a good thing. but at the end of the day, it's
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a decision by kim. if he makes the strategic decision to give up his most destructive weapons, there's going to be progress. if he doesn't, it's going to be up to president trump to use all of the american leverage short of the use of force, but we can do that to make kim realize he's got a choice; keep his weapons, keep power, not both. ed: don't want to lose sight of the fact that there was an important meeting with the chinese president. you follow that just as closely. that, obvious, is about trade and tariffs, but it's intertwined with what's happening in north korea talks. talk about these two tracks and whether it's helpful or hurting, because china is, obviously, key to getting a deal with north korea. >> yeah. xi jinping, i think, dangled cooperation with kim at to saca g -- osaka g20 meeting. what we didn't see was the chinese in any of those pictures. i think that's a good thing, because the chinese have been a malign influence for decades,
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but the one thing about the talks which really disturbed me was president trump decided to give a reprieve to huawei technologies. that's not what we should be doing because they pose a threat to american national security and the national security of our friends and partners. pete: so you say it's incredibly -- i mean, china has been, backed up north korea from the beginning. >> right. pete: do they have an incentive, do they -- they're fearful if south korea comes all the way to their border, they've got a problem on their border. can we do enough with them to get kim jong un to actually make it happen? >> sure. what we should do to chinese is basically say, look, we're going to disconnect your banks from the global financial system if you continue to launder money through new york. we've been allowing the north koreans to openly violate sanctions for a very long time, and they've become much more bold about it in the last six or so months. so i think the president -- this is a president trump question, you know? the chinese are bad actors.
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so are the russians. the south koreans are openly violating too because everybody is getting away with it. president trump needs to bring down the hammer first on beijing, then on moscow, then on seoul, and we solve this short of the use of force. but until then, kim kim jong uns going to continue to defy us. jedediah: a negotiation deal on tariffs would be very, very big for this president. he was talking about that when no one was talking about it last time around in the campaign. do you see progress you can actually count on? >> no, or you can't count on it because, you know, we've had decades of failed trade agreements with china, so why do we think the remedy is another trade agreement? no, that's not going to work. what's going to work, i think, is disengaging from the chinese economy, reducing our vulnerability to chinese bridge reasons and hostility and all the rest of it. then i think we're going to be in a much better position. so i sort of view no deal as a really good deal for the u.s. ed: and to keep the pressure on
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china. talking, reflect on most of these times whether it's been democratic or republican presidents, they come back from a g20 summit with some or the of piece of paper, a declaration, in six months we will all come back together, and it really doesn't mean anything. in this case, there's some seat of the pants, and yet he's getting historic moments where people are coming to table. you're right, we have to be skeptical, we have to see what happens six months could be the road, but he -- down the road, but he continues to make progress. >> yeah, i think there's more progress on north korea. the reason is, you know, president trump being unconventional, actually broke a log jam today, and that's a really good thing as long as he can keep up the momentum. he's got to be disciplined, and he's got to keep the pressure up on north korea. we had a very effective policy through the middle of last may when we were tightening down sanctions and not letting the north koreans get away with anything. since that time trump has let off the pressure because he
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wanted to create a favorable atmosphere, and kim jong un hasn't reciprocated. pete: interesting. you're saying the sanctions, even though they're there, they've been able to skirt them a little bit. >> oh, yes. pete: your belief is you have to bring the hammer down even more so kim jong un is truly in a corner. >> yeah. up through last may we cut off the flow of money by about 50%. that means he still has another 50%, that means a lot of work for us to do. that means -- you saw the treasury secretary, steve mnuchin, in those pictures. he's the guy who's got to enforce the sanctions. he does that, we're in a very good position. but mnuchin has been sort of, oh, i don't really want to do this too much, and that's been a problem for this administration. jedediah: thanks so much, gordon. we always appreciate your take on these important issues. ed: our coverage of the president's historic visit to north korea continues. will his surprise trip be seen as a political victory? we'll discuss next. ♪
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♪ ♪ ed: disturbing new details about the man accused of brutally murdering a utah college student just last year. he self-published a gruesome murder novel, investigators found mackenzie lueck's belongings burned in the backyard of his home. just an awful, awful story. scary moments, mean while, for united airlines passengers forced to use -- look at this emergency land aring, unbelievable. >> oh, [bleep] ed: scary. looks like everyone ended up using safe. diverted to new jersey because of a mechanical issue.
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temporarily grounding all flights at the airport. thankfully, nobody in the end was hurt. wow. jedediah: a fox news alert. president trump describing his historic meeting with kim jong un at the dmz overnight. >> we had a very productive meeting. i outlined the incredible prosperity that awaits north korea when this whole thing gets settled. they've been talking about this for a long time, but that's a country with tremendous potential x. i've had a good relationship with chairman kim. it's been a lot different. they were giving us a great briefing right at the dmz. pete: so will this be perceived as a political win for the president? if gop strategist colin reid joins us now. >> good morning. pete: you got debates, all these candidates want to be commander in chief, then you see president trump being commander in chief. what impact does that have? >> and this is why it's so hard to defeat an incumbent
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president, because they do have the ability to drive news and change discussions at a moment's notice. we're not going to be talking about the democratic debate as much as we would. you've got the fourth of july coming up, so this is a great way for president trump to turn the page on to his turf and away from the democrats. jedediah: do you think he's going to take a lot of heat for the willingness to meet with kim jong un without preconditions given what's going on in north korea, the human rights violations? how do you think that's going to be painted by people in the media? you know, in general, received by the american public? >> well, it's interesting. trump campaigned as an unconventional candidate, and it's how he's governed as well. i know there's going to be a lot of tired staffers wokennen up sunday morning on the democratic side asked to rea act to this, rain if often times it's not a democrat and republican thing because he does have an unconventional way of doing things. what the president can say is this is a problem i inherited
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that both parties tried and failed to address, and i'm doing something. that's bad news for a guy like joe biden who's spent a half century on the stage and has nothing to show for. ed: remember bob gates said joe biden was wrong about every major reform policy decision for the past two decades. >> one of the most sering indictments on joe biden, particularly because he likes to fancy himself as a foreign policy exe permit, which he's not -- expert, which he's not. ed: absolutely. colin reed, thank you. pete: this is the biggest assignment that president obama gave trump. what's the biggest problem? north korea. colin reed, thank you for your time. jedediah: a new york times article we're going to sound off on next.
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♪ ♪ >> border patrol, i.c.e., our sheriffs, everybody, these are great, great people. you are great, great people. you're feared by your foes, and you're respected by all. you are so respected. sometimes you don't hear that. you don't hear it enough. you are totally respected. jedediah: earlier this morning president trump addressing american troops in south korea, praising those who keep us safe every day including the brave men and women protecting our border. this as a new york times op-ed calls for the public shaming of border agents, saying, quote: immigration lawyers have agent names, journalists have names, photos and videos. these actions should be publicized particularly in their home community.
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ed: unbelievable. the vice president of the border patrol council, frequent guest on the show, joins us now live to react. good morning, art. >> good morning, hi. ed: you've faced criticism before, but you look at this op-ed, and it seems to take it to a whole new level. >> you know, i think people that go to this extreme, i mean, it's embarrassing, it's disgusting they go to that extreme in order to attack border patrol agents, attack the people, the men and women out there doing a fantastic job. i don't know, it's -- i've been disgusted by some of the people these people say before, but i think this one takes the cake, you know? it's shameful. i, like i said, i appear on this show, i appear on a lot of news channels, and it's not even about me. it's about spreading the truth, and i really want the agents' voices to be heard, and that's why i do it. but when somebody starts saying, taking it to this level of public shaming, it really is
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disgusting. these people are putting their lives on the line out there to keep america safe, and it true city is disappointing -- pete: they're telling journalists to give up names, lawyers to give um names, and they're characterizing your agents as people who are inhumanely e treating children. you see this, i don't believe american border patrol agents are treating kids poorly. >> they're not. i don't think it shows what agents are really doing. i've been at these facilities myself, and i've seen agents, you know, and the care they have towards the individuals that we're arresting. not just the children, but, you know, all the individuals that we arrest. i've often said it, and i continue to say it, we are the largest humanitarian organization out there. we are constantly out there saving lives, and a lot of these individuals that we do detain and arrest, they run towards us, not just away from us. there's a huge number that run towards us, and they're very grateful that we're there
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knowing that, you know, criminal organizations and the coyotes who have put them in harm's way, and they're happy to see us at times. jedediah: you know, art, one of the things that's most repulsive to me in this vilification of i.c.e. and border patrol agents is that one of the goals is to deter people from becoming agents. i find that deeply disgusting at a time when we need people at the border to enforce our national security, we should be encouraging people who want to defend our national security. it's pretty atrocious to me. >> no, it's definitely, and like i said, it's disgusting, and it comes from people that they don't care enough about this country, and at the same time they're ignorant, and they don't know enough of what agents are really doing day in and day out while they're out there putting their lives on the line. ed: very well said, art. appreciate you coming n. meanwhile, making history as the first sitting american president to cross into north korea, actually step on north korean soil. you see those historic footsteps
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right there. we have live team coverage including daniel hoffman, a former cia analyst, with his insights after the break. ♪ ♪ hey, who are you? oh, hey jeff, i'm a car thief... what?! i'm here to steal your car because, well, that's my job. what? what?? what?! (laughing) what?? what?! what?! [crash] what?! haha, it happens. and if you've got cut-rate car insurance, paying for this could feel like getting robbed twice. so get allstate... and be better protected from mayhem... like me. ♪
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and more time travelling. we like that! by the way, these chairs are ours. everyone is already sitting. ♪ >> first sitting american president to now step on north korean soil for the first time ever. ed: president trump made that history while you were sleeping, crossing into the demel terrorized zone -- demilitarized zone. jedediah: coming one day after president trump surprised the world with a warm invite on twitter. president trump says the spontaneous encounter could be very consequential. >> what happened today, i think, is great for south korea, i think it's great for north korea, i think it's great for the world. you know, when we started this, you had missiles flying over japan. they weren't so happy. pete: that's true. we thought it might just be a
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handshake, but president trump working with kim for nearly an hour as they work on restarting talks on denuclearization. the president says he and kim agreed to restart those negotiations in the next several weeks. ed: let's go to chief white house correspondent john roberts, john, i don't think you've slept in day or so, what are you seeing on the ground, sir? >> reporter: much longer than a day. [laughter] any amount of sleep will do in the near future. ed, jedediah, pete, good morning to you. the president is back to washington, d.c., left about 45 minutes to an hour ago aboard air force one, he should be back there tomorrow afternoon. the president clearly happy about his visit here to south korea in addition to his visit to osaka, the president tweeting on his way out, quote: leaving south korea after a wonderful meeting with kim jong un. stood the on the soil of north korea, an important statement for all and a great honor.
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it really was amazing to watch it play out. such a historic event. the demilitarized zone, about 160 miles long and 2 and a half miles wide, but what's called the joint security area there, it comes down to a strip of stone about 16 inches wide. president trump walked right up on the south side with kim on the north side, the president looked at kim and said, should i step? kim invited him over. here's how the president described it later on. listen here. >> we went and met at the line, and in meeting at the line, i said would you like me to come across? he said, i would be so honored, and that's the way it worked out. i didn't know really what he was going to say, but it was my honor to do it. >> reporter: now, going into in the president said this probably wouldn't be much more than a handshake, though he said handshakes could be important, the meeting would last about 5-7 minutes. as you pointed out at the top,
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ed, it lasted an hour or so with an agreement to restart nuclear talks that broke down after of the summit in hanoi back in february. >> it was a great success because we maintained our relationship. so we're going to have teams, they're going to meet over the next few weeks, and they're going to start a process, and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: the one thing that president trump believes he has is time, time is on his side. he says he's in no rush to do anything and in order to get it right, unlike so many of the other previous administrations, you have to take the time to make sure that you've got all the is dotted and all the ts crossed. listen to what the president said. >> speed is not the object. we want to see if we can do a really comprehensive, good deal. nobody knows how things turn out, but really this was a great day. this was a very legendary, very historic day. >> reporter: certainly was a historic day. as to whether or not it will ultimately be productive, that's up to u.s. team which is going
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to be led by steve begin, the president's envoy to north korea. obviously, mike pompeo, the secretary of state, will be involved too. kim jong un has proven reluctant to give up his entire nuclear program. back in february in hanoi he offered to decommission and dismantle the yongbyon plant, but president trump told him in no uncertain terms he's got to get rid of the entire nuclear program, the ballistic missile program as well as his chemical and biological weapons program. i think it's safe to say we are a long way from that even though there seems to be significant progress. pete: absolutely. john, you set the stage nicely for us this morning. great reporting. we'll spare you the questions, go ahead and take a nap. you've been up for a long time. [laughter] another guy, because he was granted an interview with the president, tucker carlson, he got up early with us this morning if you were not up, because he was at the dmz with
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president trump -- ed: from japan, went to south korea with the president and then went to dmz, and he had some amazing -- jedediah: yeah, up close and personal. take a listen to tucker carlson on this historic meeting. >> kim struck me as, he's a hard character, no question about that. maybe a little, a little off his game. i don't think he's surrounded by people he doesn't control very often. wheezing like an emphysema patient, not a healthy guy. but basically he struck me as kind of self-contained. trump was about as happy as i've ever seen him, i mean, because, you know, it really is something that hasn't been done before and probably would not have been done without him and his, you know, very different style of governing. ed: yeah. he's referring also, when you see 8 p.m. eastern, don't miss it tomorrow, tucker carlson with the president reflecting on a lot of this, but more than
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anything, it takes guts, guts for an american president to cross in with all of the confusion and the security and the north koreans armed around the president of the united states, secret service saying what's happening here. all of that, but also the significance of any american president, democrat or republican, traditionally has wanted to make sure things were scripted so they didn't fail in public, so that there was some specific deliverable from any kind of meeting with a foreign leader. this president is not just chucking out the script, i think it's much deeper. he has the courage to fail, as one of our guests said earlier, knowing that it might not work immediately, but six months down the road, a year from now, two years from now this could be the seeds of peace. jedediah: yeah. he knows the media that he's dealing with. he knows it's risky to go in there, shake his hand and have discussions without preconditions knowing full well that if north korea decides
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they're not going to oblige and progress is not made, he's going to take an incredible amount of heat. media are going to say, oh, he caved. he knows what he's facing, but i think he's saying this is a historic opportunity, this is unprecedented, and it's my obligation to try to make something happen because i think he is deeply concerned about what's going on with human rights in north korea, he's deeply concerned about denuclearizing north korea, and he feels like this is his moment to seize on that and show some leadership. pete: boy, that's true. there ises no script for going to the most weaponized border in the world with only 24 hours' notice as you're trying to negotiate a high stakes deal. tucker weighed in on that, again, having been just steps away from the president and kim jong un watching the media, the secret service, north korean security. take a listen to what he had to say. >> north korean security guys -- all of them armed, by the way.
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you're not allowed to bring guns into this part of the dmz, but they all had them -- started pushing both american reporters and also white house staff, the press secretary got pushed hard. i think they started to panic, because the leader is going into tight quarters with all these people around him, and they just really overreacted, and there was a shouting match between secret service and the, and the north koreans. pete: talk about unscripted -- jedediah: i know. pete: a shouting match between secret service, north korean officials armed with guns as our president walks into north korea. who knows how many barrels of guns are pointed at anymore that direction. this is all high stakes, it's all unprecedented, it's all high risk, and you're right, he's willing to put himself out there to create a disruptive moment that the sort of regular order of business would have never created. of. jedediah: that's exactly right. we're going to bring in daniel hoffman, fox news contributor,
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former cia station chief, served in moscow, iraq and pakistan, to react to this. how you doing today? >> great. jedediah: what do you make of this meeting between president trump and kim jong un? >> you know, we've been saying the president didn't have a script, i actually think he did. he might not have shared it publicly, but i think he did have an idea about how he wanted this to go. he said at first it might be a hand shake, but i -- hand shake, but i think he was giving kim jong un the opportunity to make it something more like that, and the president took advantage of it. the negotiation to denuclearize the korean peninsula really never got started, is so he wanted to jump-start those negotiations, and he's doing that. and i think if we want to get to point where we sanction north korea further or maintain the ones we have, we must simultaneously make every effort to negotiate, and that's what the president was doing. ed: i'm glad you mentioned hanoi, we were there reporting live together as you recall.
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the president walked away from a bad deal. he faced criticism back then. he may have -- other presidents may have felt pressured to sign a bad deal just to say i got something, but take a step back from that when we were in singapore in june of 2018 where all of this started. i remember the president said, among other things, quote: only the courageous can make peace. >> yeah. and, look, we know that there have been two plus decades of failed diplomacy including six-party talks, and the president was acknowledging the fact if we want negotiations to begin, he needs to start at the top with kim jong un, otherwise it's just not going to happen. and thus far we haven't seen the negotiations at the lower levels take place, but they aren't going to take place without kim jong un and the president having this strong personal relationship. pete: daniel, you made a career in the high stakes moments, in difficult situations in the shadows with a lot of uncertainty. bring us inside a moment like
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this. i gotta believe while there's a high possibility for failure, it also means you can get breakthroughs you would never expect. >> yeah. i mean, i think, you know, you go into a meeting like this, and you're looking at all the analysis from the intelligence community, from your secretary of state pompeo and ambassador bolton, and the president, i'm sure, factors all of that into his calculus and then makes the best judgment he possibly can. and, yes, there is great risk, but at the same time there's great reward. i agree with you that really we're only going to know the value ultimately with historical perspective. when we look back at this meeting six months or so. the president tried to visit the dmz in november 2017 but was unable to do so because of fog. and that meeting was supposed to be to show our strength and solidarity with south korea. look at where we are today where the president is reaching out his hand in north korea to
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chairman kim. jedediah: take a listen to president trump on restarting the talks with north korea. >> we just had a very, very good meeting with chairman kim, and we've agreed that we're each going to designate a team, and the team will try and work out some details. and, again, speed is not the object. we want to see if we can do a really comprehensive, good deal. over the next two or three weeks, the teams are going to start working to see whether or not they can do something. very big stuff, pretty complicated but not as complicated as people think. jedediah: you know, daniel, as we head into 2020, when is it too risky? can he afford to say they exchanged these talks and nothing comes of it? that will, of course, be used against him by all the 2020 democrat, so what do you think, too risky or not too risky? >> not too risky. look, our national interest matters most, and whether this meeting is recognized years from now as more style than
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substance, that's over to kim jong un. the president held him accountable by saying the negotiations are going to begin in two or three weeks. that's, i think, the key here, the president doing all he can do. at the end of the day, the door's open, it's a question of whether kim jong un wants to walk through it or not. pete: yeah. he can literally say i did everything i could, including visiting north korea as a pathway to peace. daniel hoffman, thank you very much. all right, well, another story we're following this morning, a conservative journalist attacked as protesters clash at antifa, as violent as they often are, on the streets of portland. we will bring it to you. [bleep] get ready for the insurance-themed experience
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♪ ♪ ed: welcome back.
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we've been all over the story from north korea, but there's a big story happening here at home as well. a conservative journalist under attack in an american city, and so you hear a lot on the left stand thing up for the media, rightly so, first amendment and all of that. but when it comes to a conservative journalist being attacked, you're not hearing a lot of voices in the mainstream immediate e ya defending this man. basically, he was on the ground. he was trying to document the violence, the nastiness, the lawlessness of some antifa activists and protesters in portland, oregon and was not only prevented from doing his job, but but his tacked. jedediah: that's andy noe. he attends, he reports on them. this is not the first time that he was assaulted. last night he landed in the e.r. with bruises and scrapes, the police seemingly nowhere to be found. he says milk shakes were thrown at him, and here he is.
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we have a clip of him talking about the attack. take a listen. >> i've been assaulted twice today earlier today, and nothing was done, and i was in the middle of the street documenting this -- >> i'm going to help you -- >> they stole my evidence. they stole my gopro. >> okay. what did they use? >> their weapons and their hands. >> did you black out? >> no. >> okay. do you have any blurred vision? >> i don't think so. i got -- they threw a milk shake on me. they hit me on the back of my head. pete: that's andy being interviewed by police. this is not a rally, this is a riot. these folk it is are violent. they bring weapons. they attack people. in this case it's a journalist, of course, they wear masks, because they're cowards. in the united states of america
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you have the freedom to assemble peacefully, and journalists have the right to report on it, not be attacked. so where were the police in portland? that's the question. and why are they not following up aggressively on an organization like antifa which is violent? they don't just use it sometimes, violence is what they do. ed: separate but certainly related to this climate that's out there -- pete: for conservatives. ed: -- particularly towards the right, remember what happened at the red hen restaurant in virginia when sarah sanders, then the white house press secretary, wanted to have dinner and was told you're not welcome here, the owner has an op-ed in "the washington post." new rules apply. jedediah: stephanie wilkinson writing this: when the day comes that the world returns to its normal ax is sis, i expect we'll see fewer highly charged
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headlines. so this is a trend we're seeing now where you're seeing people get in your face at restaurants, you're seaing all of this -- seeing all of this happen. people feel justified now to say if you disagree with me, i'm going to shut you -- peter: yeah. dehumanize. i spit at eric trump, this is how the left wants to play the game; intimidate you, shut you down, show you down. and the only thing for conservatives and trump supporters to do is be unafraid, honest and open, and then it's our job to expose it -- jedediah: and go spend your money at another restaurant. ed: we want to know what you think, friends@fox news. we also want to stay on top of other news. the president becoming the first sitting president crossing into north korea. the u.s. ambassador reacts to
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♪ ♪ pete: we are back with some quick headlines. a restaurant dock collapses sending dozens of people into the water below. [inaudible conversations] pete: police say more than 40 people were taking pictures on the dock at a popular restaurant in south carolina when it suddenly gave way. about 20 people had to be pulled from the creek. three people were taken to hospital with only minor injuries. and progress on the political stalemate in venezuela could be on the way. norway will reportedly start mediating new discussions
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between u.s.-backed leader juan guaido and disputed president nicolas maduro, but there are some sticking points, of course, wyoming doe is calling for new elections which maduro rejected. now, president trump making history as the first sitting u.s. president to visit the dmz to meet with kim jong un overnight. how are american allies reacting? u.s. ambassador to israel david friedman is live in jerusalem, and he joins us now. mr. ambassador, thanks for joining us this morning. before we get on to another topic of particular interest in jerusalem today, i want to get your comment on the president's actions stepping into north korea. israel has had many historic meetings. walk us through the significance of, you think, a day like this. >> well, pete, greetings from jerusalem. pete: greetings. >> i think it was a big moment. i think it was a big moment, i think it was a historic moment. i think it set exactly the right
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platform for the teams to reengage and, hopefully, make some progress. and, look, i would say kudos to president trump for another bold and courageous decision. pete: absolutely. so we will continue to monitor that. you've got a deal of the century potentially between israel and the palestinians of similar scope. but before -- what we really wanted to talk about with you this morning is a, something of historic significance happening in jerusalem today. in the city of david, there's a pilgrimage road 2,000 years old. i had a chance to see it in my document for fox nation, battle in the holy city. here is a preview of it, and then i want you to explain more about it. never seen anything like it. >> i think this is the most exciting excavation in the world, i really do. you're on the road. this is the actual road as it was found. can you believe it? pete: how long is this tunnel? we just entered it. >> the road is 2100 feet. it egos from the pool where they
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would have cleansed all the way into the temple in the north. pete: wow. so you could walk the road that was used 2,000 years ago. >> that's it. pete: mr. ambassador, explain the significance of the pilgrimage road and the city of david in jerusalem. >> well, you know, it brings the bible back to life. if from a sewage pipe that burst with 15 years ago came these excavations that resulted in the discovery of the road where the jewish pilgrims would cleanse themselves before ascending to the temple, if then an entire road -- not a relic, but a road intact from that pool ascending to the temple. people can literally immerse themselves in the environment where, you know, the great biblical figures of the time would walk, where jesus walked. we know that jesus took this road, we know his visits to the temple are well documented, so you really have the opportunity to immerse yourself in ancient
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history in this incredible, stunning discovery. pete: absolutely. jesus would have walked on that road as a jew to go to holy testify m. but take -- temple. but take it even deeper for us for our viewers this morning. why does a discovery like this matter so much? >> well, you know, in four days we're going to celebrate the 243rd signing of our declaration of independence. that document really changed the world by fundamentally changing the way that we think about the relationship between a government and its citizens. and in particular, you recall the words that every human being is endowed by his or her creator with certain unalienable rights. now, how did our founding fathers know what those rights were that were so important to our creator? well, among other things, they did that by reading the bible. and where does the word of the bible come from? well, isaiah, who lived at the same time as king hezekiah who
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built the pool, isaiah says that the word of god from the bible came from jerusalem. so what do we know from this? we understand that when we think of america and its beginnings, well, the physical beginnings we can think about plymouth rock, or we could think about valley forge or think about the constitutional convention in philadelphia or washington, d.c., but the spiritual underpinning, the bedrock of our principles as a nation comes from jerusalem. so this site is a heritage site for america as well as for israel. it's one of the best examples of that unbreakable bond, that ancient historical bond between the people of the united states and the people of israel. pete: so well said, mr. ambassador. it also comes at a critical time when there are insidious forces trying to erase history, saying there never was solomon's temple, there never was a jewish presence, and every single day as you're familiar we're
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discovering more that confirms the bible. speak more on that. >> well, the facts speak for themselves. you can have your own opinion, but you can't have your own facts. this is science. this was the work of secular archaeologists, well recognized leaders in the need. they had no agenda. they discovered this ancient road, and the facts are the facts. pete: great stuff. ambassador david friedman, thank you very much for being with us this morning and bringing this great story to us. appreciate it. >> thank you, pete. thank you. pete: all right. well, it's the big story this morning, president trump becomes the first president to cross into north korea. our coverage of the historic moment continues coming up next. ♪ ♪ fact is, every insurance company hopes you drive safely. but allstate actually helps you drive safely... with drivewise. it lets you know when you go too fast... ...and brake too hard. with feedback to help you drive safer. giving you the power to actually lower your cost.
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pete: fox news alert, the president taking historic steps for denuclearization on the korean peninsula, president trump crossing the demilitarized zone, becoming the first president to walk on north korean soil. jedediah: kim jong un greeting the president at the dmz for a historic handshake, this just one day after president trump surprised the world with an invite on twitter. ed: the president is not taking the pressure off yet, vowing to keep sanctions in place as perhaps the talks restart. >> i mean, at some point, look, i don't like sanctions being on his country. i'm looking forward to it, but
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sanctions remain, yes. but at some point during the negotiation, things can happen. that's what we'll be talking about. ed: the president said they agreed to restart negotiations over the next several weeks, so let's go to joel rubin, leader at the washington strategy group. good morning, joel. >> good morning, thank you. ed: obviously, an historic moment. we want to take that in and also, though, we need to be skeptical about the days i head. i was in singapore for the first summit, hanoi for the second, there was progress, but then kim never really followed through on denuclearization. >> yeah, that's right, ed. and so this process that has not yet really taken off does need to take off, and i think what we saw last night was the president making it clear to kim that there has to be a step-by-step negotiation, this has to be teams engaged. north korea has not wanted to
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put a team forward, the united states has been engaging but not really successful in that way, and it can't just be leader to leader, it has to be a process where we can document, we get agreements, where we get certainty that denuclearization is going to happen. pete: joel, why hasn't the process taken off before, and could this be an important igniter? >> this could be a real igniter, because this seems to, like, the last kind of meeting that president trump wants to have. the process didn't take off before in many ways because it looked like a photo op, and it looked like there were soft agreements and not a lot of follow-through. and that's on kim. so now with president trump going to north korea, and it's interesting, right? president nixon can go to china and now president trump goes to north korea, that's a big move. kim knows that, and i don't think president trump has any more political space available to him to try to make moves like this again.
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so nopefully, he leaned in -- hopefully, he leaned in hard to kim at that meeting afterwards if said this is it, we need a deal, but we have to get a process to get us there. jedediah: joel, i'm obviously skeptical, but what about the political implications here for president trump if there is no follow through from north korea e? we're heading into 2020, we're heading into fierce campaign season. what does this look like for him if this doesn't play out like planned? >> well, you have reason to be skeptical. there have been deals with north korea in the past, and they've been broken by north korea, and we too have broken our share of deals in the past as well. president trump, he seems to want to have a little bit of wig withing room by saying -- wiggle room by saying timing doesn't matter. and i think that's the appropriate message. i think he needs to be given enough space here by politicians politically in washington to pursue this because this is big. this is nuclear weapons. this is east asia, and we can't
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mess around with this. there's bipartisan -- there are major events different presidents have taken credit, as they should. these are american victories. he needs some space to win. ed: we have been direct and honest in saying there's skepticism and this is not just all wonder and light, but by the same token, will you and some of your friends in the obama administration admit there were eight years of very little progress in your days with north korea, and now this president has actually made progress with an unconventional approach? >> yeah, it's frustrating there wasn't progress during those eight years, and there also wasn't much in the bush administration. we have to go back to 1994, '95 to framework agreement that got some progress, and it was torn up by the bush administration. there's a lot of fault to go around. but president trump deserves credit for talking a bold step, getting engaged, personally
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putting his credibility on the line to get this started in a real way. pete: joel's a breath of fresh air to say we want a win for america and our president regardless of party. joel rubin, thank you for your time. great insight. jedediah: some headlines for you. an ms-13 gang member sentenced to life in prison for a 2016 murder. he is the second member of the violent street gang to get a life sentence for the ambush-style killing intended for a rival gang member in maryland. an accomplice also got a life sentence lasting october. and republican state lawmakers killing a climate bill after returning from a dramatic walkout. the oregon bill aimed at limiting greenhouse gas emissions was sent back to committee just days before the senate session ends. eleven gop senators fled the capitol and the state earlier this month to protest the bill, insisting it would have hurt rural communities. and new insulin pumps could
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be hacked. medtronic recalling some of its many med products over cybersecurity risks. the fda saying someone could potentially connect to devices remotely and change the settings resulting in either too much or too little insulin. anyone using those products is encouraged to switch to a different model. i'd say so. [inaudible] trained in the heart strings. the daily mail reporting the rolling stones' frontman now has a cardiologist. the 75-year-old singer is back on tour just weeks after major heart surgery. a source says the doctor is required by jagger's insurance company. pete: hey, if you can afford it, it's smart. ed: you're getting paid millions, just came out of heart surgery. jedediah: not a bad deal. ed: 2020 dems proposing some far-left ideas in some purple states, they're not having any of it.
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pete: west virginia's lieutenant governor says the ideas could destroy his state's success. he joins us live coming up. ♪ ♪ my experience with usaa has been excellent. they really appreciate the military family and it really shows. with all that usaa offers why go with anybody else? we know their rates are good, we know that they're always going to take care of us. it was an instant savings and i should have changed a long time ago. it was funny because when we would call another insurance company, hey would say "oh we can't beat usaa" we're the webber family. we're the tenney's we're the hayles, and we're usaa members for life. ♪ get your usaa auto insurance quote today.
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♪ ♪ ed: gas prices set to go up in at least five states ahead of the fourth of july holiday. higher gas taxes taking effect tomorrow in california, ohio, illinois, south carolina and tennessee. as of friday the national average for a gallon of gas was $2.70. for the second year in a row, mississippi takes the top spot for the worst drivers in the whole country. according to a new study by smart asset, the magnolia state has the highest amount of driving-related tickets. alabama and california following closely behind. the best drivers? hmm, massachusetts. jed? jedediah: good driver, ed.
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[laughter] it's one of the main platforms on the democratic agenda, and 2020 hopefuls making it clear how they feel in their climate change plans. >> we're going to free ourselves from a against on fossil fuels. >> we tax climate change with the toughest regulations in the country. >> it is time, long overdue, that we hold the fossil fuel industry that they cannot continue through their carbon emissions to destroy this planet. jedediah: our next guest is sounding the alarm about these democratic hopefuls and the economic gains that could be erased in his state. jim justice joins us now to explain. welcome, governor. >> how are you doing this morning, scwead? jedediah: i'm doing great. hope you're doing great too. i am concerned about the implications of some of these climate change policies that are being brought to the stage right now by democrats, and the
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implications they could have for states hike yours, west virginia. can you talk a little bit about what that trickle effect could be? >> well, it'd be catastrophic to west virginia, there's no question. but it'd be catastrophic to this nation. if you watch those people on stage, i mean, do they really have a clue a what's going on in this world? all they want to do is have their soap box to stand on and ramp and rail and everything, and at the end of the day they don't have a clue really what this nation is all about and what this nation is really doing. they don't really understand that china is spewing into the atmosphere seven times what we're doing here. and on and on is and on. but what they want us to do is they want us to blow our legs off, you know, in order to help china even more. it's just preposterous. you know, they want us to be a socialist, you know, nation and everything. we founded this nation on our capitalism and the way we are, and we're the greatest nation on the earth over and over and over. if we want to go back and let
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these people rule the day, terrible mistake for our nation. jedediah: you know, the problem is when you talk about the green new deal and when you talk about, you know, battling climate change, this all sounds really good. people don't really realize the implications of statements like going after of coal, going after natural gas, going after so many assets that generate the u.s. economy. so what would your advice be to someone like president trump who that has to go onto a debate stage at a time when all of these democratic talking points have a feel-good feeling and come out and say this is why this is problematic, the approach you're taking? yes, you can be concerned about climate change, but you also have to be concerned about the implication on jobs and the american economy. >> well, listen, we all want a clean environment. we all want clean air and clean water. there's no question about that. but we don't want our people to freeze to death in the dark. and in all honesty today, if you removed all fossil fuels today and shut everything down today,
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we would have such a catastrophic situation in this country, it would be unbelievable. and then the very cast of characters that's on the stage would be running for the hills. i mean, what we have to do is a good, methodical plan. you have the same kind of guy in west virginia that has brought west virginia from 50th to 1st that you have in the white house. we're business people. we absolutely are not career lifer politicians. we're business people that go and attack problems in a business-like manner, in a fashion that we all want greatness for our environment, our waters and everything else. we all want safety and everything for our people, the same things. but we're business people and we're getting it done. for those that are throwing rocks at president trump, the same are throwing rocks at me. and at the end of the day, he's doing an incredible job for the people of this country. jedediah: you know, we have that
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stat from the department of commerce that west virginia led the nation in personal income growth for the first quarter of 2019 with a 5.6% growth there. what is the message there to democrats and to the rest of the nation when it congresswomans to what people -- comes to what people can learn from what's happening in west west virginia? >> not only are we growing in our natural resources, got our coal miners and gas people back to work, but we've got tourism booming in west virginia. we've got manufacturing, high-tech, all kinds of things. i say to people all the time, you know, we have thousands, tens of thousands of really high paying jobs, and we don't have the people to fill. so if you want to live in paradise, a place that's got four of the greatest seasons on the planet within a rock's throw of two-thirds of this population in this country, you want to have a great paying job, you've got to come to west virginia. jedediah: governor, i think your point about president trump being a businessman is pivotal. that's why people elected him.
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they realized he would understand the implications of these policies on businesses throughout the country, and i think that's key as he heads into these intense debates. thanks so much for giving us our input. >> thank you guys for all i don't you do all the time. jedediah: well, the pledge of allegiance banned from one city council meeting, and then came the backlash, and now the mayor is doing something about it. that's coming up. ♪ ♪ booking.com offers free so bookers can book now... and ask their boss later. [do you want breakfast or no?] free cancellations! [definitely breakfast.] how good is that?
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♪ ♪ pete: after the devastating tornado that ripped through joplin, missouri, in 2011, a group of competition barbecue teams came together to feed their fellow americans in need.
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operation barbecue relief has since served almost three million meals in 26 states, and now some of those award-winning recipes can be found in a new book called operation barbecue. ed: here to tell us more and offer pro tips for your fourth of july cookout is dan hayes, co-founder, also a barbecue runner-up on chopped grillmasters, more importantly, a good man helping a lot of people. before we get to food, what's it like going around the country, people who are hard hit, feeding them and giving a hand up? >> one of the best things is to be able to give somebody a good hot comfort food meal. this pulled pork sandwich is very similar to what we feed people after a disaster. if you can take your mind off what's happened to them for a few minutes, you do an amazing thing for them. pete: i imagine days and weeks
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of -- >> no, we're providing a hot meal to them. pete: it's like being in the field in the military, and you've been eating an mre, and you come home and something's hot -- >> exactly. it does. and when it's comfort food, it's even better. pete: even better. >> so fourth of july, we have all these -- ed: you've got sandwiches here? >> we have a grilled pork tender the loin -- tender hoin. we have one on the grill that we're doing, and it's awesome because you can sit here, and you can add any kind of, you know, spice, taste, whatever you want to it, you know? you've got jalapenos over here, we can -- we just took this off. check this out. ed: i'll check it out. >> let me try a little bit of that. >> this is jalapeno apricot. it's a little glaze that we made. >> so we get our fruits and vegetables. >> absolutely.
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fruits and vegetables. you know, tenderloin's a cost effective piece of meat, and if you grill it right, nice and juicy, takes on anything that you want it to -- >> what else do we have here? >> so we have a pound cake here that was grilled with peaches. it's got a bourbon whipped cream on top. >> that's nice. >> this is a street corn. it's a bake, but you can use it as a dip. i love it. ed: all the corn through times square. >> no, nothing like that. something lighter, a grilled row main salad right here with blue cheese on top -- >> jedediah would like that. >> this burger over here, it's a 12-year-old kid that a made that recipe. he's amazing -- ed: where do they find the book? >> obr.org or go to your favorite online, you know, bookstore. ed: we appreciate it. pete: incredible recipes. i'll bring you some lettuce.
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jed. [laughter] jedediah: we are turning to a fox news alert. overnight president trump becoming the first american sitting president to cross into north korea. dan bongino joins us live to weigh in at the top of the hour. 'cause let's be honest... nobody likes dealing with insurance. right? see, esurance knows it's expensive. i feel like i'm giving my money away. so they're making it affordable. thank you, dennis quaid. ... so you'll remember it. when insurance is affordable, it's surprisingly painless. book two, separate qualifying stays at choicehotels.com...
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ed: good morning straight to this fox news alert a sitting american president has stepped on to north korean soil for the first time ever, president trump making history, crossing the korean demilitarized zona long side kim jong-un, overnight. jedediah: and coming one day after president trump stunned the world with a invite on twitter and he says the spontaneous summit could be very consequential. president trump: what happened today, i think, is great for south korea. i think it's great for north korea, and i think it's great for the world, and when we started this you have missiles flying over japan. they weren't so happy. pete: president trump meeting with kim for nearly an hour, as
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they work toward denuclear it station. the president says he and kim agreed to restart negotiations over the next several weeks. ed: let's go straight to our chief white house correspondent john roberts live on the ground live in seoul, south korea john it's getting dark there what do we see? reporter: ed, jedediah, pete, good morning to you. it may work out it may not work out that's what the president said but you can't get anything unless you try and the president certainly tried today winging his way back to washington d.c. aboard air force one the president tweeting "leaving south korea after a wonderful meeting with chairman kim jong-un, stood on the soil of north korean important statement for all and a great honor." now the president has been thinking about this for a while but it came as quite a surprise yesterday, when the president tweeted to kim jong-un hey, i'm going to be at the dmz and do you want to come along and we'll shake hands and say hi so there you see the president. that's a little strip of pavement between two blue diplomatic houses in the middle of that piece of pavement there,
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there is a line of stone about 16 inches wide, and that is the demarkation, the military demarkation line between south and north korea and the president walked up to it with kim jong-un and then stepped over it becoming the first sitting u.s. president in the history to walk on north korean soil. here is how the president described it. president trump: we went and met at the line and a meeting at the line, i said would you like me to come across and he said i would be so honored and that's the way it worked out. i didn't know really what he was going to say, but it was my honor to do it. reporter: now the way that president trump was selling this was it would not be anything more than a handshake, probably last five to seven minutes but as you pointed out the meeting lasted about an hour and came out with an agreement that they would get the two working groups together on the u.s. and north korean side, and see if they could restart the talks that have been suspended since that failed hanoi summit back in
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february. again the president here. president trump: what's going to happen is over the next two or three weeks the teams are going to start working to see whether or not they can do something. very big stuff, pretty complicated, but not as complicated as people think. reporter: so the big thing here for north korea is to get out from underneath the crushing sanctions that have been on that country for years upon years, kim jong-un thought he could get out from it under early some of the sanctions offered back in hanoi in february to shutter and dismantle the nuclear facility and president trump said it would take a lot more than that, still too early to talk about lifting sanctions, but the president is ultimately, that's his goal. listen here. president trump: i mean at some point look i'm looking forward to taking them off. i don't like sanctions being on this country. i'm looking forward but the sanctions remain, yes, but at some point during the negotiation, things can happen, and that's what we'll be talking about sanctions. reporter: so the president would
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like to get north korea out from underneath the sanctions and he would like north korea to prosper economically in the way that south korea has, the big sticking point in all of this is kim jong-un. the very first summit back in singapore a year ago june, kim promised the president that he was going to dismantle his nuclear program and he is not even taking one step toward that goal, so unless something different happens, going forward , it's going to be the same old song and dance. ed: no doubt about it. john appreciate your reporting as always, that sets us up perfectly for dan bongino, former secret service agent of course the lead agent on a previous presidential trip and delegation to the region. we want to point that out dan, but you and i were both on the ground in hanoi which john just mentioned which was summit 2.0 and we were talking then about the president walking away from a bad deal, while there may have been a kind of a temptation to take a weak deal just to have a
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"victory." the president did the right thing and walked away. what do you think now about just saying i'm going to go meet you at the dmz? >> well the president clearly understands that this is going to have to be some effort for personal diplomacy and ed think about it, it makes sense right? while the united states is a constitutional republic the north korean government if you want to call it that is the farthest thing from it, not even an oligarch it, it's basically the top down and that's it so the president, i think, smartly figures if he can make some kind of a personal breakthrough with kim, and get some concessions from him for the top, we may have some ground that we can tread in this but you know i don't understand what the opponents of the president's foreign policy here what they want from him. as you said and i remember hanoi again we were there. he walked away. it was a bad deal. remember, ed? everybody predicted the president is going to get rolled by kim here and what did he do? he didn't get what he wanted and he walked away and they still criticized him. i'd like to know what the
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president's opponent's plan is with a potential nuclear, i say potential because we don't really know what they're capable of although they do have some nuclear capabilities. pete: dan one of the leaders of the foreign policy resistance is ben roads, former advisor to barack obama. he just tweeted this. he said trump is lying. i was there for all eight years. obama never sought a meeting with kim jong-un, foreign policy isn't reality television. it's reality. your reaction to that? >> well, you know, you can't ever really trust what ben rhode s says, you have to remember he was literally a fiction writer before he became a so-called and i say so-called with the air quotes national security expert in the obama administration, he's probably the architect behind many of the internationals farrakhans that came out of there. i was with obama on a trip to south korea, i coordinated the logistics there. i don't recall any effort at that time to meet with the north
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koreans. that's not to say it didn't happen obviously i was with the secret service not the white house staff but trusting ben rho des, is like you put a quarter in the back of him and they will tell you a story i wouldn't take ben rhodes word for just about anything. jedediah: dan i'm skeptical when it comes to north korea, not only that they will go through with denuclearization but their internal verification mechanisms there's so many questions and concerns i have. with that being said if president obama had been able to achieve a meeting like this, he would be getting praised throughout the press for this . this is a historic moment a think out of the box decision by your president who doesn't follow the typical set of rules and he's going to get criticism no matter what because this president gets criticism no matter what. >> yeah and it's really strange who president obama chose to meet with. i mean remember he didn't avoid the cuban regime. i mean real it when you think
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about it you have two socialistic regimes that are top down what's the difference, the personal diplomacy effort on trump's part at this point what's the downside? you have a starving north korean regime, president trump is obviously trying to break through a bit with kim to make some kind of economic plea to him and who better to do it than a businessman outside of the political box. again, i don't understand from president trump's opponents and these obama supporters here. again had no problem reaching out to the cubans, what's the downside to this if we make no material concessions? you just don't like the photo op obviously the president doesn't care about that. he cares about american security and regional security so i don't get what their point is. ed: dan, we began this program in part with tucker carlson our own colleague and host he's going to have this exclusive interview with the president tomorrow night 8:00 p.m. eastern there on the ground at the dmz, got on the phone with us and was talking about the stakes
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diplomatically but also security -wise the logistics. take us inside what happens in a situation like this. you prepared for visits like this, nothing quite like this one, of course, but tucker described a scene where kim jong-un had this security aid who were not supposed to be armed. they were supposed to give up weapons but they kept them so they're armed around president trump. there's snipers from both sides the u.s. and north korean sides nearby. there is some risk involved in this, talk about what's going through the minds of secret service agents as this message plays out. >> yeah, well listen. this is the secret service number one their job is to just get it done like larry the cable guy they just do it they don't tell the president what to do or not do and always get the job done. having said that from what i'm hearing this was a last minute trip for anyone in the press whose telling you oh, this was planned out months in advance, president trump put it out on twitter just as kind of a show,
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that's kind of not true. i'm reasonably confident of that the problem with that from a security perspective, it's not really security. the problem is the logistics. now, what i mean by that is the dmz is one of the most secure areas on earth. "the rock" marines are up there. i've been up there, we took a trip up there on our own i've been to that concrete barrier on the ground that blue building where you can step into north korea next door, so my guess here is that the extended meetings that would ordinarily happen, ed in a planned trip, with north korea probably didn't happen so the message probably didn't filter down, hey here is how we work this with the weapon s but one more thing, but having foreign security armed around the president of the united states is not unusual, at all. matter of fact it happens in every country we go to. i think it only may have only been a little bit of a headache because obviously it's the north koreans who can be a little bit unpredictable as we've seen in
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the 70s where there was an incident with our u.s. military. ed: right and i've seen it on trips where around the indian prime minister his security detail is armed but that's an allie. this is a dictator with quite unfriendly country, so we just sort of wonder about what was going through there. pete: yeah, dan you'd acknowledge there's reallies being involved in this. >> no there's no question. there's an element i've said this on this network for seven years now. having done, i was the lead advance on i think four foreign trips one got canceled and was an advanced team member like in the south korea trip for probably another 10 more. there's an element of trust, guys, there really is. you're relying on that foreign host country which he walked into north korea. they're the host it's as simple as that. you're relying on them to put their 18 members in front of the president of the united states and that means people are not going to break bad on you but having said that, you may say
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well, trust that's an awful. well really what are you going to do? you have nothing. you can't ask them to disarm in front of you because there's some reciprocity there and when we go back to their country, whoever it may be they'll ask us to disarm and we're not doing that. the secret service isn't going anywhere with slingshots and rocks in their pocket you can forget it so there's an element of reciprocal trust there you just have to cross your fingers and hope it works and it's just the way it works. jedediah: thanks, dan so much for being here. pete: thank you. jedediah: appreciate it. >> you got it guys. pete: turning to 2020 far left adds as you know, dominated the stage in the first round of the debate. >> healthcare in my view, is a human right. >> well i don't even call it climate change. ed: but can more moderate democrats make a comeback? former advisor to president obama robert wolf has some insight, next. -we bought a house in a neighborhood
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>> is a human right, and we have got to pass a medicare for all single payer system. >> [applause] >> should someone whose here without document, should that person be deployed? >> that person should not be the focus of deportation. >> the only ways are no longer relevant. the scientists tell us we have 12 years before there is damage to this planet. this is a global issue. ed: the first round of democratic debates showing top
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con end tars embracing sweeping liberal policy changes. joining us now former economic advisor to president barack obama, fox news contributor, robert wolf good morning, robert >> ed how you doing today? ed: fantastic good to see you, sir. before we dive into specifics what are your general kind of thoughts about how it played out for democrats because i know you were at a fundraiser here in new york city a couple weeks back for vice president biden. he seemed to have a tough night against kamala harris. what are your broad views? >> yeah, i would say the first night seemed more like q& a as opposed to a debate and it felt like elizabeth warren won the first third, castro the second third and corey booker the last third. on the second night it certainly was much more of a big argument, people talking over each other, and no question, kamala harris was the big winner that night and i think mayor pete buttigieg did really well and then i would also say that president trump was a winner over the two-night period because i know we're
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going to talk about the topics of the debate, but it's clearly, ed, that the economy wasn't talked enough about and foreign policy wasn't talked enough about and those are really the two bookends on what people are going to vote about when it comes to 2020. ed ed: i want to get to a follow-up which is the new york times headline that says liberal democrats ruled the debate will moderates regain their voices as you know it's an ongoing conversation we had with you a friendly back and forth on fox & friends and you as a democrat said many times well this is exaggerated the party is not moving as far left as some people might say. robert this is the new york times and they're saying those debates were pretty far left. >> yeah, i would agree with the new york times headline. i think that most of the debate was sent on incredibly important issues. the four issues ex the economy and foreign policy are climate change, immigration, healthcare and gun reform and criminal
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justice, the five, and that i would say two or three of the five spent most of the two nights. i actually think that those who are not for medicare for all, i mean all of them are for healthcare as a right. there could have been a great debate on why single payer medicare for all is not the best way to go. the best way to go is to extend the public option, continue to make changes being able to cross state line, you could have had a debate about medicare x paying into the system and actually people didn't really have a debate on it. it was a missed opportunity for those who disagree with elizabeth warren and bernie sanders. ed: but doesn't it, robert go further than that? a missed opportunity for your party on what to do with healthcare for american citizens , but then when asked about illegal immigrants, we just showed video, every single democrat raised their hand and said i'll give free healthcare to illegal immigrants. we want to be a compassionate
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country, robert but can you win a national election whenever are democrat says free healthcare for illegal immigrants and didn't say a word about healthcare for our vets who are homeless in the streets, thousands and thousands of them, in american cities, robert. >> listen ed, you and i have chatted about it, you know i believe healthcare is a right and i believe that those who are here legally absolutely need healthcare. i also think we should not shut out those who are here illegally but we can't have a free medical care system for all. i think actually what vice president biden said that people should have the opportunity to pay into the system was actually the right approach, but i was surprised actually everyone raised their hand. that should have been another debate that took place, and i think that to your point, ed, and what we've been saying, the electricity in the party is certainly going to be to the left, where the grassroots are, and the people who are activists , but really we saw in the mid-terms, those who win the party's votes are actually those who agree with many of these
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progressive issues but actually are capitolists for healthcare. ed: we appreciate it. more baseball to be played my yankees beat your red sox yesterday. they did but we're playing in london today. nt. they really appreciate the military family and it really shows. with all that usaa offers why go with anybody else? we know their rates are good, we know that they're always going to take care of us. it was an instant savings and i should have changed a long time ago. it was funny because when we would call another insurance company, hey would say "oh we can't beat usaa" we're the webber family. we're the tenney's we're the hayles, and we're usaa members for life. ♪ get your usaa auto insurance quote today.
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jedediah: we are back with some quick headlines. a conservative journalist viciously attacked why a group of suspected antifa protesters in portland, oregon. they were hospitalized after getting pummeled by milkshakes he says were mixed with quick dry cement and pepper spray.
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several others including three officers were also hurt. they're all expected to be okay. at least three people have been arrested. and disturbing new details about the man accused of brutally murdering a utah college student just last year, he self-publish ed a gruesome murder novel in which the victim was burned alive. investigators found female remains burned in the backyard of the suspect's salt lake city home. he's now facing murder and kidnapping charges. and new peace talks between the u.s. and the taliban are underway. the talks centering around a potential withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. secretary of state mike pompeo has said he hopes to strike a deal by september. the state department pushing for real progress to ensure the country's up and become a safe haven for terrorists again. down to you, pete. pete: thanks, jed. well a minnesota city council reported on this yesterday. it's reconsidering now its decision to skip the pledge of allegiance at meetings after facing major backlash from the
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community for unanimously voting to nix the pledge. watch. >> in order to create a more welcoming environment to a diverse community, we're going to for go saying the pledge of allegiance before every meeting. >> all in favor? >> aye. >> any opposed? all right, that passes 5-0. pete: the pledge just not welcoming enough. the mayor is promising a revote on the issue coming up. here to react host of the joe pa g show, i'm a big fan of the show thanks for coming on this morning really really appreciate it. one of your tweets -- >> big fan of yours too, pete. pete: one of your tweets caught our eye. the idea that in order to create a more welcoming environment, you're going to skip the pledge? >> yeah, we live in a society where we're supposedly very very tolerant, very accepting very open and we are. we're an open accepting tolerant society yet we tell people who
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come here, who aren't necessarily from here, and maybe are from a different culture that you either accept or tolerate what we do. it's a very strange system where we celebrate and these people were very proud of voting 5-0 to say let's get rid of the pledge because people are intimidated by the pledge of allegiance. now you've traveled to the world i've been to a couple of places and we adopted our daughter from china. i don't remember going to china telling people to get rid of the chinese flag i don't want to see it while i'm here, don't tell us about your culture or show us the great wall of china, because i'm offended or intimidated or american, you've got to somehow serve me. it's a strange place to be in america when we say we're a melting pot and we're tolerant and accepting, yet we tell people who come here, you don't have to tolerate our stuff our flag our pledge, our ways. it's weird, pete it really is. pete: yeah it really is. ann mavity is on the st. louis park council she explained it this way. she said not everyone who does business with the city or has a conversation is a citizen. they certainly don't need to
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come into the city council chambers and pledge their allegiance to our country in order to tell us what the their input is about a sidewalk in front of their home. she seems to be missing the bigger picture here. >> yeah, what's most disturbing about that line is that a, nobody is forced to do the pledge when they come in, nobody is forced to do the pledge in school. the fact that they change the rule because they're afraid that people have to listen to the pledge or wait 30 seconds for people to say the pledge of allegiance to a flag of a country that is open, accepting and tolerant of them is weird to me. why can't you go to the council meeting, hear the pledge or maybe walk in after the pledge is donald then complain about your sidewalk or your streator your school? and again, the fact that you're not a citizen doesn't bother me. we love you. my grandparents came here from italy. but once you're here, love, accept and tolerate our culture. what's the big deal? pete: [laughter] to that point, why has the flag,
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why has the pledge become controversial? why do folks on the left see those inherent bedrocks of our country as devices? >> i don't know. i know this when my grandfather came over on a boat in 1928 he couldn't wait to see the flag and the statue of liberty and it made him feel good and you as a veteran you feel good about the flag and what you've stood for and what it stands for. the stars and stripes and goodness and opportunity and the american way of life is why a lot of these people are in st. louis park and non-citizens, citizen resident, whatever it is that you are, the fact is you have the rights here that you don't have probably where you came from, again, and traveling the world. i never raised my hand and said i'm in china, you've got to do it my way. i always thought when it rome do as the romans do was a good thing and you followed that. when in the united states of america, love the flag, embrace what it stands for, enjoy our tolerance and our acceptance, and stop giving us a hard time about things that are as you said, are bet bedrock here.
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pete: yeah, now we actually reached out to the st. louis park city council and we've yet to hear back and we'd advice any member of the city council to come on our program and also of note this is in represent teva illham omar's district, we would love her to come on the program and ask her how she feels about this should the pledge be said. we've got to leave it right there. love your program. come back soon. >> appreciate it. pete: you've got it. well, back to fox news alert, president trump made history by crossing into north korea. our coverage of the big moment, continues next. hey, who are you? oh, hey jeff, i'm a car thief... what?! i'm here to steal your car because, well, that's my job. what? what?? what?! (laughing) what?? what?! what?! [crash] what?! haha, it happens. and if you've got cut-rate car insurance, paying for this could feel like getting robbed twice. so get allstate... and be better protected from mayhem...
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ed: we are back with a fox news alert the president takes historic steps literally towards deniking the korean peninsula, president trump crossing the demilitarized zone becoming the first american president to step foot on north korean soil. jedediah: kim jong-un greeting the president towards historic handshakes the meeting at the dm z coming just one day after president trump surprised the world with an invite. president trump: we went and met at the line and in meeting at the line, i said would you like me to come across and he said i would be so honored and that's the way it worked out. i didn't know really what he was going to say, but it was my honor to do it. ed: the president ended up meeting with the north korean dictator for about an hour or so he said they agreed to restart negotiations officially over the
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next several weeks, let's bring in the director of korean studies at the center for the national interest harry good to have you back here this morning and obviously, the president and the north korean leader restart ing negotiations big picture, but it seems to me the hard work is yet to be donald that's getting the teams whether it's the secretary of state or others to meet him, the president's chief negotiator for north korea for example, actually doing the hard work of moving towards denuclearization. how does that play out? >> well the hard work begins and i think the great thing about this is it's the pictures and the optics that set the stage for all of this. we often forget that kim jong-un is going to have to literally sell not only denuclearization to his own people, but he's going to have to actually sell the object of peace to his people. think about this for a second. his grandfather, his father, and him himself has told the north korean people that america is the enemy from birth until death so he's going to have to not only reverse that but actually have to take the right of
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nuclear weapons out of the north korean constitution so not only are we facing big challenges but kim is going to have to sell this but these pictures he can show that to the north korea people as progress and that's big and we forget that. pete: did he need a shakeup like this, a curveball to restart these high stakes negotiations which as ed kind of alluded to over the last year, year and a half, not much has cop yet but could this create a spark? >> both sides needed this. i think he really needed some sort of game changer and these pictures do that. a lot of people are saying on social media oh, it's just a photo op, i would disagree when people think of history and historic moments they put nixon and think of shaking hands so now this gives both sides the impetus to really sit down and develop a deal that works for both sides and i do think that can happen now. jedediah: harry let's take a listen to president trump talking about the meeting and then we'll discuss. president trump: the reason i
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met with kim jong-un, we had a great meeting, because we're all in this together. we want to get this thing solved we had a very productive meeting i outlined the incredible prosperity that awaits north korea when this whole thing gets settled. they've been talking about for this a long time, but that's a country with tremendous potential and i've had a good relationship with chairman kim. its been a lot different. they were giving us a great briefing right at the dmz. jedediah: so what is the very next step that happens now? >> well what's going to happen now is steve began, our special representative to north korea, is going to meet with whoever his new counterparts are and they are going to try and pick-up the pieces from hanoi. we already know from a lot of reporting there was a deal that was pretty close. we almost hadley a on offices in washington, we almost had a political declaration ending the korean war, but now we have to
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get denuclearization steps. what that looks like, the north koreans give up the nuclear facility and a massive facility and president trump would give some sort of small sanctions relief. we're not going to take off all the sanctions but we could suspend them maybe for a year, and we could test the north koreans really if they're going to do this. we send inspectors in they mess with the inspectors the sanctions would snapback. i think that's how to do it. ed: harry you are quite the diplomat yourself and as evidence of that i heard you a moment ago a lewd to our representatives sitting down with the north korean representatives whomever they may be, apparent reference to the fact that the past negotiators from hanoi, there were reports a few weeks ago they were executed because kim jong-un wasn't happy with how it turned out then there was some corrections to that saying well maybe they weren't executed but sidelined, they were sent to siberia, if you will. that gets at the fact that kim jong-un is in a desperate position. what does that mean for negotiations moving forward in terms of his pocket book, the economy in north korea, tucker
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carlson earlier saying that he seemed to not be in such great health. he's under pressure. >> well think about north korea for a second. they are a tiny country. if you leave most of the country side doesn't have plumbing, water, electricity, they put all their money into nuclear weapons so kim desperately needs these sanctions lifted so we have to figure out a mutually agreeable formula where kim feels comfortable to do that. he can work with south korea to bring in billions maybe trillion s of dollars in investment, this can all work out, but we've got to build trust on both sides. it's the only way it's going to happen. ed: we appreciate your insight and a diplomat himself thanks for coming in here. >> thanks guys. jedediah: we'll turn to headlines now. and a reality star honored with an emotional voyage out to sea. hundreds gathering for a memorial paddle in hawaii for our friend, beth chapman. mourners releasing a wreath of flowers. the co-star of dog the bounty hunter died wednesday after a battle with cancer she was 51
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years old. and a restaurant collapses sending dozens of people into the water below. police say more than 40 people were taking pictures on the dock at a popular restaurant in south carolina when it suddenly gave way. about 20 people had to be pulled from the creek. three people were taken to the hospital with minor injuries. and a music festival in belgium suddenly shut down amid a fraud investigation. organizers canceling the festival hours after people arrived. the event was supposed to feature a major artist like card i b. police using dogs to kick the angry festival-goers out. the organizers blame security concerns but they're now being questioned in a case that's being compared to the infamous fire festival.
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pete: what a mess. jedediah: not a good look and chris pratt giving us all a reminder about why it's so important to wear sunscreen the actor sharing this photo on his instagram page taken during his honey wooden hawaii with new wife katherine schwarzenegger. he wrote suns out guns out i might have got a touch of crispy on the honeymoon and pet and schwarzenegger officially tied the knot earlier this month. ed: the original photo um -- it's good. jedediah: sun burn is not a good thing. i'm obsessive about that now. i got one bad sun burn wasn't doing that again. pete: really? i use a little bit the first day jedediah: you forget about it. ed: when i hear suns out guns out i think of -- reporter: yeah, i would say yes wear your sunscreen it's a do as i say not as a do situation because i always forget my umbrella and i always forget my sunscreen and i end upturning burning but it has been a fantastic day weather wise so
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far on fox square, there's some corn hole happening to my left and a great group of fans behind me can i get a little bit of a wave? there's folks here from alabama, patriotism waving around can i get your name? >> alice. reporter: and what's your name? >> elizabeth. reporter: would you mind helping me do the forecast would that be okay? here is what i want you to do. i'll give us this clicker hit that button when i tell you to okay? >> okay. reporter: let's bring up the maps and talk about this forecast where it's going to be warm around the country, hit the button. there it is and these are our temperatures a little bit later today running up into triple digits in a whole lot of spots hit the button one more time and there is our feels like temperature, you did a fantastic job. thank you very much. now for your last job i want you to say back to you we'll throw it back into the studio. >> back to you. reporter: back to you guys. i just lost my job. ed: thank you, adam. jedediah: be careful. pete: you may have just lost your job. all right, on a tough story isis
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releasing these threatening posters of potential terror attacks, just ahead of the fourth of july. how seriously do we need to take them? we ask a former counterterrorism officer, coming up next. ♪ ♪ here i go again on my own ♪ goin' down the only road i've ever known ♪ ♪ like a-- ♪ drifter i was ♪born to walk alone! you're a drifter? i thought you were kevin's dad. little bit of both. if you ride, you get it. geico motorcycle. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more.
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don't miss our 4th of july special with the queen sleep number 360 c4 smart bed now $1299. plus, free premium delivery when you add a base. ends sunday. sleep number. proven, quality sleep. pete: welcome back. couple of quick headlines scary moments for united airline passengers forced to use evacuation slides after an emergency landing. a free thin down a slide the houston-bound flight from new york diverted to newark airport in new jerseys because of a mechanical issue and the plane blew a pair of tires when landing temporary grounding all flights and in a second story let's hope easy jet doesn't have any issues with its electric flames. the loco carrier plans to start using electric jets in 2027, to
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cut fuel costs and reduce emissions. the airline is working with a tech firm to design planes with swappable batteries that can fly up to 300 miles, sorry we're out of battery power. yeah, we'll see. jedediah: isis fanatics issuing terror threats against the u.s. and britain ahead of independence day. online posts include potential targets in london and new york city. posters show london's big ben up in flames threatening attacks coming soon and another shows a u.s. soldier, with flames on a terrorist attack in manhattan and a burning plane appearing to have crash-landed in a river. ed: how serious of a threat could this be and how much should we be doing to prepare about it? former cia counterterrorism officer dan gabriel joins us live. good morning. >> good morning guys thanks for having me. ed: isis can throw these thins out there sometimes, other times law enforcement officials need to pay close attention how serious is this ahead of july 4th? >> this is time to pay attention this weekend marks the
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fifth anniversary of the establishment of the caliphate in mosul, which is the second largest city in iraq so we see this propaganda after it was launched globally last month is that isis is very much relevant and adapting still. pete: so you're saying the physical caliphate defeated largely in iraq and syria, but has it reconstituted is it elsewhere, does it live only online, what do we know? >> sure, well what we know about the caliphate is it's not really about a physical place or a political context. it's really about an ideology and for that it doesn't need any territory to hold. i can also say this in both iraq and syria, there is also a lack of security and stability currently in places that isis wants help, and that's the kind of scenario or circumstances that you can see isis korea can't. jedediah: dan how do you decipher when it's a real threat versus just say online propaganda and what do you do about it? my concern is always how do you
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act immediately in the name of prevention? >> sure and we'll get the best from the business of both federal intelligence agencies and our military and of course local law enforcement first responders are always trying to connect these dots, and trying to verify and corroborate what might be just a hoax versus what's a real threat. ed: in fact, you mentioned mosul a moment ago and you're behind a new film available on amazon and we'll take a look at that and get your reaction on the other side. watch this clip. >> i am a journalist and i've interviewed viewed dozens of isis defectors, in an attempt to understand their ideology and objectives and i have finally secured an interview with a high -value detainee who might be an important piece of this puzzle in order to reach a location where he is detailed my journey will take me into the heart of isis-controlled mosul. ed: that sets the table nicely
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for what they learned i know you don't want to give away the whole film so people will stream it but what did that journalist learn? >> sure, i know really this story takes place between baghdad and mosul between october 2016 and july 2017 as that journalist travels up the t egris river into mosul in parallel with the frontlines of the iraqi security forces and like the heart of darkness or or apocalypse now the further we go up the river the more dangerous it gets but the more interesting characters we meet until we ultimately sit down with that isis recruiter he was just describing. pete: what motivates him, briefly? >> it's the ideology that he explains is very much just a very strict fundamental interpretation of a brand of islam. ed: well the serious threat out there we appreciate you bringing us this film. pete: thanks, dan. ed: still ahead the first debate for the democrats in the books how can these candidates stand out in such a crowded feel we
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will ask 2020 hopeful john delaney when he joins us live. jedediah: plus getting a jump start on fourth of july celebration with an american favorite corn hole coming up next. >> ♪ ♪ ♪ this summer, book two, separate qualifying stays at choicehotels.com... ...and earn a $50 gift card. because when your business is rewarding yourself...
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ed: corn hole from the backyard of american pastime to a very serious competition. pete: the pros are here to show us how it's done stacey moore is the founder of the american corn hole league stacey thanks for being here. >> thanks for having us. ed: talk about the competition. >> we got our july 4th event coming up we'll be live on espn at 1:00 giving out over $50,000 that day. jedediah: oh, wow. pete: so how did you come up
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with this? you were having a beer playing corn hole? >> yeah, doing a lot of tailgating, and i saw these guys playing really seriously. i was like oh, there's a lot more to this than i thought. got to understand the strategy and how these guys play the game and i said i think it's going to be a professional sport. jedediah: so how is it done? how do we do it? what's the strategy here? >> so the strategy is you want to throw as flat of a bag as possible that gives you the most control of the bag. so you'll notice, they throw it really flat. pete: and right in the hole. jedediah: okay, cool. ed: should we give it a shot? pete: here we go. >> you stand opposite young protesters partner. pete: go for it. we've got to use their bean bags and their field. jedediah: you're supposed to be over there. ed: reverse it. pete: all right, go for it, rock and roll. jedediah: what am i doing i'm
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here somewhere do we stand? right here? ed: no that's cheating. >> [laughter] pete: she's pregnant she's pregnant. she can do that. >> you can't bounce it. pete: you can't bounce off there pete: just go fast both of you. boom! >> that's called bad corn hole. pete: you got the rolling technique, i like it. it's the jed technique. go, ed. >> we have one point for red. ed: it's got to be flat. pete: i played a lot of backyard corn hole. just saying i've got a set at home and i'm not messing around. jedediah: it's hard. pete: i've got you, jed. in the hole! jedediah: oh, pete.
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>> 27 feet, front to front. a lot further than people think. >> [applause] >> boom! ed: more is coming up on the other side. hey, who are you? oh, hey jeff, i'm a car thief... what?! i'm here to steal your car because, well, that's my job. what? what?? what?! (laughing) what?? what?! what?! [crash] what?! haha, it happens. and if you've got cut-rate car insurance, paying for this could feel like getting robbed twice. so get allstate... and be better protected from mayhem... like me. ♪ i felt withdrawn, alone...mile, you become closed off. having to live with bad teeth for so long was extremely depressing. now, i know how happy i am. there was all the feeling good about myself that i missed. i wish that i had gone to aspen dental on day one and not waited three years. at aspen dental, we're all about yes.
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good morning. straight to a fox news alert. president trump becoming the first american president to step foot on north korean soil ever. taking also broader steps towards denuclearization in the process. >> the president being greeted at the dmz for a handshake. the president is optimistic that spontaneous summit could become consequential. >> nobody knows how things will turn out. it was a great day, very legendary, very historic, quick notice. nobody saw this coming. it was great he was able to react. >> they sat down for nearly an hour for that meeting. the president says they agreed
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to restart negotiations over the next several weeks. and guys, all morning long, we have been covering this breaking development that truly is historic. i mean, when you look at the armistice that was signed on the 38th parallel and the korean war that was fought to deter the communists and we have held that line ever since in a state of war that's still not technically over, this president has had two previous summits, trying to get kim jong-un to wrong back from the precipice this a last minute opportunity. we will see what comes of it. jedediah: kind of amazing that the president would tweet something out in a social media age that suddenly he would be stepping into the dmz and greeting kim jong-un. many concerns about will this come to fruition in terms of denuclearization. what are the verification processes and the enforcement mechanisms within north korea? so many questions to be asked, but this is a historic moment and an accomplishment for the president to be able to do that. the truth is you can't make headway unless you agree to sit at the table and have these
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conversations. whether or not he should have done it without preconditions will be up for debate. i'm hopeful, optimistic as much as i can although skeptical when it comes to north korea. i'm rooting for my president. if he's able to make headway, it is good for this country and the world. >> as we heard from many of our news-making guests throughout the morning you won't succeed in diplomacy without trying. the president took a chance. it took courage to send it out on social media, kim jong-un could have said no, maybe having the american president losing face, he put it out there, put some pressure on kim. do you want a deal or not? are you going to move forward here. our own tucker carlson had a real interesting and remarkable opportunity to be on the ground. remember he has this exclusive interview coming with the president that will be on monday at 8:00 p.m. eastern. you see him there reporting with his executive producer justin right there at the dmz, a unique opportunity for our colleague. tucker came on the program earlier and talked about what he
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saw. >> no question about that. maybe a little off his game. i don't think he's surrounded by people he doesn't control very often. wheezing like an emphysema patient, not a healthy guy. but he struck me as kind of self-contained. trump was about as happy as i have ever seen him because it really is something that hasn't been done before and probably would not have been done without him and his, you know, very different style of governing. >> tucker went on to talk about the scene there, the dmz, while it is demilitarized it is the most weaponized air or one of them in the world, with north koreans guards pointing at the south koreans. there have been firefights across that border, a lot of
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disputes. when you do a last minute trip with people of this high-profile and security details, you bring into the press into it, north korea with the state media, we have our free media, it all comes together in what could be a logistical nightmare. tucker was there on the ground watching the security guys and media guys, this is what he had to say? >> the security guys all of them armed by the way, not allowed to bring guns into this part of the dmz but they had them, started pushing both american reporters and white house -- even the press secretary got pushed pretty hard. i think they were starting to panic because their leader was going into tight quarters with all these people around them. they really overreacted. there was a shouting service between the secret service and the north koreans. >> some of the best insights this morning were from tucker on the scene there. don't miss his interview 8:00
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p.m. eastern tomorrow night. tucker carlson tonight. he's going to give you not just the interview, the sound bites from the president of the united states, but also tucker's own reflections from on the ground. let's keep this rolling now and go to jim hanson, president of the securities studies group. of course someone we like to have on frequently when we talk about these big big national security issues. jim, your thoughts this morning? >> i think president trump made a calculation that everybody's been trying to do the same thing over and over again, and we weren't getting anywhere, so he made a personal appeal to kim jong-un. he's catching a lot of baloney for the people in the press and his opposition for treating him like a human being, for buttering him up. well, that's a tried and true technique when you're dealing with another big personality. kim's pretty full of himself. so trump treats him like a big man, invites him to the table, and makes a grand gesture of walking across the line into north korea. that's as likely to clear the logjam as anything you could talk about in the technical
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dealings about how we'll actually implement a deal. jedediah: jim, this is a president who doesn't necessarily follow typical political protocol as we know. in making this decision, do you think he consulted with his advisors, or do you think this is a decision he made on his own in the spur of the moment? he did put that tweet out. how much went into the decision be hind this meeting? >> it looked spontaneous. it was not exactly that spontaneous. of course he discussed it with his advisors. in the end, like i said, this was a thing he did on twitter, a kind of trivial place to conduct stuff except that president trump has turned into it a global diplomatic channel. and so he kind of put the pressure on kim to say look, i am treating you like an equal, even though he's not. i want you to come to the table. i will come to your location, and we together can take you out of, you know, the dark ages where your people live into a possibility of gleaming skyscrapers. i think that's a pretty good
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offer. i think it has a possibility. >> kim jong-un's whole life is premised on insecurity. he's insecure about maintaining power, insecure about his handlers in china and the relationship to the united states and south korea. you're thinking that his personal relationship by being built up that doesn't mean the united states is ignoring the huge problems of north korea, build him up, put him in a place where he can feel secure enough to make the kind of deal where he gives up his security blanket, his nuclear weapons blanket. >> bingo pete, that's it. he can't give up his nukes about worrying about whether his generals and other leaders there are going to take him out in a coup because they are worried about what's going to happen. by president trump upping his, you know, global stature, he gives him the ability to say look, i have actually brought north korea into the big-time. we are now a player on the global stage and this gives him the opportunity to do something that is actually dangerous to him personally and to his regime. so i think it's a calculated
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ploy by president trump, and it's got as good a chance to succeed. people worry about, you know, all the difficulties of the technical arrangements of this. we've been thinking about those for decades. somebody had to make a personal breakthrough to give the korean leader -- the north korean leader a chance to do this. ed: jim, what happens next then? how do we make sure this is a reality, that there's actual progress moving forward? we have been teased before, the previous two summits. yes, there was progress but then kim jong-un, there's black sliding and -- there's backsliding, he starts testing elsewhere. yeah, i will give you a look at that site but maybe there's intelligence saying there's another site somewhere else. how do we finally know that we're going get somewhere? >> well, president trump did the right thing walking away in hanoi. he said look, i'm giving you the chance to play in the big leagues. you either play straight or i'm out. now he's giving him a chance to come back. nothing's changed. it is not like he's going to say okay now we're going to let you
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get away with the games. he just left meeting with president xi and talked to china about enabling these things. probably got some sort of assurance that china is not going to bail him out if he can make the progress. all the hard work is on the back end in verifying these things. you know, trust but verify, and probably not even trust, just verify. once they do something, though, once they give tangible evidence of their denuclearization, maybe they can have some food and gas. pete: jim hanson, thank you very much for your insights this morning. jedediah: headlines for you now. after his meeting at the dmz, president trump addressed the american troops at the airbase. >> you are great people. you are fighting. you are fighting hard and you're -- just your presence, off presence like no other -- you have a presence like no other, no other. so as president i have no greater honor than to serve as commander-in-chief of the greatest fighting force on the face of the earth, the united
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states military. thank you very much. [cheers and applause] jedediah: the president is on his way back to the states as we speak. and a conservative journalist viciously attack by a group of suspected protesters in portland, oregon. the journalist was hospitalized after getting pummelled by milk shakes he said they had quick dry cement and pepper spray. several others including three officers were also hurt. they are all expected to be okay. at least three people have been arrested. ed: the first ever major league baseball game in london turned into a slugfest. the yankees and red sox combining for 30 runs. >> back at the wall!
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[cheers and applause] ed: i was excited when the yankees put six runs up in the first of the inning but then the red sox answered with 6 in the bottom. it was 6-6 after one inning. the yankees though prepailed 17-13 at -- prevailed 17-13 at the end prince harry and duchess meghan were at the scene. the manager of the red sox said it was the most nervous he had ever been. he was briefed. here's a guy who has been in the world series, under the pressure, the red sox won last year, and he said the protocol, don't do this, do this. he said he was more nervous at that than any baseball he has ever been in. they play again today. pete: feels like a bit of false advertising for major league baseball. come watch 30 runs a game. i hope the next one 1-nothing, pitcher's duel so they can realize it. good stuff. he tried to position himself as more moderate during this week's 2020 democrat debate.
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that's not him. it was supposed to be john delaney. he's a presidential candidate who was on that stage. we will talk to him about what it was like to be on the stage, the latest on north korea, is the party trending too far left? john delaney on fox & friends, coming up. with all that usaa offers why go with anybody else? we know their rates are good, we know that they're always going to take care of us. it was an instant savings and i should have changed a long time ago. we're the tenney's and we're usaa members for life. call usaa to start saving on insurance today.
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when a stuffy nose closes in... (whimper) breathe right strips open your nose up to 38% more than cold medicine alone. (deep breath) breathe better, sleep better. breathe right. stepping across that line was a great honor. a lot of progress has been made. a lot of friendships have been made. great conflict in this area, great great conflict and now we have just the opposite and it's my honor and it is the chairman's honor to say we work well together. pete: president trump touting the progress made following his meeting with kim jong-un at the dmz in historic trip overnight. how are those running to replace him in 2020 reacting? jedediah: let's ask one of them, democratic hopeful john delaney
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is joining us this morning. welcome to the show. >> good morning. jedediah: we have a lot to get to when it gets to the debate. one of us will talk about healthcare. i want to get your reaction to president trump meeting with kim jong-un. do you think this was a good idea? potential for success here? what do you make of it all? >> well, i certainly don't think it was a bad idea. i mean, i have been someone who has not kind of criticized the president having these engagements because i think it's important to have dialogue. i have worried about where this is going to go, what kind of deal he's going to cut, etc., but, you know, i think like a lot of americans, we are not sure what to make of it but dialogue is not a bad thing and we will see where it goes. you have to remember on these things. the devil is in the details. the way you pound out an agreement with north korea around nuclear weapons is you need a lot of experts on both sides, from each country working on these details. ed: you're a democrat. you are running to replace this president. but would you -- do you want him
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to succeed? i mean, do you want to see the opportunity for president trump to stand next to kim jong-un and say this peninsula will be free of nuclear weapons, verifiably? would that be a good win for america? >> it would be a huge win for america; right? i mean, i think every american should want the korean peninsula to be denuclearized. that's in the best interest of the citizens of the united states of america. and if this president can accomplish that, i will cheer him on and congratulate him for doing it. pete: would you also acknowledge that the obama biden administration handed this problem to trump after eight years of no progress? in fact, backwards? >> listen, i don't think -- just like i said, you know, if the president were to actually denuclearize korean peninsula, i would applaud him for it. i don't think you can point fingers at anyone on this korean situation. it's been going on for a very
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long period of time. very long period of time. and so, you know, the devil's in the details on this. i hope the president is successful. you know, i worry in his efforts to cut a deal that he may cut a deal that's not a great deal. but everyone should want him to be successful. of course why wouldn't any of us want the korean peninsula be denuclearized? that would be a huge win for america and the world. >> he walked away from what many say was a bad deal, but he did demonstrate that. we will see how this plays out. >> this is going to go on for a long time. this is good progress but assume this is going to make a very long time and probably into the next administration. ed: while the president has been on the world stage, he would maybe argue and push back that he will get a deal before democrats take over and in either two or six years. in the meantime, while he's been on the world stage, you and i were down in miami. i was covering you and the rest of the candidates. let's have a quick taste of what you said on the stage. we want to hear some reaction. >> i think we need to do real
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things to help american worker and the american people. we need real solutions, not impossible promises, creating universal healthcare so every american gets healthcare, but not running on making private insurance illegal. i think we should be the party that keeps what's working and fixes what's broken. [cheers and applause] >> i mean, doesn't that make sense? ed: there seems to be a lot of common sense coming from you, particularly on healthcare. you called it political suicide that bernie sanders and kamala harris both said they would give up private health insurance, wreck that system for medicare for all. now kamala harris widely seen as the winner of that first debate is walking that back and said i didn't understand the question. are you going to let her off the hook? >> well, i think she's a cosponsor on the bill that's in the u.s. senate, and that bill is very clear that it makes private insurance illegal. so, you know, listen, either the people who are on that bill either they didn't read the bill
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or they didn't really care, and they just wanted to do what was popular. either way, that's not what we need from leaders. jedediah: is there room, though, john for a moderate on the stage because i've watched those debates, and it was hard left, hard left. it was bernie sanders saying he's going to raise taxes on not only the rich but the middle class as well. you had a whole stage of democrats raising their hands that they would advocate for a healthcare plan that covered illegal immigrants. that does not sound like a party that is welcoming moderates in. >> i agree with you, but i don't think those people on the stage actually represent the democratic party. because here i am in iowa, right? i have been to all 99 counties in iowa. when i talk to americans in coffee shops and their living rooms, and the issues they talk to me about are all the same, healthcare, pharmaceutical prices, are there going to be jobs in these communities? what are we going to do to build infrastructure? what about the public schools? i don't feel like my kids are getting the education they need. we have too much student debt.
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those are the issues that the american people care about including democrats so if we run on some of the things you just talked about, we will have a very hard time. >> we appreciate it. we have maria bartiromo coming up next. everybody stick with us. thank you, congressman. it's "progressive on ice." everything you love about car insurance -- the discounts... the rate comparisons... and flo in a boat. ♪ insurance adventure awaits at "progressive on ice." tickets not available now or ever. you see clear skin. cosentyx can help people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis find clear skin that can last. don't use if you're allergic to cosentyx. before starting, get checked for tuberculosis. an increased risk of infections and lowered ability to fight them may occur. tell your doctor about an infection or symptoms,
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battling democratic primary opponents. the comic is set to go on sale july 3rd. but get this dc comics reportedly sending a cease and desist order for using the likeness of he-man. i think they want to have him with a dad bod instead of that. i don't know. jedediah: kind of looks like thor to me there. president trump touting -- he became the first sitting president to step foot into north korea. >> the reason i met with kim jong-un -- we had great meeting because we're all in this together. we want to get this thing solved. i outlined the incredible prosperity that awaits north korea. that's a country with tremendous potential. i have had a good relationship with chairman kim. >> sunday monday futures host is joining us now to react, maria
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bartiromo. >> good morning. >> your assessment? >> i think it is incredible that the president has the instincts that he does, the instinct just to reach out to kim jong-un spoke volumes about the way the president deals with major issues. he goes first towards diplomacy. a shake of the hands, stepping your foot into that territory is so important from the messaging standpoint, in terms of where the united states wants to be. if this president actually gets north korea to denuclearize, it's incredible. and i think this is obviously among the steps to doing that. look, at this point we haven't seen north korea do anything; right? we haven't seen any change in terms of their planning, of denuclearization but it feels like this president has done more than any other president in terms of actually getting them closer to that point. we will see. jedediah: obviously very risky for him too, though, because he has extended himself forward and if north korea comes back and doesn't deliver, that's going to
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be accountability. people are going to say this is part of your legacy that you made an attempt and didn't succeed. >> yeah, but you made the attempt and you actually went there and put your foot in north korea, something no other president has done. look, there's no lying about who kim jong-un is. the guy is a killer. the human rights abuses are beyond. however, we don't want this country to have nuclear weapons and to be, you know, continuing to plan for them. so this is the first time we're actually seeing a nod toward well, maybe there is some light here. maybe we can actually change this culture. ed: this president also took a lot of hits from his critics over china and the tariffing, saying this will never work. he's gotten china on the table. on this trip it's now been obscured a bit by what's going on with kim jong-un, but he's gotten a truce at least with chinese president xi. what are your expectations about the markets this coming week, number one? number two, we played this clip yesterday with jamie dimon who you know well who is not always a big fan of this president, yet he said you know what?
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he deserves credit for the economy and the tax cuts largely work. >> that's right. jamie dimon has been changing, shifting slowly but surely around president trump. i think it has a lot to do with china. jp morgan got licenses to operate in china, that would not have been the case without the president. the leader dimon saying let me look at policy. putting personality to one side. we had 3.1% growth in the first qrt -- quarter. we have unemployment at 51 year low. maybe an opening for china. for too long the ceos of the major companies in this country have been so interested about protecting and getting into china to sell to their 1.4 billion people, that they forgot to protect their own products so that they started getting stolen. and that's the issue. so i don't know where this goes. this is a culture in terms of theft of intellectual property and forcing the transfer of technology in china.
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the president is kicking the can down the road a bit here but at least the talks are still on. ed: jpmorgan chase and jamie dimon may be seeing some of the wisdom of what the president is doing but bank of america is not. they just announced plans to cut ties with companies that help run detention facilities and private prisons down at the border. they are taking a political stand with what they loan to. >> they really are, one of the reasons is because they went to one of the detention centers, homestead and they didn't like the conditions there. what they are missing in my view is the fact that the system is overwhelmed. we are busting out in terms of the detention centers around the border because too many people are trying to get into this country. we're talking about a million apprehensions likely this year alone, when i went to the border, and obviously, ed, you have done it so incredibly well, and i was glued to the screen when you were there, but the bottom line is all of these people are there and they are not recognizing that our border patrolmen are doing other jobs instead of actually patrolling the border.
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they're actually caring for babies. they are becoming sick because they have been walk -- they are coming sick because they have been walking and hitchhiking for months. kevin mccarthy is coming up, he's been an ally to president trump, we will talk about the historic moment with congressman mccarthy. then we will get the other side. we will talk with the acting director of u.s. citizenship and immigration service and in addition get the other side from the democrats, representative ryan who was on the stage, a hopeful for the 2020 presidential candidate. he's a moderate, pete. will he even get past go? jedediah: not a lot of room for them right now. thanks, maria. a new york times op-ed calls for the public shaming of border agents. the border patrol council reacts, next. what? what?? what?! (laughing) what?? what?!
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pete: we are back with a fox news alert. president trump becoming the first sitting president, american president to step foot in north korea. the historic step across the demilitarized zone alongside kim jong-un as you see right there. he met him straight into north korea. jedediah: the north korean leader welcoming president trump with a handshake at the dmz. president trump optimistic that the spontaneous summit can help advance efforts to denuclearize the korean peninsula. >> what happened today i think is great for south korea. i think it is great for north korea. i think it is great for the world. when we started this, you had
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missiles flying over japan. they weren't so happy. ed: the meeting with kim for about an hour or so is a work towards the deal. the president says he and kim agreed to restart negotiations over the next several weeks. let's bring in kevin cork live in south korea with the latest. it's evening there. good morning here. >> good to be with you. what a day and what a trip quite frankly. we have talked a lot, right, about the g 20 and obviously the president coming here to meet with president moon, but to step over that border was something else and not just watching the english analysis on television, but also watching the south korean broadcast, the pictures from the 50s and the 60s and so on. you really got the sense it was more than just an american president stepping into north korea. it is the sense that history really has been made and maybe even proceed a historic future. small step but maybe a fateful one that could lead to not only denuclearization of the peninsula, maybe, just maybe, eventually a chance to reunify a
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nation long separated be amilitarized border -- by a militarized border. >> we went and met at the line and in meeting at the line, i said would you like me to come across? he said i would be so honored. that's the way it worked out. i didn't know really what he was going to say, but it was my honor to do it. >> an honor to do it, said the president, who notably did not mention denuclearization during his remarks today, but guys, he did talk about possible sanctions relief. >> at some point, look, i'm looking forward to taking them off. i don't like sanctions being on this country. i'm looking forward, but sanctions remain, yes, but at some point during the negotiations, things can happen. that's what we will be talking about sanctions. >> talking about sanctions indeed. before leaving asia, heading back home to washington, the president took a little time out to address members of the u.s. military at an airbase, just
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south of where we are here in seoul. he told the troops that it was indeed a great honor to stand in north korea. as you mentioned, ed, the president also made sure to tell everybody that the nuclear talks will be resuming fairly shortly. of course you might recall they broke down over in vietnam a few months ago but hope springs eternal, a historic time here in seoul. back to you. jedediah: thanks, kevin. >> here to give us more analysis is dr. rebecca grant, an international relations expert. thank you very much for being here this morning. truly historic only a brief visit into north korea, but it is a lot more than the number of steps he took there. >> that's right. president trump really has three components to his north korea policy. one of course is denuclearizing, the second is working towards the permanent peace treaty which is good for south korea and north korea, and then the third piece, transforming the relationship. that's why the meeting and a step across at the dmz was so important.
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he's working towards a durable transformation of our relations with north korea. jedediah: doctor, that was a solid initial first step that president trump made. what should the trump administration be doing now immediately as a follow up to that? >> well, what i'd like to see next, i would like to see the international atomic energy agency inspectors from the u.n. visit north korea. they haven't been in since 09. kim jong-un made remarks last fall about possibly letting the inspectors go back in and start looking around at the nuclear sites and making lists. this will take some time, but we want to see some formal progress towards getting spent fuel rods out and taking down the weapons of mass destruction. ed: dr. grant, what about china's role here? earlier in the trip the president had a chance to sit down with president xi. there's the issue of trade and tariffs of course. but it seems to me kim jong-un is unlikely to really do much of anything without some sort of a wink and a nod or a direct
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conversation with china? >> that's right. china really has them on a short leash, and remember, president xi of china was in pyongyang just ten days ago. so my sense is that china has given president trump a big assist here, that xi delivered a constructive but appropriate message to kim saying hey, let's get back into the talks with the u.s. it's very much in china's interest for north korea to behave. they weren't able to make north korea rich, and they want to see north korea behave and ultimately lessen the military tensions in that region. my read is that xi gave an assist absolutely. pete: incredibly complicated. you have to give the president credit for the willingness to tackle it. dr. grant, thank you very much. >> thank you. jedediah: top democrat schumer now calling on the atf to investigate the mysterious deaths of the american tourists in the dominican republic. he said in a statement quote
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given that we still have a whole lot of questions and very few answers the fed should double their efforts on helping get to the bottom of things. at least 13 americans have died in the dominican republic since last june. a new op-ed in the new york times calling for border officials to be identified and publicly shamed. the piece written by a british professor accuses border agents of abusing and torturing migrant children. border patrol council vice president says that's just not true. >> i've been at these facilities myself. and i've seen agents, you know, and the care they have towards individuals that we're arresting, not just the children, but, you know, all of the individuals that we arrest. there are a huge number that run towards us and they're very grateful we're there. jedediah: the times has not commented on the piece. republican state lawmakers killing a climate bill after returning from a dramatic walk-out. the oregon bill aimed at limiting green house gas
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emissions was sent back to committee just days before the senate session ends. 11 g.o.p. senators fled the capitol and the state earlier this month to protest the bill insisting it would have hurt rural communities. tom hanks having a hard time bidding fare well to his iconic toy story character woody. >> buzz, wait! wait! >> where are you going? >> you are right prospector i can't stop andy from growing up, but i wouldn't miss it for the world. jedediah: hanks has provided the voice for the beloved sheriff since the beginning of the franchise. he says parting ways with the character has been terrible. >> i was in the same studio, in the same microphone, with the same -- at disney, they said okay, great, thanks and just like that, however many years, we're over. jedediah: toy story 4 hit theaters earlier this month. it will be the final movie in the series. that's sad. it is tough to break up with a
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character. >> nothing's ever final. everything makes a comeback. jedediah: i like tom hanks. since big, i have been a big tom hanks fan. adam, are you a big tom hanks fan? >> i like tom hanks. i have a whole bunch of kids behind me. are you excited for toy story 4? anybody? yeah, there we go. weather feeling really warm out here, guys. it is going to be a hot one. this is a kid with a hat who felt like he wanted to be on tv today. what's your name? >> jonathan. adam: i love the hat. how would you sum up the forecast right now? >> warm. adam: warm, boom, that really pretty much does it. we take a look at the maps. you are going to see that jonathan is correct. 75 degrees here in new york city. spots in the middle of the country running up to the 80s right now. guess what, jonathan? it is only going to get warmer. running up to 92, 98 degrees in the middle of the country, getting into the heart land. you add in the humidity, that's the big heavy sticky air that
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you are feeling outside right now, feeling closer to triple digits. once again i find another stylish young person who is coming after my job and absolutely right, guys, warm across the country today. >> adam klotz, thank you very much. take a look at this insane video -- it is insane but far too common. a conservative journalist attacked as antifa rioters clash in the streets of portland. that story is coming up next. nd. whoa. travis in it made it. it's amazing. oh is that travis's app? it's pretty cool, isn't it? there's two of them. they're multiplying. no, guys, its me. see, i'm real. i'm real! he thinks he's real. geico. over 75 years of savings and service.
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this video is simply shocking, the entire story is shocking what happened to this conservative journalist. pete: yeah and the trend overall of conservatives under attack. this is in antifa. some call it a rally. i will call it a riot. there always happens to be violence that follows antifa because they instigate it. this is a reporter who covers antifa frequently.
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he's there to cover this. that's what happens to him. he's literally attacked here. ed: you see how they've got -- they are scared to even show their faces, these folks who are doing this. jedediah: this is not the first time that this particular journalist has been assaulted. he has been covering antifa for a long time. he was tweeting out images last night of himself bruised and battered in an emergency room. let's listen to him explain the attack. >> i just got beat up by the crowd, no police at all. in the middle of the street, they saw my go pro and he punched me several times in my face and my head. i'm bleeding. i was in the middle of the street in front documenting this. they stole my evidence. they stole my go pro. they just started attacking me. >> what did they use? >> their weapons in their hands. jedediah: that's him telling
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police what happened. and that was the question everyone had when they looked at it, where were the police in portland? ed: at least the police helped him at some point, where were they throughout the whole thing? jedediah: and gave enough time for people to record this. the environment we are in right now is unfortunate where someone who is a journalist, who is covering these protests, riots, whatever you want to call them, they shouldn't have to worry about their physical safety when they do that. it is a scary reality. this is multiple times that he's suffered attacks for simply doing his job in a non-violent fashion. ed: cowards to cover their faces, criminals who are using milk shakes but in this case it apparently had wet dry cement in it to hurt him. ridiculous. it is happening in a much broader context. pete: it sure is. this is a sanctuary city for illegals but not journalists. when sarah sanders was told to
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leave a restaurant by the owner, that owner wrote an op-ed. the title of the op-ed when it comes to high-profile collisions in restaurants new rules apply. stephanie wilkinson the owner of the red hen doubles down says when the day comes that the world feels it can return to its normal access, whatever she deems to be normal i will expect we will see fewer highly charged encounters making headlines in the meantime the new rules apply if you are complicit in spreading hate maybe you should consider dining at home. ed: she decides whether you can eat out at a restaurant which should be a free right of anyone to go around anywhere in the country. eric trump by the way one of the president's -- pete: another example. ed: this is a horrible example in chicago about a week or so ago. he was spit at by someone in a bar or restaurant in chicago. watch this. >> i think there's almost no tolerance on the left. they always call themselves the tolerant left. you see very little tolerance
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out of that. i don't think that's an action that's indicative of party. i think you have a person who is sick, but you see these cases time and time again. look at all the -- look at sarah huckabee sanders when she's in restaurants getting screamed at. look at what happens to ted cruz. when they are down, go up and kick them in the face. you know it's your duty to harass, you know, anybody -- look at what they do with us. jedediah: this san epidemic now -- this is an epidemic now. when conservatives go to speak at college campuses, they can't sit with their family and friends and enjoy themselves at a restaurant. the question is, what can we do about it? this is horrific that you should be ostracized and abused for your political -- >> the only thing you can do is stand up to it. the left decided to dehumanize trump supporters and conservatives. coming up, this morning we're going to work out, that's a bench press right there if i have ever seen one. is that adam?
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ed: ready for the push up challenge. pete: we're going to take him on. we will be right there. ♪ i wanted more from my copd medicine... ...that's why i've got the power of 1 2 3 medicines with trelegy. the only fda-approved 3-in-1 copd treatment . ♪trelegy. ♪the power of 1-2-3. ♪trelegy 1-2-3 trelegy. with trelegy and the power of 1 2 3, i'm breathing better. trelegy works 3 ways to... ...open airways,... ...keep them open... ...and reduce inflammation... ...for 24 hours of better breathing. trelegy won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. trelegy is not for asthma. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. do not take trelegy more than prescribed. trelegy may increase your risk of thrush, pneumonia, and osteoporosis. call your doctor if worsened breathing, chest pain, mouth or tongue swelling ...problems urinating, vision changes,
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>> the army corporal chris coughlin was dedicated to the football family and his country. he was 41 years old when he joined the army, was a fitness enthusiast who was always trying to catch a lift. in 2009 he was killed by a roadside bomb in afghanistan. jedediah: to honor him, his sister created the catch a lift fund that's helped thousands of post 9/11 wounded veterans regain their mental and physical strength. >> lynn coughlin and four remarkable veterans are here to show us what it means.
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lynn, thank you very much for being here >> thank you for having us. >> thank you for the service of your brother and everything he's done for this country. you are carrying his legacy forward. >> yes, we are. catch a lift has helped 5600 veterans currently across the nation. we provide wellness, fitness, grants, whatever they need to heal holistically through their own journey. they have physically healed. they drop hundreds of pounds, get off the medications 5 to 30 a day, which is incredible, and they do that through fitness, however they want to heal. >> let's quickly go to each one. we want to honor each person here. let's start down here. >> jason smith. >> how are you doing? >> good. >> what has been the impact of this catch a lift on your life? >> it's been amazing. you know, it gives me a healthy outlet post military service to stay active. it is very important for veterans to be active after the military service.
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>> can you show us some stuff? >> we are going to run out of time. >> he can bench a lot more than you. >> show us just one? >> sure. >> i got to see it. that's heavy. >> nice job. awesome work. >> we only have a couple seconds. everybody give us your exercise right now before we get cut off. you have dead lifts, modified pull ups. >> we want to see you do it. wow! >> holy cow! let's hear some applause. >> awesome job. >> go for it. >> yeah. >> very important modification. >> amazing. >> awesome. >> you guys are so inspiring -- so incredible inspiring >> the organization is catch a lift. what's the website? >> catch a lift.org. check it out. amazing. thank you very much. more fox & friends coming up.
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>> have a great sunday! [cheers] maria: good sunday morning. thank you very much for joining us. i'm maria bartiromo. joining me on sunday morning futures republican house minority leader kevin mccarthy with new reaction this morning to president trump's historic crossing into north korea to meet kim jong-un. and the temporary trade cease-fire the president broke with china's xi. plus 2020 democratic presidential candidate congressman tim ryan of ohio is here. a democratic congressman of california is here, sits on the house armed services committee and co chairs the sanders campaign. also ahead an

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