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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 7, 2016 2:44am-4:00am MDT

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establishment of safe zones under the umbrella of international approval. and we have to act. the fact that you had the assad regime with the russians in the wake the failure of the russian reset by hillary clinton, they're literally on the edge of aleppo and you point straight to 100,000 children. we have to act. we have to act now to establish and protect those safe zones. >> so -- >> and when i was talking the other night in the debate i said we absolutely should be prepared to use military force to establish and preserve the safe zones -- >> so -- >> -- and the ability for people to safely evacuate out of those areas. >> so governor -- >> we can't stand idly by while this humanitarian crisis unfolds --
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ticket, has said this. "i would have stayed out of syria." you guys have a different position on this issue. >> well, i think donald trump's been very, very clear about his view of the syrian situation, that what we have is an administration that first said we were going to have a reset with russia. that's been a total failure under hillary clinton's leadership as secretary of state. president obama said he would ever used chemical weapons against its citizens that there would be consequences. the assad regime did and there were -- >> so just to be absolutely clear, governor pence, you -- just to be absolutely clear -- i do think -- i want to be -- >> in -- >> forgive me. i want to be absolutely clear. you and donald trump agree that you would use u.s. military force, you have said, to bomb assad forces and to enforce a
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between the two of you? >> well, where there's absolute agreement is we have to establish safe zones for people to be able to get out of harm's way in aleppo. and if you don't back that up with military resources and our allies in the region, then you can't really guarantee that people in thoand those 100,000 children will be able to get out of harm's way. syria has imploded into a civil war. isis is headquartered in syria. it's all emblematic of the weak and feckless leadership of this administration -- >> governor, let me ask one question and make one distinction. >> and that's why we need change. but we cannot stand idly by. by the way, america has. moving red lines, feigning resets with russia. as the secretary of state recently said, we're just out of talks with russia. all the while here we have the leader of russia, you know, flexing his muscles, expanding his influence in the region. the united states of america
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suffering families in aleppo. and at the same time we need to continue focus our resources as donald trump has on destroying isis at its source. it's headquartered in syria. it's headquartered in raqqah. and when donald trump becomes president of the united states, we're going to put the safety and security of the american people first but we're also going to be there to provide humanitarian relief and support for people that are coming under the brutal, brutal results of >> cbs will have live coverage
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sick, huh? i'm good. i just took new mucinex clear and cool. what is this sudden cooooling thing happening? it's got a menthol burst. you can feel it right away.
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and clear your worst cold symptoms. let's end this. halloween is right around the corner, and that means carnival season is drawing to a close. operators are taking down their tents and loading away their rides until next year. bill geist paid a visit to the annual carnival trade show, where all the newun ? >> reporter: it's the annual carnival trade show. held in gibsonton, florida by the 4,500-member international independent showman's association. >> not too fast. >> reporter: it's one carnival where if you like a ride -- >> whee! >> reporter: -- you can buy it.
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million dollars. >> reporter: although at these prices there aren't a lot of impulse purchases. >> this we're looking at $100,000. >> whoa. >> reporter: it's one-stop shopping for carnival operators like danny brown from arizona. >> we own about 40 rides. >> reporter: who's trying to keep up with customer demand. >> they want more things. they want to be scared to death. >> so you scare people to death for a living. >> that's what they want. you know. >> i'm scared. >> repr: scary rides and some pretty frightening carnival food too. lee stevens is a carnival food vendor. >> we have a death by chocolate funnel cake. we came up with a chocolate batter. we developed a chocolate cream cheese icing. with hershey's syrup. >> reporter: custom food trailers are serious business. >> when you see an $8 sausage sandwich it's because a $280,300
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>> reporter: games of course -- >> come on, baby. >> reporter: -- are crucial to the carnival experience. >> oh! >> this game that we're standing beside now is what we call our whopper water. the price on this is around $210,000. >> we're coming out with new stuff all the time. >> reporter: bob casada, who owns bob's space racers, is a legend in the carnival game industry. and for one very good reason. the first whack-a-wholmole. >> well, yeah, we did the first whack amole. >> are you proud of it? >> yeah. very proud. >> reporter: prices have never been more important. >> we have to make people walk up to the game and want to play it. they want color. they want size. this guy we call him turtle. >> that's t-u-r-d-l-e. turdle.
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sideshow acts, human oddities, bizarre animal stunts. those have been relegated to the carney museum across the street. doc rivera is curator. >> you paid your dime and wanted to see the three-legged man. was he real? maybe. maybe he wasn't. but you had to pay your dime to go in and find out. incidentally, he was real. that was frank lantini. he was the three-legged man, and he lived here in gibsonton. >> reporter: in fact, gibsonton was once the hometo every sideshow performer in the country. which made for one strange little town. >> in the '40s and '50s there were 138 human oddities in this town. >> and you had the tallest fire chief and the police -- >> 8'4". >> and the police chief -- >> a midget. >> hi, y'all. >> reporter: ward hall, 85, is a renowned former sideshow impresario. he vividly recalls old
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was a guy who had 15 big bears. >> did the neighbors object? >> no. because the neighbor was the guy who had two 24-foot python snakes. >> reporter: ward traveled for decades with ward's wonders of the world. >> i had the lady of the frog girl. oh, my goodness. >> and lobster boy? >> no. the lobster boy never worked for me. we were friends. but in general there are no more freak shows. if i could find t open a freak show tomorrow and make more money than ever. but where do you find the freaks? they're not here anymore. >> primary elections. >> i guess. yeah. >> reporter: about all that remains of the old sideshow days is a small monument out on the highway. and the showman's cemetery. the final resting place of the human cannonball and lobster boy. ?
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thriving.
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y254ey yi0y archbishop murphy high school in everett, washington has a football team that's so good other schools refuse to play them. the three games murphy high has managed to play this season they've won by a combined score of 170-0. carter evans has the story. >> reporter: the powerhouse around these parts. undefeated is an understatement. they managed to win their last three games without even stepping on the field. the archbishop murphy wildcats haven't lost a game or even given up a single point this season. the school says it's the result of hard work and dedication. >> we're not looking to hurt anybody in this game. football by its nature can be a
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way. >> reporter: but the size and strength of archbishop players has some schools and parents worried their teams will get crushed. literally. >> the kids were concerned about going against a team that was much larger, much more physical. >> reporter: granite falls high school forfeited tomorrow's game against the wildcats. it's the third team to bow out this season. >> i don't care what other people think. it's our safety. we're playing, not them. >> reporter: granite falls has just one football player who weighs 250 ds archbishop murphy has six, including three who weigh at least 300 pounds. >> it's like putting a vw bug up against a mack truck. >> reporter: stacy morris's son is a granite falls freshman and safety on the team. >> we have 15 seniors, and if any of those seniors get hurt our replacements are mostly freshmen and sophomores. >> that could mess up your entire season. >> yeah. it's definitely a safety issue and it's also strategic. >> reporter: there are growing calls around the league for
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critics argue the private catholic school has an advantage because it can draw bigger players from around the region, something public schools can't do. >> we have kids that come here for all variety of reasons. we have great academics here. we have great programs. and to be perceived as a school that's recruiting these huge kids, it's just not reality. >> reporter: wednesday the wildcats wore their jerseys to a school press conference, hoping the next time they'll beui up for an actual game. >> as a team we do miss football. and that's the bottom line. >> reporter: archbishop murphy has three more games scheduled this month. we've contacted all of those schools and so far the one we've heard back from still plans on taking the field. >> and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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? a killer off the coast. powerful hurricane matthew approaches the eastern shores of florida. >> you need to leave now. so if you're in an evacuation zone, get out. >> waters are rising. the wind is howling. the rain is coming down. four states order evacuations. >> i live right by the water, so i'm leaving. >> streets and airports empty out. shelters are filling up. as the storm that left more than 100 dead in the caribbean approaches the southeastern united states, forecasters make a dire prediction. >> this could be not only a very expensive hurricane but a very deadly hurricane. >> announcer: this is the "cbs
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beach, florida. the southeast is threatened tonight by the most powerful hurricane in more than a decade. matthew is about 100 miles offshore. it's expected to make landfall overnight just north of here, on the space coast of florida, near cape canaveral. it is a huge hurricane. 120 miles wide. and it is strong. sustained winds up to 140 miles an hour. residents from florida to the carolinas have been ordered to evacuate. nearly 3,000 are in shelters in florida alone. president obama has declared an emergency in florida and now in south carolina. the governor of florida is warning of potentially catastrophic damage. flooding and power losses for millions that could last for days. airports are shut down.
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even disney world is shutting down. that fantasy world gives way to the reality of a very dangerous storm. matthew has already killed a reported 140 people in the caribbean, most of them in haiti. forecasters tell us the major threat to the u.s. is a storm surge of up to 11 feet that miles of the atlantic coast. a short time ago we checked the winds on the beach. this is the atlantic shore here in palm beach. the winds at this point are blowing at about 39 miles an hour. that is tropical storm force. a little bit later this evening it is forecast that these winds will be at 90 miles an hour or more. the sand is blowing up off the
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alone. we have a team of correspondents up and down the southeast coast. first we're going to go to manuel bojorquez just south of ft. lauderdale. >> reporter: scott, here along dania beach we are seeing dangerous surf, waves up to 10 feet tall, and bands of rain. officials along this part of south florida say this is now the time to hunker down and wait for matthew to pass. the outer bands of hurricane matthew pounded south florida this afternoon with gusty winds and torrential rain. beaches were closed as the surf became dangerous. ahead of the storm business owners raced to board up windows. there were long lines again at gas stations. that is, until they ran out. also empty, some store shelves. it was a last-minute rush for anyone who hadn't prepared for the storm. robert mccall lives near dania beach and hopes these makeshift
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he's leaving after hearing the governor today. >> when he said "this will kill you," not can kill you, it will kill you. >> reporter: that was it? >> that was it. >> time is running out. there are no excuses not to evacuate. our number one priority is to protect every life. >> reporter: governor rick scott repeatedly urged people to leave evacuation zones immediately. >> we should not be putting people's lives at risk because you made the foolish decision not to evacuate. >> reporter: leaving was not an easy process for gloria dixon, who runs a group home for 15 residents with cerebral palsy and had to evacuate all of them. >> we need this facility not to flood. this is their home. we don't need it to flood. we need things to remain intact. >> reporter: another concern as the hurricane churns up the coast is the threat of tornadoes. florida's governor has activated 3,500 national guard troops to
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recovery. >> reporter: i'm mark strassmann in daytona beach. local officials worry the predicted nine-foot storm surge could collapse the main street pier. at sunset four bridges to this barrier island will close to arriving traffic. most of the 20,000 residents here have left. but not all. >> are you guys going to hang out or are you guys going to evacuate? >> reporter: michael chitwood, the daytona beach police chief, worries about the holdouts. and what would you call those >> you're a fool. because this hurricane is unlike any other hurricane we've seen. >> reporter: by chitwood's definition steve and judy lampe are fools. they'll ride out matthew at home and hope sandbags and aluminum storm shutters will protect them. weather's getting worse. >> i know. >> reporter: any second thoughts? >> once the bridge closes it's scary. you know, at 6:00. >> reporter: because then you're? >> stuck. >> reporter: three blocks away les thompson decided this
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he and his wife, chris, will head inland to orlando to stay with their son. >> the reality is i don't think we've ever gone through anything like this. certainly once in a lifetime. >> reporter: once the bridge is closed, holdouts will still be allowed to drive off the island but no one may drive on. those holdouts have been warned if they call 911 after storm conditions get too dangerous emergency teams will not respond. >> reporter: i'm omar villafranca on exuma island in the bahamas. hurricane matthew tore throu night. the wind and storm surge was so powerful, boats were smashed onto the shore. hurricane winds over 140 miles per hour ripped the roof off this house in the bahamas. we felt the wrath of matthew as the storm hit overnight in exuma. beaches are empty. homes are boarded up. and here on exuma island, most of the people are without electricity.
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100 and rising. two days after the hurricane hit the island nation as a category 4. in jereme, 145-mile-per-hour winds decimated homes while flood waters swept away roads and bridges. the widespread damage prompted the haitian government to suspend sunday's presidential election. back in the bahamas crews immediately started clearing debris from the roads at daylight. magnolia morely rode out the stor t >> we figured that we're blessed, that the eye passed to the south of us, and we did not get more intense conditions than we did. >> reporter: cleaning up the debris will take several days. thousands of people in the bahamas are still without power, but many know the storm could have been much worse. omar villafranca, cbs news,
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now let's go to eric fisher, chief meteorologist at our boston station wbz. eric, where's this headed? >> well, scott, unfortunately we've spent the day watching matthew regain strength yet again. it is back to a category 4 hurricane. as it moves through the bahamas and starts to make its trek toward the state of florida. the inner eye wall right over freeport on grand bahamas, very destructive winds expected there. and it will start to make its way toward the coast of florida as we head into the overnight hours. hurricane warnings are up from just north of miami all the way up the coastline. that's a big factor in this storm, the fact that they go all the way up through the coast of south carolina. and here's a look at the timeline. you see that center as it works its way toward the coast. it may move right along it, just off or just on, but the bottom line is the same. very destructive winds moving
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winds, a big storm surge. if you're in an evacuation zone, heed those warnings. wind is one thing. it is destructive in its own right. but storm surge is the number one killer. they're looking out for your safety. listen to those warnings. the storm continues to track right along the coast as it heads up through south and north carolina inundating it with very heavy rainfall, and that's one thing to watch. as we head toward the weekend, parts of eastern south and north carolina have had 10 to 15 inches of rain in the past month. when you add this much rain on top of it, scott, we could have a very significant flood event unfolding this weekend. >> eric fisher, wbz. eric, thank you very much. most everything we know about hurricane matthew comes from the forecasters at the national hurricane center in miami. earlier today we spoke to the director, meteorologist rick knabb. >> i can't remember a hurricane on a track like this. >> i cannot either. one that has already impacted haiti and eastern cuba and is impacting the bahamas.
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>> it seems, though, with this track right up the coastline, that if the eye of the storm moves a little bit west you could take in millions more people very easily. >> well, slight differences in the track of the hurricane could make a huge difference in terms of the magnitude of the impacts for particular locations. even if the center of circulation stays just offshore, it's easy for the hurricane to bring hurricane-force winds onto the coast, even bring strong winds well inland. every hurricane has its own dna, its own characteristics. story. and i think folks in florida, georgia, and south carolina could end up experiencing wind, water, or both. >> what kills most people in a hurricane? >> we know that historically, last several decades, with landfalling u.s. tropical systems, 9 out of 10 people who have died have died as a result of water. the wind can be damaging and deadly too. all the hazards are in play in an extremely dangerous situation. >> you have enormous experience
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this storm that has surprised you? >> what has surprised me is how the scenario has set up such that so many people are in harm's way. and it's amazing how sometimes hurricanes seek out the worst possible paths in many ways and affect so many people. but that's the reality we're faced with. there's no denying it now. this is a serious threat to several states. florida up through georgia and south carolina. the time is now to act. you don't want to just hope the problem away. >> dr. rick knabb, the director of the national hurricane center. up the atlantic coast folks who live in georgia and south carolina are clearing out of matthew's path. errol barnett is on tybee island. >> reporter: the hunters have called this coastal georgia community home for 40 years. but today they're leaving it all behind. the waters family is doing the same. >> i grabbed the boys' baby
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girlfriend of mine made us and a couple important papers. and we're out of here. >> reporter: fearing a storm surge of 10 to 12 feet, 15 inches of rain, and hurricane-force winds, georgia joined south carolina today in ordering mandatory evacuations for people on the coast. it also reversed 125 miles of ea to accommodate those leaving. south carolina did the same on i-26 as businesses in charleston boarded up. both states have deployed the national guard and opened shelters for those with nowhere to run. we caught up with the mayor of tybee island, jason buelterman, just before he evacuated. >> you can replace your home. you can replace community buildings. but you cannot replace a human
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could spell disaster if matthew pushes up a sizable storm surge as it is expected to do. he also tells me the last time a hurricane followed this exact track and gained strength, scott, it obliterated this entire island. >> errol barnett, thanks. well, the world's largest cruise ship ports are closed. some of those ships are riding out the storm at sea. and major airports in florida of course have shut down. here's our transportation correspondent, kris van cleave. >> reporter: the last flight out of ft. lauderdalft mid-afternoon, leaving workers little time to make final preparations for the looming storm. in west palm beach the check-in kiosks were wrapped in plastic. judy baylyn managed to get a flight to washington today. >> we were the last night out. we were desperate but we were the last flight out. >> reporter: airports in miami, ft. lauderdale, west palm beach and and orlando are closing. and others could be affected as the storm moves north. more than 3,785 flights through saturday have already been canceled.
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industry. >> not only do they not want the planes to be stuck in the path of the storm but they don't want them to be damaged. there are instances where planes actually get tipped over in a very strong wind. so they're going to be moving the planes to a safe harbor. >> reporter: amtrak has also halted service in the southeast through at least saturday. in orlando disney world will be closed at least through friday. just the fourth shutdown in the park's history. the airlines are offering waivers so you can make changes or get a refund without having to pay a fee. to slowly begin service as early as tomorrow afternoon but it could take a couple of days to get things back to normal and of course all of that depends on what kind of damage matthew brings. >> kris van cleave, thanks. our team will be back with the latest on the hurricane later in the broadcast. but right now let's go to anthony mason in new york with more of the day's news. anthony? >> thanks, scott. still ahead, how fast that new jersey commuter train was going
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and clear your worst cold symptoms. let's end this. new tide purclean is the first eco-friendly product in your cupboard that won't wait to be discovered. some may claim some labels are green but only one has the powerful tide clean new tide purclean, 65% bio-based, 100% cleaning power of tide you know your heart loves megared omega-3s... but did you know your eyes, your brain, and your joints really love them too? introducing softgel delivers mega support. just 33 days now till the election. three days till the next debate between donald trump and hillary clinton. this one will be town meeting style, with the candidates taking questions from both the audience and the moderators in
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>> reporter: after returning from a western campaign swing, donald trump spent part of thursday prepping for sunday's second presidential debate, as he tries to right a listing campaign. polls this week show hillary clinton ahead in battleground states. by five points in florida, four points in pennsylvania, three points in north carolina, and 11 points in colorado. the race has tightened in ohio, but trump trails in michigan, another midwest state he hoped to make competitive. complicating matters, a letter signed by 30 former republican members of congress that branded the gop nominee "manifestly unqualified to be president" and urged other republicans "not to vote for this man, whose disgraceful candidacy is indefensible." the former lawmakers criticized trump's call for a temporary ban on muslim immigration, something running mate mike pence said today no longer applies. >> well, because it's not donald trump's position now.
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website still shows the press release announcing the proposed ban. while clinton also focused on debate prep, her running mate tim kaine tried to make the best of mixed reviews of his debate performance by needling pence for sidestepping many incendiary trump positions. >> i think there's a level of desperation in the trump campaign right now. >> reporter: clinton's camp had to sidestep an embarrassment of its own, reversing a recent move to increase campaign ads on the weather channel. on twitter rnc chairman reince priebus said clinton was exploiting hurricane matthew for political gain and urged her to apologize. trump is here in new hampshire for what amounts to a tune-up town hall in advance of sunday's showdown with clinton. anthony, on saturday trump will be in wisconsin at an event in the congressional district of house speaker paul ryan. but it is unclear if ryan, the host of the event, and trump will even appear together. >> major garrett. thanks, major. cbs news will bring you live coverage of the clinton-trump
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evening at 9:00 eastern time. next, the final seconds before a deadly train crash. what are you doing right now? making a cake! uh oh. i don't see cake, i just see mess. it's like awful. it feels like am not actually cleaning it up. what's that make mommy do? (doorbell) what's that? swiffer wetjet. this is amazing. woah wow. now i feel more like making a mess is part of growing up. only new wetjet pads have absorb and lock stop cleaning. start swiffering. i did everything i could to make her party perfect. almost everything. you know, 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by
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avoid a septic disaster with rid-x. today the national transportation safety board said a new jersey transit train accelerated to twice the speed limit, 21 miles an hour, just before it crashed in hoboken a week ago. a data recorder shows the engineer applied the emergency brake less than a second before impact.
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injured more than 100. it's hard for us here at cbs news to believe, but it's been ten years since cameraman paul douglas and sound man james brolan were killed by a roadside bomb in baghdad. senior correspondent mark phillips shared his thoughts at a memorial service today in london. >> ten years, eh? if, to coin a phrase, a week is a long time in politics, what's ten years in the news business? as far as paul and james are concerned, ten years seems like no time at all. judging from our conversations, everybody's approach to this commemoration seems to be similar. has it really been ten years? it seems like yesterday or last week. the shock was so deep and the loss so great that no amount of time can really diminish it. >> ten years ago we promised we would never forget paul douglas and james brolan. tonight we renew that vow. more about the hurricane in
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back now in west palm beach, florida. this is the cafeteria of forest hill high school, one of nearly 50 shelters set up by the red cross to accept about 3,000 people who have answered the governor's call to evacuate. who are these people? >> these are people who have
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they were either in mobile homes or at vulnerable places. they're heeding the call from the authorities. >> reporter: roberto baltodano has volunteered for the red cross since 1992. >> it's the most important thing we can do is the peace of mind of knowing they're not alone. >> reporter: megnalda espanina came with her 12-year-old daughter jasraya. jasraya told us she brought the thing she needed the most. top of her list, her homework. omar mazerigos came with his >> we live really close to the evacuation zone and to the shore. so we just wanted to come to a little bit more of a safer spot. >> reporter: and we couldn't help but notice angelina velasquez with her little boy, george. he's six days old. how did you start? >> because the red cross helped me once. august 24th, 1992. hurricane andrew. they fed us for 17 days. so i came to know what the red cross does. >> reporter: and you've been volunteering ever since? >> ever since. >> we asked one man in the shelter if he feared losing his
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he told us, "if i have my life, i am rich." and that's the "overnight news." for the very latest developments on hurricane matthew, don't miss "cbs this morning." and for all of us at cbs news all around the world, good night
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? this is the "cbs overnight news." and welcome to the overnight news. i'm don dahler. evacuations have been ordered from florida to south carolina as hurricane matthew begins its assault on the u.s. mainland. matthew packing sustained winds of 140 miles an hour has left a trail of death and destruction the fear is it can do the same to the east coast. airports have shut down. hundreds of flights have been canceled. and president obama declared an emergency in florida. the state could face catastrophic damage, flooding and power losses for millions. it could last days. manuel bojorquez in dania beach just south of ft. lauderdale
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>> reporter: the outer bands of hurricane matthew pounded south florida this afternoon with gusty winds and torrential rain. beaches were closed as the surf became dangerous. ahead of the storm, business owners race to board up windows. there were long lines again at gas stations. that is, until they ran out. also empty, some store shelves. it was a last-minute rush for anyone who hadn't prepared for the storm. robert mccall lives near dania beach and hopes these makeshift sandbags will protect his home from flooding. he's leaving after hearing the >> when he said this will kill you. not can kill you, it will kill you. >> reporter: that was it? >> that was it. >> time is running out. there are no excuses not to evacuate. our number one priority is to protect every life. >> reporter: governor rick scott repeatedly urged people to leave evacuation zones immediately. >> we should not be putting people's lives at risk because
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>> reporter: leaving was not an easy process for gloria dixon, who runs a group home for 15 residents with cerebral palsy and had to evacuate all of them. >> we need this facility not to flood. this is their home. we don't need it to flood. we need things to remain intact. >> reporter: another concern as the hurricane churns up the coast is the threat of tornadoes. 3,500 national guard troops to assist with rescues and recovery. >> reporter: i'm mark strassmann in daytona beach. local officials worry the predicted nine-foot storm surge could collapse the main street pier. at sunset four bridges to this barrier island will close to arriving traffic. most of the 20,000 residents here have left. but not all. >> you guys going to hang out or are you guys going to evacuate? >> reporter: michael chitwood, the daytona beach police chief, worries about the holdouts. and what would you call those people?
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because this hurricane is unlike any other hurricane we've seen. >> reporter: by chitwood's definition steve and judy lampe are fools. they'll ride out matthew at home. and hope sandbags and aluminum storm shutters will protect them. >> the weather's getting worse. >> i know. >> any second thoughts? >> once the bridge closes it's scary. >> because then you're -- >> stuck. >> reporter: three blocks away les thompson decided this morning that staying was foolish. he and his wife, chris, will head inland to orlando to stay with their son. we've ever gone through anything like this. certainly once in a lifetime. >> reporter: once the bridge is closed holdouts will still be allowed to drive off the island but no one may drive on. those holdouts have been warned, if they call 911 after storm conditions get too dangerous, emergency teams will not respond. i'm omar villafranca on exuma island in the bahamas.
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the wind and storm surge was so powerful boats were smashed onto the shore. hurricane winds over 140 miles per hour ripped the roof off this house in the bahamas. we felt the wrath of matthew as the storm hit overnight in exuma. beaches are empty. homes are boarded up. and here on exuma island most of the people are without electricity. 100 and rising, two days after the hurricane hit the island nation as a category 4. in jeremie, 140-mile-per-hour winds decimated homes while flood waters swept away roads and bridges. the widespread damage prompted the haitian government to suspend sunday's presidential election. back in the bahamas crews
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magnolia morley rode out the storm in the motel she manages. >> we figure that we're blessed, that the eye passed to the south of us and that we did not get more intense conditions than we did. >> reporter: cleaning up the debris will take several days. thousands of people in the bahamas are still without power. but many know the storm could have been much worse. omar villafranca, cbs news, exuma island, the bahamas. in other news this morning, the giant private spy company booz allen hamilton has some explaining t. has been charged with stealing national security secrets. harold martin was arrested in august after the fbi found a treasure trove of top secret documents and computer files in his home. booz allen is the same government contractor that employed edward snowden. jeff pegues has the story. >> reporter: the investigation began in august after sensitive nsa information about u.s. hacking tools ended up online.
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enforcement sources say investigators are still not confident that all of the u.s. secrets harold martin allegedly stole have been accounted for and recovered. in addition, law enforcement sources say they are trying to determine whether anyone else was involved. when the fbi searched harold martin's maryland home, they found hard copy documents and digital information that contained highly classified material. according to the complaint released wednesday, martin first denied stealing the top secret information but later said he knew what he had done was wrong. debbie martin is his wife. >> you know, he's a good man. and that's all i can really tell you. >> reporter: i a statement the suspect's attorney said, "at this point these are mere allegations. there is no evidence that hal martin intended to betray his country." the 51-year-old served in the navy for five years before spending another three in the active reserves. martin was working at the nsa as a contractor after being hired
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he would have had top secret security clearance. >> we must ensure whistleblowers can act again. >> reporter: the company is facing its second major black eye in three years after it hired nsa leaker edward snowden. in 2013 snowden released thousands of documents revealing the nsa's controversial surveillance program. after snowden's leak booz allen strengthened their program for detecting insider threats. in a statement house intelligence committee member adam schiff called the latest security breach distressing. he said, "it is painfully clear that the intelligence community still has much to do to institutionalize reforms designed to protect in advance the nation's sources and methods from insider threats." john carlin is u.s. assistant attorney general. >> what can happen is you have amazing defenses to protect your intellectual property but you forget sometimes to have a program where you're watching those who you trust.
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hillary clinton and donald trump are taking some time off the campaign trail to prepare for sunday's presidential debate in st. louis. this will be the second of three planned debates. and it will be a town hall-style face-off with a lot of interaction with the crowd. trump's advisers are stressing the need for him to remain calm his skin. they say he can take some clues from his running mate, mike pence, who didn't lose his cool in tuesday's vice presidential debate with tim kaine. pence discussed that debate on "cbs this morning." >> i was very humbled, very honored to be on that stage to tell the story about donald trump's vision to make america great again. it was my great privilege to go out. and to be honest with you, i know some people have said i won the debate. i'll leave that to others.
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donald trump won the debate. it was donald trump's vision to make america great again. it was donald trump's aspirations for this country. the policies he's been articulating that i carried forward -- >> well, he said it was his -- governor pence -- >> i also wanted to draw a contrast in this debate. and as i said, it was a privilege for me to be there. >> governor pence, he's claiming credit. he says it was his good judgment in choosing you -- >> as his first hire. >> yeah. as his first hire. do you think that's an example of the good judgment, and are you giving him any pointers? people say you could give him pointers this sunday night. >> well, look, i honestly -- obviously, i'm very humbled by his esteem and by the kind words of others. but i think the reason why donald trump has built an extraordinary business, an extraordinary career is because he has had the judgment to make it through tough times. you saw those tax releases that came out from 20 years ago. he faced enormous losses in his business. he led an incredible comeback.
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him women and men of extraordinary ability and enteprise and i think it's exactly the kind of judgment and exactly the kind of people that he's going to bring around him if we have the privilege of serving in the next administration. >> governor, you said that in the debate you were speaking about donald trump's vision. however, you guys differ on a number of policy issues.% so let me ask you specifically about those issues. specifically on the topic of immigration. mr. trump said that he has supported a deportation ta do you also support that? >> well, that came up in the debate and it was quite striking to me. all this talk about a deportation force. we have a deportation force in this country. it's called immigrations and customs enforcement. and for the first time in the history of immigrations and customs enforcement their union endorsed donald trump to be the next president of the united
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illegal immigration beginning with border security, strengthening internal enforcement you through immigrations and customs, identifying and removing from this country criminal aliens that are bringing violence and crime to our streets, removing people from this country that the law requires leave after they overstay their visa and then saying once we've done all of that -- >> got it. >> -- let's then reform our immigration system. and t and i on that or any other issue. i truly do believe the american people long for us to end illegal immigration. we've talked about it for decades. let's do it and let's do it in the order that donald trump described. >> governor, let me ask you about aleppo. aid groups say the situation there is dire. there are 100,000 children trapped inside aleppo without food, water, or aid. would you support using u.s. warplanes to enforce a zone, a
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>> well, donald trump and i have consistently called for the establishment of safe zones under the umbrella of international approval. and we have to act. the fact that you had the assad regime with the russians in the wake the failure of the russian reset by hillary clinton, they're literally on the edge of aleppo and you point straight to those families, stra t we have to act. we have to act now to establish and protect those safe zones. >> so -- >> and when i was talking the other night in the debate i said we absolutely should be prepared to use military force to establish and preserve the safe zones -- >> so -- >> -- and the ability for people to safely evacuate out of those areas. >> so governor -- >> we can't stand idly by while this humanitarian crisis
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>> so governor, your running mate, the man at the top of the ticket, has said this. "i would have stayed out of syria." you guys have a different position on this issue. >> well, i think donald trump's been very, very clear about his view of the syrian situation, that what we have is an administration that first said we were going to have a reset with russia. under hillary clinton's leadership as secretary of state. president obama said he would draw a red line, that if syria ever used chemical weapons against its citizens that there would be consequences. the assad regime did and there were -- >> so just to be absolutely clear, governor pence, you -- >> and you only need to mention that isis -- >> just to be absolutely clear -- i do think -- i want to be -- >> in -- >> forgive me. i want to be absolutely clear. you and donald trump agree that you would use u.s. military force, you have said, to bomb assad forces and to enforce a
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there is absolute agreement between the two of you? >> well, where there's absolute agreement is we have to establish safe zones for people to be able to get out of harm's way in aleppo. and if you don't back that up with military resources and our allies in the region, then you can't really guarantee that people and those 100,000 children will be able to get out of harm's way. syria has imploded into a civil war. isis is headquartered in syria. it's all emblematic of the weak and feckless leadership of this administration -- >> governor, let me ask one question and make one distinction. >> and that's why we need change. but we cannot stand idly by. by the way, america has. moving red lines, feigning resets with russia. wringing our hands. saying as the secretary of state recently said that we're just out of talks with russia. all the while here we have the leader of russia, you know,
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the united states of america needs to be there for those suffering families in aleppo. and at the same time we need to continue focus our resources as donald trump has on destroying isis at its source. it's headquartered in syria. it's headquartered in raqqah. and when donald trump becomes president of the united states, we're going to put the safety and security of the american people first but we're also going to be there to provide humanitael for people that are coming under the brutal, brutal results of this kind of action. >> cbs will have live coverage >> cbs will have live coverage of the next i absolutely love my new york apartment, but the rent is outrageous. good thing geico offers affordable renters insurance. with great coverage it protects my personal belongings should they get damaged, stolen or destroyed. [doorbell] uh, excuse me. delivery. hey. lo mein, szechwan chicken, chopsticks, soy sauce and you got some fortune cookies.
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perspirant spray. awarded best of beauty by allure. halloween is right around the corner, and that means carnival season is drawing to a close. operators are taking down their tents and loading away their rides until next year. bill geist paid a visit to the annual carnival trade show, where all the new fun and games are up for sale. ? >> reporter: it's the annual carnival trade show. held in gibsonton, florida by the 4,500-member international independent showman's association. >> not too fast. >> reporter: it's one carnival where if you like a ride -- >> whee!
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>> the air max is about 3/4 of a million dollars. >> reporter: although at these prices there aren't a lot of impulse purchases. >> this we're looking at $100,000. >> whoa. >> reporter: it's one-stop shopping for carnival operators like danny brown from arizona. >> we own about 40 rides. >> reporter: who's trying to keep up with customer demand. >> they want more things. they want to be scared to death. >> so you scare people to death for a living. >> that's what they want. you know. >> i'm scared. scary rides and some pretty frightening carnival food too. lee stevens is a carnival food vendor. >> we have a death by chocolate funnel cake. we came up with a chocolate batter. we developed a chocolate cream cheese icing. with hershey's syrup. >> reporter: custom food
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>> when you see an $8 sausage sandwich it's because a $280,300 food trailer. >> reporter: games of course -- >> come on, baby. >> reporter: -- are crucial to the carnival experience. >> oh! >> this game that we're standing beside now is what we call our whopper wter. the price on this is around $210,000. >> we're coming out with new stuff all the time. >> reporter: bob casada, who legend in the carnival game industry. and for one very good reason. >> you're credited with building the first whack-a-mole? >> well, yeah, we did the first whack-a-mole. >> are you proud of it? >> yeah. very proud. >> reporter: prizes have never been more important. >> we have to make people walk up to the game and want to play it. they want color. they want size. this guy, we call him turdle. >> that's t-u-r-d-l-e. turdle. >> what won't buyers find at
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bizarre animal stunts. those have been relegated to the carney museum across the street. doc rivera is curator. >> you paid your dime and wanted to see the three-legged man. was he real? maybe. maybe he wasn't. but you had to pay your dime to go in and find out. incidentally, he was real. that was frank lantini. he was the three-legged man, and was once the hometown of nearly every sideshow performer in the country. which made for one strange little town. >> in the '40s and '50s there were 138 human oddities in this town. >> and you had the tallest fire chief and the police -- >> 8'4". >> and the police chief -- >> a midget.
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renowned former sideshow impresario. he vividly recalls old gibsonton. >> over here on crystal street was a guy who had 15 big bears. >> did the neighbors object? >> no. because the neighbor was the guy who had two 24-foot python snakes. >> reporter: ward traveled for decades with ward's wonders of the world. >> i had the lady of the frog girl. oh, my goodness. >> and lobster boy? >> no. the lobster boy never worked for me. we were friends. but in general there are no more freak shows. if i could find the freaks, i'd open a freak show tomorrow and make more money than ever. but where do you find the freaks? they're not here anymore. >> primary elections. >> i guess. yeah. >> reporter: about all that remains of the old sideshow days is a small monument out on the highway. and the showman's cemetery. the final resting place of the human cannonball and lobster
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the carnivals are still thriving. providing thrills to the bold
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archbishop murphy high school in everett, washington has a football team that's so good other schools refuse to play them. the three games murphy high has managed to play this season they've won by a combined score of 170-0. carter evans has the story. >> reporter: the archbishop murphy wildcats are considered a powerhouse around these parts. undefeated is an understatement. they managed to win their last three games without even stepping on the field. the archbishop murphy wildcats haven't lost a game or even given up a single point this season. the school says it's the result of hard work and dedication. >> we're not looking to hurt anybody in this game. football by its nature can be a violent sport.
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>> reporter: but the size and strength of archbishop players has some schools and parents worried their teams will get crushed. literally. >> the kids were concerned about going against a team that was much larger, much more physical. >> reporter: granite falls high school forfeited tomorrow's game against the wildcats. it's the third team to bow out this season. >> i don't care what other people think. it's our safety. we're playing, not them. just one football player who weighs 250 pounds. archbishop murphy has six, including three who weigh at least 300 pounds. >> it's like putting a vw bug up against a mack truck. >> reporter: stacy morris's son is a granite falls freshman and safety on the team. >> we have 15 seniors, and if any of those seniors get hurt our replacements are mostly freshmen and sophomores. >> that could mess up your entire season. >> yeah. it's definitely a safety issue and it's also strategic. >> reporter: there are growing calls around the league for archbishop murphy to play in a
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catholic school has an advantage because it can draw bigger players from around the region, something public schools can't do. >> we have kids that come here for all variety of reasons. we have great academics here. we have great programs. and to be perceived as a school that's recruiting these huge kids, it's just not reality. >> reporter: wednesday the wildcats wore their jerseys to a school press conference, hoping the next time they'll be suiting up for an actual game. football. and that's the bottom line. >> reporter: archbishop murphy has three more games scheduled this month. we've contacted all of those schools and so far the one we've heard back from still plans on taking the field. >> and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning
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