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tv   DW News  PBS  March 27, 2018 6:00pm-6:31pm PDT

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brent: this is "dw news," live from berlin. tonight, telling more russian diplomats to leave. nato joins the mass expulsion of russians suspected of being spies. nato's secretary-general jens stoltenberg says that seven russians attached to the military alliance will be expelled. this follows the expulsions of more than 100 russian diplomats from 20 countries. also coming up, facebook ceo mark zuckerberg has reportedly agreed to testify about an unprecedented data scandal. the british parliament summoned him to do to same, but he said thanks but no thanks. and russian president vladimir putin blames what he calls quote, criminal negligence for a shopping mall fire in siberia the left scores dead.
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but protesters are demanding answers amid rumors of a cover-up. ♪ brent: i'm brent goff. it's good to have you with us. tonight, there is more fallout from a nerve agent poisoning of a former russian spy and his daughter in the u.k. london is accusing the russian government of masterminding the attack, which has left sergei and julia skripal fighting for their lives. 20 sovereign countries, including britain, the u.s., germany, australia and many eu members have since said they are expelling more than 100 russian diplomats in response. nato joined the mass expulsions today, announcing it was sending home seven russian diplomats and denying accreditation the three more. reporter: with nato joining the expulsions of russian diplomats, the alliance's secretary-general said moscow had it coming.
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>> this sends a clear message to russia that there are costs and consequences for its unacceptable and dangerous pattern of behavior. reporter: the crisis started on british soil with accusations that moscow was behind the poisoning of a russian double agent in salisbury earlier this month. the british foreign secretary calls the expulsions a turning point. >> what you are seeing in this huge diplomatic expulsion is a desire to correct that and to say, right, russia, enough is enough. reporter: russia denies having anything to do with the poisoning and insists the u.s. is coercing other states to join its lead. >> this or that country tells one or two diplomats to leave while whispering apologies into our ears. we know that this is the result of colossal pressure, colossal blackmail, which is now
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unfortunately the main tool of washington on the international arena. reporter: and on the streets of moscow, people also expressed belief their country is being victimized. >> the americans are against us and they are trying to crush us so that our country will not develop and will not become even stronger. >> apparently we do not have the influence of other countries like the united states or the developed european countries. reporter: russia's relations with the west are clearly on ice, and a thaw may be a long time coming. brent: so how is this likely to be viewed in the kremlin? i am joined now by kemerovo --
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>> this is exactly what is being fed to the russian populace by the kremlin cup again a machine. i think a lot of people believe the whole thing is a set up by washington, and attempted to frame russia. in russian politics in the putin era, the sun rises and sets in washington. everything in the world is about washington. i think it is no surprise that this situation is viewed solely through this kind of russian-american confrontation. brent: how do you think moscow will react? so far we have seen a tit for tat response. will that continue? konstantin: i think generly yes, this is the rule. but in certain cases it will be
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impossible to go to the disparity between russian diplomatic missions abroad and broader diplomatic missions in russia. the same goes for the nato military liaison office. there are not enough people to expel. but generally yes, i think moscow will respond. but i think they in the kremlin and the square with a foreign ministries are thinking about what the russian regime likes to call astronomical response. for that there are hackers. brent: is that what you expect that we're likely to see? we have heard the british prime minister say that there could be some kind of cyberattack that would originate from moscow. konstantin: i would not be surprised at all. i think until now, we have seen
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no signs usually of moscow relenting. in the eyes of mr. putin, in the eyes of his in-crowd, any attempt to pull back, to relent, to stop, is equal to defeat. this idea that you should never show weakness is very strong in moscow. that is why ethically should see retaliation. -- why we should see retaliation. brent: as soon as the british government began pointing the finger at russia over the salisbury poisoning, we all knew that vladimir putin could expect some pushback. do you think he has been caught off guard by the scale of this response? konstantin:, yes absolutely. i think that no one in moscow expected there would be such a massive response by the west. no one actually expected the
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united states to join in with such a significant contribution to these expulsions. especially after a telephone conversation between president trump and vladimir putin. as well if you look at the list, even hungary, where the prime minister is presenting himself as very close to mr. putin, very much on the same wavelength. but even budapest expelled one russian diplomat. that has shown where the real propaganda -- where the real priorities of hungary lies. quite a lot of unpleasantness for moscow. and frankly, there was nothing like that ever meted out to saddam hussein or the kim family in north korea. it is a very significant diplomatic humiliation. brent: konstantin von eggert giving us valuable analysis tonight.
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thank you very much. tonight, the ceo of facebook mark zuckerberg has reportedly agreed to testify before a u.s. congressional committee. it is not yet known when such a hearing would take place. reports say sometime in april, perhaps. earlier today zuckerberg refused an invitation to appear before a british parliamentary committee. lawmakers on both sides of the atlantic want to question him about how millions of user's details got into the hands of a firm that was hired to influence voters. >> our next focus is building community. reporter: he is the public face of the world's biggest social network. ciable when it comes to taking questions, especially not from european politicians. as inquiries mount about how facebook uses the data of its 2 billion users, he told this british parliamentary committee he will not be giving evidence.
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>> we believe given the serious nature of the allegations that have been made about the access and use of facebook user data, that mark zuckerberg should give evidence to the committee. reporter: one man who wanted to talk was the pink-haired whistleblower at the heart of this data scandal. he said it was the race for the white house that made him go public. >> donald trump makes a click in your head this has a much wider impact. i don't think that military style information operations is conducive for any democratic process, whether u.s. presidential or local council race. reporter: political campaigns have changed. he works as a data engineer for cambridge analytica. the firm boasts of its ability to win elections on the cheap. in 2014 they pay for millions of facebook profiles and are accused of using them to build psychological programs to micro-target voters.
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>> the right moment is more important than ever. reporter: it helped them swing votes in elections around the world, including donald trump's. they deny using the data. the company's co-founder disputes that claim. >> it is categorically untrue. categorically untrue that cambridge analytica has ever used facebook data. reporter: there is one silicon valley billionaire who could surely shine light on this and many other questions. brent: and the facebook story just gets longer legs. joining me tonight is jonathan at the university of southern california. he is also the author of move fast and break things. how facebook, google and amazon cornered culture and undermined democracy. it is good to have you on the show.
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i want to have your reaction for these reports that mark zuckerberg has agreed to testify before u.s. congressional committee. will these lawmakers in washington be able to reign him in this way? jonathan: i don't think he has any choice. this has gone way too far. he has avoided testifying himself. he has sent his lawyers two months ago to the congress. and that was kind of an sold to the can -- kind of an insult to the congressional leaders. now he has to show up in person. it is clear that for the first time the u.s. authorities are going to try to pull these companies into control in a way that only the europeans have to date. it seems to me that the federal trade commission has now reopened an investigation. and facebook signed a consent
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agreed with the ftc in 2011 that had fines of up to $40,000 per occurrence of data breach per day. if you do the math, that could be a $2 trillion fine. obviously they won't fine them that because that would put them out of business. but they could fine them in the billions, close to the fine the eu fined google six months ago. brent: what about zuckerberg saying no to the british parliament? what good is he doing himself or facebook, for that matter, by saying yes to washington, no to london? jonathan: he is not doing himself any good at all. he has really mismanaged this crisis. they stayed quiet for almost 10
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days, did not say anything. and when they did say something, they kind of blamed it on cambridge analytica. they had been buffaloed by cambridge analytica and fooled. it is so obvious that this breach, which took place two years ago, all facebook did was send them a letter saying please delete the information on 50 million of our users that you have in your files. and of course cambridge analytica ignore that. brent: the cambridge analytica whistleblower, he spoke to british parliamentarians today. and i'm quoting him here, he said i do not think that military style military -- operations is conducive to any democratic process. military style operations. is that the kind of threat we are facing? jonathan: no.
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if you are able to do deep psychological profiles of 2 billion people and be able to target them with exact kind of information warfare that you know they will respond to, at the exact moment that you know that they are riled up, i don't see how you could collect anything else but information warfare. -- call it anything else but information warfare. brent: we are unfortunately out of time but we appreciate your insights. jonathan taplin joining us from california. thank you. jonathan: my pleasure. brent: here are some of the other stories now making headlines around the world. israeli media reports say that prime minister benjamin netanyahu has been rushed to the hospital. seen here meeting germany's
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foreign minister on monday is reportedly suffering from a high fever. the 68-year-old has served as israel's prime minister since 2009 and held the job back in the 1990's. the lawyer for detained catalan separatist leader carles puigdemont says his client will never surrender in the fight for independence from spain. puigdemont is awaiting a decision whether to be expelled for -- the white house said the two leaders also discussed as china's illegal acquisition of intellectual property. looks like germany's biggest lender is banking on a new boss to turn its fortunes around. daniel: probably wishing he
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could borrow some credibility. deutsche bank is looking to replace ceo john cryan. continued clashes between him and the bank chairman were reportedly behind the move. that as deutsche struggles to get back in the black. but who would want to replace john cryan? the top job is increasingly seen as poisoned. reporter: he took over in 2015, tossed with turning the bank's fortunes around. now a report suggests john cryan's days at deutsche bank could be numbered. speculation about a possible successor is already rife. >> we are hearing the lender has apparently asked the vice chairman of goldman sachs to take over, which is interesting because also the new state secretary and the german finance
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ministry is a former goldman sachs employee but it seems he is not interested. one thing it is sure, it is going to be a very challenging job. reporter: among the many challenges, reversing three consecutive years of losses. some of which could be attributed to the billions of dollars it has had to pay out as a result of scandals related to mortgage fraud and price manipulation. and then there is the mammoth task every book -- restoring the bank's tattered image. there's a lot left to be desired. cryon's decision to quadruple bonus payouts last year did little to allay concerns. daniel: waymo is teaming up with jack you are. -- with jaguar. the two firms are keen to emphasize safety after in autonomous vehicle recently killed a pedestrian. waymo is so confident they sate
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you can handle an autonomous jaguar later this year. reporter: it is a big deal for the car industry and tech sector. they want to develop the first self driving luxury vehicle. the ceo picks -- stressed his cars have traveled more than 5 million miles. >> we have the confidence it is safe technology. it is only going to get better. a really important point to keep in mind with the drivers that we are building is that each car shares all that knowledge. reporter: that may not be enough to put the minds of driverless technology critics eddie's. -- at ease. but one thing is clear. the race to launch a autonomous vehicles is speeding up. daniel: jens korte has the analysis from wall street as we heard, competition in the automated driving space is
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renting up. tesla trimmed its gain tuesday. jens: it could be a threat to tesla, no doubt at this point. antennas that is running behind production schedule -- and tesla is running behind their own production schedule. not just because of competition from waymo and jaguar, but there had been a fatal crash last week with a tesla car. now we heard on tuesday that the investigation has started. that puts extra pressure on the stock of tesla. daniel: chipmaker nvidia is suspending its self driving car program. what can you tell us? jens: well, also because of the fatal accident last week in arizona with an uber car,
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therefore nvidia said they are putting their tests on hold globally. so that will probably also affect tests being run in germany in the past couple of weeks and months. if you look at how important the driverless technology is for nvidia right now, as a percentage of revenue it is tiny. but it is future growth that investors focused on, and the stock of nvidia also dropped by about 8% and took the entire tech industry down with it. so we saw a sharp selloff here on wall street in general, and that started with the news from nvidia that they are holding the tech. daniel: we were warned that serious accidents could happen. looks like they are already here. jens korte, thank you very much. as rent in big cities rises, urbanites find it difficult to enjoy the simple pleasure of gardening.
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but you can grow your own fruits and vegetables in the city. just don't look to the ground for the solution. go to your rooftop instead. reporter: steel, glass and concrete as far as the eye can see. that can leave nature lovers feeling bereft in places like hong kong. luckily they can now retreat to little green oases of high. this garden is nearly 150 meters above ground level. it is n by a startup helping cater to conscious -- health-conscious hong kong residents. >> people want to have more control. they also have more trust. if i grow mysel i know what went in and i can trust whatever comes out. reporter: it is a growing trend everywhere. from paris, to johannes berg -- johannesburg. and urban gardens are not always
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outdoors. the 17th floor of this industrial apartment block also holds a bean sprout garden. not to be outdone, londoners are also planting vegetables underground in bunkers. but does all this even make sense? >> the produce, the actual volume of what they produce is quite small. what they do produce in large amounts is happiness. reporter: they don't just never actually body, it is good for the soul too. daniel: some food for thought. that's it for business. back to brent. brent: now to russia, anger is mounting over the shopping center fire in siberia that killed 64 people. 41 of them were children. president vladimir putin has blamed the fire on what he calls criminal negligence. opposition leader alexei navalny urged mourners to show up for a
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vigil in moscow. wednesday has been declared a day of national mourning. many in russia calling for an independent probe into the blaze, and they accuse authorities of a cover-up, trying to hide the extent of the disaster. reporter: this fire has done more than scorch what was once the shopping center. it stirred intense anger here over alleged negligence, corruption, and lax fire safety standards. many people here also don't believe the death count officials are giving. they think there could be more victims. >> these two are mine. we could identify my children because they suffocated. other children had only half of a head. they were here without hands or legs. reporter: when the blaze engulfed the mall, the fire alarm did not sound. investigators say it had not been operational for two weeks.
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as people tried to flee, they found many emergency exits blocked. there are reports children were left locked inside cinemas as staff fled. investigators also say the public address system had not been switched on. >> a lot of children died. they died because of irresponsibility of the management, and i could not imagine the scale of the tragedy would be this big. most of all, i am shocked that they are hiding the truth from us. reporter: two days after the tragedy and amid criticism for its slow response, the russian government announced a day of national mourning. president putin visited kemerovo and asked the protesters to trust in a transparent investigation. >> 100 investigators are working on this case. they will inspect the whole chain, starting with those who gave permissions and finishing with those who must have been in charge of the security. reporter: but many still
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searching for loved ones are mistrustful of the government's promises. volunteers across the city are distributing their own list of those missing. scores of names have been added. most of them, children. brent: the united nations has warned that the future of an entire generation of children is in doubt. unicef says close to half a million children in yemen have dropped out of school since 2015. that is when saudi arabia and its allies intervened in the fighting there. reporter: it is the weakest who suffer most. these children are in a hospital in the capital of yemen. many of them are malnourished. this is just one consequence of yemen's three-year long war. unicef says some 1.8 million children in yemen are now malnourished. 400,000 of them are fighting for their lives. the war has also turned many
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schools to rubble. some learn under canvas in improvised classrooms. but more than two million yemeni children are getting no education at all, and most teachers are no longer paid. the war has only worsened the country's education crisis. >> it doesn't just affect the children and their individual development, but the whole country. the millions of children who cannot go to school now will grow up illiterate and uneducated. that will contribute to poverty being passed on to the next generation. reporter: and in a land where destruction and hunger rule, more and more of these children are being recruited as soldiers. the u.n. says it needs more than two billion euros this year alone to help yemen. next week at the international donor conference in geneva, they will know if that sum can be delivered. brent: here's a reminder of the top story we're following.
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nato is expelling seven russian diplomats in response to the poisoning of a former double agent in britain. joining 27 countries in taking diplomatic action against moscow. after a short break i will be back to take you through the day. stick around for that. ♪ [captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org]
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