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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 4, 2016 2:05am-3:29am PST

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tonight an anti-government militia has taken over a federal building in burns, oregon. they're threatening a deadly battle over ranchers' rights. several protesters were also part of an armed standoff in nevada in 2014. here's jennifer dowling of our portland affiliate koin. >> the constitution. that's what we're up here for. the constitution. >> reporter: armed militia set up camp at the now here national wildlife refuge headquarters. they say to seize lnd the federal government did not have authority to purchase. >> the constitution. >> that building is the people's building. >> reporter: how long will you stay? >> as long as is necessary. >> reporter: group leader ammon bundy posted this facebook video earlier this week. >> this is not a time to stand
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it is the time to stand up and come to harney county. we need your help. 100 protesters showed up to support dwight hammond and his son steven. >> go hammond. >> yeah. >> reporter: the men were convicted of arson after starting what they called controlled burns on their ranch in 2001 and 2006. they served time, but a judge recently ordered the two back to years. >> don't know what to say. it just seems like a little overreach for having burned 127 acres. >> reporter: the two say the bundys don't speak for them and they plan to surrender peacefully tomorrow. >> we're here to stand up for our brothers and sisters and show the world, show america that we stick together. >> reporter: the protest spread to the nearest wildlife refuge. >> get out of here, you cowards! >> reporter: ammon's father cliven had his own dispute with federal officials over grazing permits in nevada in 2014. that developed into a confrontation between militia
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now ammon bundy says the militiamen plan to occupy this wildlife refuge for years until harney county residents can claim their rights to the land. >> when government steps outside the bounds that the people have the people to put that government back in its place. >> reporter: it's unclear how but members say using weapons is not out of the question if out. jeff? >> jennifer dowling, thank you. tomorrow, about 600 workers return to the office complex in san bernardino, california where 14 people were killed last month in a terror attack. the conference building where the shootings took place during a holiday party will remain closed.
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be right back. president obama returned from his hawaiian vacation today, and it appears he will begin his final year in office with new action on gun control. tomorrow he'll meet with attorney general loretta lynch to discuss possible executive measures including expanded background checks that would not require approval from congress. on thursday the president holds a town hall meeting on reducing gun violence. starting monday in new hampshire former president bill clinton will begin stumping for his wife in key primary states. it is a big move for hillary clinton's campaign in a state where she trails bernie sanders. major garrett is in concord, new hampshire. major? >> reporter: jeff, when it comes to presidential surrogate politics, no one brings more to the table than bill clinton. that's on the plus and negative
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on the positive side bill clinton has an entire repertoire of victories or near victories here in new hampshire, finishing a surprising second in 1992, helping propel hillary clinton to an upset victory in 2008. and he has a reputation in new hampshire of caring about the state and speaking to voters directly and persuasively. all that will be put to hillary clinton's benefit in a tight race against bernie sanders. on the negative side there is bill clinton's past, which donald trump has made an issue, but many new hampshire democrats fought those battles out the very first time in 1992, and they tell me if trump brings up those issues now it is likely to rile up democratic supporters of the clinton family because they fought those wars once before, helped bill clinton recover from them, and are ready, willing, and able to fight them again on behalf of hillary clinton. jeff? >> major garrett tonight in new hampshire. tonight many along the mississippi river still face flood threats. the river is expected to crest in the south over the next few days. meanwhile, states where the floods have receded are struggling to recover.
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>> reporter: nearly 14,000 acres of alexander county, illinois are underwater tonight. 125 properties are flooded. others are surrounded like the home of jennifer corey and brandon dillo. >> this happened so fast. you don't have time to really get ready for it. >> reporter: if they want to leave, they have to do it by boat. today they went out for supplies. there's not much in the house. the concrete is dry thanks to a levee they built that is eight feet high, and it's holding tonight. back in 2011 their home flooded after water overran the levee. that time it was five feet. if you refuse to leave, build it higher. this is our home. so we're staying here. >> reporter: so far nine deaths missouri. in allenville, missouri sheriff john jordan boated over a bean field to check on residents. >> this is the ross residence >> reporter: terry and his wife,
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refusing to leave. >> really close. >> reporter: their home is now surrounded in water. >> you don't want somebody to come in and loot the rest of the stuff that you've worked your life for. >> reporter: downstream the army corps of engineers is confident a 3,500-mile levee stretching from southern missouri to the gulf of mexico will hold. it's 35 feet tall and 200 feet wide at the base. engineer derek smith. >> well, there's really two different kinds of levee systems. up there is more of a levee system built for agriculture protection, and down here the level of protection is much higher. >> reporter: back here in alexander county, illinois i'm standing on the roof of the bigham home, which is surrounded by water on both sides. tonight. jeff, the bigham family has put 25,000 sandbags and eight pumps around the property to keep it it's working very well. just look at the neighbor's home. flooded. >> david begnaud, thank you very much. the west coast is bracing for a wild weather week. it's a wave of rain associated with el nino.
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beginning tonight, four storms are expected to bring drought relief but also potentially mudslides. an entire neighborhood evacuated by a gas leak gets more bad news outside los angeles. and a final salute to the hug lady of fort hood, texas.
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right back. we have been following the story of a massive methane leak in california. it's in porter ranch, a neighborhood on the northern edge of los angeles. mireya villareal reports neighbors are being told it may be months before they can go home. >> do you miss your old house? >> yeah. >> reporter: 8-year-old nate sutterland is among hundreds of children forced out of their porter ranch homes by an odor they can't see but with effects so many have felt. his mother, christine. >> i've been nauseous. i've felt lethargic. my kids have had nose bleeds. they've had headaches. >> reporter: two schools have closed because of abnormally high levels of methane. but residents feel they're not
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getting enough answers about exposure. >> it's surreal. we are a living science experiment i believe. >> reporter: it was the same christine katz and their five children. place at the pediatrician's office, we were there so much. and i did everything i could. and i felt helpless. me questions. is it safe? you know, there's only so much as a parent that you can keep telling them without lying. >> you have an 8 and a 10-year-old. how do you explain to them what's going on out there? >> somebody didn't maintain a gas field and now we've got a problem. they say, well, can we go home now? and we say, well, not yet. we'll be home soon. okay, well, when? >> do you miss your friends over there? >> yeah. we don't get to see our friends that often over here. since we're too far away. >> reporter: the katz family will now commute 40 miles each morning to attend their relocated school. >> we haven't been outside since
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october. our swing set have cobwebs. it's sad. >> reporter: their once thriving town now a ghost town. mireya villarreal, cbs news, porter ranch, california. up next here, the financial forecast for 2016. we are in the age of ageless. age neutral. age defiant. age agnostic. olay is a purveyor of ageless. only the best 1% of ingredients make it into our products. for transformed skin without expensive brands or procedures. it's the ultimate beauty victory. nobody has any idea how old you are. with olay, you age less. so you can be ageless. olay. ageless. your heart loves omega-3s. but there's a difference between the omega-3s in fish oil and those in megared krill oil. unlike fish oil, megared is easily absorbed by your body...
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the markets open for 2016 tomorrow coming off a 2% drop in
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so what's in store for the financial year ahead? from stocks to mortgages to gas cbs business news analyst jill schlesinger is here. jill, welcome back. we were talking about this. it could have been this year. >> yeah. and it seemed awful. and maybe if you had some of the esoteric stuff, the emerging markets and commodities, it was bad. but it wasn't a terrible year. for 2016 analysts are predicting a lot of the same. volatile, probably mid single digits if we're lucky. now, it's also a presidential year, and presidential years going back to 1948, we see a 6.1% increase in the stock market. that's compared to an 8.8% in other years. so maybe there's a lot of pressure on the market coming into the year. >> the fed raised rates for the first time in a long time. the 30-year mortgage actually went down. what happens next? >> so now we're hovering around 4%. a lot of people saying that rates are probably going to inch up very slowly this year. that said, we've got some data about rents versus buying.
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and still, in about 58% of markets that realty track covers, they say renting is cheaper than buying. that could change in 2016. mortgage rates low. job market continuing to improve. wages increasing. we might see some more people flow into the housing market. that could be a good time to buy a house. >> we've had an extended holiday when it comes to gas prices. what's next there? >> well, it's amazing. 40-something percent drop in 2014. another 30% drop last year. we see oil trading at about 37 bucks a barrel. we don't suspect it's going to be much worse. could go down in the 30s and test that. but for the next year we're looking at about consistent level of prices. gas prices set to average around $2.30 to $2.40. that would be a drop from last year and pretty darn good news for consumers. >> jill, happy new year. thanks very much. >> happy new year. dairy prices are expected to rise after blizzards last month in texas, oklahoma, and new mexico killed about 40,000 cows. farmers are still assessing the damage.
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still ahead here, a second-string quarterback is the inspiring comeback kid. at least ten people were hurt during an off-road race in argentina after a mini cooper
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it happened during trials for the dakar rally, a 5,000-mile, 14-day race across the mountains and the deserts of argentina and bolivia. it was one of the most dramatic comebacks ever. and as jericka duncan reports, last night's alamo bowl featured an unlikely hero. >> taking a shot down the field! >> reporter: from the very beginning it seemed like oregon's prayers were being answered. by the start of the second quarter they had a 27-0 lead on texas christian university. tcu' struggles seemed obvious. two days before the alamo bowl their starting quarterback trevone boykin was arrested and charged with assaulting a police officer after a bar fight. so senior bram kohlhausen, a transfer who had never started a game in his career and who lost his father to cancer in november, was forced to step up. it wasn't until the second half that kohlhausen truly broke out of his shell and into college football glory. his teammates fed off his
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energy, mounting an impressive comeback, overcoming a 31-point deficit. at the end of the second overtime both teams were tied at 41. but kohlhausen scored soon after, giving his team a six-point lead. in the third overtime oregon's last-ditch effort fell short, sealing the game for tcu and their new football hero. kohlhausen dedicated the victory to boykin. >> this will be one i'll tell my grandkids. i mean, this is a night i never thought would ever happen. i honestly just decade it to tre. he's the one who showed me how to play like i did tonight. >> it was a remarkable finish from an unlikely player whose recent loss inspired him to play the best game of his life. jericka duncan, cbs news, new york. a memorial today for the woman known as the hug lady of fort hood, texas. before she died christmas eve elizabeth laird hugged about half a million soldiers heading off to war and returning home. today thousands turned out for
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coming up, every dog has its can i go to the sleepover? lucy, i want you to promise me something if there's any drinking i want you to say, no thanks not my thing. mom i promise you your real friends won't care, deal? i promise mom they really do hear you did you pack your toothbrush? for tips on how to start the talk visit underagedrinking.samhsa.gov a public service message from the substance abuse and
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a dog in pennsylvania doesn't have long to live. so her owner is trying to give her as much joy as possible. together they're working their way down a bucket list and sharing it all online. here's jamie yuccas. >> reporter: a drive through the car wash. swimming for the first time. >> nice job, honey. >> reporter: french fries at mcdonald's. and a walk down the aisle. with just months to live, this beagle-poodle mix is checking off an 81-item bucket list with her owner, todd burchanowski. reyes was diagnosed with lymphoma just before thanksgiving. >> it was the toughest day of my life. >> reporter: burchanowski is posting each adventure to facebook. some are simple. there's number 43, build a snowman.
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others are sweet. like number 66, take a relaxing bubble bath. identify with. like number 12. friend. why did you create the bucket list? >> we just wanted to do something that would be special for her in her last days. >> reporter: it seems to be striking a chord with people from across the country, who write back with words of encouragement. the duo still needs to check off about 30 items. >> i try to, you know, give her many hugs and kisses and as ny treats as she wants wadays. >> reporter: it's a journey no one really wants to take, especially with their best friend. jamie yuccas, cbs news, new york. that is the overnight news r this monday. r some of you the news ntinues. r others check back with us a ttle later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the overnight news. i'm jeff glor. president obama is back at the white house after his two-week holiday in hawaii. at the top of his current agenda, gun control. the president says he's preparing a series of executive actions that would not require congressional approval. chip reid reports. >> reporter: it was just after the mass shooting at an oregon community college in october that the president decided he had to take executive action on guns. he made the announcement in his weekly address, posted on the white house website. >> i directed my team at the white house to look into any new actions i can take to help reduce gun violence. and on monday i'll meet with our attorney general, loretta lynch, to discuss our options. >> reporter: sources tell cbs
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news those options include expanding the definition of who is in the business of selling guns so that more gun sales trigger background checks and requiring enhanced reporting and tracking of lost and stolen guns. the president blames the republican congress for giving him no choice but to take unilateral action. >> we know we can't stop every act of violence. but what if we tried to stop even one? what if congress did something, anything to protect our kids from gun violence? >> reporter: last month senate republicans blocked democratic proposals that would prevent people on the terror watch list from buying guns and require background checks for online gun purchases. meanwhile, some states are taking action on their own. in california a new gun control law that took effect yesterday allows judges to order the seizure of guns from people deemed dangerous by their own family or by law enforcement. texas, though, is going the other direction on gun control with a new law allowing guns to be carried openly in public places.
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the nra did not respond to our request for a comment. but when the details of the president's plan are announced, which could be as early as next week, the response from gun rights supporters is expected to be furious. 2016 brought a series of notable new laws to states from coast to coast. here with a look, kris van cleave. >> reporter: the new year brings some good news for taxpayers in oklahoma and in massachusetts, where state income taxes are dropping and minimum wage workers in more than a dozen states will get raises in 2016. but the most controversial new laws center around guns. in texas a new open carry law allows people with concealed weapon permits to wear a holstered gun in most public places. >> it's going to be a learning process. there's going to be some growing pains at the beginning. i'm sure there will be some people that will be startled possibly by the sight of someone carrying openly. >> reporter: this as california tightens its gun laws, banning firearms in or around schools
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weapons permits. bb and pellet guns sold in the golden state will have to be a bright color like pink to make clear they are not real. in hawaii new signs are posted warning of a first in the nation law raising the legal smoking age from 18 to 21. the law applies to cigarettes and electronic smoking devices. a second law there bans e-cigarettes in places where smoking is prohibited. >> our youth survey shows that a fourfold increase happened in public high school students who use e-cigarettes. from 5% in 2011 to 22% by 2015. >> reporter: tennessee becomes the first state to create an online registry of animal abusers for people who have been convicted of animal cruelty. state representative daniel jernigan supported the measure. >> if you're going to pull a dog behind a truck, if you're going to burn a cat, if you're going to do severe animal cruelty, then there needs to be some consequences to your actions. >> reporter: among other new laws taking place across the country, washington, d.c. has
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california has banned drivers and bicyclists from wearing earbuds in both ears or resting them on their ears, closing a legal loophole. and parents in north carolina can freeze their children's credit reports to prevent identity theft. elsewhere, illinois is starting what are essentially combination locks on certain prescription painkiller bottles. became the first states to automatically register people to vote when they obtain or renew a driver's license. the republican presidential contenders are strongly opposed to the president's gun control plans. john dickerson discussed the subject with gop front-runner donald trump on "face the nation." >> well, i don't like it. i don't like anything having to do with changing our second amendment. we have plenty of rules and regulations. there's plenty of things that they can do right now that are already there, they don't do we have a tremendous mental health problem. we're closing places all over the world. all over the country they're closing. nobody's doing anything about that. all they want to do is blame the
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guns. and it's not the gun that pulls the trigger. so i don't like it. i think that he's looking to do executive orders to do something having to do with guns. >> background checks happen for normal gun purchases at a normal store. so his argument would be just do it here. it's this loophole, you want to make it the same everywhere. >> john, i'm going to have to take a look at it, but i don't like changing anything. right now they have plenty of rules and regulations and they should be looking at mental health. i mean, we should build like institutions for people that are sickos. we have sickos all over the place. and that's the problem. >> so you'd spend more money on that? >> here's the problem. i would definitely spend more money on that. here's the problem. the bad guys are always going to get the guns. you can have all the restrictions you want. but the bad guys are always going to have the guns. >> let me ask you about executive orders in general. like them? don't like them? that the president uses them to go around congress. >> well, i don't like them. and our country wasn't based on executive orders. nobody really knew that we even had an executive order, such a thing. it's supposed to be you get along with congress and you
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cajole and you go back and forth and everybody gets in a room and we end up with deals. and there's compromise and lots of other things. but you end up with deals. here's a guy just goes -- he's given up on the process and he just goes and signs executive orders on everything. >> so if you were president -- you seem like the kind of guy who if you were president you would use an executive order or two. >> i will say this. there's a lot of precedent based on what he's doing. now, some have been -- his executive order on the border amazingly the courts actually took that back a step and did something that was very surprising, is they did the right thing. so that maybe that one. but i would be rescinding a lot of executive orders that he's done. i mean, he just -- the one thing good about executive orders, the new president he comes in, boom, first day, first hour, first minute you can rescind them. >> let me ask you about a video that's been put out by al shabab. this is an isis-affiliated terror group. and in the video they use you, donald trump, a clip. >> donald j. trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of muslims entering the
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country's representatives can going on. >> then the video goes on and says "the west will eventually turn against its muslim citizens." they're saying to muslims either united states because of what mr. trump is proposing. >> look, there's a problem. i bring it up. other people have called me and they say you have guts to bring it up because frankly it's true. but nobody wants to get involved. now people are getting involved. people that are on different persuasions than me right now, john, are saying you know, maybe trump isn't wrong. we want to examine it. there's a lot of bad stuff going on. i'm watching the news tonight, actually. cbs. and so many of the elements. you look at germany. you look at brussels. you look -- all over the world they're shutting down cities that never had a problem before. they're shutting down countries that never had a problem before. you look at paris, what
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to help keep your family healthy, lysol that. the retail sales numbers are trickling in from the holiday shopping season. michelle miller has a look at the winners and losers. >> reporter: unusually warm winter weather triggered sales drops in coats, hats, and gloves. but consumers did spend money on mattress and furniture supercenter in tampa. he's keeping his store open on new year's day after having a record-breaking holiday sales season. >> from black friday until now our sales have been up 65% compared to last year.
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and it is the highest increase i've ever experienced. >> reporter: and rising spending in the furniture business shows the u.s. economy is strengthening. says sarah quinlan, senior vp at mastercard advisers. >> the furniture is more important because that really shows sustained confidence. i'm buying that sofa and i'm investing and i'm saying that i have confidence, i'm going to hold on to my job, get bonused and be able to pay off these purchases. >> reporter: there were some surprising dips in buying trends this time around. sales in men's apparel and electronics were both down. but quinlan says it's no cause for concern. >> this was a tremendous year for the economy in the united states as reflected in retail sales, which really does reflect the entire economy. which really bodes well for the new year. >> reporter: and a couple of other factors driving the spending surge -- cheap gas and
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online shopping is up 20%, and elaine, consumers, they're spending roughly about 75 cents of every dollar saved at the gas pump. uber is looking to expand in china. but the company faces both legal hurdles and local competition. seth doane has more. >> reporter: with the smog and traffic to prove it, china has as many as 750 million urban commuters. and there's a multibillion-dollar battle for their business. >> it has all the cars around us here. okay. he's letting us in. >> reporter: we crisscrossed beijing to witness the fight from the front seat. in the ring heavyweights uber worth upwards of $70 billion. versus china's dd quaidi valued at 16 billion. >> reporter: we're in a dd car. this gentleman picked us up. but he doesn't want to go on camera. he says he's doing this to make a little extra money.
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"i can make about $800 a month," he said. "it will help cover the expense of my car." ride-hailing services are brand new to china and are technically illegal but the law is selectively enforced. both didi and uber are operating in a gray area while the government reviews its regulations. >> call on uber here. two minutes away. >> reporter: since this kind of operation is still considered illegal in beijing, chu jong fo told us, "i drive for uber because it will cover all the penalties if i get caught." didi dwarfs uber here. it's in 360 cities across china compared to uber's 21. both companies are spending big to lure drivers and riders. and both are relying on publicity stunts like this short-lived uber boat we rode in the city of hangzhou. in a letter to investors uber's said competing in china is not for the faint of heart.
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we'd add driving here is not for the faint of heart either. seth doane, beijing. kenya may seem like an unlikely place to find a vibrant country music scene. but on a recent trip to nairobi with president obama major garrett saw the influence of elvis on a local musician. >> reporter: as daylight drifts away, bonfires crackle, longnecks stand guard, and -- country music makes the twilight feel right. this is nairobi, kenya, a city of nearly 4 million. 8,000 miles from the grand ole opry. but for a reporter traveling with president obama the country music and feel of americana is unexpectedly real. right down to the performer, elvis. not knowing what real love is elvis otieno, or sir elvis as
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he is not an impersonator. he's as country as johnny cash. lose these new york blues >> my mom and my dad loved elvis presley. and so when my mom gave birth to me, that was the year elvis presley died. mysteriously i became a musician. rock me mama like a wagon wheel >> reporter: elvis was born in rural kenya, the son of a preacher. rock me tell me about country music in nairobi and in kenya. is there an audience for it? >> a huge audience here in kenya. way back then from '50s and '60s there has always been a country music program on the airwaves in the kenyan soil. >> reporter: there still is. "strings of country" runs three times a week. david kamoso hosts the show and
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colonial rule in 1963. >> kenyans got exposed to country music a long time ago. well, i don't obey no social graces elvis a phenomenon. >> the songs sound like the original. that's why wherever he goes there's a huge following. >> reporter: like flash and sarah mwasa, who follow elvis wherever he performs. >> me and my wife are just crazy we love country. >> his voice is just amazing. >> reporter: elvis sometimes shares the stage with esther kankara, an up-and-comer on the kenyan country scene, who styles herself after an american country legend, dolly parton. >> i really love singing her songs. most people say i sing like her. or she sings like me. i don't know. country has such themes like
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family values, love, god, and country roads. >> reporter: those timeless themes, elvis says -- -- give country music universal appeal and sometimes set dreams in motion. like leaping from an outdoor stage in nairobi to a honky-tonk or something bigger in america. >> it is a dream. but i always put myself in a spot where if it doesn't happen i don't think it's going to be a really big story for me. i keep it simple. >> just like country. >> yeah, that's right. oh, yes, i'd rather love and lose you than never know real love at all >> reporter: major garrett, nairobi, kenya. seriously? where do you think you're going? to work, with you. it's taco tuesday. you're not coming. i took mucinex to help get rid of my mucusy congestion. oh, right then i'll swing by in like 4 hours. forget the tacos! one pill lasts 12 hours. i'm good all day.
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a hollywood special effects on the internet with his home movies. john blackstone has the story of action movie kid. >> reporter: james hashimoto is pretty much your typical 5-year-old. with superhuman powers. the action movie kid videos have blown up online, scoring millions of views. they're created by his dad, daniel hashimoto, hashi to his
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friends. >> here we go! >> reporter: special effects wizard who's worked on films such as "kung fu panda 2." >> you know what i told you about climbing on there. >> reporter: the short clips evolved out of play time with dad. >> i'm climbing. >> i know. your mom's going to kill me. >> reporter: real moments at home not directed by dad are simply captured on a smartphone and then turned into movie-quality magic. >> you forgot your lunch! >> he's pretending to be iron man i think and blasting up the kitchen and i thought it would be so fun to add graphics and show them to him so he can see what it's like being a real superhero. >> what was your reaction the first time you saw james blowing the kitchen apart? >> sorry. >> i guess i thought oh, hashi. richardville, has her own outlet for creativity. preparing custom chocolates for parties and events from her home kitchen. >> he has a daddy who makes
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in a chocolate factory. so he's a lucky kid. >> reporter: the couple has teamed up to write their first action movie kid book. the cover, of course, animates. thanks to an app called blipper. amazing what you can do with an old-fashioned book now. >> it sure is. >> you clearly have the video ideas, but when it came to writing the book, mandy, you became the brains in the operation? >> mostly. i don't know if became is the right word. >> i would give her credit for being the brains of the operation overall. >> reporter: combining his heroic deeds with his love of sci-fi, the book has the kid taming a slime monster. >> slime monster is no match for action movie family. >> reporter: action movie family. >> whoa. >> let's go. >> hopefully part of the lesson of the book is if as a parent you engage in your child's imaginative play you can kind of
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for them. >> reporter: for "cbs this morning" john blackstone, los angeles. colorado state university has a new program in beer. barry petersen has this story. >> there are beers over there. >> reporter: beer and college have gone together for a long time. >> don't lose the foam. that's a common technique people have a problem with especially if you're pouring off a keg. >> reporter: but not like this. colorado state university is one of several colleges now offering a major in beer. >> is this fun? >> it is fun. and it's a lot of work as well. >> reporter: jeff calaway would know. he left the cutting-edge world of biotech to teach about a beverage that man started brewing 7,000 years ago. and beer, it turns out, is complicated. >> this isn't brewing beer in your garage. you've got to have a lot of science that goes with this. >> absolutely. so before the students even get to think about brewing beer they have to learn biochemistry, microbiology, physics, organic chemistry. there's a lot that you have to do to work your way into the lab.
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set their course to work with craft beers like new belgium, a brewery just down the street. >> america is the best place in the world to drink beer right now. this is where the innovation is happening in beer. >> reporter: ceo kim jordan and her former husband started making beer in a garage in 1991. today new belgium craft beers are shipped across america and even to sweden. but little breweries are doing big business. in 2014 the craft beer market was $19.6 billion strong. still smaller than the $101 billion in sales of beers overall. but craft brewery sales also grew 22%. so to help train more future beer makers new belgium donated a million dollars to the csu program. it's a career with a beverage that has a philosophy all its own.
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as benjamin franklin lovingly
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wants us to be happy. we all have the ability to touch the lives of those around us. sometimes, even the smallest act has the power to change a life. reach out to the veterans in your life today - let them know they're not alone. [phone ringing] man: hello kate: hi dad. that's the power of 1. ... one simple act can make all the difference. uh just gonna hang out. with gary and todd? yea. i've been meaning to ask you, is there any drinking going on in this crowd? no. so if any of your buddies ever pressure you to take a drink, just tell them you promised your dad you wouldn't. i'd do anything to keep you safe. ok. i will. i hope this is working.
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they really do hear you. for tips on what to say visitderagedrinking.samhsa.gov natalie cole passed away last thursday. anthony mason looks back on her life and legendary career. >> reporter: in a career that spans four decades, natalie cole sold more than 30 million records. you are my first love the daughter of the legendary nat "king" cole and jazz singer maria hawkins ellington, cole made her name in r&b. i'm so glad she broke t in 1975 with the hit single "this will be." this will be an everlasting love for me the song, which earned cole two grammys including best new artist, was originally offered to someone else, says music journalist james bernard.
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franklin first. i miss you like crazy >> reporter: for all of cole's legacy that would both help and haunt her career. >> hi, ed. how are you? >> reporter: she appeared with him in 1957 on cbs's "person to person" with edward r. murrow. >> how many of those pups would you like to keep? >> all of them. >> reporter: cole was just 15 years old when her father died of lung cancer. his loss would lead to a struggle with drug addiction. she wrote candidly of her many low points in a 2000 autobiography, "angel on my shoulder." in an interview with "cbs sunday morning" in 2006 she described one of her darkest moments inside of a burning hotel room. >> i had pulled my paraphernalia. i had my drugs. i was getting ready to say okay, this is the way i'm going, i guess i'm going out like this. and when they hacked -- you know, axed the door down and came through, it was like valhalla. it was like god was saying, i'm
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not through with you yet. unforgettable >> reporter: cole's greatest triumph came in 1991 with the album "unforgettable with love," covers of standards originally recorded by her father. that's why darling it's incredible her duet with her dad on "unforgettable" would sell 14 million copies and earn cole six grammys. she discussed the collaboration in an interview on "cbs this morning" two years ago. >> i never got a chance to say good-bye. and so i continued to converse and tell my dad how much i love him when i get an opportunity to sing these kinds of songs. >> reporter: despite health problems including hepatitis c and kidney failure, cole continued to put out records and tour. to help secure her legacy. unforgettable too >> that is the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm jeff glor. [ yelling in foreign language ] 42 people were later arrested, though iran has now also named the street in honor of nimr al nimr. the country's supreme leader, the ayatollah ali khamenei said saudi arabia will face divine revenge. in indian kashmir police used tear gas and rubber bullets against an angry crowd protesting the killing of the shiite cleric. in lebanon protesters also targeted the saudi embassy, heavily guarded by the army and police. saudi arabia is ruled by a sunni muslim monarchy. nimr al nimr demanded equality for shiites and called for peaceful protests during the arab spring.
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and sentenced to death two years later for crimes including disobeying saudi arabia's rulers. the u.s. says it's worried the execution of nimr al nimr will exacerbate religious tensions. but jeff, saudi arabia is unrepentant and says al nimr, along with the 46 other people it executed on saturday, was put to death in accordance with islamic law. >> holly williams in istanbul. isis released a new video today claiming it shows the execution of five prisoners. isis had accused the men of spying for britain and syria. the video's not been independently verified but it does resemble past videos from isis. washington. >> reporter: the men believed to be syrian were shack sxld dressed in jumpsuit. they reportedly were claimed to be activists but were executed as spies accused of installing cameras so the british could observe isis movements in its syrian stronghold raqqah, where
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coalition air strikes have pummeled islamic state positions. >> this is a message to david cameron. >> reporter: the video features i masked man who speaks english with a british accent, threatening the u.k. and its prime minister. >> one day invade your land, where we would rule by the sharia. >> reporter: and comes just days after david cameron's new year video message promised to continue the battle against violent islamic extremists. >> i want us to be very clear. you will not defeat us. >> reporter: the video ends with a chilling appearance by a child in military fatigues, threatening non-muslims. the gruesome video is the latest in a number of highly produced violent propaganda messages aimed at the west and used as recruiting tools. its timing may be no coincidence. coming in the aftermath of isis defeat in the key iraqi city of ramadi, says michael morel, former deputy director of the cia and a cbs news contributor. >> i think this is a message to
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their supporters that they're still in the game after these series of defeats, particularly ramadi. i think that's what this is all about. >> reporter: this purported isis video, jeff, is the first to feature an english speaker since jihadi john. he was a notorious executioner killed in a coalition air strike in november. >> kris van cleave, thank you. tonight an anti-government militia has taken over a federal building in burns, oregon. they're threatening a deadly battle over ranchers' rights. several protesters were also part of an armed standoff in nevada in 2014. here's jennifer dowling of our >> the constitution. that's what we're up here for. the constitution. >> reporter: armed militia set up camp at the national wildlife refuge headquarters. they say to seize land the federal government did not have authority to purchase. >> the constitution. >> that building is the people's building. stay? >> as long as is necessary. >> reporter: group leader ammon bundy posted this facebook video earlier this week.
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>> this is not a time to stand down. it is the time to stand up and come to harning county. we need your help. >> reporter: yesterday at least 100 protesters showed up to support dwight hammond and his son steven. >> go hammond. >> reporter: the men were convicted of arson after starting whax they called controlled burns on their ranch in 2001 and 2006. they served time, but a judge recently ordered the two back to prison for about four more years. >> don't know what to say. it just seems like a little overreach for having burned 127 acres. >> reporter: the two say the bundys don't speak for them and they plan to surrender peacefully tomorrow. >> we're here to stand up for our brothers and sisters and show the world, show america that we stick together. >> reporter: the protest spread to the nearest wildlife refuge zbrp get out of here, you cowards! >> reporter: ammon's father cliven had his own dispute over grazing rights in nevada in 2014. that developed into a confrontation between militia
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members and law enforcement. now ammon bundy says the militiamen plan to occupy this wildlife refuge for years until harnon county residents can claim the rights to the land. >> when it steps outside the bounds the people have given it that it is the duty of the people to put that government back in its place. >> reporter: it's unclear how many are in the militia group, but members say using weapons is not out of the question if authorities try to force them out. jeff? >> jennifer dowling, thank you. tomorrow, about 600 workers return to the office complex in san bernardino, california where 14 people were killed last month in a terror attack. the conference building where the shootings took place during a holiday party will remain
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be right back. uh just gonna hang out. with gary and todd? yea. i've been meaning to ask you, is there any drinking going on in this crowd? no. so if any of your buddies ever pressure you to take a drink, just tell them you promised your dad you wouldn't. i'd do anything to keep you safe. ok. i will. i hope this is working. i promise. i love you too dad. they really do hear you. for tips on what to say visitderagedrinking.samhsa.gov packers. packers. vikings. vikings. red state. blue state. vegan. carnivore. announcer: we come from different places... uptown. downtown. night owl. early bird. announcer: we come to different conclusions. half empty. half full. announcer: but when we live united, we create real, lasting change in the building blocks of life. the education, income, and health of our communities, our families, even the person next to us. both: live united. announcer: real change won't happen without you. so give. advocate. volunteer. live united.
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president obama returned from his hawaiian vacation today, and it appears he will begin his final year in office with new action on gun control. tomorrow he'll meet with attorney general loretta lynch to discuss possible executive measures including expanded background checks that would not require approval from congress. on thursday the president holds a town hall meeting on reducing gun violence. starting monday in new hampshire former president bill clinton will begin stumping for his wife in key primary states. it is a big move for hillary clinton's campaign in a state where she trails bernie sanders. major garrett is in concord, new hampshire. major in. >> reporter: when it kupds to presidential surrogate politics no one brings more to the table than bill clinton. that's on the plus and negative side.
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on the positive side bill clinton has an entire repertoire of victories or near victories in new hampshire, finishing second in 1992 helping to propel hillary clinton to an upset victory in 2008. and he has a reputation in new hampshire of caring about the state and speaking to voters directly and persuasively. all that will be put to hillary clinton's benefit in a tight race against bernie sanders. on the negative side there is bill clinton's past, which donald trump has made an issue, but many new hampshire democrats fought those battles out the very first time in 1992, and they tell me if trump brings up those issues now it is likely to rile up democratic supporters of the clinton family because they fought those wars once before, helped bill clinton recover from them, and are ready, willing, and able to fight them again on behalf of hillary clinton. jeff? >> major garrett tonight in new hampshire. tonight many along the flood threats. the river is expected to crest days. meanwhile, states where the floods have receded are
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david begnaud is in illinois. >> reporter: nearly 14,000 acres of alexander county, illinois are underwater tonight. 125 properties are flooded. others are surrounded like the home of jennifer corey and brandon dillo. >> this happened so fast. you don't have time to really get ready for it. >> reporter: if they want to leave, they have to do it by boat. today they went out for supplies. there's not much in the house. the concrete is dry thanks to a levee they built that is eight feet high, and it's holding tonight. back in 2011 their home flooded after water overran the levee. that time it was five feet. they learned a lesson. if you refuse to leave, build it higher. this this is our home. so we're staying here. >> reporter: so far nine deaths are confirmed in illinois, 15 in missouri. in allenville, missouri sheriff john jordan boated over a bean field to check on residents. >> this is the ross residence there. >> reporter: terry and his wife, wanda ross, are 2 of 32 people refusing to leave. >> really close.
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>> reporter: their home is now surrounded in water. >> you don't want somebody to come in and loot the rest of the stuff that you've worked your life for. >> reporter: down stream the army corps of engineers is stretching from southern will hold. it's 35 feet tall and 200 feet wide at the base. >> well, there's really two different kinds of levee systems. up there is more of a levee protection, and down here the level of protection is much higher. >> reporter: back here in alexander county, illinois i'm standing on the roof of the bigham home, which is surrounded by water on both sides. and the water is still rising tonight. jeff, the bigham family has put 25,000 sandbags and eight pumps around the property to keep it dry, and it's working. it's working very well. just look at the neighbor's flooded. >> david begnaud, thank you very much. the west coast is bracing for a wild weather week. it's a wave of rain associated
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beginning tonight, four storms are expected to bring drought relief but also potentially mudslides. an entire neighborhood evacuated by a gas leak gets more bad news outside los angeles. and a final salute to the hug lady of fort hood, texas.
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right back. we have been following the in cole cal. it's in porter ranch, a neighborhood on the northern edge of los angeles. maria villarreal reports neighbors are being told it may be months before they can go home. >> do you miss your old house? >> yeah. >> reporter: 8-year-old nate sutterland is among hundreds of children forced out of their porter ranch homes by an odor they can't see but with effects so many have felt. his mother, christine. >> i've been nauseous. i've felt lethargic. my kids have had nose bleeds. they've had headaches. >> reporter: two schools have closed because of abnormally high levels of methane.
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but residents feel they're not getting enough answers about exposure. >> it's surreal. we are a living science experiment i believe. >> reporter: it was the same nightmare for brian and christine katz and their five children. >> i almost had my own parking place at the pediatrician's office, we were there so much. and i did everything i could. and i felt helpless. >> then the boys started asking me questions. is it safe? you know, there's only so much as a parent that you can keep telling them without lying. >> you have an 8 and a 10-year-old. how do you explain to them what's going on out there? >> somebody didn't maintain a gas field and now we've got a problem. they say, well, can we go home now? and we say, well, not yet. we'll be home soon. okay, well, when? >> do you miss your friends over there? >> yeah. we don't get to see our friends that often over here. since we're too far away. >> reporter: the katz family will now commute 40 miles each morning to attend their
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>> we haven't been outside since october. our swing set have cobwebs. it's sad. >> reporter: their once thriving town now a ghost town. maria villarreal, cbs news, porter ranch, california. up next here, the financi there are a lot of different kinds of yucky germs. but not all disinfecting wipes... are approved to kill the same number of them. lysol wipes are approved to kill more types of germs than clorox. this cold and flu season lysol that. (cell phone rings) where are you? well the squirrels are back in the attic. mom? your dad won't call an exterminator... can i call you back, mom?
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he says it's personal this time... if you're a mom, you call at the worst time. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. where are you? it's very loud there. are you taking a zumba class? hey buddy, let's get these dayquil liquid gels and go. but these liquid gels are new. mucinex fast max. it's the same difference. these are multi-symptom. well so are these. this one is max strength and fights mucus. that one doesn't. uh...think fast! you dropped something. oh...i'll put it back on the shelf... new from mucinex fast max. the only cold and flu liquid gel that's max-strength and fights mucus. start the relief. ditch the misery.
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the markets open for 2016
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the dow in 2015, the worst since 2008. so what's in store for the financial year ahead? from stocks to mortgages to gas prices. cbs business news analyst jill schlesinger is here. welcome back. we were talking about this. stocks weren't as bat as maybe it could have been this year. >> yeah. it seemed awful. and maybe if you had some of the esoteric stufrks the emerging markets and commodities, but it wasn't a terrible year. for 2016 analysts are predicting a lot of the same. volatile, probably mid single digits if we're lucky. now, it's also a presidential year, and presidential years going back to 1948, we see a 6.1% increase in the stock market. that's compared to an 8.8% in other years. so maybe there's a lot of pressure on the market coming into the year. >> the fed raised rates for the first time in a long time. the 30-year mortgage actually went down. what happens next? >> so now we're hovering around 4%. a lot of people saying that rates are going to inch up very slowly this year. that said, we've got some data
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about rents versus buying. and still, in about 58% of markets that realty track covers, they say renting is cheaper than buying. that could change in 2016. mortgage rates low. job market continuing to improve. wages increasing. we might see some more people flow into the housing market. that could be a good time to buy a house. >> we've had an extended holiday when it comes to gas prices. what's next there? >> well, it's amazing. 40-something percent drop in 2014. another 30% drop last year. we see oil trading at about 37 bucks a barrel. we don't suspect it's going to be much worse. could go down in the 30s and test that. but for the next year we're looking at about consistent level of prices. gas prices set to average around $2.30 to $2.40. that would be a drop from last year and pretty darn good news for consumers. >> jill, happy new year. thanks very much. >> happy new year. dairy prices are expected to rise after blizzards last month in texas, oklahoma, and new mexico killed about 40,000 cows. farmers are still assessing the damage.
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losses are expected to rise. still ahead here, a second-string quarterback is the inspiring comeback kid. people were hurt during an off-road race in argentina after a mini cooper careened into a crowd.
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the dakar rally, a 5,000-mile, 14-day race across the mountains and the deserts of argentina and bolivia. it was one of the most dramatic comebacks ever. and as jericka duncan reports, last night's alamo bowl featured an unlikely hero. >> taking a shot down the field! >> reporter: from the very beginning it seemed like oregon's prayers were being answered. by the start of the second quarter they had a 27-0 lead on texas christian university. tcu's struggles seemed obvious. two days before the alamo bowl their starting quarterback trevone boykin was arrested and charged with assaulting a police officer after a bar fight. so senior bram colehaasen, a transfer who had never started a game in his career and who lost his father to cancer in november, was forced to step up. it wasn't until the second half that colehaasen truly broke out of his shell and into college football glory.
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his teammates fed off his energy, mounting an impressive comeback, overcoming a 31-point deficit. at the end of the second overtime both teams were tied at 41. but colehaasen scored soon after, giving his team a six-point lead. in the third overtime oregon's last-ditch effort fell short, sealing the game for tcu and their new football hero. colehaasen dedicated the victory to boykin. >> this is one i'll tell my grandkids. this is a night i never thought would happen. i dedicate it to tre. he's the one who showed me how to play like i did tonight. >> it was a remarkable finish from an unlikely player whose recent loss inspired him to play the best game of his life. jericka duncan, cbs news, new york. a memorial today for the woman known as the hug lady of fort hood, texas. before she died christmas eve els beths laird hugged about half a million soldiers heading off to war and returning home.
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her funeral and a final embrace. coming my grandfather served in world war two. spending time with him were the best memories of my life. i became a physician at va because of my grandfather. so i can help others like him. i can't imagine working with better doctors, or a more dedicated staff. i'm fulfilling my life's mission with the help of my team, and thanks to these veterans. i'm proud to be a doctor at va. and proud to honor my grandfather every day.
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a dog in pennsylvania doesn't have long to live. so her owner is trying to give her as much joy as possible. together they're working their way down a bucket list and sharing it all online. here's jamie yuccas. >> reporter: a drive through the car wash. swimming for the first time. >> nice job, honey. >> reporter: french fries at mcdonald's. and a walk down the aisle. with just months to live, this beagle-poodle mix is check off an 81-item bucket list with her owner, todd burchanowski. reyes was diagnosed with lymphoma just before thanksgiving. >> it was the toughest day of my life. >> reporter: burchanowski is posting each adventure to facebook. some are simple. there's number 43, build a snowman.
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like number 66, take a relaxing bubble bath. and ones all dog owners can identify with. like number 12. watch a sunset with my best friend. why did you create the bucket list? >> we just wanted to do something that would be special for her in her last days. >> reporter: it seems to be striking a chord with people from across the country, who write back with words of encouragement. the duo still needs to check off about 30 items. >> i try to, you know, give her as many hugs and kisses and as many treats as she wants nowadays. >> reporter: it's a journey no one really wants to take, especially with their best friend. jamie yuccas, cbs news, new york. that is the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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