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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 10, 2016 1:37am-4:30am CST

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you're just like any child, who just wants to know where--where you came from. that's okay. okay.
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welcome back. the battle against cancer continues to move toward early screening with genetic tests. there are now more than 60,000 genetic tests own the market. in the race to profit from the exploding industry, a cbs news investigation found come pans may be promising more than science can deliver. jim axel rod has the cbs news investigation. >> reporter: in the fight against cancer a test that could detect a tumor before a patient shows symptoms a game changer. best case scenario, three to five years away. but our investigation found one test on the market right now that could give patients a false sense of security about their cancer risk. >> at this health care
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few weeks ago. >> very hot topic. >> biotech pioneers pitched latest and graptest in personalized health care. >> this has the potential to totally change not just cancer but all of medicine. >> reporter: dr. richard klausner, director of grail, a company developing a blood test for cancer, known as a liquid biopsy. >> somebody with no symptoms could get their blood drawn? >> exactly. >> reporter: you could determine if they have cancer. >> the holy grail. >> reporter: the idea hold great promise. klausner says proving it works will take time. >> the answers are not going to be clear until we do definitive and large scale studies because we need to know, not that this sound good, but that it is true. >> reporter: any company saying that time is now? >> we just don't have the clinical data yet. we have to get it. >> reporter: there is a lot of
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market is expected to be worth $22 billion by 2020. another company after a piece of it, san diego based pathway genomics. pathway's roster of board members includes former chair of the joint chiefs of staff, peter pace, former secretary of pcommerce, barbara franklin and newt gingrich. pathway raised $40 million in its the last round of fund-raising. >> like the most amazing thing. >> reporter: and raised its profile on an episode of "keeping up with the kardashians." >> mitch mulinex. pathway genomics. >> reporter: what caught our attention, the test launched in december. >> introducing pathway genomic's revolutionary test cancer intercept detect and monitor. >> reporter: available by physician order for as little as $299, pathway's marketing claimed it could do what others say is years away.
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growing tumor in the body. before the patient may notice symptoms. like a cancer stethoscope for detecting and monitoring cancer. >> a few weeks ago we visited pathway to ask them about their claims. before we sat down with the ceo, jim plant, they played us that marketing video. >> weep just watched a video upstairs. >> right. it says the liquid biopsy will detect cancer before symptoms. >> may, may. so we say. >> that's not what the video says. >> it says it may. we don't say will. we say may. >> reporter: you don't make the claim that you can detect cancer? >> we say, the information can be used to help guide potential early diagnosis. >> reporter: we also asked plant about this chart showing advantages of their liquid biopsy over a traditional tissue biopsy. >> we never say it replaces solid tissue by on tee. this chart looks like any other chart, doesn't it?
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>> tumor biopsy. versus cancer interceptor liquid biopsy. >> it is an additional tool in the toolbox. one piece of information that helps guide, guide, the, the physician, patient discussion. >> while good to have extra tools. that doesn't mean weep should be using them on our patient outside research settings. >> reporter: dr. max dean cancer researcher at stanford. pathway cites his research as evidence their test can detect cancer in otherwise healthy patients. >> i think we are still years away from that possibility. >> reporter: years? >> years. that absolutely requires thousands of patients and long term trials to prove that. >> reporter: thousands of patients. years of testing. millions of dollars. >> correct. >> reporter: if a company isn't doing any of the three. >> i zoent think i would order that test. >> pathway has three clinical trials under way to study its
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but they all started months after the test was put on the market. following our interview, pathway removed the marketing video from its website telling us they "had proactively decided to limit some of our marketing activities associated with cancer intercement." in september, fda sent pathway genomics a lettera citing concerns the test did not have adequate clinical validation and may harm the public health. we'll heavy part two of
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a cruise ship with more than 4500 passengers on board scheduled to limp into part today after surviving a terrifying couple days at sea. royal caribbean's "anthem of the seas" caught in a dangerous winter storm with massive waves and wind over 100 miles an hour. the ship left new jersey saturday bound for florida but was forced to turn around. jericka duncan reports from the cape liberty port. >> reporter: four people suffered minor injuries. but says the damage to the ship did not affect seaworthiness. that being said some are questioning why the ship left in the first place knowing there was a large storm in the forecast. >> oh, my god. >> reporter: 30-foot waves battled "anthem of the seas" and
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pictures taken aboard the massive ship reveal ceiling damage, overturned furniture and destroyed kitchen. >> the deck i was on, which was the clive, was taking in water from the rain. >> reporter: passenger says more than 4,500 passengers on board were ordered to ride out the storm in their stateroom sunday. >> you could hear the waves crashing against the hull, metal twisting and banging. all night long. it was scary. >> reporter: the nearly 200,000 ton liner which launched last year is one of the largest vessels of its kind. in a statement royal caribbean said "the wind speeds the ship endured were hyperthan what was forecasted." >> when the storm is brewing you don't go out of port. >> reporter: monday, florida senator bill nelson criticized royal caribbean's decision to go forward with the tri despite the weather conditions. and called on the ntsb to investigate the incident.
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so why in the world would a cruise ship with thousand of passengers go sailing right into it? >> reporter: royal caribbean says it will offer all guest is a full refund including 50% off of their next cruise. >> we have more now of gayle king's interview with president obama. he invited cbs cameras into the white house sunday before the super bowl. here is gayle. >> i'm curious about how the presidency changed you as a president and how you changed as a man in the time you have been in the office? >> my basic character is unchanged. michelle and close friends who have known me for years would say he is the same guy. there its obviously some hard-won wisdom from overcoming challenges, figuring out really hard problems. maybe just a function of age as well as having been around the track a while as president. you lose that fear.
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if something goes wrong. because there are going to be things that go wrong. >> do you have something that really stand out in your mind where you said "that was a really good day in the oval office." >> recently the visit with pope francis. >> of course. >> we had a chance to share thoughts and prayer. you know, he is somebody who is the real deal. i think he deeply cares about people, about the most vulnerable. >> one of my favorites, a picture of a little black boy rubbing your hair. that's one. and the one with ella rhodes. lifting her. i love the shots of the kids in the oval office. >> i love getting on the ground with babies in the oval office. and they're unrestrained. they will run around. they'll, they'll take out all of the apples out of the bowl. and set them in various places. then put them back. and they're out of control. >> some of them don't know you are the president, always nice. not very many people can say that. here we are in campaign 2016. lots of people want your job.
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people leading in new hampshire are bernie sanders, and donald trump, what would you have said a year ago when you hear that? >> look, there is no doubt i would have been surprised and yet i always have to remind people that this is really early in the process. early on, oftentimes, voters want to just vent and -- volt their, their passions. >> uh-huh. >> as the process goes on and they see how people react, i think they recognize that this is a pretty serious job you got to make sure that the person who is in the job is somebody who has the judgment to -- to lead the country and not just to mouth slogans. >> when you came in the office, i will never forget the video of thousand of people sitting there cheering you on. really all around the world. the message was hope and change. there were a lot of expectation
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you think you met the ex-peck tagss people had for you years ago. >> when you are in the middle of it, it is some times hard to get perspective. i have a list of things i promised to do. i check the list every so often to see how we are doing. i have done a lot of them, and i have made progress on almost all of them. and so, i feel pretty good about being able to match up what i said i would accomplish with what has been accomplished. i mention in the state of the union that one of the things i regret though is that i haven't been able to drain some of the rancor that exists here in washington. >> yeah, yeah. >> and, my rope is that, that as i am not on the ballot again, that i can contribute to getting people to step back for a moment here. >> every day i hear you put
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was given to you. do you have anything in your pocket? i heard there is cool things in the president's pocket. >> i keep these charms that people have given me along the way they rotate. >> every day you have something. >> so, this is -- a little picture of the lady of guadalupe that a latino woman, elderly woman gave to me. she, she was imploring me to get immigration laws reformed. this its rosary bead from pope francis. >> i will take this. thank you. all right, we are going to leave. i know you have to go to the super bowl. i have one more question, one more. because you are going through stress in terms of what people think of stress, job change, moving, first daughter going to college. which is most stressful for you. >> not even close. malia going off and leaving me.
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we are not going to talk about that on camera. >> i don't want you to tear up. >> thank you for letting us invade your super bowl sunday. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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every once in a wile, "60 minutes" begins shooting aster that never gets finished. one case, a 2003 report on the life and music of david bowie. bill whitaker reports. >> reporter: when bowie died on january 10th. we searched our archives and found revealing unaired interviews with this extraordinary artist. as well as sound checks and this recording session in woodstock, new york. we decide to show some tonight. i was never particularly fond of my voice. i never thought of myself as a singer, you know. i thought that i wrote songs and wrote music. that was sort of what i thought i was best at doing.
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doing my songs. i felt, i had to go out and do them. and it is only over the last few years i felt comfortable interpreting the songs myself and being a singer. and i would have much preferred other people to have done my songs. then i wouldn't have had to put all that makeup on. and that hair. oh. you know? the excitement of going into a recording studio. i still feel a terrific buzz with the actual process. that's never quit it. it really is -- so much part of my life to write and record music. i can't imagine my life without
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let's do a harmony line on the two that we just did. >> really gotten quite comfortable with the idea of getting old. when i hit my 50th. it was a good time for me. because life had gone much better than i ever thought it could be. so there was a lot really pointing to the idea that getting old is going to be panful in some ways because the body will start to not function and -- because i am pretty active. i miss all that, as that starts to happen. i feel comfortable with the fact that we have to get old. i'm just really -- i'm really very thankful that my older years are really good. they're productive. i have a great, wonderful domestic life. my public life, songwriting, recording, performances all that. the side of it i really enjoy. but never been so enjoyable. so, i kid myself really a very lucky guy. i really do.
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this wednesday. from the broadcast center here in new york city. this is the "cbs overnight news." donald trump has won the republican presidential primary in new hampshire. a big comeback after finishing second in iowa. and democrat bernie sanders has scored a resounding victory over hillary clinton. here are the numbers. a comfortable margin of victory for sanders after he narrowly lost in iowa. for the republicans a big second place finish for john kasich, with iowa winner ted cruz, jeb bush, and marco rubio trailing behind. here is some of what the candidates had to say. >> you know, when i came out i heard the end of bernie's speech. i heard some of the beginning. no, no. first of all, congratulations to bernie, in all fairness we have to congratulate him.
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but i heard parts of bernie's speech. he wants to give away our country, folks. we are not going to let it happen. i don't know where it is going with bernie. we wish him a lot of luck. but we are going to make america great again. but we are going to do it the old-fashioned way. we are going to beat china, japan. we are going to beat mexico in trade, we are going to beat all of these countries that are taking so much of our money away from us on a daily basis. it's not going to happen anymore. we have the greatest business people right now in the world. they call me all the time. they want to be involved. we have political hacks negotiating our deals for billions and billions and billions of dollars. not going to happen anymore. we are going to use the finest business people in the world. we are going to do something so
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and the world is going to respect us again. believe me. [ cheers and applause ] we are repealing and replacing obama care. it's gone. we're getting rid of common core. we are going to educate our children locally. we educate our children locally. we are going to preserve our very sacred second amendment. there is not going to be any more chipping away at our second amendment. >> there is something that is going on that i'm not sure that anybody can quite understand. there is magic in air with this campaign. because we don't see it as just another campaign. we see it as an opportunity for all of us, i mean all of us to be involved in something that is bigger than our own lives. to change america, to, to reshine america, to restore the spirit of america. and to leave no one behind. am i right?
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for. [ cheers and applause ] >> kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! you know, something big happened tonight. let me tell you what it is. let me tell you what it is. we have had tens and tens of millions of dollars spent against us with negative advertising. okay. see that's the old politics. that's the old politics. we never went negative because well have more good to sell than to spend our time on somebody else. >> once again, the talking heads and the washington insiders were support would break against the
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told, could not do well in the again. and tonight, the men and women state proved them wrong. [ cheers and applause ] >> in florida, we shrunk the state government by 11%. 11% because i took on the powerful public unions. we need to do that in washington, d.c. to fix the mess there as well. washington -- [ cheers and applause ] washington need to become once again the servant rather than the masters of the american people. and i know how to do this. i will restore the proper balance. government cannot grow faster than our ability to pay for it. and in a bush administration it will not do it. >> i tell you, i know many people disappointed. i'm disappointed with tonight.
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something. but i want you to understand something. our disappointment tonight is not on you. it's on me. it's on me. i did not do well on saturday night. so listen to this, that will nver happen again. [ cheers and applause ] >> for the democrats it was bernie sanders in a landslide. the vote was a powerful rejection of hillary clinton. who won in new hampshire in the primary in 2008. she its now looking to bounce back in south carolina. both candidates spoke to their supporters. >> we have sent the message that will echo from wall street to washington, from maine to california. [ cheers and applause ] and that is -- that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their superpacs.
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nine months ago we began our campaign here in new hampshire. we had no campaign organization. we had no money. and we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the united states of america. and tonight with what appears to be a record breaking voter turnout. because of a huge voter turnout and i say huge -- we won.
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and the excitement that the democratic party will need to succeed in november. >> i want to begin by -- congratulating senator sanders on his victory tonight. and i want to thank each and every one of you. and i want to say, i still love new hampshire and i always will. and here's what we are going to do -- now we take this campaign to the entire country. we are going to fight for every vote and every state.
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difference in people's lives. >> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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it doesn't look like the weather dampened the turnout as a storm dropped 7 inches of snow. that's nothing new hampshire can't handle. another storm moving up the east coast made a mess in maryland. flooding the big concern along the coast. there was a terrible crash today in germany. two commuter trains were put on the same track. automatic braking systems failed. and they hit head-on. at least 10 people were killed. dozens injured. some air lift to hospitals. others taken buy boat. no word yet on how the trains were switched off to the same track. tonight, a cbs news investigation into what is said to be a revolutionary blood test
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even before a patient notices symptoms. several companies are racing to develop this, but are some of them promising more than they can deliver. jim axelrod and producer emily grande looked into this. >> reporter: at this health care conference in silicon valley a few weeks ago, biotech pioneers, pitched latest and greatest in personalized health care. >> this has the the potential to totally change not just cancer, but all of medicine. >> reporter: dr. richard klausner, director of grail, a company developing a blood test for cancer, known as a liquid biopsy. >> somebody with no symptoms could get their blood drawn? >> exactly. >> reporter: you could determine if they have cancer. >> the holy grail. >> reporter: the idea hold great promise. klausner says proving it works will take time. >> we just don't have the
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we have to get it. >> reporter: there is a lot of incentive, the liquid biopsy market is expected to be worth $22 billion by 2020. another company after a piece of it, san diego based pathway genomics. pathway raised $40 million in its last round of fund-raising. >> like the most amazing thing. >> reporter: and raised its profiles when one genetic test was featured on "keeping up with the kardashians." >> hi, how are you. >> mitch mulinex. with pathway genomics. nice to meet you. >> reporter: what caught our attention, the test launched in december. >> introducing pathway genomics revolutionary test cancer intercept detect and monitor. >> reporter: available by physician order for as little as $299, pathway's marketing claimed it could do what others say is years away. >> cancer intercept can detect a owing tumor in the body. before a patient notices symptoms. >> a few weeks ago we visited
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before we sat down with the ceo, jim plant. video. >> we just watched a video it says the liquid biopsy will detect cancer before symptoms. it says it may. we don't say will. we say may. >> reporter: you don't make the claim that you can detect cancer? >> we say, the information can be used to help guide potential early diagnosis. >> reporter: we also asked plant about this chart showing advantages of their liquid biopsy over a traditional tissue biopsy. this chart looks like any other chart, doesn't it? >> it's not an either/or. >> tumor biopsy. it is an additional tool in the toolbox. one piece of information that helps guide, guide, the, the
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>> while good to have extra tools. that doesn't mean weep should be using them on the patient outside research settings. >> reporter: dr. max dean cancer researcher at stanford. pathway cites his research as evidence their test can detect cancer in otherwise healthy patients. >> i think we are still years away from that possibility. >> reporter: years? >> years. that absolutely requires thousands of patients and long term trials to prove that. >> reporter: thousands of patients. years of testing. millions of dollars. >> correct. >> reporter: if a company isn't doing any of the three. >> i've don't think i would order the test. >> the food and drug administration tells us it considers tests like cancer intercept a health risk. they sent ape letter citing concerns the test did not have adequate clinical validation and
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and pathway has tests under way. after our interview, pathway did pull that promotional data from its website. >> jim, thank you very much. great report. you are probably wondering how the companies are able to sell unproven tests. jim will have more on that on "cbs this morning." federal health officials sent hundreds of kits to florida to test for the zika virus. 16 cases are confirmed there. the most of any state. there are 64 cases in 16 states and district of columbia. zika spread by mosquitoes and suspected of causing a serious birth defect. will the rocket mortgage take off? or is it a fast ride to trouble? the broncos get a parade fit for champions. >> and this little piggy goes to
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couldn't afford them put the u.s. on the road to the great recession. so, we were curious when we saw an ad during the super bowl for an 8-minute mortgage. anthony mason went looking for answers. >> reporter: quicken loans super bowl ad made a simple proposition. >> what if we did for mortgages what the internet did for buying music and plane tickets and shoes. >> that's what they're offering for rocket mortgages. seven years after the housing crisis nearly took down the economy, the ad rang alarm bells. let's do the financial crisis ace again but with apps, dave weigel of "the washington post" tweeted. >> i know a lot of people interpreted the commercial saying we are going back to the days of easy money. that is simply not happening. >> holden lewis of bankrate.com says the median credit score of
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out of 850. the highest since 2001. rocket mortgage is just trying to streamline the application process. is this quicken app a game changer do you think? >> i think it is a game changer in the sense that other mortgage companies are going to have to make it easier to put in your documentation and your paperwork. >> reporter: on the rocket app you enter income, bank details which allows quicken to communicate directly with banks and estimates an affordable home price and costs and allows customers to lock in a rate. says quicken president jay forner. >> you go on rocket mortgage. see the interest rates. see the fees. see how changing the interest rate would change your fees. >> this is not about changing credit standard? >> no. quicken loans is known for having some of the highest credit standards in the country. >> reporter: rocket he says is trying to take the mystery out of the mortgage process. that super bowl ad got attention. forner says 14,000 people visited their website in the first minute it aired.
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the good times are rolling in
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we'll visit when we come back. we have breaking news from the u.s. supreme court. the divided court decided to stop enforcement of the president's sweeping plan to address climate change. until after all of the legal challenges are resolved. downtown denver was painted orange today as hundreds of thousands welcomed home the super bowl champion broncos. fans lined up 30 deep for the parade. mvp vonn miller and quarterback, peyton manning on the lead firetruck along with the lombardi trophy held high by
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the wiech of team owner pat bowlen, who stepped down in 2014 with alzheimers disease. the crowds were just as spirited in new orleans for mardi gras. bands serenaded the french quarter. the beads flew. costumes. the celebration ends when fat tuesday becomes ash wednesday the beginning of the christian holy sea son of lent. the polls in new hampshire today. an escaped pig showed up at one voting places. police had no luck corralling it. eventually the owner came and got it. no telling if the pig was republican, democrat or
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as the candidates await the woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. when the twins were about 10 days old, the doctors told us they were going to need blood transfusions. we're so proud of who they've become. as a result of one person, deciding to spend an hour of their life giving blood is just immeasurable, how powerful that one donation could possibly be.
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as the candidates await the vote count we size up the competition. not theirs, ours. here is julianna goldman. >> reporter: you might think this is any other shoe leather reporter covering hillary clinton, but caitlyn clark is 11 years old. >> there are any specific issues you want covered. >> reporter: among the 20 on assignment for scholastic news, providing a kids' eye view of the political process. >> we are going to get a lot more good jobs with rising income for people. >> thank you, do you have a plan so you know how to do that?
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i do. >> reporter: 14-year-old gabe ferris learned some times you score interviews. >> why should young voters vote for you, trump? >> like the rest of us. some times you don't. >> governor kasich, why should young voters, vote for you. >> just the nature of the beast. not going to get every interview i guess. on to the next candidate. >> reporter: and any way, max's colleague had already spoken with john kasich and filed a blog post. >> there is lots of issues that affect kids, the environment, education, the economy. that's one of the reasons i really like my job is i get to, i get to tell other kids about that. >> reporter: scholastic had a volunteer press corps since 2000. since then the job has evolved. they're juggling multitasking demands of campaign coverage. shooting videos, taking notes on iphones and of course tending to their twitter feeds. as for making political predictions kaitlyn has seen enough not to. >> i think it is just a level playing field now. we'll find out tuesday night. >> reporter: reporters making civics class look like child's
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julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. >> and that's the overnight news for this wednesday. continues. little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. here are the numbers. comfortable margin of victory for sanders after he lost in iowa. for the republicans, a big second place finish for john kasich with iowa winner, ted cruz, jeb bush and marco rubio trailing behind. here's some of what the candidates had to say. >> you know when i came out i heard the end of bernie's speech. i heard some of the beginning. no, no. first of all, congratulations to bernie. in all fairness. we have to congratulate him.
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i heard parts of bernie's speech. he wants to give away our country, folks. he wnlts toants to give it away. we are not going to let it happen. i don't know where it is going with bernie. we wish him a lot of luck. we are going to make america great again. we are going to do it the old-fashioned way. we are going to beat china, japan, going to meet mexico in trade. we are going to beat so many countries taking money away from our country. we have the greatest business people right now in the world. they call me all the time. they want to be involved. we have political hacks negotiating our deals for billions and billions and billions of dollars. not going to thap penhappen any more. we are going to use the finest business people in the word. we are going to do something so good, fast, and strong. the world is going to respect us again.
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we are repealing and replacing obama care. it is gone. we are going to educate our children locally. we are going to j kate our children locally. there is something going on. i don't think any body can quite understand. there is magic in air with this campaign. because we don't see it as just another campaign. we see it as an opportunity for all of us, i mean all of us to be involved in something that is bigger than our own lives. to change america, to, to reshine america, to restore the spirit of america. and to leave no one behind. am i right? that's what we are all fighting for. [ cheers and applause ] >> kasich! kasich!
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kasich! kasich! kasich! you know, something big happened tonight. let me tell you what it is. let me tell you what it is. we have had tens and tens of millions of dollars spent against us with negative advertising. okay. we have had tens of millions. see that's the old politics. that's the old politics. we never went negative because well have more good to sell than to spend our time on somebody else. >> once again, the talking heads and the washington insiders were confident that our wave of support would break against the rock of the granite state. that a conservative, we were told, could not do well in the
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we were told that over and over again. and tonight, the men and women here and all across this great state proved them wrong. [ cheers and applause ] >> in florida, we shrunk the state government by 11%. 11% because i took on the powerful public unions. we need to do that in washington, d.c. to fix the mess there as well. washington -- [ cheers and applause ] washington need to become once again the servant rather than the masters of the american people. and i know how to do this. i will restore the proper balance. government cannot grow faster than our ability to pay for it. and in a bush administration it will not do it.
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people disappointed. i'm disappointed with tonight. but i want you to understand something. but i want you to understand something. our disappointment tonight is not on you. it's on me. it's on me. i did not do well on saturday night. so listen to this, that will never happen again. [ cheers and applause ] >> for the democrats it was bernie sanders in a landslide. the vote was a powerful rejection of hillary clinton. who won in new hampshire in the primary in 2008. she its now looking to bounce back in south carolina. both candidates spoke to their supporters. >> we have sent the message that will echo from wall street to washington, from maine to california. [ cheers and applause ] and that is -- that the government of our great country
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not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their superpacs. [ cheers and applause ] nine months ago we began our campaign here in new hampshire. we had no campaign organization. we had no money. and we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the united states of america. and tonight with what appears to be a record breaking voter turnout. because of a huge voter turnout and i say huge -- we won.
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and the excitement that the democratic party will need to succeed in november. >> i want to begin by -- congratulating senator sanders on his victory tonight. and i want to thank each and every one of you. and i want to say, i still love new hampshire and i always will. and here's what we are going to do -- now we take this campaign to the entire country. we are going to fight for every vote and every state. we are going to fight for real
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>> the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. that's fun. it's already dry! no wait time. this is great. it's very soft. can i keep it? (laughs) all the care of dove... ...now in a dry antiperspirant spray. >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, this is an important message. so please, write down the number on your screen. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. it's a rate lock for your life insurance that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get.
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>> welcome back to the overnight news. the battle against cancer, and according to one reecen't survey. there are now more than 60,000 genetic tests own the market. in the race to profit from the companies may be promising more than science can deliver. jim axelrod has the cbs news investigation. >> reporter: in the fight against cancer a test that could detect a tumor before a patient best case scenario, three to five years away. but our investigation found one test on the market right now that could give patients a false sense of security about their cancer risk. >> at this health care
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few weeks ago. >> very hot topic. >> biotech pioneers pitched latest and graptest in personalized health care. >> this has the potential to totally change not just cancer but all of medicine. >> reporter: dr. richard klausner, director of grail, a company developing a blood test for cancer, known as a liquid biopsy. >> somebody with no symptoms could get their blood drawn? >> exactly. >> reporter: you could determine if they have cancer. >> the holy grail. >> reporter: the idea hold great promise. klausner says proving it works will take time. >> the answers are not going to be clear until we do definitive and large scale studies because we need to know, not that this sound good, but that it is true. >> reporter: any company saying that time is now? >> we just don't have the clinical data yet. we have to get it. >> reporter: there is a lot of
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market is expected to be worth $22 billion by 2020. another company after a piece of it, san diego based pathway genomics. pathway's roster of board members includes former chair of the joint chiefs of staff, peter pace, former secretary of commerce, barbara franklin and newt gingrich. pathway raised $40 million in its the last round of fund-raising. >> like the most amazing thing. >> reporter: and raised its profile on an episode of "keeping up with the kardashians." >> mitch mulinex. pathway genomics. >> reporter: what caught our attention, the test launched in december. >> introducing pathway genomic's revolutionary test cancer
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>> reporter: available by physician order for as little as $299, pathway's marketing claimed it could do what others >> cancer intercept can detect a growing tumor in the body. before the patient may notice symptoms. like a cancer stethoscope for detecting and monitoring cancer. >> a few weeks ago we visited pathway to ask them about their claims. before we sat down with the ceo, jim plant, they played us that marketing video. >> weep just watched a video upstairs. >> right. it says the liquid biopsy will detect cancer before symptoms. >> may, may. so we say. >> that's not what the video says. >> it says it may. we don't say will. we say may. >> reporter: you don't make the claim that you can detect cancer? >> we say, the information can be used to help guide potential early diagnosis. >> reporter: we also asked plant about this chart showing advantages of their liquid biopsy over a traditional tissue biopsy.
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solid tissue by on tee. >> this chart looks like an -- either/or, doesn't it? >> it's not an either/or. >> tumor biopsy. versus cancer interceptor liquid biopsy. >> it is an additional tool in the toolbox. one piece of information that helps guide, guide, the, the physician, patient discussion. >> while good to have extra tools. that doesn't mean we should be using them on our patient outside research settings. >> reporter: dr. max dean cancer researcher at stanford. pathway cites his research as evidence their test can detect cancer in otherwise healthy patients. >> i think we are still years away from that possibility. >> reporter: years? >> years. that absolutely requires thousands of patients and long term trials to prove that. >> reporter: thousands of patients. years of testing. millions of dollars. >> correct. >> reporter: if a company isn't doing any of the three. i don't think i would order that test. >> pathway has three clinical trials under way to study its
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but they all started months after the test was put on the market. following our interview, pathway removed the marketing video from its website telling us they "had proactively decided to limit some of our marketing activities associated with cancer intercept." in september, fda sent pathway genomics a lettera citing concerns the test did not have adequate clinical validation and may harm the public health. >> we'll have part two of jim's investigation tomorrow. the cbs overnight news will be right back. living well your immune system works hard to keep you on top of your game. you can support it by eating healthy, drinking fluids, and getting some rest. and you can combine these simple remedies with airborne. no other leading immunity brand
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plus it has a specially crafted blend of 13 vitamins, minerals and herbs. so when you want to support your immune system, take airborne, and enjoy living well. one day a rider made a decision. the decision to ride on and save money. he decided to save money by switching his motorcycle insurance to geico. there's no shame in saving money. ride on, ride proud. geico motorcycle, great rates for great rides. (sounds of birds whistling) music
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a cruise ship with more than 4500 passengers on board scheduled to limp into part today after surviving a terrifying couple days at sea. royal caribbean's "anthem of the seas" caught in a dangerous winter storm with massive waves and wind over 100 miles an hour. the ship left new jersey saturday bound for florida but was forced to turn around. jericka duncan reports from the cape liberty port. >> reporter: four people suffered minor injuries. but says the damage to the ship did not affect seaworthiness. that being said some are questioning why the ship left in the first place knowing there was a large storm in the forecast. >> oh, my god. >> reporter: 30-foot waves
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whipped chairs off its deck. pictures taken aboard the massive ship reveal ceiling damage, overturned furniture and destroyed kitchen. >> the deck i was on, which was the clive, was taking in water from the rain. >> reporter: passenger says more than 4,500 passengers on board were ordered to ride out the storm in their stateroom sunday. >> you could hear the waves crashing against the hull, metal twisting and banging. all night long. it was scary. >> reporter: the nearly 200,000 ton liner which launched last year is one of the largest vessels of its kind.
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said "the wind speeds the ship endured were hyperthan what was forecasted." >> when the storm is brewing you don't go out of port. >> reporter: monday, florida senator bill nelson criticized royal caribbean's decision to go forward with the trip despite the weather conditions. and called on the ntsb to investigate the incident. >> it was forecast for days. so why in the world would a cruise ship with thousand of passengers go sailing right into it? >> reporter: royal caribbean says it will offer all guest is a full refund including 50% off of their next cruise. >> we have more now of gayle king's interview with president obama. he invited cbs cameras into the white house sunday before the super bowl. here is gayle. >> i'm curious about how the presidency changed you as a president and how you changed as a man in the time you have been in the office? >> my basic character is unchanged. michelle and close friends who have known me for years would say he is the same guy. there its obviously some hard-won wisdom from overcoming challenges, figuring out really hard problems.
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well as having been around the track a while as president. you lose that fear. you lose that sense of, oh, what if something goes wrong. because there are going to be things that go wrong. >> do you have something that really stand out in your mind where you said "that was a really good day in the oval office." >> recently the visit with pope francis. >> of course. >> we had a chance to share thoughts and prayer. you know, he is somebody who is the real deal. i think he deeply cares about people, about the most vulnerable. >> one of my favorites, a picture of a little black boy rubbing your hair. that's one. and the one with ella rhodes. lifting her. i love the shots of the kids in the oval office. >> i love getting on the ground with babies in the oval office. and they're unrestrained. they will run around. they'll, they'll take out all of the apples out of the bowl. and set them in various places. then put them back. and they're out of control. >> some of them don't know you are the president, always nice.
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that. here we are in campaign 2016. lots of people want your job. if we had said a year ago, the people leading in new hampshire are bernie sanders, and donald trump, what would you have said a year ago when you hear that? >> look, there is no doubt i would have been surprised and yet i always have to remind people that this is really early in the process. early on, oftentimes, voters want to just vent and -- volt their, their passions. >> uh-huh. >> as the process goes on and they see how people react, i think they recognize that this is a pretty serious job you got to make sure that the person who is in the job is somebody who has the judgment to -- to lead the country and not just to mouth slogans. >> when you came in the office, i will never forget the video of thousand of people sitting there cheering you on. really all around the world. the message was hope and change.
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and white do. do you think you have met the expectations people had for you all those years ago? >> when you are in the middle of it, it is some times hard to get perspective. i have a list of things i promised to do. i check the list every so often to see how we are doing. i have done a lot of them, and i have made progress on almost all of them. and so, i feel pretty good about being able to match up what i said i would accomplish with what has been accomplished. i mention in the state of the union that one of the things i regret though is that i haven't been able to drain some of the rancor that exists here in washington. >> yeah, yeah. >> and, my rope is that, that as i am not on the ballot again, that i can contribute to getting
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here. >> every day i hear you put something in your pocket that was given to you. do you have anything in your pocket? i heard there is cool things in the president's pocket. >> i keep these charms that people have given me along the way they rotate. >> every day you have something. >> so, this is -- a little picture of the lady of guadalupe that a latino woman, elderly woman gave to me. she, she was imploring me to get immigration laws reformed. this its rosary bead from pope francis. >> i will take this. thank you. all right, we are going to leave. i know you have to go to the super bowl. i have one more question, one more. because you are going through stress in terms of what people think of stress, job change, moving, first daughter going to college. which is most stressful for you. >> not even close. malia going off and leaving me. that will make me tear up. we are not going to talk about
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>> i don't want you to tear up. >> thank you for letting us invade your super bowl sunday. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers. but when my father sank into depression, i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel,
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(franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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every once in a wile, "60 minutes" begins shooting aster that never gets finished. one case, a 2003 report on the life and music of david bowie. bill whitaker reports. >> reporter: when bowie died on january 10th. we searched our archives and found revealing unaired interviews with this extraordinary artist. as well as sound checks and this recording session in woodstock, new york. we decide to show some tonight. i was never particularly fond of my voice. i never thought of myself as a singer, you know. i thought that i wrote songs and
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that was sort of what i thought i was best at doing. and because nobody else was ever doing my songs. i felt, i had to go out and do them. and it is only over the last few years i felt comfortable interpreting the songs myself and being a singer. and i would have much preferred other people to have done my songs. then i wouldn't have had to put all that makeup on. and that hair. oh. you know? the excitement of going into a recording studio. i still feel a terrific buzz with the actual process. that's never quit it. it really is -- so much part of my life to write and record music. i can't imagine my life without doing that. let's do a harmony line on the two that we just did. >> really gotten quite comfortable with the idea of getting old. when i hit my 50th. it was a good time for me. because life had gone much better than i ever thought it could be. so there was a lot really pointing to the idea that getting old is going to be panful in some ways because the body will start to not function and -- because i am pretty active.
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to happen. i feel comfortable with the fact that we have to get old. i'm just really -- i'm really very thankful that my older years are really good. they're productive. i have a great, wonderful domestic life.
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that. this is the "cbs overnight news." donald trump has won the republican presidential primary in new hampshire. a big comeback after finishing second in iowa. and democrat bernie sanders has scored a resounding victory over hillary clinton. here are the numbers. a comfortable margin of victory for sanders after he narrowly lost in iowa. for the republicans a big second place finish for john kasich, with iowa winner ted cruz, jeb bush, and marco rubio trailing behind. here is some of what the candidates had to say. >> you know, when i came out i heard the end of bernie's speech. i heard some of the beginning. no, no. first of all, congratulations to bernie, in all fairness we have to congratulate him. we might not like it.
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speech. he wants to give away our country, folk ss. we are not going to let it happen. i don't know where it is going with bernie. we wish him a lot of luck. but we are going to make america great again. old-fashioned way. japan. we are going to beat mexico in trade, we are going to beat all of these countries that are taking so much of our money away from us on a daily basis. it's not going to happen anymore. we have the greatest business people right now in the world. they call me all the time. they want to be involved. we have political hacks negotiating our deals for billions and billions and billions of dollars. not going to happen anymore. we are going to use the finest business people in the world. we are going to do something so
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respect us again. believe me. [ cheers and applause ] we are repealing and replacing obama care. it's gone. we're getting rid of common core. we are going to educate our children locally. we educate our children locally. we are going to preserve our very sacred second amendment. there is not going to be any more chipping away at our second amendment. >> there is something that is going on that i'm not sure that any anybody can quite understand. there is magic in air with this campaign. because we don't seep it as it as just another campaign. we see it as an opportunity for all of us, i mean all of us to be involved in something that is bigger than our own lives. to change america, to, to reshine america, to restore the spirit of america. and to leave no one behind. am i right? that's what we are all fighting for.
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>> kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! you know, something big happened tonight. let me tell you what it is. let me tell you what it is. we have had tens and tens of millions of dollars spent against us with negative advertising. okay. we have had tens of millions. see that's the old politics. that's the old politics. we never went negative because well have more good to sell than else. >> once again, the talking heads and the washington insiders were confident that our wave of support would break against the rock of the granite state.
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told, could not do well in the state of new hampshire. we were told that over and over again. and tonight, the men and women here and all across this great state proved them wrong. [ cheers and applause ] >> in florida, we shrunk the state government by 11%. 11% because i took on the powerful public unions. we need to do that in washington, d.c. to fix the mess there as well. washington -- [ cheers and applause ] washington need to become once again the servant rather than the masters of the american people. and i know how to do this. i will restore the proper balance. government cannot grow faster than our ability to pay for it. and in a bush administration it will not do it. >> i tell you, i know many people disappointed. i'm disappointed with tonight.
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i want-up to understand something. our disapin thepointment tonight is not on you. it's on me. it's on me. i did not do well on saturday night. so listen to this, that will never happen again. [ cheers and applause ] >> for the democrats it was bernie sanders in a landslide. the vote was a powerful rejection of hillary clinton. who won in new hampshire in the primary in 2008. she its now looking to bounce back in south carolina. both candidates spoke to their supporters. >> we have sent the message that will echo from wall street to washington, from maine to california. [ cheers and applause ] and that is -- that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and
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campaign contributors and their superpacs. [ cheers and applause ] nine months ago we began our campaign here in new hampshire. we had no campaign organization. we had no money. and woe weree were taking on the most powerful political organization in the united states of america. and tonight with what appears to be a record breaking voter
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because of a huge voter turnout and i say huge -- we won. because we harnessed the energy and the excitement that the democratic party will need to succeed in november. >> i want to begin by -- congratulating senator sanders on his victory tonight. and i want to thank each and every one of you. and i want to say, i still love new hampshire and i always will. and here's what we are going to do -- now we take this campaign to the entire country. we are going to fight for every vote and every state. we are going to fight for real
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difference in people's [ vocalizing ] [ buzzing ] [ tree crashes ] [ wind howling ]
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it doesn't look like the weather dampened the turnout as a storm dropped 7 inches of snow. that's nothing new hampshire can't handle. another storm moving up the east coast made ape mess mess in maryland. flooding the big consaern longcern along the coast. there was a terrible crash today in germany. two commuter trains were put on the same track. automatic braking systems failed. and they hit head-on. at least 10 people were killed. dozens injured. some air lift to hospitals. others taken buy boat. no word yet on how the trains were switched off to the same track. tonight, a cbs news investigation into what is said to be a revolutionary blood test
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symptoms. several companies are racing to develop this, but are some of them promising more than they can deliver. jim axelrod and producer emily grande looked into this. >> reporter: at this health care conference in silicon valley a few weeks ago, biotech pioneers, personalized health care. >> this has the the potential to totally change not just cancer, but all of medicine. >> reporter: dr. richard klausner, director of grail, a company developing a blood test for cancer, known as a liquid biopsy. >> somebody with no symptoms could get their blood drawn? >> exactly. >> reporter: you could determine if they have cancer. >> the holy grail. >> reporter: the idea hold great promise. klausner says proving it works will take time. >> we don't hatch the clinical data yet.
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>> reporter: there is a lot of incentive, the liquid biopsy market is expected to beep worth $22 billion by 2020. another company after a piece of it, san diego based pathway genomics. pathway raised $40 million in its last round of fund-raising. >> like the most amazing thing. >> reporter: and raltzed edraised its profiles when one genetic test was featured on "keeping up with the kardashians." >> mitch mulinex. >> reporter: what caught our attention, the test launched in december. cancer intercept detect and monitor. >> reporter: available by physician order for as little as $299, pathway's marketing claimed it could do what others say is years away. >> cancer intercept can detect a growing tumor in the bed beforeody. >> a few weeks ago we visited pathway to ask them about their
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before we sat down with the ceo, jim plant? e they played us the marketing video >> we just watched a video upstairs. it says the lechiquid biopsy will detect cancer before symptoms. >> may, may. we don't say will. we say may. >> reporter: you don't make the cancer? >> we say, the information can be used to help guide potential early dieing anice. >> reporter: we also asked plant about this chart showing advantages of their liquid biopsy over a traditional tissue biopsy. this chart looks like any other chart, doesn't it? >> it's not an either/or. >> tumor biopsy. it is an additional tool in the toolbox. one piece of information that
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physician, patient discussion. >> while good to have extra tools. that doesn't mean weep should be using them on the patient outside research settings. >> reporter: dr. naks dean cancer researcher at stanford. pathway cites his research as evidence their test can detect patients. >> i think we are still years away from that possibility. >> reporter: years? >> years. that absolutely requires thousands of patients and long term trials to prove that. >> reporter: thousands of patients. years of testing. millions of dollars. >> correct. >> reporter: itch a skuchlf a company isn't doing any of the three. >> i've don't think i would order the test. >> the food and drug administration tells ulszs it considers tests like cancer intercement a health risk. they sent ape letter citing concerns the test did not have
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may harm the public. and pathway has tests under way. after our interview, pathway did pull that promotional data from its website. >> jim, thank you very much. great report. you are probably wondering how the companies are able to sell unproven tests. jim will have more on that on "cbs this morning." federal health officials sent hundreds of kits to florida to test for the zika virus. 16 cases are confirmed there. the most of any state. there are 64 cases in 16 states and district of columbia. zika spread by mosquitoes and suspected of causing a serious birth defect. will the rocket mortgage take off? or is it a fast ride to trouble? the broncos get a parade fit for champions. >> and this little piggy goes to
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on primary night. living well your immune system works hard to keep you on top of your game. you can support it by eating healthy, drinking fluids, and getting some rest. and you can combine these simple remedies with airborne. no other leading immunity brand gives you more vitamin c. plus it has a specially crafted blend of 13 vitamins, minerals and herbs. so when you want to support your immune system, take airborne, and enjoy living well.
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it's ok!
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couldn't afford them put the u.s. on the road to the great recession. so, we were curious when we saw an ad during the super bowl for an 8-minute mortgage. anthony mason went looking for answers. >> reporter: quicken loans super bowl ad made a simple proposition. >> what if we did for mortgages what the internet did for buying music, plain tickets and shoes. >> what they're doing for mortgages. seven years after the housing crisis nearly took down the economy, the ad rang alarm bells. let's do the financial crisis ace again but with apps, dave weigel of "the washington post" tweeted. >> i know a lot of people interpreted the commercial saying we are going back to the days of easy money. that is simply not happening. >> holden lewis of bankrate.com says the median credit score of a mortgage applicant is now 753 out of 850. the highest since 2001.
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to streamline the application process. is this quicken app a game changer do you think? >> i think it is a game changer in the sense that other mortgage companies are going to have to make it easier to put in your paperwork. >> reporter: on the rocket app you enter income, bank details which allows quicken to communicate directly with banks and estimates an affordable home price and costs and allows customers to lock in a rate. forner. >> you go on rocket mortgage. see the interest rates. see the fees. see how changing the interest rate would change your fees. >> this is not about changing credit standard? >> no. quicken loans is known for having some of the highest credit standards in the country. >> reporter: rocket he says is trying to take the mystery out of the mortgage process. that super bowl ad got attention. forner says 14,000 people visited their website in the first minute it aired.
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>> anthony mason, thank you.
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we'll visit when we come back. we have breaking news from the u.s. supreme court. the divided court decided to stop enforcement of the president's sweeping plan to address climate change. until after all of the legal challenges are resolved. downtown denver was painted orange today as hundreds of thousands welcomed home the super bowl champion broncos. fans lined up 30 deep for the parade. mvp vonn miller and quarterback, peyton manning on the lead
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lombardi trophy held high by anabellboland. crowd were just as spirited in new orleans for mardi gras. bands serenaded the french quarter. and bead flew. and marchers wore outrageous kos exhumes. the celebration ends when fat tuesday becomes ash wednesday the beginning of the christian holy sea son of lent. it was a real squeaker at the polls in new hampshire today. an escaped pig showed up at one voting places. police had no luck corralling it. eventually the owner came and got it. no telling if the pig was
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and we'll be right back. every day it's getting closer going faster than a roller coaster a love like yours will surely come my way hey, hey, hey babies aren't fully developed until at least 39 weeks. if your pregnancy is healthy, wait for labor to begin on its own.
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o0 c1 travel is part of the american way of life. when we're on vacation, we keep an eye out for anything that looks out of place. [ indistinct conversations ] miss, your bag. when we travel from city to city, we pay attention to our surroundings. [ cheering ] everyone plays a role in keeping our community safe. whether you're traveling for business or pleasure, be aware of your surroundings. if you see something suspicious,
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as the candidates await the vote count we size up the competition. not theirs, ours. here is julianna goldman. >> reporter: you might think this is any other shoe leather reporter covering hillary clinton, but caitlyn clark is 11 years old. >> there are any specific issues you want covered. >> reporter: among the 20 on assignment for scholastic news, providing a kids' eye view of the political process. >> we are going to get a lot more good jobs with rising income for people. >> thank you, do you have a plan so you know how to do that? >> i do. i do. >> reporter: 14-year-old gabe ferris learned some times you
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>> why should young voters vote for you, trump? >> like the rest of us. some times you don't. >> governor kasich, why should young voters, vote for you. >> just the nature of the beast. not going to get every interview i guess. on to the next candidate. >> reporter: and any way, max's colleague had already spoken with john kasich and filed a blog post. >> there is lots of issues that affect kids, the environment, education, the economy. that's one of the reasons i really like my job is i get to, i get to tell other kids about that. >> reporter: scholastic had a volunteer press corps since 2000. since then the job has evolved. they're juggling multitasking demands of campaign coverage. shooting videos, taking notes on iphones and of course tending to as for making political predictions kaitlyn has seen enough not to. >> i think it is just a level
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we'll find out tuesday night. >> reporter: reporters making civics class look like child's play. julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. >> and that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the cbs overnight news. donald trump has won the republican presidential primary in new hampshire. a big comeback after finishing second in iowa. second in iowa. and democrat bernie sanders has scored a resounding victory over hillary clinton. here are the numbers. a comfortable margin of victory for sanders after he narrowly lost in iowa. for the republicans a big second place finish for john kasich, with iowa winner ted cruz, jeb bush, and marco rubio trailing behind. here is some of what the candidates had to say. >> you know, when i came out i heard the end of bernie's speech. [ awed murmur ] i heard some of the beginning. no, no. first of all, congratulations to
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to congratulate him. we might not like it. but i heard parts of bernie's speech. he wants to give away our country, folks. we are not going to let it happen. i don't know where it is going with bernie. we wish him a lot of luck. but we are going to make america great again. but we are going to do it the old-fashioned way. we are going to beat china, japan. we are going to beat mexico in trade, we are going to beat all of these countries that are taking so much of our money away from us on a daily basis. it's not going to happen anymore. we have the greatest business people right now in the world. they call me all the time. they want to be involved. we have political hacks negotiating our deals for billions and billions and billions of dollars. not going to happen anymore. we are going to use the finest business people in the world. we are going to do something so good and so fast and so strong and the world is going to respect us again. believe me. [ cheers and applause ] we are repealing and replacing obama care. it's gone. we're getting rid of common
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we are going to educate our children locally. we educate our children locally. we are going to preserve our very sacred second amendment. there is not going to be any more chipping away at our second amendment. >> there is something that is going on that i'm not sure that anybody can quite understand. there is magic in air with this campaign. because we don't see it as just another campaign. we see it as an opportunity for all of us, i mean all of us to be involved in something that is bigger than our own lives. to change america, to, to reshine america, to restore the spirit of america. and to leave no one behind. am i right? that's what we are all fighting for.
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>> kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! you know, something big happened tonight. let me tell you what it is. let me tell you what it is. we have had tens and tens of millions of dollars spent against us with negative advertising. okay. we have had tens of millions. see that's the old politics. that's the old politics. we never went negative because well have more good to sell than to spend our time on somebody else. >> once again, the talking heads
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confident that our wave of support would break against the rock of the granite state. that a conservative, we were told, could not do well in the state of new hampshire. we were told that over and over again. and tonight, the men and women here and all across this great state proved them wrong. [ cheers and applause ] >> in florida, we shrunk the state government by 11%. 11% because i took on the powerful public unions. we need to do that in washington, d.c. to fix the mess there as well. washington -- [ cheers and applause ] washington need to become once again the servant rather than the masters of the american people. and i know how to do this. i will restore the proper balance. government cannot grow faster than our ability to pay for it. and in a bush administration it
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>> i tell you, i know many people disappointed. i'm disappointed with tonight. but i want you to understand something. i want-up to understand something. our disappointment tonight is not on you. it's on me. it's on me. i did not do well on saturday night. so listen to this, that will never happen again. [ cheers and applause ] >> for the democrats it was bernie sanders in a landslide. the vote was a powerful rejection of hillary clinton. who won in new hampshire in the primary in 2008. she its now looking to bounce back in south carolina. both candidates spoke to their supporters. >> we have sent the message that will echo from wall street to washington, from maine to california. [ cheers and applause ] and that is -- that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their superpacs.
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nine months ago we began our campaign here in new hampshire. we had no campaign organization. we had no money. and we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the united states of america. and tonight with what appears to be a record breaking voter turnout. because of a huge voter turnout and i say huge -- we won.
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and the excitement that the democratic party will need to succeed in november. >> i want to begin by -- congratulating senator sanders on his victory tonight. and i want to thank each and every one of you. and i want to say, i still love new hampshire and i always will. and here's what we are going to do -- now we take this campaign to the entire country. we are going to fight for every vote and every state. we are going to fight for real solutions that make a real difference in people's lives.
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welcome back. the battle against cancer continues to move toward early screening with genetic tests. there are now more than 60,000 genetic tests own the market. in the race to profit from the exploding industry, a cbs news investigation found come pans may be promising more than science can deliver. jim axel rod has the cbs news investigation. >> reporter: in the fight against cancer a test that could detect a tumor before a patient shows symptoms a game changer. best case scenario, three to five years away. but our investigation found one test on the market right now that could give patients a false sense of security about their cancer risk. >> at this health care conference in silicon valley, a
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>> very hot topic. >> biotech pioneers pitched latest and graptest in personalized health care. >> this has the potential to totally change not just cancer but all of medicine. >> reporter: dr. richard klausner, director of grail, a company developing a blood test for cancer, known as a liquid biopsy. >> somebody with no symptoms could get their blood drawn? >> exactly. >> reporter: you could determine if they have cancer. >> the holy grail. >> reporter: the idea hold great promise. klausner says proving it works will take time. >> the answers are not going to be clear until we do definitive and large scale studies because we need to know, not that this sound good, but that it is true. >> reporter: any company saying that time is now? >> we just don't have the clinical data yet. we have to get it. >> reporter: there is a lot of
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market is expected to be worth $22 billion by 2020. another company after a piece of it, san diego based pathway genomics. pathway's roster of board members includes former chair of the joint chiefs of staff, peter pace, former secretary of pcommerce, barbara franklin and newt gingrich. pathway raised $40 million in fund-raising. >> like the most amazing thing. >> reporter: and raised its profile on an episode of "keeping up with the kardashians." >> mitch mulinex. pathway genomics. >> reporter: what caught our attention, the test launched in december. >> introducing pathway genomic's revolutionary test cancer intercept detect and monitor. >> reporter: available by physician order for as little as $299, pathway's marketing claimed it could do what others say is years away.
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growing tumor in the body. before the patient may notice symptoms. like a cancer stethoscope for detecting and monitoring cancer. >> a few weeks ago we visited pathway to ask them about their claims. before we sat down with the ceo, jim plant, they played us that marketing video. >> weep just watched a video upstairs. >> right. it says the liquid biopsy will detect cancer before symptoms. >> may, may. so we say. >> that's not what the video says. >> it says it may. we don't say will. we say may. >> reporter: you don't make the claim that you can detect cancer? >> we say, the information can be used to help guide potential early diagnosis. >> reporter: we also asked plant about this chart showing advantages of their liquid biopsy over a traditional tissue biopsy. >> we never say it replaces solid tissue by on tee. this chart looks like any other chart, doesn't it?
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>> tumor biopsy. versus cancer interceptor liquid biopsy. >> it is an additional tool in the toolbox. one piece of information that helps guide, guide, the, the physician, patient discussion. >> while good to have extra tools. that doesn't mean weep should be using them on our patient outside research settings. >> reporter: dr. max dean cancer researcher at stanford. pathway cites his research as evidence their test can detect cancer in otherwise healthy patients. >> i think we are still years away from that possibility. >> reporter: years? >> years. that absolutely requires thousands of patients and long term trials to prove that. >> reporter: thousands of patients. years of testing. millions of dollars. >> correct. >> reporter: if a company isn't doing any of the three. >> i zoent think i would order that test. >> pathway has three clinical
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but they all started months after the test was put on the market. following our interview, pathway removed the marketing video from its website telling us they "had proactively decided to limit some of our marketing activities associated with cancer intercement." in september, fda sent pathway genomics a lettera citing concerns the test did not have adequate clinical validation and
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we'll heavy part two of
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a cruise ship with more than 4500 passengers on board scheduled to limp into part today after surviving a terrifying couple days at sea. royal caribbean's "anthem of the seas" caught in a dangerous winter storm with massive waves and wind over 100 miles an hour. the ship left new jersey saturday bound for florida but was forced to turn around. jericka duncan reports from the cape liberty port. >> reporter: four people suffered minor injuries. but says the damage to the ship did not affect seaworthiness. that being said some are questioning why the ship left in the first place knowing there was a large storm in the forecast. >> oh, my god. >> reporter: 30-foot waves battled "anthem of the seas" and
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pictures taken aboard the massive ship reveal ceiling damage, overturned furniture and destroyed kitchen. >> the deck i was on, which was the clive, was taking in water from the rain. >> reporter: passenger says more than 4,500 passengers on board were ordered to ride out the storm in their stateroom sunday. >> you could hear the waves crashing against the hull, metal twisting and banging. all night long. it was scary. >> reporter: the nearly 200,000 ton liner which launched last year is one of the largest vessels of its kind. in a statement royal caribbean said "the wind speeds the ship forecasted." >> when the storm is brewing you don't go out of port. >> reporter: monday, florida senator bill nelson criticized royal caribbean's decision to go forward with the trip despite the weather conditions. and called on the ntsb to investigate the incident.
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so why in the world would a cruise ship with thousand of passengers go sailing right into it? >> reporter: royal caribbean says it will offer all guest is a full refund including 50% off of their next cruise. >> we have more now of gayle king's interview with president obama. he invited cbs cameras into the white house sunday before the super bowl. here is gayle. >> i'm curious about how the presidency changed you as a president and how you changed as a man in the time you have been in the office? >> my basic character is unchanged. michelle and close friends who have known me for years would say he is the same guy. there its obviously some hard-won wisdom from overcoming challenges, figuring out really hard problems. maybe just a function of age as well as having been around the track a while as president. you lose that fear. you lose that sense of, oh, what
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because there are going to be things that go wrong. >> do you have something that really stand out in your mind where you said "that was a really good day in the oval office." >> recently the visit with pope francis. >> of course. >> we had a chance to share thoughts and prayer. you know, he is somebody who is the real deal. i think he deeply cares about people, about the most vulnerable. >> one of my favorites, a picture of a little black boy rubbing your hair. that's one. and the one with ella rhodes. lifting her. i love the shots of the kids in the oval office. >> i love getting on the ground with babies in the oval office. and they're unrestrained. they will run around. they'll, they'll take out all of the apples out of the bowl. and set them in various places. then put them back. and they're out of control. >> some of them don't know you are the president, always nice. not very many people can say that. here we are in campaign 2016. lots of people want your job.
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people leading in new hampshire are bernie sanders, and donald trump, what would you have said a year ago when you hear that? >> look, there is no doubt i would have been surprised and yet i always have to remind people that this is really early in the process. early on, oftentimes, voters want to just vent and -- volt their, their passions. >> uh-huh. >> as the process goes on and they see how people react, i think they recognize that this is a pretty serious job you got to make sure that the person who is in the job is somebody who has the judgment to -- to lead the country and not just to mouth slogans. >> when you came in the office, i will never forget the video of thousand of people sitting there cheering you on. really all around the world. the message was hope and change. there were a lot of expectation for you, voters had, both black
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you think you met the ex-peck tagss people had for you years ago. >> when you are in the middle of it, it is some times hard to get perspective. i have a list of things i promised to do. i check the list every so often to see how we are doing. i have done a lot of them, and i have made progress on almost all of them. and so, i feel pretty good about being able to match up what i said i would accomplish with what has been accomplished. i mention in the state of the union that one of the things i regret though is that i haven't been able to drain some of the rancor that exists here in washington. >> yeah, yeah. >> and, my rope is that, that as i am not on the ballot again, that i can contribute to getting people to step back for a moment and say we are on the same team here. >> every day i hear you put something in your pocket that
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do you have anything in your pocket? i heard there is cool things in the president's pocket. >> i keep these charms that people have given me along the way they rotate. >> every day you have something. >> so, this is -- a little picture of the lady of guadalupe that a latino woman, elderly woman gave to me. she, she was imploring me to get immigration laws reformed. this its rosary bead from pope francis. >> i will take this. thank you. all right, we are going to leave. i know you have to go to the super bowl. i have one more question, one more. because you are going through stress in terms of what people think of stress, job change, moving, first daughter going to college. which is most stressful for you. >> not even close. malia going off and leaving me.
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we are not going to talk a embarrassed by a prostate exam? imagine how your doctor feels. as a urologist, i have performed 9,421 and a half prostate exams. so why do i do it? because i get paid. und... on this side of the glove i know prostate exams can save lives. so, if you are a man over 50, talk to you doctor to see if a prostate exam is right for you. if we can do it, so can you.
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every once in a wile, "60 minutes" begins shooting aster that never gets finished. one case, a 2003 report on the life and music of david bowie. bill whitaker reports. >> reporter: when bowie died on january 10th. we searched our archives and found revealing unaired interviews with this extraordinary artist. as well as sound checks and this recording session in woodstock, new york. we decide to show some tonight. i was never particularly fond of my voice. i never thought of myself as a singer, you know. i thought that i wrote songs and wrote music. that was sort of what i thought i was best at doing.
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doing my songs. i felt, i had to go out and do them. and it is only over the last few years i felt comfortable interpreting the songs myself and being a singer. and i would have much preferred other people to have done my songs. then i wouldn't have had to put all that makeup on. and that hair. oh. you know? the excitement of going into a recording studio. i still feel a terrific buzz with the actual process. that's never quit it. it really is -- so much part of my life to write and record music. i can't imagine my life without
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let's do a harmony line on the two that we just did. >> really gotten quite comfortable with the idea of getting old. when i hit my 50th. it was a good time for me. because life had gone much better than i ever thought it could be. so there was a lot really pointing to the idea that getting old is going to be panful in some ways because the body will start to not function and -- because i am pretty active. i miss all that, as that starts to happen. i feel comfortable with the fact that we have to get old. i'm just really -- i'm really very thankful that my older years are really good. they're productive. i have a great, wonderful domestic life. my public life, songwriting, recording, performances all that. the side of it i really enjoy. but never been so enjoyable. so, i kid myself really a very lucky guy. i really do.
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this wednesday. from the broadcast center here in new york city. this is the "cbs overnight news." donald trump has won the republican presidential primary in new hampshire. a big comeback after finishing second in iowa. and democrat bernie sanders has scored a resounding victory over hillary clinton. here are the numbers. a comfortable margin of victory for sanders after he narrowly lost in iowa. for the republicans a big second place finish for john kasich, with iowa winner ted cruz, jeb bush, and marco rubio trailing behind. here is some of what the candidates had to say. >> you know, when i came out i heard the end of bernie's speech. i heard some of the beginning. no, no. first of all, congratulations to bernie, in all fairness we have to congratulate him.
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but i heard parts of bernie's speech. he wants to give away our country, folks. we are not going to let it happen. i don't know where it is going with bernie. we wish him a lot of luck. but we are going to make america great again. but we are going to do it the old-fashioned way. we are going to beat china, japan. we are going to beat mexico in trade, we are going to beat all of these countries that are taking so much of our money away from us on a daily basis. it's not going to happen anymore. we have the greatest business people right now in the world. they call me all the time. they want to be involved. we have political hacks negotiating our deals for billions and billions and billions of dollars. not going to happen anymore. we are going to use the finest business people in the world. we are going to do something so
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and the world is going to respect us again. believe me. [ cheers and applause ] we are repealing and replacing obama care. it's gone. we're getting rid of common core. we are going to educate our children locally. we educate our children locally. we are going to preserve our very sacred second amendment. there is not going to be any more chipping away at our second amendment. >> there is something that is going on that i'm not sure that anybody can quite understand. there is magic in air with this campaign. because we don't see it as just another campaign. we see it as an opportunity for all of us, i mean all of us to be involved in something that is bigger than our own lives. to change america, to, to reshine america, to restore the spirit of america. and to leave no one behind. am i right?
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for. [ cheers and applause ] >> kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! kasich! you know, something big happened tonight. let me tell you what it is. let me tell you what it is. we have had tens and tens of millions of dollars spent against us with negative advertising. okay. we have had tens of millions. see that's the old politics. that's the old politics. we never went negative because well have more good to sell than to spend our time on somebody else. >> once again, the talking heads and the washington insiders were confident that our wave of support would break against the
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told, could not do well in the state of new hampshire. we were told that over and over again. and tonight, the men and women here and all across this great state proved them wrong. [ cheers and applause ] >> in florida, we shrunk the state government by 11%. 11% because i took on the powerful public unions. we need to do that in washington, d.c. to fix the mess there as well. washington -- [ cheers and applause ] washington need to become once again the servant rather than the masters of the american people. and i know how to do this. i will restore the proper balance. government cannot grow faster than our ability to pay for it. and in a bush administration it will not do it. >> i tell you, i know many people disappointed. i'm disappointed with tonight. but i want you to understand
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but i want you to understand something. our disappointment tonight is not on you. it's on me. it's on me. i did not do well on saturday night. so listen to this, that will nver happen again. [ cheers and applause ] >> for the democrats it was bernie sanders in a landslide. the vote was a powerful rejection of hillary clinton. who won in new hampshire in the primary in 2008. she its now looking to bounce back in south carolina. both candidates spoke to their supporters. >> we have sent the message that will echo from wall street to washington, from maine to california. [ cheers and applause ] and that is -- that the government of our great country belongs to all of the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their superpacs.
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nine months ago we began our campaign here in new hampshire. we had no campaign organization. we had no money. and we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the united states of america. and tonight with what appears to be a record breaking voter turnout. because of a huge voter turnout and i say huge -- we won.
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and the excitement that the democratic party will need to succeed in november. >> i want to begin by -- congratulating senator sanders on his victory tonight. and i want to thank each and every one of you. and i want to say, i still love new hampshire and i always will. and here's what we are going to do -- now we take this campaign to the entire country. we are going to fight for every vote and every state. we are going to fight for real
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almost sixty million americans are affected by mental illness. together we can help them with three simple words. my name is chris noth and i will listen. from maine to maui, thousands of high school students across the country are getting in on the action by volunteering in their communities. chris young: action teams of high school students are joining volunteers of america and major league baseball players to help train and inspire the next generation of volunteers. carlos pea: it's easy to start an action team at your school so you, too, can get in on the action.
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if you were a hippie in the '60s, you need to know. it's the dawning of the age of aquarius. yeah, and something else that's cool. what? osteoporosis is preventable. all: osteo's preventable? right on! if you dig your bones, protect them.
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it doesn't look like the weather dampened the turnout as a storm dropped 7 inches of snow. that's nothing new hampshire can't handle. another storm moving up the east coast made a mess in maryland. flooding the big concern along the coast. there was a terrible crash today in germany. two commuter trains were put on the same track. automatic braking systems failed. and they hit head-on. at least 10 people were killed. dozens injured. some air lift to hospitals. others taken buy boat. no word yet on how the trains were switched off to the same track. tonight, a cbs news investigation into what is said to be a revolutionary blood test to detect cancer.
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symptoms. several companies are racing to develop this, but are some of them promising more than they can deliver. jim axelrod and producer emily grande looked into this. >> reporter: at this health care conference in silicon valley a few weeks ago, biotech pioneers, pitched latest and greatest in personalized health care. >> this has the the potential to totally change not just cancer, but all of medicine. >> reporter: dr. richard klausner, director of grail, a company developing a blood test for cancer, known as a liquid biopsy. >> somebody with no symptoms could get their blood drawn? >> exactly. >> reporter: you could determine if they have cancer. >> the holy grail. >> reporter: the idea hold great promise. klausner says proving it works will take time. >> we just don't have the
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we havto get it. >> reporter: there is a lot of incentive, the liquid biopsy market is expected to be worth $22 billion by 2020. another company after a piece of it, san diego based pathway genomics. pathway raised $40 million in its last round of fund-raising. >> like the most amazing thing. >> reporter: and raised its profiles when one genetic test was featured on "keeping up with the kardashians." >> hi, how are you. >> mitch mulinex. with pathway genomics. nice to meet you. >> reporter: what caught our attention, the test launched in december. >> introducing pathway genomics revolutionary test cancer intercept detect and monitor. >> reporter: available by physician order for as little as $299, pathway's marketing claimed it could do what others say is years away. >> cancer intercept can detect a growing tumor in the body. before a patient notices symptoms. >> a few weeks ago we visited pathway to ask them about their
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before we sat down with the ceo, jim plant. they played us the marketing video. >> we just watched a video upstairs. it says the liquid biopsy will detect cancer before symptoms. >> may, may. it says it may. we don't say will. we say may. >> reporter: you don't make the claim that you can detect cancer? >> we say, the information can be used to help guide potential early diagnosis. >> reporter: we also asked plant about this chart showing advantages of their liquid biopsy over a traditional tissue biopsy. this chart looks like any other chart, doesn't it? >> tumor biopsy. it is an additional tool in the toolbox. one piece of information that helps guide, guide, the, the
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>> while good to have extra tools. that doesn't mean weep should be using them on the patient outside research settings. >> reporter: dr. max dean cancer researcher at stanford. pathway cites his research as evidence their test can detect cancer in otherwise healthy patients. >> i think we are still years away from that possibility. >> reporter: years? >> years. that absolutely requires thousands of patients and long term trials to prove that. >> reporter: thousands of patients. years of testing. millions of dollars. >> correct. >> reporter: if a company isn't doing any of the three. >> i've don't think i would order the test. >> the food and drug administration tells us it considers tests like cancer intercept a health risk. they sent ape letter citing concerns the test did not have adequate clinical validation and
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and pathway has tests under way. after our interview, pathway did pull that promotional data from its website. >> jim, thank you very much. great report. you are probably wondering how the companies are able to sell unproven tests. jim will have more on that on "cbs this morning." federal health officials sent hundreds of kits to florida to test for the zikairus. 16 cases are confirmed there. the most of any state. there are 64 cases in 16 states and district of columbia. zika spread by mosquitoes and suspected of causing a serious birth defect. will the rocket mortgage take off? or is it a fast ride to trouble? the broncos get a parade fit for champions. >> and this little piggy goes to
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couldn't afford them put the u.s. on the road to the great recession. so, we were curious when we saw an ad during the super bowl for an 8-minute mortgage. anthony mason went looking for answers. >> reporter: quicken loans super bowl ad made a simple proposition. >> what if we did for mortgages what the internet did for buying music and plane tickets and shoes. >> that's what they're offering for rocket mortgages. seven years after the housing crisis nearly took down the economy, the ad rang alarm bells. let's do the financial crisis ace again but with apps, dave weigel of "the washington post" tweeted. >> i know a lot of people interpreted the commercial saying we are going back to the days of easy money. that is simply not happening. >> holden lewis of bankrate.com says the median credit score of
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out of 850. the highest since 2001. rocket mortgage is just trying to streamline the application process. is this quicken app a game changer do you think? >> i think it is a game changer in the sense that other mortgage companies are going to have to make it easier to put in your documentation and your paperwork. >> reporter: on the rocket app you enter income, bank details which allows quicken to communicate directly with banks and estimates an affordable home price and costs and allows customers to lock in a rate. says quicken president jay forner. >> you go on rocket mortgage. see the interest rates. see the fees. see how changing the interest rate would change your fees. >> this is not about changing credit standard? >> no. quicken loans is known for having some of the highest >> reporter: rocket he says is of the mortgage process. that super bowl ad got attention. forner says 14,000 people visited their website in the scott.
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the good times are rolling in
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we'll visit when we come back. we have breaking news from the u.s. supreme court. the divided court decided to stop enforcement of the president's sweeping plan to address climate change. until after all of the legal challenges are resolved. downtown denver was painted orange today as hundreds of thousands welcomed home the super bowl champion broncos. fans lined up 30 deep for the parade. mvp vonn miller and quarterback, peyton manning on the lead firetruck along with the lombardi trophy held high by
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the wiech of team owner pat bowlen, who stepped down in 2014 with alzheimers disease. the crowds were just as spirited in new orleans for mardi gras. bands serenaded the french quarter. the beads flew. and marchers wore out rain just costumes. the celebration ends when fat tuesday becomes ash wednesday the beginning of the christian it was a real squeaker at the polls in new hampshire today. an escaped pig showed up at one police had no luck corralling it. eventually the owner came and got it. no telling if the pig was republican, democrat or independent. and we'll be right back.
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woman: what does it feel like when a woman is having a heart attack? chest pain, like there's a ton of weight on your chest. severe shortness of breath. unexplained nausea. cold sweats. there's an unusual tiredness and fatigue. there's unfamiliar dizziness or light-headedness. unusual pain in your back, neck, jaw, one or both arms, even your upper stomach, are signs you're having a heart attack. don't make excuses. make the call to 9-1-1 immediately. learn more at womenshealth.gov/heartattack. when the twins were about 10 days old, the doctors told us they were going to need blood transfusions. we're so proud who they've become. as a result of one person, deciding to spend an hour of their life giving blood is just immeasurable, how powerful that one donation could possibly be.
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as the candidates await the vote count we size up the competition. not theirs, ours. here is julianna goldman. >> reporter: you might think this is any other shoe leather reporter covering hillary clinton, but caitlyn clark is 11 years old. >> there are any specific issues you want covered. >> reporter: among the 20 on assignment for scholastic news, providing a kids' eye view of the political process. >> we are going to get a lot more good jobs with rising income for people. >> thank you, do you have a plan so you know how to do that?
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i do. >> reporter: 14-year-old gabe ferris learned some times you score interviews. >> why should young voters vote for you, trump? >> like the rest of us. some times you don't. >> governor kasich, why should young voters, vote for you. >> just the nature of the beast. not going to get every interview i guess. on to the next candidate. >> reporter: and any way, max's colleague had already spoken with john kasich and filed a blog post. >> there is lots of issues that affect kids, the environment, education, the economy. that's one of the reasons i really like my job is i get to, i get to tell other kids about that. >> reporter: scholastic had a volunteer press corps since 2000. since then the job has evolved. they're juggling multitasking demands of campaign coverage. shooting videos, taking notes on iphones and of course tending to their twitter feeds. as for making political predictions kaitlyn has seen enough not to. >> i think it is just a level playing field now. we'll find out tuesday night. >> reporter: reporters making civics class look like child's
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julianna goldman, cbs news, washington. >> and that's the overnight news for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning
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