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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 28, 2016 2:42am-4:00am MST

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so he should have been as sick as cal. he should be on a feeding tube. he should be paralyzed. and i thought, i've got to be a part of this. i need to help this happen again and again and again. >> reporter: maria cafalas has turned cupcakes into weapons of war. her war against mld. >> selling the company seems kind of silly, but i don't know what else to do. >> reporter: she's raised more than $250,000 and helped where she could. but she's hit a wall. so far not a single gene replacement therapy has been approved by the fda. the trial in italy is closed to new patients. it could be years before any children with mld will be allowed to receive the treatment in the united states.
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now it's like when do we get this here? what will it take? tell me what you need me to do. >> reporter: until then she continues to fight her battles -- >> yay! >> reporter: -- one cupcake at a time. the price children proof to her the war can be won. >> you keep using the word "miracle." in what way is all of this a miracle? >> our son is still with us. that's the miracle.
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in most elementary schools unruly students can expect a trip to the principal's office or at least a time out in the corner. tony dokoupil found a school in baltimore where the punishment for misbehaving is meditation. >> every day here at robert coleman elementary school begins with what the school calls a mindful moment. it is and meditation. and you can actually see some of it going on behind me right now in this first-grade classroom. don't worry, they can tune me out. you might not expect this kind of thing in west baltimore but it's actually the vision of two brothers from right here in the neighborhood. it's the morning rush at robert coleman elementary school. but after the buses arrive and the kids pour in the usual classroom chatter comes to a complete stop. >> fill your belly like a
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>> reporter: twice a day more than 300 students -- >> all the way to the top. >> reporter: -- take part in a program called mindful moments. they learn to breathe, stretch, and block out distractions. >> inhale deeply. >> and you've seen a difference? >> a huge difference. >> reporter: carline thompson is the school principal. >> they taught the students how to redirect their negative i >> reporter: so you've seen suspensions go down p. >> we've had zero suspensions. >> hold on to that breath. >> reporter: when students fight or misbehave at coleman, they aren't sent to the principal's office. instead they come here to the mindful me room where they're taught to resolve conflicts peacefully. >> inhale deep. >> chin to your chest. >> reporter: and teach others what they've learned.
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>> breathe through your nose. >> how does make you feel? >> all the things that are happening, i passed that on. all the problems, i passed that on and worry about what's more important. >> reporter: the program is the vision of ali and ottman smith, who grew up nearby in one of baltimore's most volatile neighborhoods. >> there's violence going on in the neighborhood. there's drug abuse in the neighborhood. all these things just getting dumped on these kids. and they need a way to deal with it. >> reporter: many of the children witnessed the riots that erupted in their city in 2015. is now also a matter of personal activism. >> we're teaching kids at a young age to make a change in the community in terms of how conflict is resolved. if they worry about the past it brings about anger or if they worry about the future it causes anxiety. and these techniques kind of make focus on the present. which that's all there ever really is. >> reporter: but of course the brothers do have a vision for their own future. right now they are in 14 public schools here in baltimore, reaching about 4,000 kids per
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these days practically everyone has gps on their phones. but what happens to you if you stop to ask directions? steve hartman found out on the road. ? ? thank you ? >> reporter: there are two very different sides to 48-year-old anita hughes. ? thank you jesus ? at her church in cleveland she is a fearless hurricane. while at home she's more like a stationary front. except for church she rarely leaves the house and won't travel anywhere by herself. which is why it was such a big deal last month when anita hughes decided to step way outside her comfort zone and take a trip on her own. >> i just got out, and i made it
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i turned the ignition, and i actually got on 77 south. and i went. >> reporter: she was headed for north carolina, for a gospel concert. and she made it just fine. but on the way home she got so terribly lost she didn't an know what state she was in. so anita pulled into this 7-eleven in strasburg, virginia to ask directions. you can see her entering there on the right. unfortunately there's no sound. but by all accounts you could hear her desperation loud and clear. >> can somebody please tell me how to get to cleveland? and everybody in the store just paused. >> i mean, she came in full-throated, like a broadway star, on stage reaching the back row. she was genuinely turned around. >> reporter: jason wright was a customer in the store. he says he gave anita directions but she was still scared and skeptical. >> i said if that's the right way you come show me how to get to cleveland. so he did. >> reporter: what? >> yeah. he was so nice.
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i live here to the south. i'm driving north so far out of my way. >> reporter: jason drove 35 miles out of his way to get her back on track to cleveland. but here's the best part. a few days ago he drove another 300 miles to take her to the moon. >> ah! >> reporter: obviously, anita and jason have become fast friends. they talk on the phone just about every day and now share a >> just a little bit of appliance of affection can change your whole situation. >> reporter: since their chance encounter, anita has taken another trip, to detroit. she got a new job and says she's more confident now than ever. ? and as for jason -- ? he will never fail you ? he thinks he's gotten even more out of this.
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? new ammunition for trump. >> honestly, i think we've had enough of the clintons in all fairness. also tonight, the first lady embraces clinton. >> she is absolutely ready to be commander in chief on day and yes, she happens to be a woman. an american who led an isis cell tells us how he was recruited online. >> he explained how islam was, you know, like my calling. police in north dakota arrest protesters trying to stop an oil pipeline.
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team. >> when the dogs realized that they were getting out of those kennels, it was just happy chaos. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." a new headache has landed in the clinton campaign inbox. another hacked e-mail has gone public. this one from an aide to former president bill clinton and his family foundation. it reveals a tangled web of ch enrichment in what the aide calls "bill clinton incorporated." it's 11 days till the election, and we'll begin with nancy cordes. >> reporter: republicans accused the clintons today of cashing in on charity work, citing a hacked memo in which mr. clinton's long-time aide, doug band, described how he urged clinton foundation donors to offer president clinton paid speeches
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worth $900,000. the british firm barclays shelled out $700,000 for two speeches. and for-profit university chain laureate international paid $3.5 million a year for what band described as a "foundation relationship that evolved into a business relationship for president clinton." >> thank you so much. >> reporter: band wrote the memo in 2011 after chelsea clinton accused him of hustling foundation donors to drum up consulting firm called teneo. band argued he was not only the foundation's chief fund-raiser but had arranged more than $50 million in for-profit activity for president clinton, including in-kind services for the president and his family for personal travel, hospitality, vacation and the like. band complained he was being scapegoated. the former president, he said, "is far more conflicted every
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gets many expensive gifts from donors." >> you are very clearly quoting from wikileaks. >> reporter: hillary clinton and her aides have consistently refused to comment on any of the hacked e-mails or even confirm their authenticity. >> what's really important about wikileaks is that the russian government has engaged in espionage against americans. >> reporter: late today the campaign did put out a statement saying that none of the financial relationships in memo are new, they are all laid out in the former president's tax returns. but the hacked e-mails show, scott, that campaign aides were worried about the blurred lines at the foundation and how they would reflect on the candidate as far back as 2014. >> nancy cordes for us tonight. nance, thank you. and now let's go to major garrett, covering the trump campaign. >> just today we read about clinton confidante doug brand bragging that he had funneled tens of millions of dollars to
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foundation donations, paid speeches and consulting contracts. >> reporter: donald trump seized on the hacked memo at the first of three rallies in ohio today. >> mr. band called the arrangement unorthodox. the rest of us call it outright corrupt. >> reporter: trump and clinton are effectively tied in the buckeye state, and piling on the theme of clinton corruption is about all trump has left to tilt the balance. >> if the clintons were their enterprise when they weren't in the white house, just imagine what they'll do given the chance to once again control the oval office. >> reporter: trump's goal? rally dispirited republicans and sow doubts among mildly committed clinton backers. >> hillary clinton is the most corrupt person ever to seek the office of the president. >> reporter: trump also uses the
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he has refused to release his tax returns and now ignores questions about numerous allegations of sexual misconduct and assault. in the final presidential debate trump turned a question about the accusations into another attack on clinton's ethical vulnerabilities. >> but i will tell you, what isn't fictionalized are her e-mails where she destroyed 33,000 e-mails criminally, criminally, after getting a subpoena from the united states congress. >> reporter: trump l rather, and tomorrow heads to iowa where he once held a modest lead but now finds himself tied with clinton. scott, day to day trump does do more events than clinton, but the inescapable fact remains he has much more ground to make up. >> major garrett, thanks. today clinton and michelle obama campaigned together for the first time. they were in north carolina. >> seriously, is there anyone
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obama? [ cheers and applause ] and maybe, maybe it's especially, especially meaningful to me because i do know something about being first lady of the united states. >> so she is absolutely ready to be commander in chief on day one. and yes, she happens to be a woman. >> well, before day one, of course, there will be election day. and cbs news has learned that federal law enforcement for violence timed to the election. most of the threats have been made on social media. federal agencies are trying to determine which ones are real and which ones are just talk. we learned late today that a former contractor for the national security agency arrested for stealing secrets allegedly possessed some of the most closely guarded secrets that america has, the names of
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the amount of secret material allegedly stolen by harold martin is breathtaking, and jeff pegues is following the case for us. jeff? >> reporter: scott, if it gets in the wrong hands, investigators say the information that martin stole could cost american lives. prosecutors say it includes intelligence officers' names and puts -- and martin's theft puts the secrecy of their identities at risk and endangers the lives and safety of those officers. the documents also reveal that the secrets he allegedly stole risks exposure of american intelligence operations. martin, who had a security clearance for some 28 years, was arrested in late august, and during a search of his home investigators found the equivalent of half a billion pages of sensitive documents, many of which were marked "secret" and "top secret." martin was employed by defense contractor booze allen hamilton, which also hired edward snowden. the company announced today that former fbi director robert mueller will investigate its
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compulsive hoarder.
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well, tonight we have a rare interview with an american who became a leader of an isis cell, sending other young americans to their deaths in syria. abdirizak warsame has an exotic name, but minneapolis is the only home he's ever he's one of thousands of somali refugees who have been welcomed there since the 1990s. warsame is now facing 15 years in prison. in an interview for this sunday's "60 minutes" he told us that he was pulled into terrorism online through the lectures of anwar al awlaki, an al qaeda cleric. >> he explained how islam was, you know, like my calling. it was almost like he was
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you were special, you know, and like you're the chosen one. >> how much time did you spend watching these videos? >> i would continuously watch them when i wasn't doing anything, when i wasn't at school or doing my homework or out with my family, i was watching those videos. >> reporter: and around the videos grew a congregation. >> i thought i was the only one, but when i met these group of men that i was friends with it was kind of they also knew about these videos too. we would listen and listen and listen until we became, you know, wrapped in this ideology. all those lectures would talk about how it wasn't a time for just, you know, talking but it was a time for action. >> reporter: the route to action was a link away, in the videos of isis. warsame and 11 friends set their
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>> i'd be helping people who are oppressed and people who are muslim. >> reporter: the first two reached syria, yusuf jama and abdi nur. what happened to him? >> i believe he's dead. >> how did that happen? >> he was fighting and he was killed. >> reporter: yusuf jama was also killed. are you responsible for their deaths? >> yeah. i believe i am responsible for their deaths. and i think about tha day. >> this is the fascinating story of how a dozen american teenagers decided to fight for isis and how the somali community in minneapolis is fighting to save its youth. the story is this sunday on "60 minutes." isis, of course, is still in control of iraq's second largest city, mosul, but iraqi and kurdish forces are closing in. u.s. warplanes and special forces are in the fight, and
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civilians are escaping from isis as the extremists retreat from their villages. this offensive has killed hundreds of isis fighters, according to the u.s. coalition, with over 300 square miles clawed back by iraqi and kurdish forces to the east and south. but they still haven't entered mosul itself. at the american base south of mosul major chris parker told us protecting the city's 1 million civilians will make the fight more difficult. >> air strikes do become more complicated when you move into a major metropolitan area. and the fighting will be more complicated. this is a tough fight. they've been dug into mosul for two years now and had time to prepare. >> reporter: there are 50,000 iraqi ground forces, compared to the 5,000 isis fighters thought to be in mosul.
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car bomb. a vehicle laden with explosives. isis has used dozens of them in this battle, and we've witnessed the panic they cause on the front line. they want to die. i guess the only, you know, real comparison is kamikaze pilots in the second world war. >> when you're dealing with that mentality, it's a very dangerous enemy. there's no doubt about that. >> reporter: this is the biggest military challenge tir faced since the u.s. invasion of 2003. two years ago, scott, when isis first blitzed across northern iraq, some soldiers here ran away. >> holly williams on the battlefield for us tonight. holly, thank you. north dakota arrested protesters who have been blocking construction of an oil pipeline. barry petersen is there. >> the whole world's watching you nazis. >> reporter: it was tough and it
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camps and protesters were detained. it was an unequal fight. police had billy clubs, mace and weapons. this is the way it's been going. the police have just arrested one of the protesters. over here the protesters continue to taunt them. and every time the protesters make a move the police move right along with them. in the middle of it all, activist wiyaka eagleman struggles to k and you can win against all of this? >> i'm not saying we're going to win but it's going to be a tough battle spiritually. >> reporter: cass county sheriff paul laney ran the law enforcement operation. >> our emphasis here is we don't want a confrontation. the last thing north dakota law enforcement wants is a confrontation. the last thing the state of north dakota wants is a confrontation. >> reporter: the camps block construction of a nearly 1,200-mile pipeline that would carry crude oil from the baken oil fields to illinois.
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the native americans say if there was ever a leak it would pollute a tribal lifeline that also provides drinking water to millions of americans downstream. the protesters have come here from reservations across the u.s. and neither side shows any sign of giving in. barry petersen, cbs news, near cannonball, north dakota. coming up, a student charged with serialex did he keep a notebook of potential victims? a track team runs to the help of canines in need. and an experimental birth control for men. simple as a shot.
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today a college student in wisconsin was charged with sexually assaulting five women, and prosecutors say there may be more. demarco morgan reports from madison. >> i'll order cash bail in the amount of $200,000. >> reporter: 20-year-old university of wisconsin madison college student alec cook was in court today facing 34 counts ranging from sexual assault to false imprisonment on five women. prosecutors say that cook's crimes date back to at least 2015. for sexual assault, authorities say at least a dozen women have come forward claiming that they were victims too. university of wisconsin police department mark lubocott. >> i don't think we have seen something like this in a long time where we have this many people coming forward. >> reporter: authorities found a notebook at cook's apartment listing names of women and what he wanted to do to them. one victim says he strangled her and kept her against her will. another says she was drugged. the dean of students tried to
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campuswide letter saying, "i was shocked and saddened to learn that several uw madison students have reported being sexually assaulted by a fellow student." >> you can ask the d.a. -- >> reporter: cook's attorney, christopher van wagon, says his client is innocent. >> he's been painted as the face of evil in madison and now across the entire nation, across the globe. that's wrong, and we're going to do everything we can to show that to the d.a. and eventually if necessary to a jury. >> reporter: scott, cook has been suspended from campus and he court next month. >> demarco morgan for us tonight. demarco, thank you.
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extraordinary starts here. new k-y intense. a stimulating gel that takes her pleasure to new heights. k-y intense. most birth control, of course, is designed to be use the by women. but dr. jon lapook is here to talk about an xrermtal drug for men. >> reporter: right. well of course, scott, most of the methods are for women. there are vasectomies, there are condoms for men, but really little else. and in this trial they looked at a combination of hormone injections to try to reduce the sperm count in men. now, it was 96% effective in reducing sperm count. there were four pregnancies
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satisfied with the method. but scott, here's the thing. in 2011 the study was halted early because of concern over the number of side effects including mood swings determination, acne, and increased sex drive. >> well, with side effects like that i can imagine a lot of women are saying right now, are you kidding me? let's bring this thing to market. >> reporter: you can almost hear them applauding. and i think legitimately so because women have borne the brunt of contraception for so many years. the side effects of it, the inconvenience. and it's nice to know that though this didn't work they're working on a method for men. and i think you'll see some tinkering with this in the future but i don't know when or if this particular time of method will be effective or come to market. >> dr. jon lapook, thanks very much. up next, puppy love.
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we end tonight with an unusual track meet. every runner is a winner. here's carter evans. >> reporter: at the santa barbara county animal shelter -- >> these are dogs. they want to run. they want to play. >> hi, guys. >> reporter: coordinator stacy silva came up with a plan that cross-country coach luis escobar couldn't refuse. >> you've got a bunch of dogs that are in cages and want to be outside running, and i've got a group of high school students that love to run.
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>> perfect match. >> he's excited to go. >> when the dogs realized that they were getting out of those kennels and to go outside as a group, it was just happy chaos. >> reporter: who does most of the rubbinnning? who does the pulling? >> she does the pulling. i'm just kind avenue long for the ride. >> reporter: when the kids from st. joseph high first ran with the shelter dogs in august, escobar posted a 60-second video. then all of a sudden -- >> there was millions and millions of views and shares. >> reporter: at the end of that menusa holds a tired carrier named fred. >> fred's had it. >> reporter: a week later he returned to the shelter. >> and the moment he saw me he starts crying. i'm like, oh, my goodness, he just needs to come with us. >> reporter: they are now inseparable. the new menusa family dog. the ultimate goal, says junior sequioa chumpitaz, is to raise awareness about the plight of shelter animals. but the attachment is real. >> when we have to put them
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hopefully you'll get adopted. >> does a dog that gets exercised and socialized more, does it make it more adoptable? >> 100%. it doesn't have all this pent-up energy that it's trying to show you just because now you're paying attention to it. it makes a huge difference. >> reporter: this training regimen may not help st. joseph win more races, but they've already won over plenty of hearts. >> come on, buddy. >> reporter: carter evans, cbs news, santa maria, cali news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news, and be sure not to miss "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new
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? >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. 11 days and counting till election day, and hillary clinton hit the campaign trail with perhaps her biggest supporter, first lady michelle a. is refusing to comment on the release of the latest hacked e-mails. it details how former president bill clinton used his family foundation to make himself a multimillionaire. nancy cordes has the story. >> reporter: republicans accused the clintons today of cashing in on charity work, citing a hacked memo in which mr. clinton's long-time aide, doug band, described how he urged clinton foundation donors to offer
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relationship that evolved into a business relationship for president clinton. >> thank you so much. >> reporter: band wrote the memo in 2011 after chelsea clinton accused him of hustling foundation donors to drum up business for his new corporate consulting firm called teneo. band argued he was not only the foundation's chief fund ra-rais but had arranged more than $50 million in for profit activity for president clinton including in-kind services for the president and his family for personal travel, hospitality, vacation and the like. band complained he was being scapegoated.
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is far more conflicted every single day in what he does and gets many expensive gifts from donors. >> you are very carrily quoting from wikileaks -- >> reporter: hillary clinton and her aides have consistently refused to comment on any of the hacked e-mails or even confirm their authenticity. >> and what's really important about wikileaks is that the russian government has engaged in espionage against americans. donald trump is seizing on the latest hacked ma the tip of the iceberg of what would happen if hillary clinton captures the white house. trump also repeated his charge that the election is rigged against him. major garrett reports. >> just today we read about clinton confidant doug brand bragging that he had funneled tens of millions of dollars to bill clinton inc. through the foundation donations, paid speeches, and consulting contracts. >> reporter: donald trump seized
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of three rallies in ohio today. >> mr. band called the arrangement unorthodox. the rest of us call it outright corrupt. >> reporter: trump and clinton are effectively tied in the buckeye state, and piling on the theme of clinton corruption is about all trump has left to tilt the balance. >> if the clintons were willing to play this fast and loose with their enterprise, when they imagine what they'll do given the chance to once again control the oval office. >> reporter: trump's goals, rally dispetered republicans and sow doubts among mildly committed clinton backers. >> hillary clinton is the most corrupt person ever to seek the office of the president. >> reporter: trump also uses the corruption charges to deflect from his own lack of transparency. he has refused to release his tax returns and now ignores questions about numerous allegations of sexual misconduct
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in the final presidential debate trump turned a question about the accusations into another attack on clinton's ethical vulnerabilities. >> but i will tell you what isn't fictionalized are her e-mails where she destroyed 33,000 e-mails criminally, criminally, after getting a subpoena from the united states congress. >> president obama was in miami defending the affordable care act. he admits it may need to be tweaked but insists it's helping millionseo medical bills. but a lot of those people are about to see a big increase in their premiums. chip reed reports. >> we're going to repeal it and we're going to replace it. >> the disaster known as obamacare. >> it is catastrophic. >> reporter: donald trump isn't shy about using obamacare's problems to his advantage. >> repealing obamacare and stopping hillary clinton's health care takeover is one of
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must win. >> reporter: it's giving the republican presidential candidate some rare common ground with his party. >> this law is collapsing under its own weight. >> reporter: speaker of the house paul ryan calls obamacare a failure. >> it's devastating arizona. with premiums set to double. >> reporter: and republican senators including john mccain -- >> i approve this message. >> reporter: -- and ron johnson -- >> have been harmed by obamacare. >> reporter: -- are trying to use rising health care costs -- >> we need ron johnson to stop it. >>ep re-election. lower than expected enrollment, especially by millennials, is one big reason those premiums are soaring by an average of 25%, though about 85% of consumers will get a subsidy. >> we do believe there are changes that need to occur. >> in washington wednesday health and human services secretary sillia matthews burwell said the higher rates are due to insurance companies initially offering rates that were too low because of a lack of data from a previously
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gosh, that sounds bad and we need to keep focusing on what consumers are paying. >> it's completely unaffordable. >> reporter: but the words are little comfort to jackie maroney, a woman whose insurance company sent her a letter saying it's leaving the marketplace. >> i'm a widow. i have two kids. it makes it very difficult. it looked like a war zone in cannonball, north dakota where soldiers and police in riot g against a planned pipeline. barry petersen is there. >> the whole world's watching you nazis! >> reporter: it was tough and it was tense as police moved forward to take over makeshift camps and protesters were detained. it was an unequal fight. police had billy clubs, mace, and weapons. this is the way it's been going. the police have just arrested one of the protesters. over here the protesters
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make a move the police move right along with them. in the middle of it all activist wiyaka eagleman struggles to keep the peace. you can win against all of this? >> i'm not saying we're going to win gu it's going to be a tough battle spiritually. >> reporter: cass county sheriff paul laney ran the law enforce operation. >> our emphasis here is we don't want a confrontation. the last thing north dakota law enforcement wants is a confrontation. the last thing the state of north dakota wants is a confrontation. >> reporter: the camps blocked construction of a nearly 1200-mile pipeline that would carry crude oil from the balkan air fields to illinois. builders want to tunnel under the missouri river. the native americans say if there was ever a leak it would pollute a tribal lifeline that also provides drinking water to millions of americans downstream. the protesters have come here
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u.s. and neither side shows any sign of giving in. i did everything i could to make her party perfect. almost everything. you know, 1 i n 10 houses could get hit by an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month,
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(coughs) that cough doesn't sound so good. well i think you sound great. move over. easy booger man. take mucinex dm. it'll take care of your cough. fine! i'll text you in 4 hours when your cough returns. one pill lasts 12 hours, so... looks like i'm good all night! ah! david, please, listen. still not coughing. not fair you guys! waffles are my favorite! ah! some cough medicines only last 4 hours. 12 hours. start the relief.
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a rare disease known as it is caused by a single faulty gene in our dna, and it runs in families. gene therapy can sometimes cure this terrible illness. but it's not available here in the united states. martha teischner tells us why. >> reporter: amy and brad price's home in omaha, nebraska is crazy with all the kids around. there are seven of them, ages 2 to 11.
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see small memorials to one more. liviana, who died in 2013 at the age of 5 1/2. of a rare nightmare disease called late infantile met achromatic luke o'dystrophy, mld, that destroys brain cells and is caused by a single faulty gene. >> she was happy all the time. >> she loved p >> tutu. >> she always had on tutus. >> reporter: she was talkative, addicted to caillou, the animated tv series, a lively little girl. till she was 2. >> her knees were going a little knock-kneed. and she had been just randomly falling down. >> reporter: her doctor said nothing to worry about. but she quickly got worse. >> i was in the kitchen doing
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crying, and i said liviana, what's wrong? she said mommy, my legs don't work. >> reporter: liviana was diagnosed in the fall of 2010. >> she's sitting on the bed in her tutu and her colorful sweater and they're telling me she's going to die. >> reporter: these are faces of mld. many children with the disorder are dead by the age of 6. and it runs in families. if it hadn't been for liviana, amy and brad price would never children tested. they learned that their infant son giovani had inherited the faulty gene too. >> and i get a call from the doctor's office. >> did you just know? >> i knew. and i was thinking i really have just been told two of my kids now are going to die. >> reporter: except that's not what happened. doing research online, amy price discovered the existence of a
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of an extraordinary gene therapy treatment for mld that would save giovani's life and later, when his sister cecilia was born with mld, hers too. the treatment works only on children who, like them, have not yet started showing symptoms. the price family scraped together the money to go to milan. dr. alessandro bifi oversaw the trial. >> the patients go to the surgery room for a collection of the stem cells on receive their cells back on friday evening. >> reporter: a patient's stem cells contain the faulty gene, which the doctors have learned how to fix. amazing, right? but then they need a vehicle to insert the good gene into the stem cells before those are put back into the patient's body. here's what's really amazing.
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can't get aids. >> why the hiv virus? is it particularly efficient at -- >> yeah. >> -- getting around the body? >> it's very efficient in entering our cells. and that's why we use it. >> reporter: how well did the children do? it will take years to know for sure. but so far so good. >> at least 70% to 80% of them have an outstanding benefit coming from the treatment. some of the children are going to school and having a life. >> reporter: look at giovani price. 6 now. in first grade. look at his sister cecilia. ceci for short. twice a year they have to go back to milan to be tested and monitored. tell me about dr. bifi. >> oh, gosh. >> i call her my angel. our angel. she took us in as -- like
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the united states? gene therapy has a checkered history. in the '90s hyped as the next big thing, research herewithered after serious setbacks including a death during clinical trials. >> so you see a drawing of a typical virus. >> reporter: but more than 15 years later it's back. one sign, dr. bifi is now head of the gene therapy program at cancer and blood disorder center. do you believe that gene therapy is finally coming into its own? >> i think yes, absolutely. >> reporter: the mld trial, bifi thinks, demonstrates what's possible, offering promise to the 30 million americans who suffer from some 7,000 rare diseases. >> birdie. >> reporter: trials for the
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giovani price have received in milan have not begun in the united states. they are two of only 24 children in the world with mld to receive it. >> doing pretty good out there, buddy. >> reporter: compare giovani -- >> we're going to get your diaper on, start your spa treatment. >> reporter: to caliope joy carr, also 6, from balakinwood, pennsylvania outside philadelia she can still smile and laugh. but that's about all. she was diagnosed at 2. ? the itsy-bitsy spider climbed up the spout again ? for her parents, college professors patrick carr and maria cafalas, coming to terms
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>> it's decline in slow motion. and that's difficult. >> i remember the social worker said it's good to try to cry in the shower to save it from your family and your children. >> pull. pull. >> reporter: after more than a year of rage and grief maria decided that she had to find some way of helping mld children. it was too late for cal. but she was desperate to give her daughter's life >> we're not wealthy people. we didn't know very influential people who could write a big check for a million dollars. so we said we'll start selling cupcakes. >> reporter: the caliope joy foundation was formed in 2013. >> they're so good. >> reporter: it's been slow going. but the money added up. and when maria learned about the italian trial and the fact that amy price had to keep going back
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money to help families get to italy. >> she sent me a picture of giovani playing in his front yard. he's three months younger than cal. so he should have been as cal. he should be on a feeding tube. he should be paralyzed. and i thought, i've got to be a part of this. i need to help this happen again and again and again. >> reporter: maria cafalas has turned cupcakes into weapons of war. her war against mld. el what else to do. >> reporter: she's raised more than $250,000 and helped where she could. but she's hit a wall. so far not a single gene replacement therapy has been approved by the fda. the trial in italy is closed to new patients. it could be years before any children with mld will be allowed to receive the treatment
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>> now it's just impatience. now it's like when do we get this here? what will it take? tell me what you need me to do. >> reporter: until then she continues to fight her battles -- >> yay! >> reporter: -- one cupcake at a time. the price children proof to her the war can be won. >> you keep using the word "miracle." in what way is all of this a miracle? >> our son is still with us. that's the miracle. (war drums beating) fight heartburn fast. with tums chewy delights. the mouthwatering soft chew that goes to work in seconds to conquer heartburn fast. tum tum tum tum. chewy delights. only from tums. (achoo!) did you know you can pick up cold & flu viruses from things in your home for up to 48 hours? it's like having a sick family member that you didn't even know was there. and we all know what happens when one family member gets sick.
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in most elementary schools unruly students can expect a trip to the principal's office or at least a time out in the corner. tony dukoupil found a school in baltimore where the price for misbehaving is meditation. every day begins with what the school calls a mindful moment.15 meditation. you can see some of it going on behind me right now in this first grade classroom. don't worry, they can tune me out. you might not expect this kind of thing in west baltimore but it's actually the vision of two brothers from right here in the neighborhood. it's the morning rush at robert coleman elementary school. but after the buses arrive and the kids pour in the usual classroom chatter comes to a complete stop. >> fill your belly like a
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than 300 students -- >> all the way to the top. >> reporter: -- take part in a program called mindful moments. they learn to breathe, stretch, and block out distractions. >> inhale deeply. >> and you've seen a difference? >> a huge difference. >> reporter: carline thompson is the school principal. >> they taught the students how to redirect their negative energy into something positive. >> reporter: so you've seen suspensions go down p. >> we've had zero suspensions. >> hold on to that >> reporter: when students fight or misbehave at coleman, they aren't sent to the principal's office. instead they come here to the mindful me room where they're taught to resolve conflicts peacefully. >> inhale deep. >> chin to your chest. >> reporter: and teach others what they've learned. >> how do i do it? >> breathe through your nose. >> how does make you feel? >> all the things that are
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on and worry about what's more important. >> reporter: the program is the vision of ali and ottoman smith, who grew up nearby in one of baltimore's most volatile neighborhoods. >> there's violence going on in the neighborhood. there's drug abuse in the neighborhood. all these things just getting dumped on these kids. and they need a way to deal with it. >> reporter: many of the children witnessed the riots that erupted in their city in 2015. the brothers' mission, they say, is now also a a activism. >> we're teaching kids at a young age to make a change in the community in terms of how conflict is resolved. if they're worried about the future it causes anxiety, and these techniques kind of make you focus on the present, which that's all there ever really is. >> reporter: but of course the brothers do have a vision for their own future. right now they are in 14 public schools here in baltimore, reaching about 4,000 kids per
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and other students as soon as
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these days practically everyone has gps on their phones. but what happens to you if you stop to ask directions? steve hartman found out on the road. ? >> reporter: there are two very different sides to 48-year-old an at her church in cleveland she is a fearless hurricane. while at home she's more like a stationary front. except for church she rarely leaves the house and won't travel anywhere by herself. which is why it was such a big deal last month when anita hughes decided to step way outside her comfort zone and take a trip on her own. >> i just got out, and i made it
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actually got on 77 south. and i went. >> reporter: she was headed for north carolina, for a gospel concert. and she made it just fine. but on the way home she got so terribly lost she didn't an know what state she was in. so anita pulled into this 7-eleven in strasburg, virginia to ask directions. you can see her entering there on the right. unfortunately there's no sound. but by all accounts you could hear her desperation loud and clear. >> what did you say exactly? how to get to cleveland? and everybody in the store just paused. >> i mean, she came in full-throated, like a broadway star, on stage reaching the back row. she was genuinely turned around. >> reporter: jason wright was a customer in the store. he says he gave anita directions but she was still scared and skeptical. >> i said if that's the right way you come hoe show me how to get to cleveland. so he did. >> reporter: what? >> yeah. he was so nice. >> i mean, i'm going in the complete opposite direction.
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i'm driving north so far out of my way. >> reporter: jason drove 35 miles out of his way to get her back on track to cleveland. but here's the best part. a few days ago he drove another 300 miles to take her to the moon. >> ah! >> reporter: obviously, anita and jason have become fast friends. they talk on the phone just about every day and now share a real fondness for one >> just a little bit of appliance of affection can change your whole situation. >> reporter: since their chance encounter, anita has taken another trip, to detroit. she got a new job and says she's more confident now than ever. ? and as for jason -- ? he will never fail you ? he thinks he's gotten even more out of this. a lesson of a lifetime. >> that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news
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little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast centerrrfrw captioning funded by cbs it's friday, october 28th, 2016. eleven days until the presidential election. this is the "cbs morning news." a scare for the trump campaign last night when mike pence's plane went skidding off a laguardia runway in the rain. a cbs news in bed on the scary seconds. >> suddenly we hit the ground, big thump, followed by big thumps. trump hits hard over new links between the clinton foundation and bill clinton's pockets. >> just imagine what they will

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