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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 11, 2017 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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>> the united states should first tell russia that this kind of war crime is unacceptable in the world today. >> reporter: despite all the heated rhetoric, the trump administration is leaving the door open to better relations with russia. and scott, they say they're even open to coordinating in the fight against isis. >> margaret brennan on the banks of the moscow river for us tonight. margaret, thank you. among those killed in last week's nerve gas attack were the loved ones of abdel hamid al yusef. >> reporter: this is the face of
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syria's civil wash. abdel hamid al yusef lost 29 of his family members last week, including his wife and twin babies. i wanted my daughter to be a doctor, he told us. and ahmed was going to be my sidekick. he they were alive, he said. i loved them so much, and i know they loved me, too. of abdel hamid told me he put them next to each other in their grave and told them not to be scared. even in the cruelty and chaos of syria's six-year-long conflict, the attack stands out for its
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brew at th brutality. it happened on his second anniversary with his wife. six years ago, he told us, he was taking part in peaceful protests against the syrian president bashar al-assad, an uprising that met with violence. assad is a criminal, he said. all we wanted was dignity and freedom. do you think that the american missile strikes will make any difference? i thought it was a good start, he told us, but the regime airstrikes haven't stopped. his 16-year-old nephew achmed was released from hospital yesterday. they, like their country, have been broken by this war. holly williams, cbs news, near the turkey/syria border. police in wisconsin are searching for a man wanted for stealing an arsenal of guns. 32-year-old joseph jakubowski
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made a video of himself, mailing a 161-page, anti-government, anti-religion manifesto to the president. a local sheriff says jakubowski is angry at all government officials. coming up next, a passenger is forcibly removed from an overbooked plane. and later, a place where war veterans find peace.
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police used force last night to eject a passenger from a flight to chicago o'hare airport. the man had done nothing wrong. united airlines had overbooked the flight and needed four seats for its own employees. when no passenger volunteered, flight attendants chose four at random and ordered them off. three walked. kris van cleave shows us what happened to the fourth. >> oh, my god! >> oh, my god. >> reporter: a scream heard across the internet today has embroiled united airlines in a social media crisis. this passenger on a united flight sunday from chicago to louisville was dragged from his seat by aviation police after turning down united's offer of money. he was refusing to be bumped off the oversold flight to make way for employees.
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tyler bridges was five rows back. >> you see the man hit his head on the armrest. and it looked like he was knocked unconscious, and then they pull him off the plane. >> reporter: the passenger argued he was a doctor who needed to see patients in the morning. today the security officer was placed on leave. oscar munoz issued a statement calling it upsetting and apologizing to passengers. >> their is is yet another bad move by united. >> reporter: henry is an aviation industry analyst. >> why didn't the airline offer more money. i know they offered $800, why didn't they offer even more money to get people off the plane. everybody has their price. where it happened hours before the airline quality ratings were released. alaska airlines scored top overall honors. delta finished second for the
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year. but delta's been getting low marks for the last five days after repeated disruptions stemming from severe weather and computer issues. more than 3,000 delta flights were canceled. many more delayed, leaving some to spend spring break camping at the atlanta airport. melissa mcmahon missed her wedding. >> i'm going to have a break down at the airport. i might as well just go back home, i don't know. >> reporter: but laura and her family aren't complaining, she's a travel writer. she wrote a column, why delta airlines paid me $11,000 not to fly to florida this weekend. >> we walked away with $11,000 for giving up our seats in the overbooked flights. >> reporter: they have apologized and plan to operate a normal schedule tomorrow. airlines have a right to bump passengers, but they say they're going to take a look at what
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the pulitzer prizes were announced today. and the winners included david it farn thoeld. comments that were caught on video. colson whitehead one the pulitzer for fiction for the underground railroad. for 18 years, sergio garcia was always a runner-up. that changed yesterday on the sport's biggest stage at augusta. >> and after so many years, once and for all! for sergio! >> that of course was jim nantz of cbs sports. i sunk the birdie putt to win the 81st matters and his
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first-ever majors. the green jacket was a,,,,,,,,,,
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finally tonight, many american combat veterans struggle every day with the trauma of war. but some are finding inner peace in calm waters. and mark strassmann has their story. >> reporter: at the georgia aquarium, creatures from three oceans dazzle visitors each day. most of them never notice something special, swimming along the surface. >> you got it, man. >> reporter: dive master mike
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hilliard leads groups of anxious combat vets. like him, many have wounds you can't see. he battled depression and anger until he discovered scuba diving. >> in war, no matter what. >> reporter: you get back your innocence in the water. >> you get a piece of it back. you're able to kind of create another life in that moment. >> reporter: studies show this aquatic therapy can be as effective as drugs in reducing anxiety and depression. but virginia brown davis nearly had a panic attack approaching the water. >> the anxiety really kind of taking over. >> reporter: the 52-year-old former army staff sergeant developed severe ptsd while deployed in afghanistan in 2010. she found her courage and snorkeled with other vets for nearly an hour. >> it was the most relaxing feeling i think i've felt in a
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long time. the stress that was over me, i released it. >> reporter: you felt a release. >> oh, absolutely. i was grinning from ear to ear. >> reporter: more than 22,000 vets and active military have swum in this tank since 2008. >> they're used to presentiotec themselves. and being ins that environment they can let that down. in doing so, they find themselves again. >> reporter: no one's suggesting this tank offers a miracle cure. but many have found something wondrous in it, a sense of peace. mark strassmann, cbs news, atlanta. that's the overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us just a little bit later for the morning news, and sure not to miss cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." hi, everyone, and welcome to the overnight news. i'm dimarco morgan. united airlines is stumbling to stem the criticism after a man was dragged offer the plane. they apparently sold more tickets than they had room on the plane. so someone had to go. kris van cleave has the story. >> reporter: a scream across the internet has people embroiled. this united flight from chicago to louisville. the passenger was dragged off the plane, he was refusing to be
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bumped off the oversold flight to make way for employees. tyler bridges was five rows back. >> you see the man hit his hid on the armrest, and it looked like he was knocked unconscious, and then they pull him off the plane. >> reporter: the passenger argued he was a doctor who needed to see patients in the morning. today they placed the officer in the video on leave. oscar munoz called the situation upsetting and apologized to passengers. >> the >> this is yet another bad pr move by united. the situation wasn't handled well. why didn't the agent offer more money? i know they went up to $800 per passenger. why didn't the agent offer more money to get people off the plane. everybody has their price. >> reporter: the incident happened just hours before the annual airline quality ratings were released, showing declines in delays, lost bags and passengers being bumped from
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flights. alaska scored overall honors, delta finished second for the year, but delta's been getting low marks for the last five days stemming from interruptions and computer issue. many were left camping at the airport. melissa mcmahon missed her wedding. >> i'm going to have a mental break down at the airport. i might just go back home. i don't know. >> reporter: but laura begley bloom isn't complaining. she and her family profited off the miss richery. she wrote a column, why delta airlines paid me $11,000 not to fly to florida this weekend. >> we walked away with $11,000 in compensation for giving up our seats on the overbooked flights. >> reporter: delta is apologizing for the disruption and plans to prun a normal schedule on tuesday. the department of transportation says it's going to review what
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happened on that flight. cbs news, richmond, virginia. secretary of state rex tillerson will be in moscow today where tensions are high over the u.s. cruise missile strike on a syrian air base. tillerson has called the russians incompetent for not stopping the attack. but he has no plans to speak directly with vladimir putin. major garrett reports. >> reporter: what comes next is a question most on their minds and a big question inside this white house as well. >> this is a president that's not afraid to act. >> reporter: trump administration officials called the president decisive but were divided on the policy in syria after the cruise missile strikes. >> what wea're trying to do is defeat isis. >> reporter: they agreed the fate of isis was more important than that of syrian dictator
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bashar al-assad. >> the first priority is the defeat of isis. >> reporter: but the two top diplomats differed. tillerson suggested the fate of assad was in the hands of a country beleaguered by six years of war. >> we can navigate an outcome in which the syrian people will determine assad's fate. >> reporter: while haley called for assad's ouster. >> there's not any outcome where it's going to happen with assad at the hid ead of the regime. >> regime change is now the policy of the trump administration. that's what i've heard. >> what's required is some kind of political solution to that very complex problem. >> reporter: national security adviser h.r. mcmaster said syria's civil war with its many factions and feuding terrorist cells rests at the heart of the policy dilemma, dislodging assad some fear could be just as bad or worse than the status quo. >> it's very difficult to
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understand how a political solution could result from continuation of the assad regime. now we're not saying that we are the ones who are going to effect that change. >> reporter: an equally pressing issue? how to handle syria's top military ally, russia. >> i hope that russia is thinking carefully about its continued alliance with bashar al-assad because every time one of these horrific attacks occurs, it draws russia closer in to some level of responsibility. >> reporter: tillerson is traveling to moscow and will soon meet with sergey lavrov to find out if the vladimir putin government is willing or interested in backing away from the assad regime at any level. the white house is also dealing with a staff shakeup. k.t. mcfarland is out as the deputy national security adviser. she was brought in after michael flynn. she will soon be nominated as the next ambassador to
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singapore. inside syria, some of the survivors of the syrian gas attack are not too impressed with president trump's attack on the air base. jets are still taking off and staging bombing runs on the same town that was hit by the gas. holly williams has the story. >> reporter: this is the face of syria's civil war. abdul hamid al yusef lost 29 of his family members last week, including his wife and twin babies. i wanted my daughter aya to be a doctor, he said, and achmed was going to be my sidekick. he buried them on wednesday, the day after the attack on his hometown. you chose to carry your babies in your arms to be buried. why did you do that? because that's how i carried them when they were alive, he said. i loved them so much, and i know they loved me too.
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abdel hamid told me he put them next to each other in their grave and told them not to be scared. even in the cruelty and chaos of syria's six-year-long conflict, the attack stands out for its brutality. it happened on abdel hamid's second anniversary with his wife. six years ago, he told us, he was taking part in peaceful protests against the syrian president, bashar al-assad. an uprising that met with violence. assad is a criminal, he said. all we wanted was dignity and freedom. do you think that the american missile strike will make any difference? i thought it was a good start, he told us, but the regime airstrikes haven't stopped. his 16-year-old nephew, achmed, was released from hospital yesterday. they, like their country, have
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. president trump has vowed to bring jobs back to america. but what if those jobs don't exist anymore? these days, automation is making a lot of professions obsolete. david polk of yahoo finance took a ride on the road to the future. >> reporter: tony hughes has been a long-haul truck driver for more than 20 years. but today, all he has to do is sit back and relax. >> okay. rosebud is on. woo-hoo. >> reporter: we're hauli hauling 20,000 pounds of freight down the florida turnpike in a self-driving truck. it's been retrofitted with a kit. these two founded the company in
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2016. >> we think that sometime toward the end of the year we could be doing this without a person behind the wheel. >> reporter: this year? >> yeah. >> reporter: self-driving trucks this year. >> yeah. >> reporter: and if it's not his company, it might be otto whose truck made headlines by driving across to colorado to deliver a shipment of beer. otto is owned by uber which has also been testing self-driving taxis in pennsylvania and arizona. but here's the thing. once our trucks and taxis drive themselves, what will happen to the people who used to do those jobs? in the u.s., that's 180,000 taxi drivers, 600,000 uber drivers and 3.5 million thruck drivers. martin ford is the author of "rise of the robots." he says driverless cars and trucks is just the beginning of
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a wave of automation that will threaten millions of jobs in every industry at once. like america's nearly 5 million store workers. later this year, shoppers in seattle will be able to walk in to the first amazon go grocery. take what they want and walk out again. sensors will detect what you take and bill you automatically. >> the cashiers are totally gone. you're going to end up with the equivalent of a walmart with, you know, a handful of employees. you scale that out, and that's just extraordinarily disruptive. >> reporter: you name an occupation, and there's somebody considering a robot to take it over. >> look how delicate, perfect every time. >> reporter: at zume pizza in silicon valley, four specialized robots help make the pizza. eventually, the company plans to replace the remaining humans on the line, too. here's zume's chief technology expert. you would think there would be
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some roman pizza chef who would say no, this is not the way it's been done since our ancestors. >> as the world changes, there's a lot of other things we don't do like our ancestors did either. >> reporter: the problem is they threaten blue color jobs. not so, says martin ford. >> we're seeing dramatic advances in the area of computers analyzing tumors, mammograms and being able to find disease. we're seeing algorithms moving to areas like journalism for example. >> reporter: wait, wait, certainly not journalism. >> absolutely. by one account, every 30 seconds, there's a new story published that's machine-generated. >> reporter: they're even threatening the masters of the universe, two weeks ago, black rock, the world's largest money manager announced that it's laying off dozens of human stock pickers and replacing them with
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robots. by 2025, across the financial industry, artificial intelligence is expected to replace 230,000 human workers. >> bring on the disruption that is automation. >> reporter: this is the chief information officer at goldman sachs. the company now hires nearly as many computer engineers as financial workers. >> reporter: in the movie "wall street", they would be barking buy, buy, buy, into the phone. >> now they're going click, click, click. >> reporter: a quarter of these people aren't traders. they're coders. writing software to automate the routine grunt work of employees all across the company. some day, could software replace the functions of these folks? >> that's a great question. i don't think anybody knows the answer. >> reporter: all right, we get it. no job is safe. according to one recent study, 47% of american jobs could be lost to ought make in the next
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20 years. martin ford says it's time to start thinking about what we're going to live on in the post-robot economy. >> one of the things out there is a guaranteed minimum income. >> reporter: and this is where everybody gets let's say $10,000 a year just for being alive. >> right. a better way to think of it is the idea that we built this tremendously prosperous society. everybody ought to have, if you're a citizen at least, some sort of ownership stake in this. >> reporter: but the purpose of having a job is not just to have income, it's also meaning and purpose and a place to go every day. >> that's right. that's going to and real challenge. it's the challenge with us all. >> reporter: ah, but wait. most experts do agree that automation will soon take over millions of our jobs, but they don't all agree that that will mean mass unemployment. >> history has suggested that the pessimists have been wrong time and time again. >> reporter: including m.i.t.
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economist. >>q >> we have tractors that do the work that horses used to do. we don't do bookkeeping with books, but this has not reduced the amount of employment. >> reporter: he also points out that the changes won't happen overnight. >> i'm sure 20 years from now, almost no one will be driving a vehicle. young people will say i'm not going to have a driving career so i won't go there. >> reporter: but they may think i'll go to retail, that's going away. maybe i'll be a cher. that -- chef. >> it's the year 1900, and 40% of all employment is in agriculture. so some twirpy economist teleports back in time to farmer
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pogue. what do you think 38% of the people are going to do? health and wellness, software, mobile devices. most of what we do barely existed 100 years ago. >> reporter: in other words, just because we can't predict what we'll be doing doesn't mean we'll be doing nothing. and, sure enough, despite having replaced so many stock traders with software, alisha says that goldman sachs still employs the same number of people. >> all of a sudden, that young person is engaging with the client on their actual problems, rather than being stuck till 1:00 a.m. doing nothing but manning several different spreadsheets and trying to corral all this data together. >> reporter: you'll hear the same argument at starski robotics. they will still employ human drivers, but they'll sit in front of screens, driving the
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trucks by remote control once they're off the highway. and if tony hughes can keep his job without the weeks away. >> so in that aspect, it's going to make my life better. >> reporter: if you get hired to be one of the pilots, the remote control pilots. >> sure. >> he's on the top of the list. >> reporter: this might be my last chance to be in a truck with a human driver. i had to ask. >> will you? >> yeah, i will. >> reporter: yes, yes. i'd like to see a robot do that. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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every kid has probably eaten a kit kat, at least once in their lives. you know that song, ♪ break me off a piece of that kit kat bar ♪ it turns out kit kats are huge in japan. >> reporter: at a shop in tokyo's ginza district, luxury kit kats are on full display. that's right. luxury kit kats. and the mastermind behind these $5 kit kat confections is this
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chef. in general, he says, the japanese prefer milder flavors, rather than aggressive flavors that hit you over the hid. takagi's kit kats with flavors like macha green tea, butter and strawberry maple. cedrick mccroy is kit kat's man in japan. how big is kit kat in japan? >> it's very big. we consume up to 5 million kit kats in japan a day. >> reporter: kitto katto sounds a lot like kitto katsu which means "you surely will win." that's why it's become an edible
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talisman. the company shrewdly decided to capitalize on that. >> absolutely. and it became part of the mission to play their lucky charm. so kit kat's mission in japan is really to encourage people. >> reporter: and to sell some not-to-mildly-flavored kit kats to tourists. anyone in the mood for a purple sweet potato kit kat? or a bite of a refreshing apple kit kat. a kit kat a day keepes the doct doctor away. woo. or perhaps you'd like to spice things up with a wasabi kit kat. or how about a sake kit kat. >> they have read on facebook or social media that the japanese kit kat was fantastic. so when they come here they want to taste. >> reporter: kit kat diplomacy.
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back in his confectionary, he indulged me as we talked about a premium new kit kat. i know it sounds crazy, but could we mix the pistachio with the raspberry? >> translator: shall we give that a try? >> reporter: yes, yes, yes, yes. the color will probably be ghastly, but it smells good, doesn't it? the color is awful, isn't it? >> translator: try a taste. >> reporter: it's very good. it's very good. try it. >> mm. very good. >> reporter: oishi. that means delicious. the kit kat. i believe i have passed my ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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in our series, "living stronger", we are introducing you to older members of the american family who are an inspiration to all members. tonight don dahler introduces you to a fencing coach. >> reporter: kristin vine is a no-nonsense fencing coach. one of the best in the nation. >> good, then i come back, you come forward. >> reporter: she drills her baylor school team in chattanooga, tennessee on the tactics and techniques that have led to 17 state titles. >> reporter: do you think people who don't fence understand the intricacies? >> absolutely not. oh, you're a fencer. yeah, that's, and they don't get it. >> reporter: but the 56-year-old isn't just content to direct
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others and stalk the sidelines. vines is a four-time, usa fencing champion who still competes. in fact, she won the gold at last year's national championship for women aged 50-59. which is better? when you're in the competition or when you see them in the competition? >> oh, i'd rather compete than watch them compete. i can't stand to watch them lose. >> reporter: at 6'2", vines says she may be a little slower than her opponents, but her secret to living stronger is to outwork them. when you began this sport 30 years ago, could you ever have imagined that you would still be competing at this age? >> nope. i figured i would have moved on to something else. >> reporter: anf coaching and winning championships isn't enough, there's also a correlation between her obscure sport and the difficult, dead language she teaches -- latin. >> it's a life lesson. how do you react to losing? how do you rye act eact to fail?
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do you quit? or do you get up and try again? and it's the kids who get up and try again where i know i've made a difference. >> reporter: one of those is seth vestal, who says she's made a difference. >> she's reason i do fence, sheet coach. >> hopefully when my knees give out they'll be able to put new ones in. and i'll keep going. >> reporter: which means for years to come, kristin vines will continue to be a towering presence on the fencing strip and in the lives of her students. don dahler, cbs news, chattanooga, tennessee. that's overnight news for this tuesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back later for the morning news and of course cbs this morning.

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