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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 5, 2018 3:00am-3:59am PST

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crash involving an amtrak train. the latest wreck happened early sunday morning, in casey, south carolina, across the river from the state capital, columbia. a passenger train, believed off to be on the wrong track, plowed into a freight train killing at least two people and injuring more than 100. cbs news transportation correspondent kris van cleave is at the crash site. >> early indications are amtrak train 91 was traveling at 59 mild an hour when it hit a freight train early this morning. on board the train were nearly 150 passengers and crew. the 54-year-old engineer, of savannah, georgia, and 36-year-old conductor were both killed when the lead locomotive and some of the passenger cars derailed. >> i was awoke by the rumbling, i guess, when the train wheels were in the gravel. and then it just stopped. and fortunately my partner was able to brace yourself,
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properly. i was not able to brace properly. ended up going into the wall. kind of giving myself a bump on the head. >> lexington county coroner. >> we should have had a lot more casualties but we didn't. >> 116 people were taken to area hospitals with range of injuries. ntsb now is on scene to investigate the crash. >> they weren't supposed to be meeting, like that, by the bridge. clearly. and there may be a time factor. that's what all it peers to me. i defer to those who, who are experts in that, and do have the correct information. it appears amtrak was on the wrong track. >> south carolina governor henry mcmaster toured the crash site. >> the first engine, fralt train, of course was torn up, single engine of the amtrak train headed south was barely recognizable. it's quite a, quite a -- crash. >> this is the third deadly amtrak crash since december.
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currently being investigated by the ntsb. kris van cleave, cbs news, columbia, south carolina. >> for more, we turn to former ntsb chairman and cbs news transportation safety analyst mark rosenker, mark, the third amtrak related accident in two months. does the company have a safety problem? >> absolutely, elaine. three accidents in 60 days. this is absolutely unaccept bum. and things need to change. this is america's national railroad. passengers are entitled to clean, efficient, safe transportation. >> well, you were chairman of the ntsb in 2008 when positive train control technology was mandated, the safety feature can help stop a train before an accident. why has there been such a delay getting this installed? >> one of great disappointments to me. i thought we had solved this problem with the railroad safety
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improvement act of 2008. requiring class 1 railroads to install positive train control by the end of 2015. that was seven years of, of, possibilities of getting this technology put into effect. they've only had the class 1 railroads, less than 20% of the tracks complete by the time the deadline occurred. the railroads went to congress and said they're not going to be able to operate unless they get an extension. congress caved in. gave them the extension. and people died as a result of that. over the past year or two. >> all right, mark rosenker, thank you very much, mark for your time. >> the house intelligence committee is expected to vote tomorrow whether few of release the democrats' rebuttal to a controversial pub memo release fried day. republicans accuse officials at the fbi and justice department of anti-trump bias and surveillance abuse.
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the president weighed in again today from florida, and errol barn elt is there. >> feeling vindicated by the house gop russia probe memo president trump quoted "wall street journal" editorial. the fbi and foreign intelligence surveillance act appear to have been used to influence the 2016 election and its aftermath. this is unacceptablen a democracy. but the president excluded this warning. mr. trump would do well to knock off the tweets lambasting the mueller probe. >> i am on record saying i support bob mueller 100%. >> congressman, the only republican house intelligence committee member to review the memo's underlying materials sees justification for the special counsel investigation. >> you need an investigation into russia. you need an investigation into trump tower and the cambridge analytic e-mail separate apart from the dossier. >> the investigation. >> adam schiff, top democrat, says despite concerns over
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surveillance of the trump campaign adviser, evidence shows another member of the campaign triggered the probe. >> it began with george papadopoulos, adviser for candidate trump someone meeting secretly with the russians talking about the stolen clinton e-mails. schiff pushed for carat e-mail to be released. committee member, will hurd explains why. >> there were references to ongoing intelligence operations. i believe they're working through that. >> i'm -- >> if the house intelligence committee votes to release the democratic memo, president trump then decides if and how it should be made public. portions could be redacted or kept under wraps entirely. elaine. >> errol barnett, thanks. now some other stories we are following in the cbs "weekend news feed." a san francisco police officer is recovering after being runover last week by a robbery suspect.
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video shows the the suspect backing up his car and running over the officer and another suspect. both survived. other officers on the scene grew their guns but did not shoot as the car drove away. >> space x is counting done to liftoff for its falcon heavy rocket. it is basically three reusable rockets bolted together. the falcon heavy weighs more than 3 million pounds and stands nearly 230 feet tall. the middle booster wril launch a car. tesla roadster towards mars. test launch tuesday from historic cape canaveral pad used in apolo missions. it will be raining purple this week at an auction of prince memorabilia. the legendary singer's purple piano, pants, and boots are among dozens of items going up for sale. the online auction begins
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the pharmaceutical industry is coming under fire for alleged role in the opioid crisis tearing at the nation. but it is not only prescription drugs fueling the crisis. traffickers are bringing drugs across the southern border and the u.s. customs service seized more than 180 pounds of fent ne fentynl air mailed into the country. >> we need the wall stopping drugs from pouring in. >> president trump used illegal drug trade as justification for the $1 billion wall. a former senior dhs official tells cbs news that's not where the drugs are coming from. >> problem is the po box in america that gets the shipment through the postal service straight from china. >> nearly a year, rob portman and team of investigators tracked the deadly door to door delivery of opioids.
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it started with a google search. turned up retailers eager to make a deal. almost go. >> senator portman's team never actually bought any drugs. in a separate probe they used shipment and payment data to track 500 apparently successful deliveries of opioids nationwide. the deals totaled nearly $250,000. the country of origin, china, preferred method of shipping, u.s. postal service express mail service. >> there is no requirement for electronic data in advance to tip off law enforcement. >> reporter: the postal service supposed to work with customs and border protection, portman says they struggle with poor coordination and volume. last fall we saw that challenge at the nation's busiest mail room. inside jfk airport. dogs and agents hand screen a fraction of the packages.
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>> i'm looking at fentanyl. >> they want every package headed to the u.s. to include automated data. the sender's name and address. 18 people of those that received drugs, face charges. and seven died of an overdose. >> when that 49-year-old man outside of cleveland ohio dies of an overdose of fentanyl within a couple weeks of delivery, you realize we are not doing our job. >> president trump's opioid commission has also recommended advanced mail screening. senator portman's bill yet to come up for a vote. in a statement, the postal service supports the goal of increased data, suggested thoughtful modifications to the bill to make it workable. >> disgraced movie mogul harvey weinstein is fighting back against new allegations of sixable miscsi actress uma thurman accused
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weinstein of trying to force himself on her years ago. here is mireya villarreal. >> now i want to dance. i want to win. i want that trophy. >> pulp fiction 1994 debut catapulted uma thurman's career in hollywood. ♪ ♪ the movie's success led thurman to reunite with the director and executive producer harvey weinstein for kill bill 1 and 2. her role as beatrice kiddo, strong woman was box office gold that brought in more than dla 300 million. but behind the scenes, thurman is now revealing in a "the new york times" article, her relationship with harvey weinstein had become toxic. he used to spend hours talking to me about material. this was my champion. i was never any kind of studio darling. he had a chokehold on the type of films and directors that were right for me. thurman accuses weinstein off taking her years ago at a london hotel. he pushed me down. he tried to shove himself on me. he tried to expose himself.
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he did all kinds of unpleasant things. when accusations against weinstein first broke in october, thurman initially stayed silent. in late november sheaf wished instagram followers a happy thanksgiving but cryptically included you, harvey and all your wicked conspirators. a spokeswoman for harvey weinstein said, weinstein considered thurman a colleague and friend. he acknowledges making an awkward pass 25 years ago after misreading her signals. but follows about her claims of being physically assaulted are untrue. in a statement to cbs news, harvey weinstein's attorney accuses uma thurman of embellishing what happened. he said they will carefully examine and investigate her statements to "the new york times" to decide whether or not off to take legal acttion against her. elaine. >> mireya villarreal, thanks. the cbs "overnight news" the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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>> reporter: the 6-year-old's father, signed her up. top. linson, a coordinator likes the fact that parents control who their children can talk to. >> that creates safer environment than text messaging that all you need is a phone number and send a message to anybody no blocks or anything with that. >> messenger kids has to be set up through a parents' face book account, children under 13 are not allowed to have their own. the app created with the help from child development experts has no buttons for sharing, commenting or liking posts. a facebook spokesperson told cbs this morning, we continue to be focused an making messenger kids be the best experience it can be for families. >> really what it is doing in doctrine eight much younger kids on to social media when their friendships should be off line and face to face. >> executive director of the campaign for a commercial free
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chiel childhood says elementary students should not be exposed to social media. cites studies linked to increases in depression, suicide rates and body image issues. >> facebook is the world's largest social media company. by them going after young children and trying to get them on social media, it is going to be a game changer. >> josh golan feels so strongly about keeping children off social media, he took the wait until 8th pledge, encouraged parents not to give their children smart phones until the 8th grade. still ahead, the club drug researchers say is showing promise for treating severe depression.
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trust #1 doctor recommended dulcolax. use dulcolax tablets for gentle dependable relief. suppositories for relief in minutes. and dulcoease for comfortable relief of hard stools. dulcolax. designed for dependable relief. an old drug is offering new hope to people who suffer from severe depression and suicidal thoughts. paula reid looked into the promising treatment and its risks. >> ann stallings says she has been battling severe depression for most of her life. she tried anti-depressants and electroconvulsive therapy, nothing worked. until she came to this potomac,
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maryland, clinic and tried ketamine. >> fifth treatment in. i had come home from the grocery store. playing around with groceries. i was like, wow, this is how you don't feel depressed. >> approved by the fda in the 1970s to sedate patients during medical procedures. commonly known as an caltrans quillizer and in powder form as special k. a club drug used to get high. today, ketamine, provided legally, off label to treat depression at an estimated 250 clinics across the u.s. dr. steve levine offers ketamine infusions around the country as alternative to anti-depressants. >> everything for the past 50 years has been based on the chemical imbalance theory of depression which has never held water. all of the medicines while they do help a lot of people are based on a flawed theory
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probably one of the reasons why they do take so long to work. >> stallings didn't have time to wait. she had an especially hard time over the holidays, and when her father got sick, she thought about taking her own life. >> so you had suicidal thoughts, you got an emergency appointment for ketamine. after that appointment your suicidal thoughts were gone. >> yes. gone. >> that's in line with what columbia university discovered in one of the largest studies yet on ketamine. researchers found the drug was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts and in patients. the effects lasted up to six weeks. for decades. dr. jerry santacora has been studying ketamine at yale. the drug is not adktive in the way opioids are, but could be harmful in the long run. >> there is at least evidence in animal models these types of medications can cause some structural damage in the brain. that is usually at higher doses,
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usually at long term exposure. we don't know where that level its. >> but for ann stallings despite unknowns she is content with a chance to feel normal. >> i've can live a quality, happy life, and beep productive, be able to go to work, to be able to have my family, to enjoy life, not walk through life. but enjoy life. it's worth it. >> paula reid, cbs news, potomac, maryland. >> up next, for this super bowl star, the biggest battle is off the football field.
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we end tonight at the super bowl where the biggest challenge facing the member of the new england patriots is not the hard charging eagles. solder tackled a greater challenge off the field now helping his son do the same. here is mark strassmann. >> reporter: nate solder plays left tackle for the nuclear patriots. one of tom brady's bodyguards on the team's offensive line. he is massive. 6'8", 320 pounds. but cancer has blindsided him twice. >> you think it is something that older people get. people that smoke cigarettes this sort of thing. not the case at all. >> in 2014, solder had surgery
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for testicular cancer and kept playing. the next year, cancer really hit home for solder and his wife lexy. hudson, their first child, was 3 months old. >> we were giving him a bath. we felt a lump on his left side. felt weird. we never noticed it before. >> hudson had a rare kidney cancer. >> hudson has tumors in both kidneys. and in each kidney, he has multiple tumors. >> emotionally we were like bankrupt. >> yeah. >> ape year of chemotherapy shrank hudson's tumors. three month as go they started growing again. which means the 2-year-old is back on chemo. >> just is this ever going to go away? >> yeah, we have faith that it will get better. i totally believe he will be okay. >> when the patriots won their fifth super bowl last year. hudson was in houston. it is the nfl's ultimate moment. but not solder's. not anymore.%
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>> before my biggest stress, biggest worry, all my concerns were coming from football. and now, football is a way that i can release from a lot of the stresses in life. >> your job is to protect tom brady. >> right. >> you would do anything to protect your son from this? got to be humbling. >> yeah, get cancer. doesn't matter who you are. knocks anyone out you. realize we are all human beings. we struggle. we have these battles we have to go through. >> for the solder's, hudson's battle could redefine the meaning of winning. mark strassmann, cbs news, foxboro, massachusetts. >> we wish the solder family the best. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you've the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, time's elaine quijano.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. for the third time in less than two months. federal investigators are at the scene of a deadly crash involving an amtrak train. the latest wreck happened early sunday morning in casey, south carolina. a passenger train believed to be on the wrong track plowed into a fralt train killing two and injuring more than a 100. cbs news, transportation correspondent, kris van cleave at the crash site.
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>> early indications are amtrak train 91 was traveling at 59 mild an hour when it hit a freight train early this morning. on board the train were nearly 150 passengers and crew. the 54-year-old engineer, of savannah, georgia, and 36-year-old conductor were both killed when the lead locomotive and some of the passenger cars derailed. >> i was awoke by the rumbling, i guess, when the train wheels were in the gravel. and then it just stopped. and fortunately my partner was able to brace yourself, properly. i was not able to brace properly. ended up going into the wall. kind of giving myself a bump on the head. >> lexington county coroner. >> we should have had a lot more casualties but we didn't. >> 116 people were taken to area hospitals with range of injuries. ntsb now is on scene to investigate the crash. >> they weren't supposed to be meeting, like that, by the bridge. clearly. and there may be a time factor. that's what all it peers to me. i defer to those who, who are experts in that, and do have the correct information. it appears amtrak was on the wrong track. >> south carolina governor henry mcmaster toured the crash site. >> the first engine of the freight train, of course was
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torn up. single engine of the amtrak train headed south was barely recognizable. it's quite a, quite a -- crash. >> this is the third deadly amtrak crash since december. currently being investigated by the ntsb. kris van cleave, cbs news, columbia, south carolina. >> for more on this, we turn to former ntsb chairman and cbs news transportation safety analyst mark rosenker, mark, the third amtrak related accident in two months. does the company have a safety problem? >> absolutely, elaine. three accidents in 60 days. this is absolutely unaccept bum. and things need to change. this is america's national railroad. passengers are entitled to clean, efficient, safe transportation. >> well, you were chairman of the ntsb in 2008 when positive train control technology was mandated, the safety feature can
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help stop a train before an accident. why has there been such a delay getting this installed? >> one of great disappointments to me. i thought we had solved this problem with the railroad safety improvement act of 2008. requiring class 1 railroads to install positive train control by the end of 2015. that was seven years of, of, possibilities of getting this technology put into effect. they've only had the class 1 railroads, less than 20% of the tracks complete by the time the deadline occurred. the railroads went to congress and said they're not going to be able to operate unless they get an extension. congress caved in. gave them the extension. and people died as a result of that. over the past year or two. >> the house intelligence committee is expected to vote
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tomorrow whether few of release the democrats' rebuttal to a controversial pub memo release fried day. republicans accuse officials at the fbi and justice department of anti-trump bias and surveillance abuse. the president weighed in again today from florida, and errol barnett is there. >> feeling vindicated by the house gop russia probe memo president trump quoted "wall street journal" editorial. the fbi and foreign intelligence surveillance act appear to have been used to influence the 2016 election and its aftermath. this is unacceptable in a democracy. but the president excluded this warning. mr. trump would do well to knock off the tweets lambasting the mueller probe. >> i am on record saying i support bob mueller 100%. >> congressman, the only republican house intelligence committee member to review the memo's underlying materials sees justification for the special counsel investigation. >> you need an investigation into russia.
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you need an investigation into trump tower and the cambridge analytic e-mail separate apart from the dossier. >> the investigation. >> adam schiff, top democrat, says despite concerns over surveillance of the trump campaign adviser, evidence shows another member of the campaign triggered the probe. >> it began with george papadopoulos, adviser for candidate trump someone meeting secretly with the russians talking about the stolen clinton e-mails. schiff pushed for carat e-mail to be released. committee member, will hurd explains why. >> there were references to ongoing intelligence operations. i believe they're working through that. >> i'm -- >> if the house intelligence committee votes to release the democratic memo, president trump then decides if and how it should be made public. portions could be redacted or kept under wraps entirely. elaine. >> errol barnett, thanks.
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>> disgraced movie mogul harvey weinstein is fighting back against new allegations of actress uma thurman accused weinstein of trying to force himself on her years ago. here is mireya villarreal. >> now i want to dance. i want to win. i want that trophy. >> pulp fiction 1994 debut catapulted uma thurman's career in hollywood. ♪ ♪ the movie's success led thurman to reunite with the director and executive producer harvey weinstein for kill bill 1 and 2. her role as beatrice kiddo, a strong powerful woman was box office gold that brought in more than $300 million. but behind the scenes, thurman is now revealing in a "the new york times" article, her relationship with harvey weinstein had become toxic. he used to spend hours talking to me about material. this was my champion. i was never any kind of studio darling. he had a chokehold on the type of films and directors that were right for me.
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thurman accuses weinstein off taking her years ago at a london hotel. he pushed me down. he tried to shove himself on me. he tried to expose himself. he did all kinds of unpleasant things. when accusations against weinstein first broke in october, thurman initially stayed silent. in late november she wished instagram followers a happy thanksgiving but cryptically included you, harvey and all your wicked conspirators. a spokeswoman for harvey weinstein said, weinstein considered thurman a colleague and friend. he acknowledges making an awkward pass 25 years ago after misreading her signals. but follows about her claims of being physically assaulted are untrue. in a statement to cbs news, harvey weinstein's attorney accuses uma thurman of embellishing what happened. he said they will ca
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friday was janet yellin's last day as chair of the federal reser reserve. what's next for her? rita braver sat down with yellin for an exit interview. >> let's see. i have got quite a few going away gifts. >> when we caught up with janet yellin friday the boxes were packed and she was almost out the door. >> i'm ready to go. >> must be bittersweet moment? >> it is a bittersweet moment. i love this job. and the central focus of my life. i enjoyed time with my family outside of work. but the work i do here is the core of my existence. and it's been my identity. >> a big change? >> it will be a big change. >> yellin was born in brooklyn, valedictorian of her high school class. the only woman to get a ph.d. in economics from yale in 1971.
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sun she worked in government and as a university professor. she also made history. >> i do want to show that women can perform well in these positions. >> good afternoon. >> by most accounts, she has. numerous republican senators voted against her confirmation. and it was an open secret that she was not the leading candidate for the job. >> widely believed to be mr. obama's first choice for the federal reserve job. >> since yellin took the helm in 2014 in the midst of the recovery from the great recession the economy has steadily strengthened. >> this is my chair right here. center. >> in large part through decisions reached here, in the federal reserve board room, in washington. >> this is arguably the most important economic conference room in the entire world. >> i think that's actually a fair assessment, the
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policymakers and senior staff sit around this table. and we sometimes disagree. but, we're not disagreeable. >> under yellin's leadership, the board slowly raised interest rates. and also slowly, started cutting back on bonds and other assets, the fed bought up to ease the recession. it worked. inflation its now less than 2%. and unemployment at 6.7% when she took office, has dropped significantly, to 4.1%. >> the labor market has become stronger. i believe that since i have become chair, several million jobs have been created, on the order of 10 million. >> i think the peppers look beautiful don't they? >> yell spin is used to debatin economic policy even at home. her husband and grocery shopping partner, george ackerloft
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happens to be a nobel prize winning economist. believe it or not they met at the fed. where they both did a brief stint in the 1970s. >> really? >> this is a fed love story? >> federal romance. >> your husband said not only did our personalities mesh perfectly but we have always been in all but perfect agreement on macro economics. that just sound so romantic. he could have said zing went the strings of my heart or something like that. >> we decided to get married very quickly. i think we were quite sure that we were right for one another. >> and there is no question he loves what she did as fed chair. >> did you ever think wait a minute. why is she, puzzled about something she was doing? or did it always make sense to you? additional gradual rate hikes are likely to be
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appropriate over the next few years. >> which raises the question of what will happen when yellin leaves. it's not a voluntary departure. she was a frequent target of donald trump during the 2016 cam feign. >> janet yellin of the fed. the fed is doing political by keeping the interest rates at this praised her. >> janet yellin, a wonderful job. >> were you uh disappointed when you learned you would not get a second term as almost everybody else has the? >> so it is common for people to be reappointed by presidents of the opposite party. i made clear that i would be welling to ser willing to serve another term. yes i do feel a sense of disappointment. look, i have been in high level positions in the federal reserve for many years. where i think i have had a seat
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at the table to make the arguments that i thought needed to be made. and to advocate for good policy. >> yellin, a democrat, will be succeeded by jerome powell, a republican. but, someone who has been described as her protege. >> people say that, your supportive of him, is that correct? >> i am supportive of him. i have worked with governor powell for five years. very constructively. he is thoughtful. balanced. dedicated to public service. i have found him to be a very thoughtful policy maker. >> still, yellin fears that some of the policies she championed are in peril. the house has passed a bill that would curtail the fed's independence when it comes to setting interest rates. and there is also talk of rolling back regulations the fed imposed on banks after the economic collapse.
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>> they're now much safer, much sounder, and much better at managing their risks. and it would be a grave misfake to roll that back. >> on yellin any last day in office, the fed flexed its muscles. slapping wells fargo with unusually harsh penalties, for widespread consumer abuses. as for yellin any view of whether the stock market, which plum elt plum elted on friday has been too high in recent months. >> i don't want to say too high. i do want to say high. price earnings ratios are near the high end of their historical ranges. itch you look at commercial real estate. prices there are quite high relative to rents. now is that a bubble? or is it too high? and there it is very hard to tell. but it is a source of, of some concern that asset valuations are so high. what we look at is, if, if stock
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prices or asset prices generally were to fall what would that mean for the ee kon cconomy as . the financial system much better capitalized, the banking system is more resilient. and i think our overall judgment is that if there were to be a decline in asset valuations it would not damage unduly the core of our financial system. >> we are in the ninth year of a recovery. can it really keep going like this? >> yes, it can keep going. recoveries don't diep of old age. >> but for now, janet yellin departs feeling that she is leaving the economy stronger than she found it. and, exiting a job she dearly loved. among people who seemed to love her. >> last opportunity for lunch in the westward cafe. thank you.
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trust #1 doctor recommended dulcolax. use dulcolax tablets for gentle dependable relief. suppositories for relief in minutes. and dulcoease for comfortable relief of hard stools. dulcolax. designed for dependable relief. make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine. blue for him. purple for her. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together. >> a young man from minnesota showed everybody at last night's super bowl what an mvp looks like. mark strassmann has his story. >> our season will not end today or this week. let's go. >> they're the moose lake rebels, a football powerhouse in northern minnesota. where the frozen fields can feel
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as hard as any tackle. for dan's lilia, a 16-year-old junior this is bliss. >> i would be in the stand wearing my rebels jeshz gee have my hair painted red and blue. watch them think to myself i want to beep out there. >> reporter: but it is complicated. danny came into the world with a separated spine. >> i was born with a broken back. paralyzed from the waist down. >> you have never walked? >> no. >> dan and cheryl lilia are danny's parents. >> you knew almost from day one he wouldn't walk. >> yeah. >> it became a realization. now he is, he is going to be in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. what do we do? we are going to raise this child. whatever he is going to be he is going to be. >> by 2, danny had spent ape year in a full body cast. he also has had nine surgeries for his mangled spine and club feet. but this football fanatic was
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born a rebel. >> he always wanted to do everything all the other kids did. >> danny was i want few be a rebel football player, all he ever wanted to do. ♪ >> before danny's sophomore year a teammate had an idea to get him on the field. danny could get out of his wheelchair, kneel down and be the player who holds the ball for the team's kicker during extra points and field goals. head coach, dave losac. >> he is excellent. >> loved that idea from day one. >> i always stress everybody finding their role on the team. and danny is just the perfect example of, you have a kid in a wheelchair. he has a role on this team. >> danny's special moment came in september, of 2016, moose lake played barnum high. >> what was it like to go out on the field the first time. >> just amazing. >> crowd cheering? >> definitely. >> thinking my gosh is actually happening. >> the crowd held their breath
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for danny. >> couldn't have been more perfect. in high manhands. he kicked it. went right through the uprights. >> must have been a dream come true? a been dreaming of being a rebel football player from kindergarten. dream come trying amazing. >> everybody coming over. high fives. crowd was cheering. there wasn't a prouder moment. >> the junior held the ball for more than 20 successful extra points. >> are you worried? >> if some one tackled him. probably the best day of his life. >> what would be the worst thing as that happened. an injury. he would get paralyzed? he is already there. >> danny's favorite nfl team, minnesota vikings heard about his passion for the game and invited him to watch them practice. >> they said are you ready to hold some kicks. yeah, sure. i put my helmet on. went out there. >> you are looking up. when he nods.
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says he is ready. you turn. open your hand. >> on the last kick their long snapper said this one is to win the game and go off to the super bowl. >> the kick was good. and the players were true to their word. danny really was going to tonight's super bowl. >> no way. >> is that for real. >> that's for real. >> congratulations. >> thank you, guys. >> two tickets. curt see courtesy of the vikings. danny also plays sled hockey and scouts say has potential to make the u.s. paralympic team. the kid born with a broken back will never walk, but he keeps kicking down doors. >> if you told me, 16 years ago, that, you would see your son playing football. are you kidding me? his determination and the things he has done has made the community realize the team
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steve hartman asked that question. >> in the shadow of the colorado hocki rockies. what to do with all the antique washington machines he has collected? >> you have got a problem. >> i do have a problem. >> 87-year-old lee maxwell had to build a warehouse to store all of the objects of his obsession. >> first automatic, 1937. >> what's more, is there is more. >> no. >> way more. >> no. >> behind the one warehouse. >> there is a second warehouse. again, filled with nothing but washing machines. >> i told you it was insane. >> it is one of the largest personal collections of anything in america. and lee says it all began innocently enough with this one maytag. he had just retired as an electrical engineering professor and was on a road trip with wife barbara when he saw this at a
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farm auction in iowa. >> by the time we got to maine, we had four. and that's where the, fur started to fly. she was thinking bad things about me. >> very bad things. >> i went off my rocker. i think maybe i did. >> by the time they got home. lee had bought a dozen more and a trail tire haul them. >> there is ate squeezer, scrubber combination. >> today there are nearly 1500 different machines in his collection. >> goes up and down. off awe one ones that you power. and ones that use power. >> he has a model never mass produced that ran on child labor. >> one kid here. >> one here. then they would teeter-totter. isn't that inventive. >> what i found most amazing. he restored all the machines. he find them in this condition. and then spends a couple weeks fix up each one. working up to ten hours a day, seven days a week. >> so what is your dilemma now?
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>> trying to find a home for it. >> so the thing can be preserved. >> do you think abumt this often? >> i do. every day. >> steve hartman or bill gates or something. >> he would look to find a ben factor. >> preferably bill gates. >> some one who could build a proper museum, dedicated to the washing machines we have today. indeed you can't leave mere without being struck how much washing machines have changed over the years. >> do you know how to turn this on? >> absluptabsolutely not. >> i didn't think so. >> how men are pretty much the same. steve hartman on the road in eaton, colorado. >> that's the "overnight news" for monday. for others check back later for the momorning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, february 5th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." over the middle into the end zone. >> a first for philadelphia. the eagles fly to a super bowl championship as the team soaks up the win, celebrations in philly take a rowdy turn. while the president said he's vindicated by the relief of the republican memo on the investigation, today democrats will fight to have their side of the story made public.

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