Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 16, 2018 3:12am-4:01am PST

3:12 am
3:13 am
my life for the last four years. >> the shooter was very active. he was actually walking down my hallway. he had shot and killed my teacher, and my door was wide open. and i was hiding in an open room that the shooter could have easily walked into and killed me. >> what is it that you want people to know about your teacher? >> he was just an amazing person. mr. beigel, his name. and he will forever be in my heart and forever be my hero because he basically saved my life. if it wasn't for him, i might not be here today. >> i didn't get to say good-bye to one miff best friends, and i got to find out this morning that he didn't make it. but i have to think about what i'm going to wear to his funeral now. >> i lost quite a few friends
3:14 am
yesterday. one that i had class with who was very close to me. and knowing that they're gone and i -- i would argue with them, and now that person is gone and i can never say i'm sorry. >> there were a lot of people that we lost, and they were wonderful people with great families. those families do not deserve what happened to them. my mom's best friend was waiting, was waiting all night because she couldn't find her son. and then now he's no longer with us. and i think that this could have been prevented. he should have never been able to get a gun. >> jack, when shootings like this happen, a lot of adults have a lot of conversations about what they think should happen. what do you think should happen? >> we shouldn't sensationalize school shootings because that
3:15 am
would downplay the severity of what this means to the parkland community and the students and family of douglas. and the best way to go about recovering from this is by providing support, love, and attention to those who need it and then go about addressing a political agenda instead of -- because within about an hour and a half of hearing that one of my best friends got shot i turned on the news live stream to see that people were using this as an argument against gun control. >> you heard jack talk about guns and -- >> it was -- yesterday was way too early to start talking about it. i don't -- i don't think that anybody should be using this for their political agenda. but i do also think at the same time this kid should never have been allowed to get his hands on a gun if he was mentally insane. ever. >> if there's anything that needs to be said right now, it's that when you shut this tv off
3:16 am
you have to go home and tell every single person you know you love them because you never know when your last time is going to be. >> i know how important that is for you, that message. >> we're going to go through this as a family. stoneman douglas is going to go through this as a family. parklanding will through this as a family. and together as a country we're going to go through this as a family. >> do you think you'll feel safe when you go back? >> through this whole ordeal we will be brave and fight we're eagles. we're not puppies. >> i don't know that i've ever seen a more remarkable, composed and inspiring group of students than the ones we talked to earlier. they are a testament to this community. they are a testament to this school district. and they wanted the -- they want the nation to know that tonight. coming up next we'll hear from the man who gave the fbi a tip about the shooting suspect last year. and later here tonight, another teenager accused of planning a school attack. he was turned in by his grandmother.
3:17 am
>> i'm finding journal entries from my grandson. okay, i never thought i'd say this, but i found bladder leak underwear that's actually pretty. surprised? it's called always discreet boutique. it looks and fits like my underwear. i know what you're thinking. how can something this pretty protect? hidden inside is a super absorbent core that quickly turns liquid to gel...
3:18 am
...for incredible protection. so i feel protected... ...and pretty. always discreet boutique. make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine. blue for him. purple for her. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together. oh! there's one.a "the sea cow"" manatees in novelty ts? surprising. what's "come at me bro?" it's something you say to a friend.
3:19 am
what's not surprising? how much money matt saved by switching to geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. disinfectant after i've says i hdisinfected? off the yeah, i'm not gonna do that. seventh generation's disinfectant spray. it kills 99.99% of bacteria, and there's no rinse required. time to come clean with seventh generation. #comeclean we're back now from parkland, florida. the fbi got a call about the school shooting suspect last year. but the bureau says it did not have enough information to take action. here's jeff pegues.
3:20 am
>> everyone down! >> reporter: about six months before police identified nikolas cruz as the douglas high school gunman -- >> i don't know how many nikolas cruzes are on youtube. >> reporter: ben bennight saw that name in the comments section of his youtube channel along with his post, dated september 24th, "i'm going to be a professional school shooter." bennight, a mississippi bail bondsman, immediately contacted the fbi, and the next day an agent came to his home. >> they took a copy of the screenshot, and i guess they initiated an investigation. i don't know. i hope they did. and i didn't hear anything else about it until yesterday when they contacted me to meet again. >> reporter: robert laskey is in charge of the fbi investigation. this afternoon he said the post was a dead end because it lacked specific information about the time, location, and identity of the person who posted it. >> the fbi also conducted internal database reviews and open source checks.
3:21 am
no additional information was found to positively identify the person who posted this comment. >> reporter: but in 2015 and 2016 cruz had posted pictures of himself on instagram with weapons. >> i could take threats like this by the dozens and send them to quantico every day and say what does this mean? it seldom means much without the background. >> reporter: ron hosko is a former assistant director of the fbi. >> they have to use their resources efficiently. and the volume of this is frankly overwhelming. if the fbi -- they do not have enough swimmers to swim in the mountain of social media threat. >> reporter: the fbi says that youtube took down the post last year. the instagram images of cruz armed with weapons? well, that stayed up until after yesterday's shooting. we reached out to instagram and youtube. we still have not heard back. jeff? >> jeff pegues, thank you for your reporting from washington tonight. coming up here
3:22 am
3:23 am
okay - let's try this. it says you apply the blue one to me. here? no... make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together. breathe freely fast wmy congestion's gone. i can breathe again! i can breathe again! vicks sinex... breathe on. in south portland, maine today a 15-year-old boy was arrested after schoolmates alert the police about a threatening message he allegedly posted on snapchat. and in everett, washington another possible attack may have been foiled by a grandmother. here's john blackstone. >> he's required to have restraints on him at all times. >> reporter: joshua o'connor may have been the next school
3:24 am
gunman. but then his grandmother called 911. >> i'm finding journal entries from my grandson. >> uh-huh. >> he's planning to have a mass shooting at one of the high schools. >> reporter: cathi o'connor called police to her home in everett, washington when she discovered this in her xwrnd son's journal. "i'm preparing myself for a school shooting. i can't wait. my aim has gotten much more accurate." >> couldn't have been an easy thing for her to do. but boy, it was sure the right thing for her to do. >> reporter: court documents say the 18-year-old had a semi-automatic rifle hidden in a guitar case, bomb-making equipment, and detailed plans to shoot people at aces high school, where he was a student. "i need to get the biggest fatality number i possibly can," he wrote. authorities say the rifle matches one used monday to rob a convenience store, and that o'connor wrote in his journal about how powerful he felt and how scared the female cashier was at him pointing his gun at
3:25 am
her. prosecutors believe the robbery was meant to get money to buy more material for the attack his
3:26 am
3:27 am
3:28 am
finally here tonight, people who knew aaron feis were not surprised that he put the safety of stoneman douglas students above his own. the assistant football coach and school security guard died a hero. at the first sound of gunshots feis yelled over his radio, "that is not firecrackers." then he ran to protect students. >> he sprinted with everything he had towards it to make sure everybody was safe. and i heard that he got in front of a couple of people and shielded them and he actually took the bullets for them. >> reporter: feis is believed to have saved at least two kids. he later died in surgery. a 1999 graduate of stoneman douglas, feis coached the offensive line. head coach willis may called him
3:29 am
"a big old teddy bear." how many of you knew coach feis? >> he was a friend to us. he wasn't just like a coach. he truly cared. >> we would always wave to him. we always made sure we took time out of aur day to speak to him and say hi because he was really the definition of an angel. >> reporter: sheriff scott israel's two sons played for him. >> the kids in this community loved him. they adored him. he was one of the greatest people i knew. >> reporter: aaron feis leaves behind a wife and daughter. he was 37 years old. >> feis, you're a hero. you're an american hero. you literally risked your life for people to live. >> and as we leave you here tonight, we want to show you one more picture of this extraordinary vigil that is taking place as people pay tribute. that is the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from parkland, florida i'm jeff glor.
3:30 am
>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." hi, everyone and welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. the suspect in the valentine's day school massacre in florida 19-year-old nikolas cruz is being held without bail. he's charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. police say cruz is the lone gunman who opened fire inside the marjory stoneman douglas high school wednesday, leaving the entire community shattered. investigators say cruz posted, quote, "very, very disturbing material on social media" and a white separatist leader says cruz trained with his group. manuel bojorquez begins our coverage. >> reporter: terrified students ran for their lives after witnessing classmates cut down by bullets. broward county sheriff scott
3:31 am
israel. >> at 2:21 hours 33 seconds the suspect readied his rifle and began shooting into rooms. >> reporter: the sheriff said nikolas cruz began firing at four classrooms on the first floor. the suspected shooter then made his way to the second floor, shot one victim, then went to the third floor, where he dropped his rifle and backpack. >> the spouspect crossed fields and ran west along with others who were fleeing and tried to mix in with the group that were running away, fearing for their lives. >> reporter: cruz turned up at a walmart and bought a drink at a subway sandwich shop. after a brief stop at mcdonald's he left at 3:01 p.m. as bullets rang out students quietly hid wherever they could. >> police, police. put your hands up. >> reporter: as police raced to their rescue. coconut creek officer michael leonard was the first to spot cruz, one hour and 20 minutes after the first shot was fired, about two miles away. >> i discovered an individual
3:32 am
walking on the sidewalk that was wearing the clothing description that had been given over the radio. he complied with my commands and was taken into custody without any issues. >> there needs to be justice. my friends are gone. >> reporter: student tyra hemans said she knew cruz was troubled but did not believe he was capable of killing her friend joaquin and assistant football coach aaron feis. >> he wasn't happy, so he had to take it out on people that were just so beautiful. >> reporter: sheriff israel once again repeated the call for anyone who sees or hears something suspicious to report it. >> if someone came forward to your agency with information about this suspect, what could you legally have done about the fact that he owned a gun? >> if he legally owned a gun, we couldn't do anything about arresting him for having a gun, but we could certainly follow up. we could certainly go to visit him. whether he legally owns a gun or not. >> so we went downstairs and they're screaming "code red,
3:33 am
code red, just keep on going, go back up." it was a very scary moment. but it was hard to believe that someone, an individual would have this type of power. >> we didn't know what was happening until our parents, who we didn't tell anything to, started texting us asking if we're okay, where we are. then we realized it was an active shooter. >> you were just 100 -- >> i was about 100 feet away from the shooter while he was firing. >> what did you see? >> i saw confusion and panic in the faces of people i went to school with, played rec sports with and saw every single day of my life for the last four years. >> the shooter was very active. he was actually walking down my hallway. he had shot and killed my teacher, and my door was wide open. and i was hiding in an open room that the shooter could have easily walked into and killed me. >> what is it that you want people to know about your teacher? >> he was just an amazing person.
3:34 am
mr. beigel, his name. and he will forever be in my heart and forever be my hero because he basically saved my life. i feel if it wasn't for him i might not be here today. >> i didn't get to say good-bye to one of my best friends, and i got to find out this morning that he didn't make it. but i have to think about what i'm going to wear to his funeral now. >> i lost quite a few friends yesterday. one that i had a class with who's very close to me. and knowing that they're gone and i would argue with them and now that person's gone and i could never say i'm sorry. there were a lot of people that we lost. they were wonderful people with great families. those families do not deserve what happened to them. my mom's best friend was waiting, was waiting all night
3:35 am
because she couldn't find her son. and then now he's no longer with us. and i think that this could have been prevented. he should have never been able to get a gun. >> jacqueline, shootings like this happen. a lot of adults have a lot of conversations about what they think should happen. what do you think should happen? >> we shouldn't sensationalize the school shootings because that would downplay the severity of what this means to the parkland community and the students and family of douglas. and the best way to go about recovering from this is by providing support, love, and attention to those who need it and then go about addressing a political agenda instead of -- within about an hour and a half of hearing that one of my best friends got shot i turned on the news livestream to see people were using this as an argument against gun control. >> you heard jack talk about guns -- >> yesterday was way too early to start talking about it.
3:36 am
i don't -- i don't think that anybody should be using this for their political agenda. but i do also think at the same time this kid should never have been allowed to get his hands on a gun if he was mentally insane. ever. >> if there's anything that needs to be said right now, it's that when you shut this tv off you have to go home and tell every single person you know you love them. because you never know when your last time is going to be. >> i know how important that is for you, that message. >> we're going to go through this as a family. stoneman douglas is going to go through this as a family. parkland will go through this as a family. and together as a country we're going to go through this as a family. >> do you think you'll feel safe when you go back? >> through this whole ordeal we will be brave and fight. we're eagles. we're not puppies. >> senior nick dworet was a
3:37 am
swimmer planning to compete for the university of indianapolis. before his death facebook friends wrote "we can't wait to see what you can achieve." alissa alhadeff was a talented soccer player. her mother said, "all she had to offer the world was love." friends called jaime guttenberg charismatic and lovely. her dad said, "we lost our baby girl." alaina petty helped victims of hurricane irma rebuild. her family says "she brought peace and joy to those who had lost everything." gina montalto volunteered as a friend for kids with special needs and was on the color guard squad. an instructor called her "the sweetest soul ever." carmen schenntrup was a some of the for a national merit scholarship. joaquin oliver from venezuela had just become a u.s. citizen. peter wang was shot holding the door open so others could flee. 14 teenagers in all, filled with promise. three adults were lost as well. geography teacher scott beigel,
3:38 am
athletic director chris hixon, and football new olay whips powerful skincare, now light-as-air a breakthrough moisturizer delightfully whipped for instant absorption feel a light-as-air finish in a flash new olay whips ageless
3:39 am
try the deoderant saving millions of clothes. degree ultraclear black + white. no yellow stains on white clothes. no white marks on black clothes. try degree ultraclear black + white. it won't let you down. of being there for my son's winning shot. that was it for me. that's why i'm quitting with nicorette. only nicorette mini has a patented fast dissolving formula. it starts to relieve sudden cravings fast. every great why needs a great how.
3:40 am
>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." the valentine's day school massacre in florida has renewed the call for tougher gun laws, but the u.s. congress is going in the opposite direction. the republican-controlled house recently passed a bill that would make gun permits just like driver's licenses. if you get a permit to year a gun in your home state, you can carry that gun across state lines and into any state in the nation. steve kroft has the story for "60 minutes." >> reporter: this is the handgun counter at van's sporting goods outside jackson, mississippi, a state with the fourth highest gun fatality rate in the country and some of the weakest gun laws. >> these are good for ankles, hip, or inside the pocket. >> reporter: pretty much anyone 18 years of age and not a
3:41 am
convicted felon can carry one of these concealed weapons here. in their pocket, their pants, or their purse. for self-defense against muggers, carjackers, and other assailants. >> it's ready to go. >> reporter: it's the concealed carry reciprocity act becomes law, they'll be able to carry them legally across state lines and onto the streets of any city in america. >> i think the aim of this bill is to simply allow responsibly armed americans to be able to travel and continue to defend their families. >> and carry concealed firearms. >> and carry concealed firearms. >> anywhere. >> yes. yes. >> reporter: tim schmidt is president and founder of the united states concealed carry association. along with the national rifle association and other gun rights groups, they have successfully sold the bill in conservative red states as a simple common sense solution to a hodgepodge of confusing contradictory state laws they say infringe upon
3:42 am
americans' rights to bear arms. >> these laws change on a quarterly basis if not more often. so you can easily go from being a responsibly armed citizen who's 100% legal to being a criminal just by crossing state lines. >> reporter: but there's fierce opposition to it in places like california where there are strict gun laws and concealed carry permits are difficult to obtain. it's one of eight states that generally require thorough background checks, at least some firearms training, and a proven need to carry a handgun. in another 30 states it's easier to get a concealed carry permit. and in many of those there's no requirement to be proficient in the use of firearms. a dozen states have no requirements at all. robin thomas, the executive director of the giffords law center to prevent gun violence, says forcing states to accept any and all gun permits would make the weakest laws in the country the new norm. >> someone who lives in nevada who's able to carry a loaded concealed weapon in nevada could
3:43 am
now bring that loaded gun into los angeles, into san francisco, and carry their loaded weapon even though in san francisco that's not someone who would get a permit. >> so this law would essentially usurp the gun laws in cities like new york and chicago and los angeles? >> absolutely. >> reporter: the blue state liberals who favor gun control it may sound like a right-wing fantasy. but to the national rifle association, which contributed $30 million to donald trump's presidential campaign and claims credit for his victory, it's their top legislative priority. and with midterm elections this year nothing is taken for granted. in 2013 a similar bill failed by just three votes. the nra declined to give us an interview on this story but their position is well documented on its website. this is the voice of its leader, wayne la prooeapierre, right af last election. >> this is our historic moment, to go on offense and defeat the force that's have aligned
3:44 am
against our freedom once and for all. i call on congress and the president-elect to pass national right to carry reciprocity as quickly as it can be written and signed. the individual right to carry a firearm in defense of our lives and our families does not and should not end at any state line. >> reporter: as proof of injustice the nra and other gun rights advocates use the case of shaneen allen as ammunition. in 2013 while driving from philadelphia to atlantic city, new jersey the single mother and mugging victim was pulled over with a pistol in her purse and a valid concealed carry permit from her home state of pennsylvania. >> let me tell you a story. >> reporter: congressman richard hudson of north carolina, who authored the house version of the concealed carry reciprocity act, told allen's story on the day the house passed the bill. >> what she didn't know is new jersey didn't recognize pennsylvania's concealed carry permits. so this single mom who'd never had a run-in with the law spent almost two months in jail and was facing ten years in prison
3:45 am
because she crossed that state line. >> how was the case finally adjudicated? >> governor chris christie stepped in and pardoned her. otherwise, like i said, she was facing ten years in prison. >> how often does that happen? >> well, once is too much. these are law-abiding citizens. these are not the problem. >> reporter: the large constituency for this message is a long way from the new jersey turnpike. in the red states that stretch from the carolinas through the mountains of the far west. it is the political fault line of regional and cultural differences that split the country. and guns are one of the triggers. >> hey. >> they're woven into the culture here. passed down from generation to generation in rural remote parts of the country where dialing 911 does not always bring immediate help. to people here, whether they're single mothers worried about robbers and rapists while driving their kids across state lines to soccer matches, or ranchers worried about rattlesnakes, guns are a
3:46 am
security blanket of self-reliance and protection. they keep them safe. >> for me it's just a way of life. it's like when i get up in the morn sxig get dressed i get my wallet, i get my watch, i get my keys, i get my phone. it's the same thing to get my gun. >> reporter: but in most big cities like los angeles, chicago, washington, d.c. and new york, guns are a cause of fear and concern, not comfort. and law enforcement is lined up against strangers from faraway places walking around their cities with loaded guns in violation of their own laws. >> i think it would be a disaster for new york city, and i think for major cities around the country. >> i think it's insanity. >> reporter: manhattan district attorney cyrus vance and new york city police commissioner james o'neal say their city has the most to lose. every year new york takes in nearly 50 million visitors from all over the country into a congested, sometimes chaotic city. even if a tiny fraction were legally carrying concealed
3:47 am
weapons, it would mean hundreds of thousands of additional guns for what is right now the safest big ski city in america. >> you bring that amount of firepower, even with well-intentioned people it's going to be extremely dangerous. >> more guns more violence, that's what you're saying. >> absolutely. >> reporter: they're not just worried about more crime but an increase in suicides, gun accidents, and heated arguments turning into lethal altercations. and with no national data base for concealed carry permits the nypd says it would not be able to immediately determine whether someone was legally carrying or not. >> right now we have a good idea of who's carrying guns. if this law passes all bets are off. anybody could come into new york city from any state and carry a weapon. >> i wouldn't presume to tell the residents of west virginia what their gun laws should be. they've figured out what they want there. but i don't think they or congress should be having west
3:48 am
virginia's laws put on new york city. >> the people who are strongest against this bill are law enforcement. >> reporter: vance and o'neil have established a formidable coalition of prosecutors and police chiefs from nearly every big city in america to lobby senators to keep the concealed carry reciprocity act from becoming law. >> representative hudson, there's huge opposition to this bill among police departments in major cities in the united states. houston, tucson he, metropolitan d.c., boston, new york city, baltimore, seattle. these are all cities where the chief of police has come out against this law. there are more if you want me to read more. >> sure. >> how do you explain that? >> there are folks on both sides of the argument. and i think good folks on both sides who are honestly trying to protect their citizens. i just disagree with the conclusions. >> so you're saying new york or los angeles or chicago, big cities have no right to pass any
3:49 am
laws that regulates who can carry a weapon. >> these cities and these states can still continue to have protect their citizens -- - >> but they can't have a law that prohibits someone from carrying a concealed weapon. >> right. just like a driver's license. you can't say you can't drive here. >> it's not just leek a driver's license. because to get a driver's license you have to demonstrate a proficiency and establish that you're not going to endanger the public. and that you understand all the laws governing it. but that's not the case in terms of possessing -- getting a concealed carry permit. >> well, driving's a privilege. owning a firearm is a constitutionally protected right. there is a difference. >> you can
3:50 am
3:51 am
make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine.
3:52 am
blue for him. purple for her. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together. as america searches for answers after another mass shooting, one thing is clear. the gun business appears stronger than ever. nearly 4 million rifles were produced in the u.s. in 2015. that's up more than 150% from a decade earlier. and the weapon of choice for many is the ar-15. marc strassmann met some proud owners. >> reporter: in the hills of western kentucky eve haney fires an ar-15. haney's a 62-year-old grandmother from tallahassee, florida. she's competing in a shooting match organized by a girl and a gun, a national group of female
3:53 am
gun enthusiasts. >> i didn't realize how competitive i was. but i am. i like to see my scores. and i like to hear the ping, ping, ping of the steel. >> reporter: 57-year-old dr. laura torres reyes is a retired air force colonel. 42-year-old robin sandoval is a mother of three from austin, texas. is it more fun than empowering or empowering than fun? >> i think it's empowering and fun. both. >> empowering and fun. >> reporter: but all of them used to hate guns. you were scared of them? >> i was petrified of them. >> i didn't want them in the house. >> i didn't want them in the home. >> reporter: for sandoval the turning point was hurricane katrina. >> first responders were unable to respond and families were kind of left on their own. i wanted to be my children's first responder. i wanted to protect them. >> this ar is my favorite ar. >> reporter: it's easy to use? >> it's easy. >> reporter: but the ar-15 is no ordinary gun. a descendant of the m-16 designed for u.s. soldiers in
3:54 am
vietn vietnam, now wildly popular among u.s. civilian gun owners who own an estimated 5 to 10 million of them. the ar-15 has also become the weapon of choice for many homicidal loners. in las vegas gunman stephen paddock modified his ar-15 into fully automatic assault rifle. >> when you first heard about vegas, what went through your minds? >> this man chose a horrible thing to do. it's on him. >> how do you get into the head of someone that's that insane? i just can't even -- i can't even go there. >> do you think there should be general civilian access to the ars? >> i do. because it's our right. it's our second amendment right. it really goes down to that. >> i like having access to my a.r. we have one for home defense. >> reporter: is it a legitimate question to ask whether there's a need for that? >> it is absolutely a legitimate question. and i think that's -- in terms of debate and speech we need to talk about these things. >> reporter: none of them knew how to protect society from killers armed with ar-15s.
3:55 am
striking that balance has been the most elusive target
3:56 am
3:57 am
the olympics in south korea have sparked a new push to reunify the country with the north. but many south koreans think that's a terrible idea. holly williams is there. >> there are some things here in south korea that most people agree on, like just how well korean barbecue goes with beer. but when it comes to how to deal with north korea, their closest neighbor and worst enemy, they cannot agree. yim kyung soon hits the slopes outside seoul every two weeks, carving up the powder. he's also 88 years old and still full of life. mr. yim learned to ski in the 1940s, but then he had to stop, he told us, because he signed up to fight in the korean war. it began in 1950 and killed 4
3:58 am
million people by some estimates. the korean peninsula is now divided between a communist north and a capitalist south. "we need to reunify our country," mr. yim told us. "we need to work together to bring peace." ♪ the singers in this choir agree. heal the world, they sing. michael jackson's plea for peace. they're a mix of south koreans and defectors from north korea, making perfect harmony. ♪ but this thaw in relations has also caused a backlash. these right-wing protesters say their government is appeasing the north. after venting their feelings about north korea's dictator kim jong un the police moved in. emotions run high when your nuclear-capable enemy is just 35
3:59 am
miles away. and recent polls show around half of young south koreans don't support reunification. many of them say after 70 years of division the north is now a foreign country. >> when they wanted to talk, they shot missiles first. >> reporter: this group said reunification might be nice one day but feared it would mean bankrolling the poverty-stricken north and higher taxes for them. >> it is something that is desirable, but i don't think korea's ready to handle the drawbacks. >> it's going to cost us tons and tons ofoney to build the country. >> reporter: reunification may be a distant dream or nightmare, depending on your perspective, but a summit meeting between the two koreas could happen this year. and that would be the first time that top leaders from the two countries have met in more than a decade. that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. and for others you can check back with us a little later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning."
4:00 am
from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm demarco morgan. captioning funded by cbs it's friday, february 16th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." a south florida community comes together to mourn the lives of 17 people gunned down in a high school shooting massacre. >> all the people here are here because we love each other and every child is our child. every loss is our loss. >> police say the 19-year-old accused shooter has confessed, and we're learning more about the suspect's troubled past.

44 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on