Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 19, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PST

3:00 am
anger and grief. more victims of the florida shooting are laid to rest. meanwhile, the outrage from survivors hasn't let up. >> gun control now! >> millenials are the ones that will make the difference because we are relentless, we do not let things go. >> also tonight immigration raids. cracking down on undocumented workers and businesses. >> you have the signs on the same dang wall. >> a state of emergency in west virginia over rising floodwaters and hazardous conditions causes a 70 car pileup in iowa. >> breaking down barriers.
3:01 am
>> gayle king sits down with the director of "black panther." >> announcer: this its the cbs "overnight news." this is the "overnight news," i'm elaine quijano. in florida yesterday, mourners walked hand in hand to pay their final respects. three more victims of the stoneman douglas shooting were laid to rest. this as the we learn the fbi wasn't the only agency to let alleged shooter nikolas cruz. >> i just feel so heartbreaken over what these poor parents have to go through. it's just -- so tragic. >> as people gathered outside stoneman douglas high school to leave flowers and pray, newly obtained documents reveal even more potential red flags about accused gunman nikolas cruz. florida department of children and families visited his home a year and a half before the shooting after cruz was on
3:02 am
snapchat cutting both arms. the investigator did not recommend further action though depression and adhd and stated he wanted to go out and buy a gun. it is unknown what he is buying the gun for. the fbi announced this week it did not follow through on a tip last month about cruz and guns. president trump tweeted, very sad the fbi missed all the many signals sent out by the florida school shooter. this is not acceptable. >> i've don't know that the signs were missed. there were multiple, multiple reports and contacts. our agency included. >> on a local tv program, broward county sheriff scott israel pushed for laws that would grant police more purz to detain those who make threats online. >> over the coming weeks we are going to find law enforcement contacted, went to the home, or went to where the killer was. and they were handcuffed with what they could do. the laws -- this isn't science fiction. we're not allowed to arrest on
3:03 am
what a person thinks about on precrimes. >> in parkland the funerals continue. including scott beagle's, the geography teacher students say died trying to block them from the shooter. the families of 14-year-old jamie guttenberg and alexander schacter planned funerals for today. the school will not reopen until at least thursday. elaine. manuel bojorquez, thank you. many of the teens survivors say they're tired of waiting for adults to do something about gun control. so they announced a nationwide demonstration, it is called the march for our lives, and will be held on march 24th. adriana diaz spoke with several students about what they help to accomplish. >> enough! enough! these students some too young to go to the polls are using their voices as their vote. >> people that i know, people that i love have died. >> teen after teen. >> this is a turning point in american history.
3:04 am
>> survived wednesday's shooting. addressed this rally saturday. >> the people in the government who are voted into power are lying to us. and us kids seem to be the only one whose notice and are prepared to call bs. >> what did if the feel like being up there in front the the crowd? >> students like emma gonzalez want to stop mass shootings with stricter gun laws. hoping to achieve what adults couldn't. >> a shame kind of fallen on the kids to take care of this one weec we are the ones that have to make sure the cogs are greesd we have to do the greasing now. we are left with the oil can. >> what year were you born in? >> 1999. >> year of the kcolumbine shooting? >> yes. >> a generation taking a stand on social media. >> gun control now. >> and on the streets. even staging a walk-out at a nearby florida school on friday. >> i feel like no one listens to us because we are kids. >> what do you say to that? >> i think that's crap.
3:05 am
i think we should have ach voice too. >> how many more times does this have to happen for them to do something it? is ridiculous. >> i think this is a tipping point. >> basketbaob weiss' daughter w killed in 2014. >> a lot of times in the weak of a shooting people are all upset and motivated for about, five, six days. this is the first time, i have ever seen, people take to the streets. >> millenials will make the difference because we have so much information at our fingertips. we are relentless. we do not let things go. >> why is a kid more relentless than an adult? >> an adult swayed by money. kids are swayed by feelings. >> student activists are using time out of school to move their agenda forward. this week they will travel to the state capital to deliver petitions calling for a ban on assault weapons. elaine. >> adriana diaz. thank you. president trump fired off
3:06 am
another tweet storm. he covered a range of topics from the iran nuclear deal to the russian meddling in the 2016 election. and he attacked the fbi, lawmakers, even former president obama. errol barnett is traveling with the president. >> reporter: in the flury of tweets, president trump has sent since friday's indictment of more than a dozen nationals trying to undermine confidence in u.s. democracy not a single one is critical of the kremlin. if it was the goal of russia to create dischord they succeeded. they're laughing their expletives off in moscow. the president was also critical of his national security adviser, after he weighed in. >> as you can seep wi with the indictment the evidence is really incontrovertible and available. >> mr. trump responded, general mcmaster forgot to say the results of the 2016 election were not impacted or changed. >> americans are the victims of what russia did. not republicans, not democrats,
3:07 am
all of us are victims. >> republican congressman trey gowdy. >> i have known, russia tried to subvert our election they're going to do the same thing in 2020 and every election there after. >> the evidence is now overwhelming and unequivocal and we need to move to protect ourselves from russian interference. >> democratic congressman, adam schiff acknowledged the previous administration should have done more. >> couldn't get obama administration to acknowledge the interference, wary to be putting their hand on the scale in the election. none is an excuse for this president to sit on his hands. >> separate from the russian indictments new developments in the special count sell's probe. after initially pleading not guilty to financial crimes and other charges, former trump campaign aide rick gates is expected to enter a plea deal. that would make him the third trump campaign official to kwop rate with robert mueller's investigation. elaine. errol barnett. thank you. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:08 am
3:09 am
at the marine mammal center, the environment is everything. we want to do our very best for each and every animal, and we want to operate a sustainable facility. and pg&e has been a partner helping us to achieve that. we've helped the marine mammal center go solar, install electric vehicle charging stations, and become more energy efficient. pg&e has allowed us to be the most sustainable organization we can be. any time you help a customer, it's a really good feeling. it's especially so when it's a customer that's doing such good and important work for the environment. together, we're building a better california.
3:10 am
immigration and customs enforcement is cracking down on employees hiring undocumented workers. the agency says they're enforcing the law. some employers say they're bad for business. mireya villarreal has the story. >> special agent with homeland security. >> reporter: homeland security agents went from business to business in a five day sweep serving dozens of employers with notices of inspection. >> very important for america to protect american jobs for authorized workers and u.s. citizens. and really to level the playing field in the terms of unfair competition. >> mike pondexter is ceo of his
3:11 am
family business pondexter nut company in the middle of an ice audit. most americans don't want labor intensive jobs. >> why are you hiring people who are not legally documented to work in the u.s.? >> because they show up with documentation, here's my green card. here is my social security card. it is illegal for me to question that. >> when the nut company was audited ten years ago, pondexter says they were forced to let go of 70% of the work force and lost $2 million. >> you think it is okay to ill il ill-illegals. >> tighttightrope. >> this is selective prosecution. >> these recipients of notices of inspection are smaller businesses. the fact is, they don't fight quite so hard. they don't have the resources
3:12 am
for, for, lawyers. and investigators. to help defend them. so they can chalk up statistics, make it impressive they're doing something. >> rafael is here -- asked us to conceal his identity. >> his employer its also, being audited. and co-workers have stopped showing up. with families and businesses on edge. debate continues whether states like california will be addressed by immigration solutions from washington. immigration and customs. enforcement conducted 1300 work place audits in 2017. they're expecting a 300% increase. companies found to be employ ememployering undocumented workers could face criminal prosecution. mireya villarreal, thank you. now stories we tar following in the cbs weekend news feed. quick moving winter storm caused a massive pileup in central iowa. officials say more than 50 vehicles were involved.
3:13 am
several people were injured. >> in west virginia, a state of emergency was issued for all 55 counties after heavy rains triggered intense flooding. in some areas the ohio river is cresting to three feet above flood stage. in iran, grieving families gathered at the airport after a twin engine passenger plane crashed. killing all 65 on board. the aceman airlines flight reportly went down in a mountainous region about 500 sayhrs.te dense e capital of fog prevented rescue helicopters from reaching the crash site. at a hockey game in chicago four fans were thrown out after hurling racist taunts at one of the black players. davonte smith pelley plays for the washington capitals, in the penalty box after fight with a player, when fans started shouting at him. security was called and the fans
3:14 am
were ejected. hundreds of thousands of magellenic penguins getting ready to head out for annual migration. birds are currently living in argentina's national reserve. mating season just ended. once their chicks get bigger, the penguins will take to the waters and go as far north as brazil. coming up -- how the chill of the winter olympics could bring a thaw between north and south korea. and later, the first all-black cast, super hero hey, are you taking the tissue test? yep, and my teeth are yellow. i mean i knew they weren't perfect, but, ugh. oh well, all hope is lost! oh thanks! clearly my whitening toothpaste is not cutting it. time for whitestrips. crest glamorous white whitestrips are the only ada-accepted whitening strips proven to be safe and effective. they work below the enamel surface to whiten 25x better than a leading whitening toothpaste. hey, nice smile! thanks! i crushed the tissue test! yeah you did! crest. healthy, beautiful smiles for life.
3:15 am
try the deoderant saving millions of clothes. degree ultraclear black + white. no yellow stains on white clothes. no white marks on black clothes. try degree ultraclear black + white. it won't let you down. of being there for my son's winning shot. that was it for me. that's why i'm quitting with nicorette. only nicorette mini has a patented fast dissolving formula. it starts to relieve sudden cravings fast. every great why needs a great how.
3:16 am
every great why make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine. blue for him. purple for her. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together.
3:17 am
at the olympics in south korea another medal for the u.s. nick goepper won a silver. as important the games are to the@le the athletes they could bring peace to the region. 22 athletes from north korea participated. their leader kim jong-un issued rare invitation to south korea's president to attend a meeting. holly williams is in seoul. >> they need to understand no more missiles no mornuclea test ttz a -- tests. >> the retired general knows more about the north korean threat than almost any one. the former head of south korea's special forces and says talks with the north are essential to stop kim jong-un making a fatal
3:18 am
miscalculati e img- jonunno kews h is in .hwrong. oni feel that he, he will alway be defensive. he will always be paranoid. and that could affect his logic and thinking which could lead to a catastrophic incident. >> a catastrophic incident could kill millions of south koreans. and also, americans. there are nearly 40,000 u.s. military personnel serving in south korea. including at the camp, the largest overseas u.s. base in the world. and looks like a transplanted american four chapels.to. a hospital. how many schools? four schools.w nopethe ace olym en north warping betwe and south korea. they're technically all at war and have been vied more than 70 years. and there are hopes for a summit
3:19 am
meeting. it is likely they'll give uepely th guarantee its survival. pessouth korea many people are actihicevimbo butecause t whey trust the north koreans to stick to their word. in its typical belligerent tone, state media said saturday it is not thirsty for dialogue with the u.s. we are fully ready for every move they make. be it sanctions, military options or sly schemes. but the u.s. says the reality is its tightening of economic sanctions its hurting north korea. >> this peace offensive that they're -- conducting right now is a direct result of -- the sanctions. >> it's no breakthrough yet. but those are rare on this divided peninsula. holly williams, cbs news, seoul. i've gotta say, i love the new place. oh thanks. yeah, i took your advice
3:20 am
and had geico help with renters insurance- it was really easy. easy. that'd be nice. phone: for help with chairs, say "chair." phone: for help with bookcases, say "bookcase." bookcase. i thought this was the dresser? isn't that the bed? phone: i'm sorry, i didn't understand. phone: for help with chairs, say "chair." does this mean we're not going out? book-case. see how easy renters insurance can be at geico.com. i can't believe it comes in... how great this tastes! vegaaaan. an ornid ii enjoy i can't believe it's not butter! in it's vegan! and it's organic!
3:21 am
i'm never gonna be able i'll take a sick day tomorrow. on our daughter's birthday? moms don't take sick days... moms take nyquil severe. the nighttime, sniffling, sneezing, coughing, aching, fever, best sleep with a cold, medicine. make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine. blue for him. purple for her. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together.
3:22 am
wasting food a huge problem in the u.s. estimated that americans throw out 80 billion pound a year. some of the biggest offenders are tourist destinations like hotels and ka scasinos in las v. thanks to technology that is changing. john black stone has the story. >> the las vegas most visitors see is glittering and opulent. a city where there seems to be more than enough of everything. especially food. an elaborate ban kit room, lunch is being served to 1300 people attending a convention. away from the vegas strip. >> get ready to open up the doors and feepd td the masses. >> the dining room serves those
3:23 am
who didn't have enough food. >> there is probably more food consumed in las vegas per capita than any other place in the world. >> since 2007 much of the leftover food from mgms las vegas hotels has been used to feed pigs. llama sedik is vice president of sustainability of mgm resorts. >> better use to feed people. >> there are challenges. >> the process to collect food is complicated. >> complicated because food safety regulations require left over banquet food to be delivered immediately for safe consumption. but now, mgm resorts has fund a way to keep their excess food safe for much longer. >> anything else? >> as soon as a banquet is finished food prepared but not served is transferred and loaded on to a truck from three square. a las vegas food bank. once it arrives there, it is flash frozen in a high tech refrigerator called a blast
3:24 am
chiller. and moved to the freezer. the food can be saved for up to three months. sent when needed to places like the catholic charities dining room. they say the program could help divert 1 million pounds of food by 2020 to feed the hungry. john black stone, cbs news, las vegas. next,he director of black panther on why the blockbuster resonates with the african-american community. and here you have a bánh mi inspired fried chicken sandwich.
3:25 am
3:26 am
you'd never find this at a fast food restaurant - it's a good thing. is that right, martha? why don't you try my asian fried chicken sandwich? it's made with crispy fried chicken strips, crunchy asian slaw and a gochujang mayo - all on a toasted baguette. security! get him! you afraid of a little competition? you want to go to war with me, jack? do you really? oh my gosh! what! i can't smell! i can't smell! ♪
3:27 am
introducing my food truck inspired sandwiches. only at jack in the box. we end with a conversation with director of "black panther" the movie opened this weekend to rave reviews and massive draw at the box office. it is expected to bring in over $200 million in president's day weeken. here's gayle king. >> are you happy with the finished product? >> proud of the work we did for sure. >> the 31-year-old directed and co-wrote black panther. story of a young african prince who takes on the mandate el of king and super hero. >> my n it your time. >> who now must defend his throne and country. action fantasy film set in a futuristic african kingdom. >> don't freeze. >> i never freeze. >> it is the first time there is
3:28 am
an all black cast for a super hero movie. and that means what to you? >> for me it was -- it was, just a beautiful opportunity, you know, i remember being young, and, watching you know, consuming pop culture, power rangers, or, batman, you know, spiderman. >> can you look at all these different super heroes. >> yeah, when i noticed was none of their worlds looked like my world. when i was growing up in the east bay area, oakland. my family, my friend, everybody was black. i was looking for stories that looked like to be my world. >> at the end of the day you said it best. you've said i wanted to make a good movie. >> that's all. and, that's so difficult to do. that if we are able to accomplish that, that's enough. >> his intention as but this movie are very clear. what is the message you want to se t yo boungla kckids who are seeing this? >> i mean i think, numb number
3:29 am
one to give them a good time at the movies. >> mission accomplished. >> a lot of time that is overlooked. value of being able to go to the movies with your friend. watch something for 2 and a half hours, coming out feeling exhilarated. the next day at school pretending to be the characters. drawing the characters. you know, dressing up as them for halloween. a lot of that is overlooked. dr. okt , timan, ahit like a being african anywhere on this, in this world, you know, for whatever reason can often come with a since of shame. you know, how the continent is depicted. how we are depicted. things we are told about ourselves. a lot of things you should feel ashamed of. and for me it was about -- my own realization is that, it is okay to be proud to african. you should be proud to be african. everybody should be proud of their own heritage. especially us. >> that's the "overnight news" for monday. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
3:30 am
this the cbs "overnight news." survivors of the deadly school shooting in florida are adding their voices to the debate over gun control. a march on washington has been announced for next month. to pressure politicians into doing something to stop the violence. students and teachers across the country are also planning walkouts and protests. this as we learn more warning signs about the accused gunman may have been missed. manuel bojorquez begins our coverage. us i jt sfeelo tbhearre aken over what these poor parents have to go through. it's just -- so tragic. >> as people gathered outside stoneman douglas high school to
3:31 am
leave flowers and pray, newly obtained documents reveal even more potential red flags about accused gunman nikolas cruz. florida department of children and families visitd his home a year and a half before the shooting after cruz was on snapchat cutting both arms. the investigator did not recommend furtr action though noted cruz suffered from depression and adhd and stated he wanted to go out and buy a gun. it is unknown what he is buying the gun for. the fbi announced this week it dinollt foowou thrgha on tip last month about cruz and guns. president trump tweeted, very sad the fbi missed all the many signals sent out by the florida school shooter. this is not acceptable. >> i've don't know that the si multie, mtipl r agcy iludets. gn>>s orea mlosel d.tv progra d county she cott th israel pushed for laws that would grant police more powers to detain those who make threats online.
3:32 am
>> over the coming weeks we are going to find law enforcement contacted, went to the home, or went to where the killer was. and they were handcuffed with h. the laws -- this isn't science fiction. we're not allowed to arrest on what a person thinks about on precrimes. >> in parkland the funerals continue. including scott beagle's, the geography teacher students say died trying to block them from the shooter. mie families of 14-year-old gu e bethrge enscndho aolle wilndll at least thursday. elaine. manuel bojorquez, thank you. many of the teens survivors say theye tire waid forti control. so they announced a nationwide demonstration, it is called the held on march 24th. adriana diaz spoke with several students about what they help to accomplish.
3:33 am
>> enough! enough! these students some too young to go to the polls are using their voices as their vote. >> people that i know, people that i love have died. >> teen after teen. >> this is a turning point in american history. >> survived wednesday's shooting. addressed this rally saturday. >> the people in the government who are voted into power are lying to us. and us kids seem to be the only one whose notice and are prepared to call bs. >> what did if the feel like being up there in front the the crowd? >> felt really good. >> students like emma gonzalez want to stop mass shootings with stricter gun laws. hoping to achieve what adults couldn't. >> it's a shame, but i think it has kind of fallen on the kids to take care of this one we are the ones that have to make sure the cogs are greased. we have to do the greasing now. we are left with the oil can. >> what year were you born in? >> 1999. >> year of the columbine shooting? >> yes. i have never known a world without a school g.
3:34 am
>> reporter: they're a generation now taking a stand on social media. and on the streets. even staging a walkout at a nearby florida school on friday. >> i feel like no one listens to us because we are kids. >> what do you say to that? hi inkhat'crap i think we should have a voice too. >> how many more times does this have to happen for them to do something it? is ridiculous. >> i think this is a tipping point. >> bob weiss' daughter was one of six students killed by a gunman in 2014, in isla vista, california. >> a lot of times in the wake of a shooting people are all upset and motivated for about, five, six days. this is the first time, i have ever seen, people take to the streets. >> millenials will make the difference because we have so much information at our fingertips. we are relentless. we do not let things go. >> why is a kid more relentless than an adult? >> an adult swayed by money. kids are swayed by feelings. >> student activists are using time out of school to move their agenda forward.
3:35 am
this week they will travel to the state capital to deliver petitions calling for a ban on assault weapons. elaine. >> adriana diaz. thank you. president trump fired off another tweet storm. he covered a range of topics from the iran nuclear deal to the russian meddling in the 2016 election. and he attacked the fbi, lawmakers, even former president obama. errol barnett is traveling with the president. >> reporter: in the flury of twt since friday's indictment of more than a dozen russian nationals trying to undermine confidence in u.s. democracy not a single one is critical of the kremlin. if it was the goal of russia to create dischord they succeeded. he wrote. they're laughing their expletives off in moscow. the president was also critical adviser, after he weighed in. >> as you can see with the fbi indictment the evidence is really incontrovertible and
3:36 am
available in the public domain. >> mr. trump responded, general mcmaster forgot to say the results of the 2016 election were not impacted or changed. >> americans are the victims of what russia did. not republicans, not democrats, all of us are victims. >> republican congressman trey gowdy. >> i have known, russia tried to subvert our 2016 ee -- election and they're going to do the same thing in 2020 and every election there after. >> the evidence is now overwhelming and unequivocal and we need to move to protect ourselves from russian interference. >> democratic congressman, adam schiff acknowledged pr donioe usre. >> we couldn't get the obama administration to acknowledge the interference, they were very wary to be putting their hand on the scale in the election. none is an excuse for this president to sit on his hands. >> separate from the russian indictments new developments in the special counsel's probe. after initially pleading not guilty to financial crimes and other charges, former trump campaign aide rick gates is
3:37 am
expected to enter a plea deal. that would make him the third trump campaign official to cooperate with robert mueller's investigation. elaine. errol barnett. thank you. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
3:38 am
your digestive system has billions of bacteria, but life can throw them off balance. try align extra strength, the #1 doctor recommended probiotic brand. with 5 times the good bacteria to re-align your system. re-align yourself, with align. okay - let's try this. it says you apply the blue one to me. here? no... make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine.
3:39 am
two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together. sometimes the signs are hard to ignore. but whenever you see clothes this clean, that's a tide ad. clean clothes may be an indication of a tide ad. tide users experience 10x more cleaning power. tide is america's #1 detergent in america.
3:40 am
on this president's day, the official portraits of barack and michelle obama are now on display in washington. the artist who painted the former first lady, overcame great challenges before her work was etched into history. alex wagner has her story. >> reporter: last week, amy cheryl went from being a virtual unknown to one of the most talked about artists in the world. on monday, her painting of michelle obama was unveiled at the national poraitr alongsid e thega portrait of president barack obama. both cheryl and wily were interviewed and chosen for the job by the obamas themselves.
3:41 am
she came in and she looked at barack and she said, well, mr. president, i am really excited to be here the i know i am being consider ford both portraits, she said, but mrs. obama, she physically turned to me, andhe said, i'm really hoping that you and i can work together. ha-ha. you maybe had a particular interest in painting her. >> yeah. yeah, yes. i mean he was asking questions as well. and she was like, no, no, no. >> unlike wily, president obama's portrait, amy cheryl had been largely unknown. this was her big break. >> you had taken out loans. you waited tables. tell us how game changing this moment is? >> i am relieved that i can pay back my school tloenloans. it is not about hard work.
3:42 am
you have to put the work in. that doesn't mean you will make it. i've mean hustling for that long, it kind of chips away at your self-esteem. and then the breakthrough al ari am. her models exclusively black and never smiling are usually strangers she meets on the street. not former first ladies. >> as the process onto on, with the first lady, did you get more comfortable? >> i did. yeah. we had two sittings. but you are still always a little nervous having to -- look her in her eyes. i have to study the face before i photograph each shot. figure out what i want. there was little intense moments where you have to have courage to keep looking because you get bashful, because you are looking act the first lady. >> why do you paint black skin as, in gray scale? >> it just looked good. like the gray skin on the bright
3:43 am
colors. it looked good. i think also i was subconsciously with not wanting to be marginalized. i say that. i feel like the black body is a political statement in itself. right. on canvas, all of a sudden i am making a political statement because i am painting brown skin. but i paint the way that i paint. you know? she chose me. she, knew what to expect. >> there are some people who look at the portrait of the first lady. i don't see her in it. i don't see the michelle obama that i know. >> yeah. >> everybody is invested in them. in all kinds of ways. on all different levels. and so, for me to even want to paint her makes me crazy. because, and i'm setting myself up for criticism. right? i feel like i captured her when i look at it i see her. i see the michelle that was present at, at the sitting. you know, a contemplative, graceful woman. you know? who understands her place in
3:44 am
history. >> today, amy cheryl has a place in history. her paintings which she works on in this baltimore studio are now selling for up to $50,000 each. but while this is her moment, it is a moment she wasn't sure he would live to see. >> when did you first find out about your heart? >> when i was 30. i had been walking around with my heart function at 18%. which is what most get transplanted at. i was asymptomatic. no symptoms at all. >> her heart was failing. plus there were relatives back home, who needed her help. so she put aside her brushes and returned to georgia. at one point, cheryl stopped painting for four years. in 2012, her brother died of cancer. just days later, cheryl received a heart transplant from a young donor nearly a decade after her
3:45 am
diagnosis. >> my brother dying changed me. didn't realize how strong i was until i lost my brother. i realized i can get through stuff. and, to see him only made me want to live my life even, harder. >> for an artist, all too familiar with mortality, amy cheryl seems to have fund a sense of permanence. after all, her work now hangs in the national port rilt grait ga. >> i think it matters the portraits are so different. something happened in history that wasn't supposed to happen. there is a continuum. there is a stop. all of of a sudden you are like what was this? so 300 years from now. when the story has been watered down. you know what i mean it? is like, those portraits will speak to that moment with the intensity that is necessary to bring forth the truth of of what happened. and why they were here. fast acting zzzquil liquicaps help you fall asleep fast, like stop staring at the clock fast, like stop worrying about your boss fast,
3:46 am
like wow, you're already asleep fast. when life keeps you up... zzzquil helps you fall asleep in as little as 20 minutes.
3:47 am
3:48 am
president's day is a time to honor the country's top leaders. many are familiar with revered name like washington and lincoln. but who was our worst president? mo rocca may have the answer. ♪ ♪ hail to the chief >> james buchanan. >> out house for five. you can have a cabinet meeting in here. >> warren harding. >> you want to shake hand.
3:49 am
let's shake hand with harding. >> wow. >> no survey of forgotten presidents. >> so fillmore's lips were on the teacup? >> yes. >> would be complete without our 17th president, andrew johnson. >> people come in thinking andrew jackson? >> lots of times. absolutely. >> andrew johnson's presidency would end in disgrace. but in 1864, when republican president abraham lincoln was running for re-election during the civil war and needed a runningmate to balance the ticket. tennessee's andrew johnson was his pick. >> he was something plit skael that really wasn't supposed to exist. a union supporting southern democrat like sasquatch. heard you exist never seen one. >> love the banner, lincoln/sasquatch, '64. >> ranger at the andrew johnson historic site in greenville,
3:50 am
tennessee. >> lots of things with his name on it. >> you will find the andrew johnson bank. andrew johnson highway. andrew johnson inn. >> he is always for this town going to be the local boy does good story. >> is this town still proud of him? >> absolutely. >> reporter: johnson was a taylor before he ran for office. >> they would need to keep heateding irons. >> his shop, the original still stands, became a place for everyday people to talk politics. >> his people, the yeoman, good solid people of eastern tennessee. >> public schools, public libraries, state fairs. anything to give the working man a leg up. >> johnson's back story says historian how war means was every bit as raw as the rail splitters. if lincoln and johnson were competing in the humble olympic who would come away with the gold? >> think johnson would. his father died when he was 3 years old. penniless family. basically no education.
3:51 am
wife taught him to write in his early 20s. >> reporter: whit made his political assent more stunning. from town elderman to vice president he didn't lose a single election. on the day, lincoln delivered his second inaugural address, johnson had, a little too much whiskey. >> the he rambled really drunk e drunkenly, 7, 8 minutes. criticizing the ambassadors. >> reporter: still there were high hopes for johnson after the shock of lincoln's assassination five weeks later on good friday. >> the when you look at sermons that were preached that easter sunday. many of the churches talked about the nation being delivered at the right moment to the man who could do the job. >> reporter: stage was set to bea savior. >> exactly. but the task ahead of johnson may have been the most daunting any president has ever faced.
3:52 am
>> impossible to conceive america 1865 when johnson took office. trying to heal the wounds of a four year war. 600,000 dead. 4 million freed slaves in the south. country of 30 million people. >> johnson wanted postwar south treated leniently. as for the fate of freed slaves. he wanted that left up to the states. but many of his so-called radical republican opponents wanted to punish secessionists and guarantee civil and voting rghts to freed men. the clash led to crisis. with the president all but declaring war on congress. in his washington birthday speech in 1866, he declaim they'd may slander me, but let me say i do not intend to be bullied by my enemies. did he take things personal leel? >> yes, he was thin-skinned team. took everything personally.
3:53 am
he remembered taunts and jeers from decade gone by. never forgot the sound of somebody criticizing him. the more you would try to get him to open of and listen to a different side of thinking the further back he would go almost to be petulant if you will. like a, like a child. like, you know he would ball not want to hear anything you have to say. >> reporter: despite the personal pleas of an ligsist leader frederick douglas, johnson vetoes major bills that would have helped former slaves. congress overrode him. finally, the bad blood spilled over. the president was impeached. and escaped removal from office by just one vote. >> on the wall here is the ticket. few went to the impeachment trial. bought a ticket every day. >> at queen county history museum, betty fletcher the keeper of all things andrew johnson. including tickets to his 1868 impeachment trial. >> i think it is that -- able to
3:54 am
the complete set. >> pretty great. unless you are the guy being impeached. >> uh-huh. >> reporter: he is not a success as president. how do you explain that to people? >> i don't know who would have been a success right then, right there. lincoln may have had it easier, road to hoe because of his political savvy. tie don't think it would have been smooth sailing even for lincoln. >> his mind is so complex. >> at national portrait gallery in washington. abraham lincoln is prominent leap placed. casting a shadow on his much less popular successor. >> how do you think he would feel about being stuck in the corner, and lincoln is where the traffic is. >> don't think he would like it. even buchanan gets a better spot over there. >> that's an insult. >> an insult. i would say.
3:55 am
my name is cynthia haynes and i am a senior public safety specialist for pg&e. my job is to help educate our first responders on how to deal with natural gas and electric emergencies. everyday when we go to work we want everyone to work safely and come home safely. i live right here in auburn, i absolutely love this community. once i moved here i didn't want to live anywhere else. i love that people in this community are willing to come together to make a difference for other people's lives.
3:56 am
together, we're building a better california. ♪ strummed guitar you can't experience the canadian rockies through a screen. you have to be here, with us. ♪ upbeat music travel through this natural wonder and get a glimpse of amazing, with a glass of wine in one hand, and a camera in the other, aboard rocky mountaineer. canada's rocky mountains await.
3:57 am
call your travel agent or rocky mountaineer for special offers now. we end with a conversation with the director of black panther. the movie opened this weekend to rave reviews and a massive draw at the box office. it is expected to bring in over $200 million this president's day weekend. here is gayle king. >> reporter: he directed and co-wrote black panther. the story of a young african prince who takes on the mantle of king and super hero. >> my son this is your time. >> now must defend his throne and country. it isset in a futuristic african country. >> don't freeze. >> i never freeze. >> the first time there is an
3:58 am
all-black cast for a seeper hero movie. that means what do you? >> for me it was -- it was a beautiful opportunity. i remember being young and watching pop culture. whether ninja turtles, power rangers, batman, spiderman. >> you look at these super heroes. >> what i noticed. not one of the worlds looked like my world. i was growing up in the east bay area. oakland. of my family, my friend. everybody was black. and was looking for stories for what i knew how to be my world. you know? >> at the end of the day you said it best. you said i wanted to make a good movie. >> that's all. that's so difficult to do. that if we are able to accomplish that, that's enough. >> his intentions about the movie are very clear. what is the message you want to send to young black kids who are seeing this? >> i mean i think, number one,
3:59 am
is to give them a good time at the movies. >> mission accomplished. >> a lot of times that is overlooked. the value of being able to go to the movies with your friend. watch something for two and a half hours, coming out, feeling exhilarated. next day at school pretend to be the characters. drauk the characters. dressing up as them for halloween. a lot of them has overlooked. at a deeper level. being, being, an african anywhere on this country, in this world, for whatever reason, right now, often comes with a sense of shame. how the continent is depicted. things we are told about ourselves. a lot of things that people will tell you, you should feel ashamed of. for me it was about, my own realization is that okay to be proud to be african. should be proud to be african. everybody should be proud of their own heritage. especially us. >> that's the "overnight news" news for this monday. from the cbs broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. ♪ ♪
4:00 am
captioning funded by cbs it's monday, february 19th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." the eastern survivors of the deadly florida high school shooting rampage are demanding action on gun control. >> the people in the government who were voted into power are lying to us and us kids are the only ones to be noticing. president trump lashes out on twitter about the russia investigation, attacking the fbi, his national security adviser, and democrats.

42 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on