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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  February 26, 2018 3:00am-4:00am PST

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go to eczemaexposed.com to learn more. deadly storms slam the south. fierce thunderstorms and tornadoes leave a path of destruction. >> we're just lucky to be alive. everything can be replaced. >> across the central u.s. the flood threat continues to rise. also tonight a newly released memo from democrats shakes up the debate overt russia investigation. an emotional sunday at stoneman douglas high school as students and teachers return to the scene of the massacre. and the winter olympics end with a spectacular ceremony and a possible diplomatic breakthrough with north korea. >> there's potential to turn things around.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. severe weather killed at least four people this weekend in the south. a wave of storms from texas to canada unleashed floods, devastating wind, lightning, hail, and tornadoes. a week of heavy rain and melting snow has caused flood emergencies in several states, and the threat is expected to continue into the week. here's tony dokoupil. >> reporter: scenes of destruction like this motel shredded by a possible tornado in northeastern arkansas guided the central and southern united states this weekend. as pounding rains, rising rivers and at least eight possible tornadoes ravaged the country. the roof of this home near bowling green, kentucky caved in, killing a 79-year-old woman. >> it was an elderly female which was located in the kitchen part of the house. >> reporter: the ohio river swelled to nearly three times its normal level in louisville,
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kentucky and spilled its banks further north, where cincinnati, ohio recorded one of its wettest days on record. just over the state line in tennessee newlyweds adam and heather edwards narrowly survived the massive storm. >> we're just lucky to be alive. everything can be replaced. >> reporter: family members say the couple huddled in a closet as winds toppled trees and hurled vehicles outside. >> metal from this barn took off and then the windows busted out. >> reporter: those deaths in arkansas and kentucky on saturday ended a 284-day run without a tornado death in the u.s., the longest streak on record. but elaine, the good news is experts believe that streak wasn't only luck, predictions might be getting better. >> tony, thank you. a newly released memo from democrats on the house intelligence committee is shaking up the debate over the russia investigation. paula reid has the latest from
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our washington bureau. >> reporter: house intelligence committee democrat adam schiff says his memo vindicates the fbi over allegations it abused its surveillance power to monitor a former trump campaign adviser. >> the fbi had every reason to be concerned that carter page might become an act of a foreign power. >> reporter: the document was written as a rebuttal to a republican memo released earlier this month. that version accused the fbi of hiding democratic ties to an opposition research dossier on trump and russia when seeking a warrant to monitor page. president donald trump hit back at schiff in an interview saturday night. >> they'll have a committee meeting and he'll leak all sorts of information. you know, he's a bad guy. but certainly the memo was a nothing. >> reporter: the democratic memo claims the fbi did not solely rely on the dossier. according to the new memo, the fbi detailed page's past relationships with russian spies and interaction with russian officials during the 2016
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campaign when seeking to obtain and renew the warrant. the author of the republican memo, committee chairman devin nunes, doubled down on his claims of politically motivated surveillance during a conservative conference saturday. >> they are advocating that it's okay for the fbi and doj to use political dirt paid for by one campaign and use it against the other campaign. >> reporter: republicans argue their memo undermines the origins of the russia investigation, but so far it's had little impact. special counsel robert mueller has now secured plea deals with three trump associates and just this week he filed dozens of new charges. his first trial, of former trump campaign chair paul man anort, will begin in the fall. elaine? >> paula reid. paula, thank you. it was an emotional sunday at stoneman douglas high school as teachers and students returned to the scene of the massacre. omar villafranca is there. >> reporter: it was a somber return for the survivors of the deadly mass shooting at stoneman
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douglas. students and teachers returned to campus, coping with the reality of what happened here. today governor rick scott called on the florida department of law enforcement to investigate the initial response to the shooting. video from school cameras showed that the armed school resource officer, broward deputy scot peterson, stayed outside the building while the shooting was taking place. peterson has since resigned. new reports say other deputies didn't enter the school either. broward county sheriff scott israel addressed the accusations on cnn's "state of the union." >> while this killer was inside the school there was only one law enforcement person, period, and that was former deputy scot peterson. >> reporter: nra spokesman dana loesch was on nbc this week and says the gun group supports a measure to arm teachers in the classroom. >> this is something parents and educators are going to have to determine for their schools. our resources are at their disposal. >> reporter: but some lawmakers
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are proposing change. florida republican congressman brian mast says he'd support the idea of raising the age to buy a rifle to 21. the army veteran also says he'd support a ban on the ar-15, a weapon the former soldier says he's familiar with. >> it pains me to know that i went out there willing to defend my country, willing to give everything with almost the exact same weapon that's used to go out there and unfortunately kill children here in parkland. and i think there's a very real opportunity here for response. >> reporter: 74 florida republican state lawmakers are asking governor rick scott to remove sheriff israel from his post. but sheriff israel has already said he does not plan to resign. elaine? >> omar, thank you. a 30-day cease-fire ordered up this weekend by the u.n. security council has yet to take hold in syria. there was more fighting sunday but nothing like the intense bombing that killed at least 500
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people last week in rebel-held eastern ghouta near damascus. a massive refugee crisis that started six months ago continues to grow. every week hundreds of rohingya muslims are still crossing over the border from myanmar, formerly burma, into bangladesh. since august nearly 700,000 have fled their homes, escaping their brutal military crackdown. our digital network cbsn, investigated the crisis and found social media is being used as a weapon against the rohingya. the new cbsn documentary, "weaponizing social media: the rohingya crisis," premieres on our streaming network, cbsn, at cbsnews.com. coming up, thoughts on gun
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control from a country that has nearly eliminated shooting
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." the parkland massacre has renewed calls to approach gun violence as a public health threat, like diseases or car crashes. over the past two decades the centers for disease control and prevention has been restricted from researching the impact of guns on public health. dr. jon lapook explains the reasons for this and why it could change. >> reporter: what's been sorely missing in the gun control debate so far has been science. and there's a reason for that. back in 1993 a cdc-funded study found homicide was three times more likely in homes with guns.
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that prompted congress to pass legislation in 1996 prohibiting the cdc from doing any research to advocate or promote gun control. the ban had a chilling effect on all gun-related research by the agency. in 2016 nearly 100 medical organizationses urged congress to repeal the legislation. after the orlando nightclub shooting that left 49 people dead, i spoke with former congressman jay dickey, who helped write the law. he told me he had come to regret its effect. why do you think it's wrong now? >> if we had just kept the research dollars going and we had said science is important and we need to get to it, i didn't realize that it was possible to do that. >> reporter: dickey died last year. but his legislation continues. and last week following the school shootings in florida congresswoman kathy caster pressed health and human services secretary alex azar
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about the lack of research. >> will you be proactive on the research initiative? >> we certainly will. our centers for disease control and prevention, we're in the science business and the evidence-generating business. >> reporter: this week two republican congressmen, leonard lance of new jersey and brian mast of florida, called for restoring cdc funding of research into gun violence. it remains to be seen whether that will snowball into actual repeal of the dickey amendment. dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. the winter olympics ended today with a spectacular ceremony and a possible diplomatic breakthrough. north korea said it is willing to hold talks with the united states. more now from ben tracy in pyeongchang, south korea. >> reporter: there were fireworks all around the olympic stadium during the closing ceremony of the games. but inside it was a picture of peace. athletes from both koreas marched together, and north
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korea's delegation was seated just behind ivanka trump. she is here representing the united states, putting on a successful olympic charm offensive. >> it's very similar to what kim jong un did by sending his younger sister. she's a softer face. >> reporter: jean lee is an expert on korean relations. she says the olympics have opened up communication between the two koreas and now potentially with the united states. >> this is a moment that i hope the south koreans and the americans recognize. there's potential to turn things around here. >> reporter: south korean president moon jae-in says the head of north korea's delegation, general kim yong chol, told him north korea has "enough willingness to talk to the united states." that would be a sudden about-face. the u.s. says the north koreans pulled out of a meeting with vice president mike pence at the last minute during his visit to south korea two weeks ago. but tensions could get in the way of talks. if planned military exercises are carried out after the games.
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the trump administration also just imposed tough new sanctions on north korea and has provided only vague support for a summit between north and south, an offer made by kim jong un. >> does president trump support the leaders of south korea and north korea getting together at a summit? >> i think he believes that the dialogue could be -- could be helpful as dialogue always can be. as long as the message remains the same and the goals remain the same. >> reporter: of course the goal is to get north korea to give up its nuclear weapons, but previous attempts at sports diplomacy have never led to that and there are no signs that 16 days of sporting events here in pyeongchang have changed kim jong un's mind. elaine? >> ben tracy. ben, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. i'm lucky to get through a shift without a disaster.
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while american lawmakers debate gun control, activists in other countries are suggesting measures that have worked where they live. roxanna saberi visited dunblane, scotland where a mass shooting in 1996 led to big changes. >> reporter: 22 years since a gunman opened fire at dunblane primary school in scotland -- >> she was killed. >> reporter: -- nick north relives that tragedy. >> at least 14 have been -- >> reporter: with each mass shooting in america. >> you tend to pick up on things that relate to what's happened in your own life. >> reporter: north's daughter sophie was one of the 16 children killed in dunblane. >> i just said no more guns. turns out that i wasn't the only one. >> reporter: he and other parents pushed politicians to prohibit private handguns. today britain has some of the strictest gun regulations in the world. if you want to buy a semi-automatic weapon or a
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handgun at a shop in britain, you can't. they're now both banned. and if you want to buy a high-end shotgun like one of these, it could take up to six months to clear all the regulations. you can only use manually loaded rifles and shotguns for hunting or hobbies at shooting clubs like this one in london. member sherman strobul says the police will also visit your home to make sure you store your gun in a safe like this. they may ask your doctor about your mental health. >> if you've had depression or anything like that, you will not get a firearms license. ever. >> reporter: since the 1996 shooting in dunblane britain has experienced only one deadly mass shooting, while the u.s. has had more than 75. >> our response in the uk matched the culture here, which is not one that particularly wants guns. >> reporter: north now has a
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message for the florida students calling for more action. >> keep reminding people what happened to you. don't take any notice of people who say, well, you're only teenagers. >> do you think these kids can really make a difference? >> i sincerely hope they can. >> reporter: in 1996, the same year as the shooting in dunblane, a gunman in australia killed 35 people. that led the country to pass sweeping gun reforms. germany did the same after school shootings in 2002 and 2009. in those countries gun violence did not disappear, but deadly mass shootings are very rare. r. still ahead, through virtual reality they are changing their minds and helping their hearts. how can you make your hair even stronger?
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has high blood pressure, which contributes to about 1,000 deaths a day. a doctor in los angeles is tackling the problem through virtual reality, giving patients an eye-opening view of the damaging effects of salt inside their bodies. mireya villarreal looked into this. >> reporter: for juanita canyon controlling her blood pressure has always been a priority. but on this night at holman church she was given a virtual look inside herself. >> oh, lord. >> reporter: and was shocked by what she saw. >> 2,000 milligrams. my god. >> reporter: when you see all that salt intake, what's that first reaction? >> oh, my god. you look at one dish and then you look up and it will tell you how much sodium is in that dish. that brings it to life. >> reporter: through a virtual reality app she was able to see a three-dimensional simulation of how salt could core rhode her pumping heart leading to high blood pressure and possibly a heart attack. >> when you actually see what's
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going on, that opens your eyes. >> reporter: african-americans develop high blood pressure at a younger age than any other ethnicity with 46% of all black women diagnosed with high blood pressure. dietary guidelines suggest less than 2,300 milligrams of salt a day. but lasagna alone has 2,800 milligrams of salt. a fast food hamburger has 970. >> some people would hold the goggles out hee, and we said no, no, it goes right up against your eyes. >> reporter: dr. brendan siegel knew virtual reality would have the greatest impact on changing behavior. >> you don't realize how it can just nudge your brain, just take hold of the emotional centers and not let go. >> reporter: after 12 weeks in cedars-sinai's medical center's program this group's average blood pressure dropped seven points, with some people's systolic blood pressure dropping as much as 57 points. >> i am modifying and i am changing. >> reporter: now juanita canyon has seen the light. >> i'm just amazed.
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>> reporter: about salt. >> reporter: about salt. mireya villarreal, cbs fire fighting is a very dangerous profession. we have one to two fires a day and when you respond together and you put your lives on the line, you do have to surround yourself with experts. and for us the expert in gas and electric is pg&e. we run about 2,500/2,800 fire calls a year and on almost every one of those calls pg&e is responding to that call as well. and so when we show up to a fire and pg&e shows up with us it makes a tremendous team during a moment of crisis. i rely on them, the firefighters in this department rely on them, and so we have to practice safety everyday. utilizing pg&e's talent and expertise in that area trains our firefighters on the gas or electric aspect of a fire and when we have an emergency situation we are going to be much more skilled and prepared to mitigate that emergency for all concerned. the things we do every single day that puts ourselves in harm's way, and to have a partner that is so skilled at what they do is indispensable,
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we end tonight on the korean peninsula. while it was last call today for the winter olympics, a fierce international competition
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continues to brew over liquid gold. david jacobson now on the korean beer battle. >> reporter: taedongong, north korea's first craft beer, can't be found among the imports in the south, but brew pubs like magpie in seoul might not exist without it. >> if it was rnt for it, i guess the korean beer being compared to north korean beer, then maybe it never would have lit the spark that it did. >> reporter: that spark came from a 2012 magazine article in "the economist" called "fiery food, boring beer," praising the suds from the north while trashing the south. >> they say like the day after that article was published every brewery in korea got a phone call from the government saying what are we doing, what are we doing wrong? >> reporter: magpie founder eric moynihan says relax the liquor laws soon followed allowing smaller batch brews and igniting the south korean craft beer scene. how would you describe what craft beer now means to south koreans? >> before it was just like an international product that was here and now people are starting to see it as like oh, this is a locally made product, we can put
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our own stamp on it. >> reporter: why brew here in korea? >> if i could be honest, i would say the beer was not very good. >> reporter: phillip rankmore, part owner of bunabu brew pun in kangnun. >> we turned it into a brewery. >> reporter: the building itself is an old rice wine factory. his beers, the work of an all korean staff, give a nod to the local community. >> the original name of gangneung. >> reporter: whether it's the name or the ingredients it's rankmore's name of putting a traditional spin on bunabu beer. >> sungcho, kukwa, even rice, we use that in our beer as well. >> reporter: creating a new tradition to share with south korea and perhaps one day the world. dana jacobson, cbs news, seoul, south korea. >> that's the overnight news for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. in the wake of the latest school shooting in florida, pressure is building on broward county sheriff scott israel to be fired for neglect of duty and incompetence. 74 members of the florida house of representatives signed a letter calling on the sheriff to be suspended immediately. they claim his officers ignored repeated warnings about the alleged gunman and his deputies were untrained to deal with an active shooter situation when it happened. omar villafranca reports. >> reporter: it was a somber return for the survivors of the deadly mass shooting at stoneman douglas. students and teachers returned to campus coping with the reality of what happened here.
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today governor rick scott called on the florida department of law enforcement to investigate the initial response to the shooting. video from school cameras showed that the armed school resource officer, broward deputy scot peterson, stayed outside the building while the shooting was taking place. peterson has since resigned. new reports say other deputies didn't enter the school either. broward county sheriff scott israel addressed the accusations on cnn's "state of the union." >> while this killer was inside the school, there was only one law enforcement person, period. and that was former deputy scot peterson. >> reporter: florida republican congressman brian mast said he'd support the idea of raising the age to buy a rifle to 21. the army veteran also says he'd support a ban on the ar-15, a weapon the former soldier says he's familiar with. >> it mains me to know that i went out there willing to defend
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my country, willing to give everything, with almost the exact same weapon that's used to go out there and unfortunately kill children here in parkland. and i think there's a very real opportunity here for response. >> reporter: 74 florida republican state lawmakers are asking governor rick scott to remove sheriff israel from his post. sheriff israel has already said he does not plan to resign. elaine? >> omar, thank you. the parkland massacre has renewed calls to approach gun violence as a public health threat, like diseases or car crashes. over the past two decades the centers for disease control and prevention has been restricted from researching the impact of guns on public health. dr. jon lapook explains the reason for this and why it could change. >> reporter: what's been sorely missing in the gun control debate so far has been science. and there's a reason for that. back in 1993 a cdc-funded study found homicide was three times more likely in homes with guns.
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that prompted congress to pass legislation in 1996 prohibiting the cdc from doing any research to advocate or promote gun control. the ban had a chilling effect on all gun-related research by the agency. in 2016 more than 100 medical organizations urged congress to repeal the legislation. after the orlando nightclub shooting that left 49 people dead, i spoke with former congressman jay dickey, who helped write the law. he told me he had come to regret its effect. why do you think it's wrong now? >> if we'd just kept the research dollars going and we'd said science is important and we need to get to it, i didn't realize that it was possible to do that. >> reporter: dickey died last year but his legislation continues and last week following the school shootings in florida congresswoman kathy caster pressed health and human
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services secretary alex azar about the lack of research. >> will you be proactive on the research initiative? >> we certainly will. our centers for disease control and prevention, we're in the science business and the evidence-generating business. >> reporter: this week two republican congressmen, leonard lance of new jersey and brian mast of florida, called for restoring cdc funding of research into gun violence. it remains to be seen whether that will snowball into actual repeal of the dickey amendment. dr. jon lapook, cbs news, new york. severe weather killed at least four people this weekend in the south. a wave of storms from texas to canada unleashed floods, devastating winds, lightning, hail and tornadoes. a week of heavy rain and melting snow has caused flood emergencies in several states. and the threat is expected to continue into the week. here's tony dokoupil. >> reporter: scenes of destruction like this motel shredded by a possible tornado in northeastern arkansas dotted
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the central and southern united states this weekend. as pounding rains, rising rivers, and at least eight possible tornadoes ravaged the country. the roof of this home near bowling green, kentucky caved in, killing a 79-year-old woman. >> an elderly female which was located in the kitchen part of the house. >> reporter: the ohio river swelled to nearly three times its normal level in louisville, kentucky and spilled its banks further north, where cincinnati, ohio recorded one of its wettest days on record. >> it started raining real hard, and then he saw this barn, metal from this barn take off, and then the windows busted out. >> reporter: deaths in arkansas and kentucky on saturday ended a 284-day run without a tornado death in the u.s. the longest streak on record. but elaine, the good news is experts believe that streak wasn't only luck. predictions may be getting better. >> tony, thank you.
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the winter olympics ended today with a spectacular ceremony and a possible diplomatic breakthrough. north korea said it is willing to hold talks with the united states. more now from ben tracy in pyeongchang, south korea. >> reporter: there were fireworks all around the olympic stadium during the closing ceremony of the games, but inside it was a picture of peace. athletes from both koreas marched together and north korea's delegation was seated just behind ivanka trump. she is here representing the united states. putting on a successful olympic charm offensive. >> it's very similar to what kim jong un did by sending his younger sister. she's a softer face. >> reporter: jean lee is an expert on korean relations. she says the olympics have opened up communication between the two koreas and now potentially with the united states. >> this is a moment that i hope the south koreans and the americans recognize. there's potential to turn things
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around here. >> reporter: south korean president moon jae-in says the head of north korea's delegation, general kim yong chol, told him that north korea has "enough willingness to talk to the united states." that would be a sudden about-face. the u.s. says the north koreans pulled out of a meeting with vice president mike pence at the last minute during his visit to south korea two weeks ago. but tensions could get in the way of talks. if planned military exercises are carried out after the games. the trump administration also just imposed tough new sanctions on north korea and has provided only vague support for a summit between north and south. an offer made by kim jong un. >> does president trump support the leaders of south korea and north korea getting together at a summit? >> i think he believes that the dialogue could be helpful as dialogue always can be as long as the message remains the same. and the goals remain the same. >> reporter: of course the goal is to get north korea to give up
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its nuclear weapons, but previous attempts at sports diplomacy have never led to that diplomacy have never led to that and there are no diplomacy have never led to that and there are no you're still here? we're voya! we stay with you to and through retirement. i get that voya is with me through retirement, i'm just surprised it means in my kitchen. so, that means no breakfast? voya. helping you to and through retirement. theseare heading back home.y oil thanks to dawn, rescue workers only trust dawn, because it's tough on grease yet gentle. i am home, i am home, i am home
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." the queen of hip-hop soul mary j. blige may soon be carrying around a couple of gold statues from the oscars. blige has been nominated for both her acting and her songwriting. michelle miller has her story. ♪ come on baby just party with me ♪ ♪ set your body free >> reporter: less than two weeks before the academy awards. ♪ ♪ before you get loose and start to lose your mind ♪ mary j. blige up for not one but two oscars is on stage in tampa, giving it her all. ♪ no more
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♪ no more drama >> when it's a show with real fans, energy is through the roof. it's amazing. ♪ when i'm looking at me when i'm looking past the mirror ♪ >> reporter: no question about it. ♪ i'm not gonna cry no more mary j. blige writes her own script. >> she's not afraid of anything. >> reporter: she's not? >> no. >> reporter: producer jimmy iovine, one of the biggest names in music, has known blige for decades. >> mary brings you on a journey, and she connects with her fans like that. and she really reflects the life she's lived, the struggles and all. ♪ ♪ take what you've been giving it ♪
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>> reporter: and now the woman called the queen of hip-hop soul is taking hollywood -- >> need to get the coffin in the ground. >> reporter: -- by quiet storm. >> appreciate it. >> reporter: as the matriarch of a family of southern sha sharecroppers she strains against crushing racism and poverty in the movie "mudbound." >> you come all the way back. you hear? >> reporter: audiences at early hearings didn't even recognize blige as florence jackson. >> the beauty about all these accolades that are coming with this part is that i disappeared. and i think that's what acting is about. i'm so happy that people did not recognize me. i was happy about that. >> reporter: it might seem a long journey for mary j. blige, from the housing project in yonkers where she grew up just outside new york city to the south of the 1940s. or maybe not.
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>> what people don't know is my family is southern. my mother's southern. my father's southern. and every summer, you know, you're a kid from new york, your family sends you down south in the summers. this woman is my grandmother. she was a sharecropper's wife. and my grandfather would be mowing the lawn and doing everything else and she would be out in the field. i saw her kill chickens. >> you had the template. >> yeah. she was definitely in my dna. >> action. >> reporter: "mudbound" was directed by dee reese, and both director and star have already made oscar history. reese as the first black woman nominated for best adapted screenplay and blige in two categories -- best supporting actress and best original song. to get those two nominations in the same year is unprecedented. ♪ like a river ♪ as florence blige keeps her fury in check with one thing on her
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mind. >> survival. my mom was that woman as well because my mom was a single parent. and we didn't live in a great neighborhood. we lived in almost you could call it beirut. for a child it was like a war zone. her whole goal was survival for. >> reporter: young mary's survival mechanism was singing. >> i would wake up in the mo morning singing commercials, singing songs. i would wake up out of my sleep, aaah. and my sister was like shut up, shut up. i just loved it. >> who was your favorite go-to? >> the children's aid society commercial. remember that? >> sing it for me. ♪ he helps me with my homework when i'm stuck ♪ ♪ they help me with my homework when i'm stuck ♪ >> i can't remember -- i remember it but i don't want to go through all that. >> reporter: blige hit commercial success with her first album, which was considered a revolutionary blend of r&b and rap.
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♪ you were the it girl. but there was a lot of other stuff going on. how did you survive it all? >> whoo. how did i survive it all? i just kept singing and partying. i was partying. i was partying hard too. so you think about a 21-year-old with all the success, with all the trauma and trials and all these things going on. how does she numb all of this? >> what did you numb? >> i was numbing just pain from just things that had happened to me as a child. ♪ ♪ where were you ♪ where were you >> reporter: she was open about the sexual abuse she says she suffered by a family acquaintance starting at the age of 5. that gives her an especially strong connection to today's "me too" movement. you wore black to the golden
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globes. was there a personal empowerment in that for you? >> i mean, this whole movement is personal empowerment for me because a lot of women are speaking the same, everything that happened to them, like we couldn't do that when we were growing up. we had to keep our mouths closed. >> reporter: blige now has a platform to speak up these days. she's won virtually every music award again and again, including nine grammys. but she wasn't nominated for one this year. in fact, very few women were. the night of the ceremony the president of the grammys, neil portnow, drew criticism for saying that women need to step up. do women need to step it up? >> women have been stepping it up for years. that comment is just ridiculous to me. ♪ i ain't gonna let nothing get in my way ♪ >> reporter: as oscar week approaches, mary j. blige would seem to be sitting on top of the world. but for the past year she's been
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involved in a bitter divorce from her husband of 14 years, kenley isaacs. she says the split even left her temporarily homeless. that's when she turned to jimmy iovine and his family. >> we just jumped in and said okay, what do you need? >> i need a place to live. >> yeah. well, she stayed with us. you know what i mean? we loved having her. breakfast with mary. it was incredible. >> reporter: and to blige it was incredible what happened last month. the day she turned 47. >> wow. what a gift you got on your birthday. >> oh, my star. >> you got a star on the hollywood walk of fame. >> yes. i always want to earn everything. i don't play games with this. i want people when someone is praising me or looking up to me, i need to have earned that. so i'm so grateful for this star right now because i've earned it
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probably three times but i'm so grateful that i have this. >> you've earned it three times. >> i've been working my ass off. i worked really hard. >> reporter: setting the stage for what could be a historic oscar sunday for mary j. blige. >> this moment is the payoff and this moment says you know what, mary, you stood strong. ♪ ♪ like a river breathe freely fast with vicks sinex. my congestion's gone. i can breathe again! i can breathe again! vicks sinex... breathe on.
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the u.s. women's ice hockey team is heading home from the olympics with gold medals around their necks. for the brandt family from minnesota it was a family affair. hannah brandt helped team usa toyotas first gold in 20 years. and her adopted sister marisa was on the ice for the unified korean team. dana jacobson has their story. >> yeah, it was an incredible feeling being able to be here with my sister. i kind of imagined what it would be like coming into it but to be able to live it out and do it with her was one of the most incredible feelings ever. >> i didn't even know what to expect going into the olympics and what it would be like.
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but now that it's almost over it's sad but we had so much fun together and with our teams. and yeah, we -- i don't know. couldn't have asked for anything different. >> opening ceremony, different teams, but did you get a chance to see each other at least? >> yeah, for a short time. my team was really late for some reason. there was lots of traffic. so got in right away and then looked for the usa sign and found her. took a picture. and then we said bye. >> yeah. i was kind of sad because i was like oh, i'm not going to see her. kind of texting you need to get here now. and then i didn't hear from her. and all of a sudden we were about to walk outside and out of nowhere she appeared and i got a little emotional just because -- to actually see her at the opening ceremonies and to have that like dream come true for both of us was pretty exciting. >> hannah, obviously for you this was the gold medal that you all sought. can you take me into what it was like for you and for your team? you get to overtime. you go to a shootout. what was that shootout like for you guys on the ice?
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>> it felt like we had a lot of confidence going into the overtime, we were playing well, we'd come from behind, and then for it to go into a shootout, we were just kind of like oh, we've got to do this now. >> that cool, that relaxed? >> yeah. you can't overthink it at that point. it's just a shootout. we do those all the time. and obviously this one meant a little bit more. but you have to kind of stay calm, cool, and collected. i don't know if it's quite sunk in yet but it's definitely a dream come true for all of us and it's just been fun to experience that with my teammates. >> can you take us into that moment right that second when you knew the u.s. had won? what was that like for the brandt family in the stands? ? we were all sitting together and we were actually with some of my teammates, and i just remember she made the save. we all screamed. and then we ran down because we wanted to be -- we wanted to try to see and you be with other parents but it was just excitement. pure excitement and joy and happiness for her team. they finally won gold. it was stressful to watch just because, you know -- yeah. it was very back and forth. and like you said, went into
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overtime and then a shootout. i was on the edge of my seat the entire time, just nervous for her and her team. but they won and it was a complete just -- yeah. so happy and relieved it was over and people would celebrate. yeah, very happy and proud. >> i know you guys spent two years where you guys really weren't in the same place as a family. not just you but with your parents. one of your responseors helped bring you together. intel. how did they do that? >> intel was awesome. they came and shot both of us in our respective training locations. >> hey, mom. >> hi, mom. >> but for us to be able to kind of share our story with our family and friends that hadn't really seen a whole lot of us. >> even when you're not there i know i always have something to play for and that's you guys. >> it was incredible the way they put that together. >> what do you think the impact was on girls in america, in korea from seeing you guys play hockey? >> i've already heard from so many people back home. people tweeting at us, that we've inspired many, many people to start playing hockey. i think we've generated a lot of new fans, and i think for us to
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be able to do that that's what we're here to do. fire fighting is a very dangerous profession. we have one to two fires a day and when you respond together and you put your lives on the line, you do have to surround yourself with experts. and for us the expert in gas and electric is pg&e. we run about 2,500/2,800 fire calls a year and on almost every one of those calls pg&e is responding to that call as well. and so when we show up to a fire and pg&e shows up with us it makes a tremendous team during a moment of crisis.
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i rely on them, the firefighters in this department rely on them, and so we have to practice safety everyday. utilizing pg&e's talent and expertise in that area trains our firefighters on the gas or electric aspect of a fire and when we have an emergency situation we are going to be much more skilled and prepared to mitigate that emergency for all concerned. the things we do every single day that puts ourselves in harm's way, and to have a partner that is so skilled at what they do is indispensable, and i couldn't ask for a better partner.
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steve hartman now with the story of a young man dedicated to keeping the memory of world war ii heroes alive. >> reporter: 20-year-old rishi sharma has always been into superheroes. the real kind. that's why as a junior in high school he made it his mission to meet as many world war ii combat veterans as possible. >> i ditched so many days of high school to go do an interview. >> reporter: you were skipping school to go interview vets? >> yeah. i started riding my bike to the local senior home. i interviewed those guys. then i started driving. >> reporter: it became a daily undertaking. >> every single day. >> reporter: when we first met rishi in 2016, he was driving all over southern california. >> i had a lot of missions. >> reporter: interviewing guys like marine tank commander ernie isley. >> they were going to make a big
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camp there and attack us at night. >> reporter: rishi talks to the men for hours. >> wow. >> reporter: then gives the recordings to their families. he says he does it because time is short. we're losing about 400 world war ii vets every day. >> it's amazing how much history and knowledge is encased in each one of these individuals and how much is lost when one of them dies without sharing their story. the fact is i wake up every day to obituarieobituaries. guys i wanted to interview and i have to find out that they died. >> reporter: at this point i should tell you rishi doesn't come from a military family. his parents immigrated here from india. and yet he cares as much about our greatest generation as any young man i've ever met. >> my name is rishi sharma. >> reporter: in addition to his in-person interviews he was telephoning at least five world war ii vets a day. just to thank them for their service and sacrifice. >> it means a great deal to me that you were willing to endure
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all of that so that i could be here today. >> oh, thank you very much. >> reporter: after this story first aired, rishi raised enough money on go fund me to expand his mission across the country. he travels by car, often sleeps in it. so far he has interviewed over 850 vets in 40 states, learning about their stories and their scars. >> bullet wound. >> reporter: those that have healed. and those that will never. >> who is that? >> this is my brother, jack. and he died in my arms on the battlefield. >> reporter: nice to know as long as there are world war ii veterans willing to talk there will be at least one young man -- >> oh, shucks. >> reporter: -- willing to listen. steve hartman, on the road, in redondo beach, california. >> you mean a lot to me. >> that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, february 26th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news". floodwaters rise, and tornadoes touch down in a storm system that stretched from texas to canada. >> we're just lucky to be alive. everything can be replaced. and students, parents, and teachers make an emotional return to the florida high school where 17 people were killed by a gunman. >> i'm scared to go back, but i know our school will be safer.

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