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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 21, 2018 3:12am-4:00am PDT

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d.c., dachphiladelphia, new yor boston. a foot of snow or more. take aways from the storm. many temperatures above freezing. the type of snow. heavy, wet stuff again. seems like that has been the way of the world around here as of
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the month of march. accumulate. trees are weathered. coastal flooding. snow starts, a.m. for the d.c. midway, philly, new york. evening kmuflt tcommute. >> ln a woman who alleges an af with donald trump before he became president is suing for a chance to tell her story. also out, the results of a approximateliy graph test on an earlier accuser, stormy daniels. here is justice reporter, paula reid. >> reporter: karen mcdougal, 1998 playmate of year alleges she met donald trump at the playboy mansion and the two had a ten month affair. today filed a lawsuit seeking to release her from an agreement she signed, that prevents her from speaking out about that relationship. the lawsuit names american media incorporated the company that owns the "national enquirer." it alleges mcdougal was paid
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$150,000 during the 2016 presidential campaign for the rights to her story. but it never ran. she also alleges, her lawyer, and mr. trump's attorney, michael cohen were working together to secure her silence. in a statement, ami said, karen mcdougal has been free to respond to press inkwir rear as but her relationship with president trump since 2016. thus the suggestion, ami silenced her is without merit. mcdougal, the late woes man to take legal action over an agreement allege lead restricting her from speak outing about president trump before his time in office. adult film actress, stormy dan yemz has the also taken the president and his personal attorney to court, and in an attempt to end a nondisclosure agreeme agreement. the white house has dismissed her claims. >> he denied all these allegations. >> cbs news obtained a report from a polygraph daniels took in 2011 at the request of a media outlet that wanted to publish her story. the examiner found a more than
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99% probability she told the truth. when she said that she and mr. trump had unprotected sex in 2006. bumt h but her claim he offered her a job on apprentice was judged inconclue sieve. the story never ran. she took to twitter to say she believes that people care about her story and question as but whether the president may have lied, bullied her or broken the law to keep her silent. she also said she is not going anywhere. jeff. >> paula reid. thank you very much. >> facebook held a crisis ills meeting to day, but cbs news has confirmed neither of its two top executives mark zuckerberg and sheryl sandberg attended. the company faces a federal investigation amid word it may have mishandled data for 50 million users. information used by cambridge analytica, a consultant to the trump campaign. john black stone has more on this. >> undercover video broadcast today by britain's channel 4 reveals cambridge analytica, ceo
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alexander mix boasting of the involvement in 20916 presidential campaign. >> have you met mr. from snp. >> many times. >> we did all the research, all the data, all the analytics all the targeting. cambridge analytica, suspended mix. facebook could be in deeper trouble. in 2011 they signed a consent decree with the ftc, not to allow unauthorized use of profile. mix's admission something jes face book may have violated the agreement. an early investor of facebook is a critic of the company. >> there is a giant problem for facebook and democracy in the united states. >> sam lester with electronic privacy information center agreetz. >> users had no idea that cambridge analytica was accessing data clear violation of the 20911 consent order. >> could cost them 40,000 for every offense all.
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that could total $2 trillion in fines. zuckerberg's silence is disappointing. >> you don't get to make a billion dollars or tens of billions of dollars without being responsible for the consequences of your actions. >> facebook spokesperson said today the entire company its outrage they'd were deceived by cambridge an liticca. lawmakers in congress and britain's parliament are holding facebook responsible and they want to hear directly from mark zuckerberg. >> john blackstone. thank you. there is much more ahead. birth control pills are for women, right. new research suggests that could change. >> later, the moment teachers became life savors. ♪when you've got...♪
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♪...nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea!♪ ♪nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea!♪ here's pepto bismol! ah. ♪nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea!♪ we are getting closer to the
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day when men will have the option of taking a birth control pill. will they? here is chief medical correspondent, dr. jon lapook. >> we decided on the pill. >> the birth control pill is 60 years old. never been one for men. dr. stephanie page says it is about time. >> one of the issues for men is that they really have few options available. >> dr. page and colleagues showed a study showing a male birth control pill, mimics testosterone was safe. it dramatically lowered testosterone levels with no change in mood or sexual function end of the month. >> sex drive, maintaining muscle all the important male characteristics are maintained by the hormone that we are giving the men. >> but will it work as birth control? normally in men, hormones from the brain stimulate the production of testosterone and sperm. the male pill works by blocking the brain hormones, which lowers testosterone levels expected to
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shut down sperm production >> we know we need to block sperm production. the key is bringing down the sperm concentrations. >> social media weighed in. one woman writing, let's let our men take one for the team once. and one man tweeted, not sure relying on us boys to remember to take it is such a good idea. >> the next step is a study to see if the pill not only lowers testosterone but also sperm count enough to be an effective form of contraception. although the pill will not hit the market any time soon. jeff, the science looks promising. >> fair amount of discussion in the newsroom today. dr. jon lapook, thank you. >> watch bystanders become >> watch bystanders become he
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>> courageous effort saved a man's life after he flipped his car in westtown, pennsylvania. teachers from a nearby school sprayed fire extinguishers to keep those flames from spreading. bystanders helped officers then roll the car. and drag the driver to safety. police say without that help from the teachers, the driver would have likely have died. up next here tonight, firefighters remember fallen heroes. ♪
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>> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of the foundation of your life and your faith in him. [music]
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. >> seven u.s. airmen were killed in iraq. two risked their lives as firefighters in new york city. fdny brothers wanted you to know them as they did. >> the guy would have done anything. we would say, certainly too good for this job. he had the mind, the tools to do anything he wanted. and he chose to help people. >> born in indiana, nyu, stanford law graduate, new york city fire fighter was 37 years old. >> all of the jobs he had, studying for, they were all about giving back. they were nothing ab aing about monetary. he lived modestly. could have worked anywhere. fter 9/11 he want to be a new york city fireman. the city was hurting. heave wanted to contribute and help.
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whatever he decided he wanted to do, within months he would be immersed in it. he would read books about japan written in german. >> what? >> it's true. >> yeah that's true. >> multiple languages. >> taught himself how to play the piano. >> he set a high bar for everybody to attain. >> chris raguso from long island, served in iraq, afghanistan, the horn of africa, and recent leap rly rescued flo victims. decorated by the fdny, six times for valor. >> when the guy comes on to the job. you go to easy fires. you don't realize how dangerous the job is. one night, you know, few years back, chris was working. we had a real bad one. and, i remember -- after the, after the fire was out, you know we were all banged up. and you know, chris, chris he had that feeling like -- like it was just, just wow. we all, we all went in there. we were in deep. and -- we all got out.
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>> he still kept putting himself in harm's way to serve. >> no question. whether it was here in the middle of the fire or, in iraq. >> yeah, that's what his unit did. >> they were, they were there to jump in. when, other members were injured or killed. and, ex-tri kate th it took fivd six guys to say amazing things. i think are are 50 lined up who wanted to say something too. i can't think of a better reflection of the kind of people they were, the keenind of men t were. >> one of our retired members, a vet, he had -- some of the best advice i felt, that we have heard yet. and it's telling us, not to mourn them. because they were doing exactly what they should have been duke. and, they wouldn't hatch hve ha any other way. >> that's the "overnight news" for wednesday.
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for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and "cbs this morning" from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm jeff glor. welcome to the "overnight news." i'm michelle miller. there has been another bombing in texas. this one at a fed ex warehouse outside san antonio. the fbi is scrambling to defer mdefer -- determine if it is linked to four bombs in austin. the devices killed two, injured four others and september the s -- set the city on edge. >> reporter: fbi and atf agents in austin immediately arrived to investigate. >> a package had been traveling
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along the all right mated convey ', when it had exploded. >> reporter: later in the morning a second suspicious package was located near austin. fedex released a statement saying a second package was secured and turned over to law enforcement. former atf bomb specialist, worked on dozens of bombing cases. she says with each explosion, investigators collect a wealth of physical evidence. bomb makers have a device, commonality. >> the fourth bomb went off in this austin neighborhood, in fact, the bomb blew up right here with two bicyclists triggered the trip wire. a few feet away you can still see some blood on the ground.
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>> anything that comes in that is sealed up and packed, we will open and inspect and make sure there is nothing problematic inside. >> police in maryland don't know why a student opened fire inside a local high school. two people were wounded. a blood bath was averted when a school resource officer engaged the gunman who is now dead. jeff pegues reports. awe . >> reporter: police say 17-year-old, austin wyatt rollins opened firen a hallway and shot 16-year-old, jalyn willie. >> there is an indication a prior relationship existed between the shooter and the female victim.
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investigators say rollins fired his semiautomatic handgun at the same time. he was later pronounced dead but not clear whether the officer shot him or he shot himself. a 14-year-old boy was also wounded in the ins dend. >> no question that his actions, his quick and immediate actions, potentially saved a great number of lives. >> so you ran here to, to reunite with your daughter? >> question. >> what was that like? >> panic. >> the school district superintendent said what happened is not so unusual anymore. >> if you don't think this can't happen at your school, you are sadly mistaken. >> 16-year-old jalene willie fighting for her life. the 14-year-old boy shot in the leg its,000 expected to survive. investigators say they have video of the shooting and that will help them figure out exactly what happened.
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the ftc launched an investigation into facebook, at issue the scandal involving the personal data of 50 million users that was harvested and used by a political consulting firm. john blackstone reports. >> undercover video broadcast today by britain's channel 4 reveals cambridge analytica, ceo alexander mix boasting of the involvement in 20916 presidential campaign. >> have you met mr. trump? >> many times. >> we did all the research, all the data, all the analytics all the targeting. cambridge analytica, suspended mix. facebook could be in deeper trouble. in 2011 they signed a consent decree with the ftc, not to allow unauthorized use of profile. mix's admission something jes face book may have violated the agreement. an early investor of facebook is a critic of the company.
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>> there is a giant problem for facebook and democracy in the united states. >> sam lester with electronic privacy information center agrees. >> users had no idea that cambridge analytica was accessing data clear violation of the 20911 consent order. >> could cost them 40,000 for every offense, times 50 million people. that could total $2 trillion in fines. zuckerberg's silence is disappointing. >> you don't get to make a billion dollars or tens of billions of dollars without being responsible for the consequences of your actions. >> facebook spokesperson said today the entire company its outrage they'd were deceived by cambridge an liticca. cambridge analytica. lawmakers in congress and britain's parliament are holding facebook responsible and they want to hear directly from mark zuckerberg. >> it has been six months since hurricane maria devastated puerto rico. in some parts of the island the power is still out.
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david begnaud took a tour to find out how residents are coping. >> we saw elisa and her husband on the side of the road with buckets. they come to the faucet to get water. >> during day, humacao looks like paradise. without power and water, it is a living hell. >> you don't see any body working here. >> we met up with yvette diaz who wrote on social media where she is demanding officials restore power to her and her neighbors. >> i don't think we should be protesting for something that we need. and something we pay. >> there is good news, more than 90% of electrical customers have
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power. but about 103,000 people do not. >> colonel welcome back to puerto rico. >> thank you. >> colonel jason kirk is leading the army corps of engineers as it helps puerto rico power authority restore electricity. >> we aren't burying the lines because we would be doing a new time consuming design effort. >> it took nearly six month just to rebuild the bridge. in the central part of the island. which restored a life line to thousands of people who had been cut off for half a year. volunteers are rebuilding roofs, distributing solar panels and as jamie and his wife lisa have done. >> here in puerto rico one thing that its so beautiful is that people who have share. and, it seems appropriate that, if we are here, and we are
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>> the crown prince of saudi arabia has begun a three week tour of the u.s. his first stop was the white house. salmon wants to buy billions of military hardware for his war in yemen. president trump approves, but some in congress are saying, not so fast. norah o'donnell sat down with the prince for 60 minutes. >> reporter: we first met prince mohammad at the royal court in riyadh. he arrived in a driving rain. the sign of good fortune in the desert kingdom. he has been called, bondvisiary home. as well as reckless and impulsive in his rise to power. he has kicked a hornet any nest
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in the middle east and earned ape host of new enemies. partly why he is one of the most heavily guarded men in the world. this is the office where he starts his days. >> working hard? >> always. >> he learned english from watching movies as a kid. he is acutely aware that 70% of the population is like him, under the age of 35, and getting restless. >> what's been the biggest challenge. >> there is a lot of challenge. i think the first big challenge we have, the people believe. >> there is a widespread perception that the kind of islam practiced in saudi arabia is harsh, strict. it is intolerant. is there any truth to that? >> after 1979, that tea true. we were victims, especially my generation. that suffered from this a great deal. >> the crown prince traces most of saudi arabia's problems to the year 1979.
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when the ayatollah khomeini established a theocracy next door in iran. the same year religious extremists in saudi arabia took over islam's holiest site. the grand mosque in mecca. in order to appease their own religious radicals, lthe saudis began clamping down, segregating women from everyday life. >> what has been this saudi arabia for the past 40 years, is that the real saudi arabia? absolutely not. this is not the real saudi arabia. i would ask your viewers to use their smart phones to find out. and they can google saudi arabia in the 70s and 60s and they will see the real saudi arabia easily in the pictures. >> what was saudi arabia like, before 1979? >> we were living a very normal life. like the rest of the gulf countries. women were driving cars. there were movie theaters in saudi arabia. women worked everywhere. we were just normal people,
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develop like any other country in the world, until the events of 1979. >> saudi women who have been virtually invisible in public have been given new rights. making it easier for them to start a business, join the military, and to attend concerts and sporting events. >> i'll go around. >> in june they will be able to get behind the wheel and drive. >> are women equal to men? >> absolutely. we are all human beings. and there is no difference. >> you have said, you are taking saudi arabia back to -- what we were. a moderate islam. what does that mean? >> we have extremists who forbid mixing between the two sexes and are unable to differentiate between a man and woman alone together and their being together in the work place. many of the idea contradict the way of life during the time of the prophet and this is the real example and the true model. >> he has curbed the powers of the country's so-called
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religious police who until recently were able to arrest women for not covering and liste says its not part of islamic law. >> the laws are very clear. and stipulated in the laws that women wear decent respectful clothing like men. this however does not particularly specify a black head cover. the decision is entirely left for wichl tuomen to decide to w decent, respectsful attire she chooses to wear. >> his words are significant. so far the kingdom's religious leaders are holding their tongues and sworn allegiance to the young prince. of all of the meet heegz pings presides over every week. this its most impormt. the economic council. the men and few women, trusted with remaking the saudi arabia social pact with the people. one of the closest advisers, a
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saudi born, harvard trained lawyer. >> we have a young fpopulation. we were providing for the population, you know, subsidized energy, subsidized water, subsidized medicine, subsidized education, we subsidized everybody's life. >> no taxes. >> no taxes. >> how close was saudi arabia to a financial crisis this? >> i don't think it was extremely close it was heading in that direction. >> reforming the welfare state is one challenge. another is what the crown prince calls saudi arabia's addiction to oil. the state oil company, aramco valued at $2 trillion dollars. stom wi some will be sold off to invest. it is concerneds, that the finances and dismal record on human rights may spook investors. >> you promised transparency and
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openness. there are reports dozens of people that have criticized your government have been arrested in the last year. they include economists, clerics, intellectintellectuals. is this an open and free society? . >> we will fry to publicize as much as we can, fast as we can information about the individuals to make the world aware of what the saudi arabia is doing to combat radicalism. >> to answer the question about human rights abuses in the country? >> saudi arabia believes in many of the principles of mu mhuman rights. we believe in the notion of human rights. ultimately saudi standards are not the same as american standards. i don't want to say that we don't have short comings. we certainly do. but naturally we are working to mend these short comings. >> but the crown prince has been accused of heavy handed tactics. the most extraordinary example happened last november. at the ritz-carlton hotel in
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riyadh. he invited hundreds of current and former government ministers, media moguls, prominent businessmen and at least 11 princes to a meeting here. where they were accused of stealing from the state. and were held until they either paid it back or proved their innocence. >> what happened at the ritz-carlton? how did that work? you were essentially the ritz-carlton became a jail. >> what we did in saudi arabia was extremely necessary. all actions taken were in accordance with existing and published laws. >> among the detained was prince bin talahal one of the richest men in the world. prince the prince was detained for two months. sawedies allowed a camera crew inside his room at the ritz for a brief interview. >> i like to say here until this is over completely. get out. life goes on.
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>> aw >> the crackdown was necessary. it wasn't easy. given the names and people who were involved. it really wasn't easy. but we just felt that we had to do this. we had to do it that way. >> what kind of corruption are we talking about? how much money was -- was disappearing? >> probably 5% to 10% of the annual spend by government which was, roughly, i would say -- anywhere between 10 to 20 billion dollars maybe more. >> $20 billion a year is just -- disappearing. >> disappearing. >> there have been reports that some detainees were physically abused. and one died in custody. the saudis told us the choice of the hotel, was to maintain the respect, dignity and comfort for those being investigated. was it a power grab? >> if i have the power, and the
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king has the the power to take action against influential people, then you are already fundamentally strong. these are naive accusations. >> how much money did you get back? >> the amount exceed $100 billion. but the real on jbjective was n this amount or any other amount. the idea is not to got money but to punish the corrupt and send ape clear signal that who ever engages in corrupt deals will face the law. >> is this also about sending a message that as we say in america there is a new sheriff in town? >> absolutely. absolutely. >> you can see that full report on our website, cbs news.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. un-stop right there!
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hey, need fast try cool mint zantac. it releases a cooling sensation in your mouth and throat. zantac works in as little as 30 minutes. nexium can take 24 hours. try cool mint zantac. no pill relieves heartburn faster. so you ask what is in a burger. meat or ground beef. not always, jamie yuccas went to a ranch searching for the answer. >> on this sprawling northern california ranch, the family has the raised black angus cattle for five generations. fogerty representatives ranchers as executive vice president of the u.s. cattleman's association. for them defining meat is easy. >> when consumers think of meat you want them to think of these guys?
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>> yes. we want them to think of this. we don't want them to think of the laboratory. don't want them to think of something under a microscope. >> the association is concerned about the increase of animal free products that have names look this one. beefy beyond beef crumbles. a product that tastes like beef. the cattleman's federal petition argues, the labels, beef or meat should inform consumers that the product is derived naturally from animals. as opposed to alternative proteins such as plants, or artificially grown in a laboratory. >> there is an opportunity. >> ethan brown, the ceo of beyondmali maliteat. >> the reason we want to use the word meat, we firmly believe this is meat not in terms of origin but in terms of composition, we are hitting all key points of composition. >> at beyond meat, los angeles area lab. brown's team is working to replicate the texture, color and
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sensory experience of eating a traditional hamburger. >> i think it is a mistake to dictate to the consumer what language they can use. >> this isn't the first fight over food labelling. dairy farmers have so far been unsuccessful. in some stores, these animal free alternatives are currently sold alongside their come pelt to -- competitors. >> do you think it is confusing to the consumer? >> no. i think the consume r is smar i. >> meat alternative sales up 6% last year. valued at $500 million. still crumbs compared to the meat industry that makes more than $50 billion annually. but the usda says it is considering the cattle rancher's petition and could decide to which foods meet the definition. >> i want this to be here generations after me. >> the consumer is saying look
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if i
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one of the biggest attractions at the zoo is lewis. unlike other apes, lewis likes to walk on hind legs. sound familiar. don dahler paid a visit to find out why. >> lewis hanging out before he starts his day. resting a little bit. a star here, for 14 years. when they posted the video here, gained national attention. researchers say, his upright behavior, might be a blue as to why humans ee vfld volved to wa two feet. lewis not like fellow play mates. weighing in at hefty 470 pounds, standing at nearly 6 feet tall. the 18-year-old gorilla prefers to stand on two legs rather than on all fours. >> gorillas will occasionally stand up for a few second or
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walk a couple steps. what we see lewis doing is really walking clear across the yar. that's quite special. >> michael stern is curator at the philadelphia zoo. he says lewis walks upright for number of reasons. >> in the individually he has hands full of tomatoes. favorite treats. doesn't want to crush them. he stands up and walks. do it more if the yard is muddy for whatever reason. he does not like the feel of mud on his hands. he just likes to, stand up and walk sometimes. >> gorillas have 98% the same dna. the 2% difference that separates their intelligence and how they walk. >> for apes it is more ee fishn't fish e -- efficient. for lewis not difficult. it comes naturally to him. >> lewis is not alone. a 27-year-old gorilla in england, made headlines in 2011. for his own human-like strut. they walk upright to more effectively gather food. which scientists say may be one of the reasons humans ee vvolve
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walk on two feet. gorillas are intriguing animals. you can tell when you look into their eyes, they're similar to us, that they're so intelligent. yet there is something animalistic about them. powerful. when you see one acting even more human by walking upright like that. it just makes you realize, wow. those, those are pretty amazing animals, the world its, is amazing nature its amazing. despite his eat nor muss size, folks here at the zoo, tell me he is quite shy. heo get dirty. in fact he has been seen using leaves or even paper bags to clean his hands. and his feet. they stretch ate fire hose across a muddy part of his enclosure, which he uses as a tightrope. to avoid getting messy. if all men were so cautious. well, that's the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others, we'll check back a bit later for the morning news and of course, cbs this morning.
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from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm michelle

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