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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  April 16, 2018 3:00am-4:01am PDT

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after the air strikes. we have the latest from the pentagon and inside syria. in a new twitter barrage, president trump suggests james comey should be sent to jail. plus comey's new revelation about hillary clinton. >> i was operating in a world where hillary clinton was going to beat donald trump. >> a spring blizzard buries the upper midwest, violent thunderstorms and tornados threaten florida to virginia. >> protesters swarm starbucks after the controversial arrest of two black men. country superstar, jason aldeen's emotional return to las vegas tonight. six months after the massacre.
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>> i have a million great memories of vegas. one horrible one. ♪ ♪ welcome to the "overnight news." i'm avenelaine quijano. president trump defending his use of the famous phrase mission accomplished. targeting the chemical weapons program. in response to a suspected chlorine and sarin attack on civilians last weekend. on "face the nation" u.n. ambassador nikki haley said the u.s. will announce sanctions against russia for protecting assad. david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: the attack on syria's chemical weapons facilities included cruise missiles launched from a u.s. submarine in the mediterranean. total of 105 missiles fired from ships and aircraft from three different directions. all of them got through, and the
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aftermath, whether seen from ground level or space, seemed to confirm the claim made by u.n. ambassador nikki haley on "face the nation." >> we set their chemical weapons program back years. >> the president tweeted, mission accomplished. echoing a slogan from 2003 prematurely declared subses in the iraq war. in fact the friday night strike did nothing to accomplish the president's goals in syria as defined by white house press secretary sarah sanders appearing on abc. >> he has talked about this relentlessly. we are all most there. we have made extraordinary gains against isis. >> it is true there are only small pockets of isis, still holding out in syria, but that is in the euphrates river valley remov removed. the one-shot strike as defense secretary mattis called it may have set back chances off cheefg tcheefg -- of achieving the other goal
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in syria. >> we have to control iran, assure that the bad acting doesn't continue and grow. >> iran's president called russia's president putin today, according to the russians the two leaders agreed the strike seriously damaged prospects for a political settlement to syria's civil war. the u.s. military has demonstrated over and over its ability to launch strikes that destroy their targets. but strikes alone almost never accomplish the mission. elaine. >> david, thank you. our seth doane was in the syrian capital friday night when the missiles struck. on saturday he checked out the smoldering rubble of a suspected chemical weapons facility in damascus. tonight he has this report from inside syria. >> reporter: dhouma in rebel hands is controlled by syrian forces. that could make it easier for chemical weapons inspectors who arrived in damascus to get to the site of the purported april
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7th chemical attack. inspectors were set to begin work today. >> syria's deputy foreign minister told us they were eager to help get inspectors to the site. though the government still claims the attack never happened. today on state tv, president bashar al assad appeared as confident as ever. holding meetings with russian lawmakers. he said $400 billion would be needed to restore syria's economy and called the coalition missile strikes an act of aggression. that's a sentiment we have heard echoed on the streets. since the air strikes, syrians and government controlled damascus have been defiant. they have been attacking and conspireing against syria for eight years, the student said. but syria is strong. in rebel held parts of the country, they have argued the air strikes did not go far enough. because assad is still in power. his forces have been making
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steady gains, knocking out opposition fighters wherever they can. like in the city of homs north of the capital. where the white helmets released video of victims of artillery shelling on rebel positions. the syrian government tells us the next crucial battle here in the capital will be against isis. which still controls a pocket of this city. elaine. >> seth doane in damascus. seth, thanks. united nations ambassador nikki haley discussed the street on syria with margaret brennan on face the nation. >> the white house said there have been reports since april of last year, 30 continued chemical weapons attack in syria some involving sarin. why did this particular attack last week warrant military action but the others didn't? >> will i think obviously this was cumulative. he, assad had been using chemical weapons multiple times. more so this was about the security council resolutions. we had, up until this point, had
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six different resolutions that would have dealt with investigative mechanisms for chemical weapons. and russia vetoed all of them. and so we felt like we had gone through every diplomatic measure of talking we could. and it was time for action. i think one thing we hope assad got the message on is the international community will not allow chemical weapons to come back into our everyday life. and the fact that he was making this more normal and russia was covering it up a, all that has to stop. >> are there any consequences for assad's patrons, russia and iran who continue to protect him? >> absolutely. so you will see that russian -- sanctions will be coming down. secretary will be announcing those monday if he hasn't already they will go directly to any sort of company that were dealing with equipment reap lated to assad and chemical weapons use. and so, i think everyone is going to feel it at this point. everyone knows that, we, we center a strong message. and our hope is that they listen
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to it. >> senator lindsay graham who you know well said he fears this is a weak military response. so what its the u.s. plan for follow-up? >> make no question about it. this was a very strong response. first of all we went after their storage facilities where they kept come poenlso this was very strong attack on the chemical weapons program. we were not looking for war. that's the last thing the president wanted was war. we were not looking for kill people. that was not something that, in our american values we would want to do. we wanted to send a strong message they needed to stop the chemical weapons program. wanted with political and diplomatic actions now, we wanted their friend, iran and russia to know we went misness and they were going to be feeling the pain from this as
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well. but our goal its not to start war. our goal know it to kill people. our goal its to
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president trump on twitter today suggested fired fbi director james comey should be sent to jail. it is a preemptive strike against comey's harsh assessment of the president in his new book. our correspondent is at the white house. >> president trump continued his tweet attack on former fbi director james comey sunday. ahead of the release of comey's explosive memoir or as the president described it comey's badly reviewed book. according to president trump, slippery james comey will go down as the worst fbi director in history. by far. comey will launch a media blitz with the book release this week. in it, comey explains his decision to reveal just before
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the 2016 elect, that the fbi had reopened the probe into the hillary clinton e-mail scandal. >> i was operating in a world where hillary clinton was going to beat donald trump. so i am sure that it, that it was a factor. like i said i don't remember spelling it out. but it had to have been that, that she is going to be elected president. if i hide this from the american people, she'll be illegitimate the moment she its elected comes out. >> jim comey in my way of thinking is a good man who made a very consequential blunder. off awe senator tim kaine was clinton's runningmate. the fbi has two clear rules, don't talk about a pending investigation. don't inject controversy before an election. they didn't follow the rules with respect to hillary clinton. >> meanwhile the president is fuming about evidence seized from his personal attorney during an fbi raid. attorney-client privilege ledge is now a thing of the past. but the white house insists, president trump remains cool. >> look, the president is very confident in the fact that he
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has done nothing wrong. and he can't speak on behalf of anyone else. but very confident in what he has, hasn't done. >> a federal judge requested michael cohen appear for a court hearing in new york tomorrow. this morning, adult film star, stormy daniels' attorney said daniels will attend. daniels was paid $130,000 by cohen, she claims, hush money to keep a 2006 sexual encounter with mr. trump quiet. as daniels' attorney put it monday could prove very interesting. elaine. >> thank you. a spring blizzard buried the upper midwest this weekend. some areas got more than a foot of snow. in pipestone, minnesota, conditions were so bad that a huge snowplow got stuck until a farmer came by with his heavy equipment. in the east, violent thunderstorms are threatening cities from florida to virginia. there is also a chance of tornados, popping up. >> the largest egg recall in eight years.
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rose acre farms recalling more than 206 million eggs because they could be contaminated with salmonella. at least 22 have gotten sick. sold in nine states high lagted on the map. health officials say affected cartons are marked with plant number p-1065. protesters swarmed a starbucks in philadelphia sunday following the controversial arrests of two black men. meg oliver has more on this. >> reporter: dozens of protesters showed up to the philadelphia starbucks sunday after two black men were arrested inside late last week. camille himes, starbucks vice president of operations. >> we know we have work to do. we have worked closely with the community here in philadelphia. it break is my heart. >> the men's attorney, lauren wimmer would not identify them. they were waiting for this man, andrew jaffe to arrive.
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>> what did they get called for? >> the men were in starbuck's less than 15 minutes. >> the guys were doing what people do every single day. they were having a meeting. they were undoubtedly singled out because of their race. >> during the time, police say the men attempted to use the restroom without buying anything. which is against starbuck's policy. when an employee asked them to leave, they refused. and she called 911. >> when they were arrested they were taken out essentially without incident. no harm done to them. >> philadelphia police commissioner went on facebook live insisting his officers did nothing wrong. >> three different occasions the officers asked the males politely to leave the location because they were being asked to leave by employees because they were trespassing. and instead, the males continued to refuse. >> starbuck's ceo kevin johnson release aid statement apologizing to the men saying, starbuck's stand firmly against discrimination or racial profiling. >> philadelphia's mayor jim
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kenny says he was heartbroken by what appears to exemplify what racial discrimination looks like in 2018. he is calling for a review of starbuck's policies and the need for implicit bias training. elaine. >> meg, thank you. coming up, a place where firefighters can treat their invisible wounds. >> later,
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dozens of firefighters are skilled each year in the line of duty. thousands more are injured. many also suffer invisible wounds including post-traumatic stress disorder. chip reid visited a center in maryland where they can get treatment. >> firefighters have one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. but responding to every imaginable kind of tragedy also takes an emotional toll. >> two teenagers were in a car, and, they slid off the road. upside down. and into a telephone pole side ways. i aapproximately jazz, bear with me. >> former firefighters and paramedic scott russell remembers the day when it became too much to bear. >> i sat under there for, 20 minutes, as we tried to get all this metal off of her. told her, held her hand. i want to got you out of here. the teenage girl didn't survive.
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russell couldn't sleep, started drinking heavily, and kept it all inside. he made a plan to commit suicide. >> i'm sitting in the basement crying, crying a puddle of tears. >> did you ever think ptsd? >> no, i heard ptsd, that's what happens when you go to war. >> finally he talked to a counselor and discovered he had been living first responders version of war. >> talk about the military being on the front lines. these are people on domestic front lines. >> dr. abby morris, psychologist is medical director of a new center in maryland for firefighters struggling with ptsd. >> we call 911 they come. who do they call? we wanted to be their 911. >> there are 60 beds, and treatment lasts 30 to 60 days. with 1 months of follow up. one in five fire fight is and paramedics will suffer from ptsd in their career.
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92% say stigma is a barrier to seeking treatment. off awe they tend to stuff it down. >> this center was the brain child of the president of the international association of firefighters. >> we're working to break that stig nama away. to let members know to come out of the shadows seek help and treatment. >> russell said that was the hardest part of all. >> we want to be the hero for the rest of the world. >> reporter: a world that need its heroes to take care of themselves too. chip reid, cbs news, upper marlboro, maryland. still ahead, country superstar, jason aldeen on his emotional return to the las vegas stage tonight.
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the biggest stars of country music in las vegas for the 53rd academy of music award. jason aldene among the performers. on a las vegas stage last october when a gunman killed 58 and wounded more than 500 others. vladamir duthier talked to him about this emotional night. ♪ you make it easy
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>> jason aldene, academy of country music entertainer of the year is back in las vegas this weekend hoping to take home the honor for the third straight year. what is it like for you to be back here? >> for me, i have of a million great memories in vegas, you know? one horrible one. it has been over six months since his performance at a music festival was tragically cut sthort wh short when a gunman opened fired from the 32nd floored of the mandalay bay. >> i love the sound, the city. looking forward to coming out here. >> the deadliest mass shooting. 58 people killed. hundreds injured. aldene invited some of the survivors to watch his rehearsal friday afternoon. >> what were you thinking about performing for them? >> think everybody that was there, we are forever bonded, man. always cool to see the people. and catch up. people don't get it unless they were actually there. i think it is their putting for
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everybody to talk about it a little bit. >> reporter: the healing process began less than a week after the shooting when he performed the tom petty song, i won't back down on "saturday night live." off awe fe felt like a healing moment for me. and a chance to tell everybody else, this is horrible, it's, but it's, it's okay to start the healing process and start to, pick up the pieces and move on. over the past 13 years, jason aldene has become one of country music's biggest stars, selling 10 million albums. eighth, rear view town was release fried day. that album was recorded before, the horrific events here. but, the title track is really interesting. it is about looking forward not looking back. >> for me about, putting things, that are sort of, held you down, things that have been a black cloud hanging over you sort of putting that in the past. looking down the road to better days.
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up next, he is a
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family and friends, gave nba rookie sensation, andre ingraham, a hero's homecoming in richmond, virginia, after a decade in the nba's development league, ingraham landed a contract last week with the los angeles lakers for the final two games of their season. and made the most of it. jamie yuccas has his inspiring story. >> you saw him right after he signed. on its way. down it goes! welcome to the nba! andre ingraham. >> that welcome took 10 long years of playing in the unglamorous developmental league. >> i kept coming back. kept believing. kept dreaming. >> the 32-year-old with specks of gray hair. >> at some poinl. maybe i should dye my hair. maybe people think i'm too old.
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people think i'm really old. >> what's going on. >> then something extraordinary happened. >> the l.a. lakers want to call you up. >> ha-ha. >> i appreciate that. >> one moment stands out above all. >> they made me call my wife at the time they told me. she let it out. there was no hesitation there. >> she's screaming, can you hear that? >> the l.a. lakers want to call you out. >> here he watched the video for the first time. >> you can hear the scream, my gosh. >> the screams help masked the sacrifices the whole family has the been through for so long. >> there was a time where i was like, okay, you are not making money, got a wife, two girls now, what are we doing here? she is going to say time's up. we need a little more. >> did she ever a say that to you? >> never, that was the best part. >> ingram's wife flew in from virginia their their two daughters watching as he scored again. and again.
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>> i just told him. >> he just hit another 3 by the way. that was in. >> oh, my god. yea. >> he finished with 19 points. >> that's what makes the story sweeter. you are just a nice guy. >> that's a great thing to hear. but in like basketball terms, no one wants to have a nice guy, you know. they're like, off the court, yeah, you are a nice guy here. and just on the court, just, you know, kind of have to be different. i wanted to see how i measured up against guys. i felt very good. >> you should feel good. >> thank you. i did. i felt excellent out there. >> hell of an opening night. >> jamie yuccas, cbs news, los angeles. persistence pays off. for three days in the nba, ingraham reportedly made nearly as much as he did in a full g league season. that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for
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the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. this is the cbs "overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news," i'm elaine quijano. president trump is defending his use of the famous phrase, mission accomplished, to applaud the missile strikes on syria. the u.s., britain, france, targeted the assad regime chemical weapons program. in response to a suspected chlorine and sarin attack on civilians last week. on face the nation, nikki haley said the u.s. will announce sanctions against russia for protecting assad. david martin is at the pentagon.
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>> reporter: the attack on syria's chemical weapons facilities included cruise missiles launched from a u.s. submarine in the mediterranean. total of 105 missiles fired from ships and aircraft from three different directions. all of them got through, and the aftermath, whether seen from ground level or space, seemed to confirm the claim made by u.n. ambassador nikki haley on "face the nation." >> we set their chemical weapons program back years. >> the president tweeted, mission accomplished. echoing a slogan from 203 prematurely declared subses in the iraq war. in fact the friday night strike did nothing to accomplish the president's goals in syria as defined by white house press secretary sarah sanders appearing on abc. >> he has talked about this relentlessly. we are all most there. we have made extraordinary gains against isis. >> it is true there are only small pockets of isis, still holding out in syria, but that isin the euphrates river valley removed. the one-shot strike as defense
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secretary mattis called it may have set back chances off cheefg -- of achieving the other goal in syria. >> we have to control iran, assure that the bad acting doesn't continue and grow. >> iran's president called russia's president putin today, according to the russians the two leaders agreed the strike seriously damaged prospects for a political settlement to syria's civil war. the u.s. military has demonstrated over and over its ability to launch strikes that destroy their targets. but strikes alone almost never accomplish the mission. elaine. >> david, thank you. our seth doane was in the syrian capital friday night when the missiles struck. on saturday he checked out the smoldering rubble of a suspected chemical weapons facility in damascus. tonight he has this report from inside syria. >> reporter: dhouma in rebel hands is controlled by syrian
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forces. that could make it easier for chemical weapons inspectors who arrived in damascus to get to the site of the purported april 7th chemical attack. inspectors were set to begin work today. >> syria's deputy foreign minister told us they were eager to help get inspectors to the site. though the government still claims the attack never happened. today on state tv, president bashar al assad appeared as confident as ever. holding meetings with russian lawmakers. he said $400 billion would be needed to restore syria's economy and called the coalition missile strikes an act of aggression. that's a sentiment we have heard echoed on the streets. since the air strikes, syrians and government controlled damascus have been defiant. they have been attacking and conspireing against syria for eight years, the student said. but syria is strong. in rebel held parts of the country, they have argued the air strikes did not go far
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enough. because assad is still in power. his forces have been making steady gains, knocking out opposition fighters wherever they can. like in the city of homs north of the capital. where the white helmets released video of victims of artillery shelling on rebel positions. the syrian government tells us the next crucial battle here in the capital will be against isis. which still controls a pocket of this city. elaine. >> seth doane in damascus. seth, thanks. united nations ambassador nikki haley discussed the street on syria with margaret brennan on face the nation. >> the white house said there have been reports since april of last year, 30 continued chemical weapons attack in syria some involving sarin. why did this particular attack last week warrant military action but the others didn't? >> will i think obviously this was cumulative. he, assad had been using
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chemical weapons multiple times. more so this was about the security council resolutions. we had, up until this point, had six different resolutions that would have dealt with investigative mechanisms for chemical weapons. and russia vetoed all of them. and so we felt like we had gone through every diplomatic measure of talking we could. and it was time for action. i think one thing we hope assad got the message on is the international community will not allow chemical weapons to come back into our everyday life. and the fact that he was making this more normal and russia was covering it up a, all that has to stop. >> are there any consequences for assad's patrons, russia and iran who continue to protect him? >> absolutely. so you will see that russian -- sanctions will be coming down. secretary will be announcing those monday if he hasn't already they will go directly to any sort of company that were dealing with equipment reap related to assad and chemical
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weapons use. and so, i think everyone is going to feel it at this point. everyone knows that, we, we center a strong message. and our hope is that they listen to it. president trump on twitter suggested fired fbi director james comey should be sent to jail. >> president trump continued his tweet attack on former fbi director james comey sunday. ahead of the release of comey's explosive memoir or as the president described it comey's badly reviewed book. according to president trump, slippery james comey will go down as the worst fbi director in history. by far. comey will launch a media blitz with the book release this week. in it, comey explains his decision to reveal just before the 2016 elect, that the fbi had reopened the probe into the hillary clinton e-mail scandal. >> i was operating in a world where hillary clinton was going
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to beat donald trump. so i am sure that it, that it was a factor. like i said i don't remember spelling it out. but it had to have been that, that she is going to be elected president. if i hide this from the american the people, she'll be illegitimate the moment she is elected, the moment this comes out. >> jim comey in my way of thinking is a good man who made a very consequential blunder. off awe senator tim kaine was clinton's runningmate. the fbi has two clear rules, don't talk about a pending investigation. don't inject controversy before an election. they didn't follow the rules with respect to hillary clinton. >> meanwhile the president is fuming about evidence seized from his personal attorney during an fbi raid. attorney-client privilege ledge is now a thing of the past. but the white house insists, president trump remains cool. >> a federal judge requested michael cohen appear for a court hearing in new york tomorrow. this morning, adult film star, stormy daniels' attorney said daniels will attend. daniels was paid $130,000 by cohen, she claims, hush money to
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starbuck's has nearly 2,000 coffee shops around the world. and it know the finished growing. in china, another starbucks opens every 15 hours. but the company's newest shop in costa rica is taking the coffee giant in a new direction. mo rocca paid a visit. >> if you happen to be high in the hills of costa rica and have a hankering for a starbuck's you are in luck. >> just an extraordinary opportunity with a real water fall that is not invented just there. >> remind me of fantasy island. >> hacienda el sacia is the site
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of starbuck's first ever visitors center where you can learn how your frapacino gets it start. howard schultz gave me a tour. >> we want this to be interactive and fun. >> visitors will also learn that coffee beans are called cherries when they're still on the vine. >> there is two beans. don't be afraid. taste it. >> sweet like honey. >> yeah, tart. sweet. >> it is the story of coffee, from seed to cup. >> this is going to become a major tourist attraction. that's what i think. >> but schultz says he wasn't thinking tourism when starbuck's bought the working coffee farm. >> what i really was dreaming about, could we find a place in which we could create sustainable coffee practices and elevate the industry as a result of what we were frying to do? >> the research done here and at eight other farmer training centers around the world, is part of the company's effort to
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help sustain a crop that is particularly vulnerable to climate change. >> starbuck's employee carl rodriguez is assisting farmers like herbert chicone in the battle as scourge known as rust. >> reporter: and starbuck's asks for nothing in return. we are in costa rica, you are greg ethiopian coffee? >> new variety. >> herbert hopes to make money from a hybrid, starbuck's develop and giving to farmers. >> we are giving it away so the entire industry can benefit. >> if it seems altruistic, well,
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starbuck's, the world's number one retailer of cough fief stand to lose venti if coffee becomes an endangered crop. schultz insists profit isn't the only motive behind the company's requirements for all the farmers it buys from. among them, no trees can be cult down for new farmland. and farm hand and pickers must be paid their country's or region's minimum wage. >> when we audit farms, find anything, one issue whatsoever that might be off standard we will not buy coffee from that farm. >> right now the market price for regular coffee is $121 for 46 kilos. how much would something like this go for? $850 versus $121. who will you sell this to, maybe starbuck's. >> maybe, i don't know. >> the new varieties will make their way into higher end
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specialty drinks selling at the company's expansive and more expensive, new roasteries. and reserve stores. >> i go into the roasteries in seattle i want a flight of clover brewed. >> three coffees. >> 8 ounces each. >> that is $16 and change. with the tax. >> we have had zero resistance in terms of the price inside the roastery. >> or cough fief milk shake is your cup of joe. >> this may be what i start the day off with now regularly. >> that consumers are willing to pay even higher prices for cough fief dri -- is something starbuck's can claim credit for. >> our parents were drinking instant, perked coffee. tasted more like fuel than coffee today. look back 30 years, especially coffee industry did not exist in america. >> 30 years ago you could be sure my favorite drink didn't exist. >> what is your coffee drink of choice? >> salted mocha frapacino with
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whip and drizzle. >> after four decades in the business, howard schultz is percolating with enthusiasm. >> you can't do it 95%. got to do it all the way. >> going to have fine? >> sure. >> get a two for one. >> a new collect, at national portrait gallery is dedicated to life the and times of average americans. michelle miller got a look around. >> reporter: among the statesmen and presidents at national portrait gallery in washington, d.c., there is now a sandwich maker, a seamstress, and a grape picker. >> american portraiture about the elite where the wealthy subject was able to hire an artist. >> you wanted to open it up? >> definitely. it is important to make sure that we are, representing multiple perspectives, we are representing everyone who walks through our doors. >> dorothy moss is co-curator of the sweat of their face. portraying american workers.
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>> how many pieces are in this collection? >> there are 80 works of art. all media. and this isn't your typical display on labor. >> no, this is not a history of the american labor movement. this is, portrayals of everyday workers. >> of the real people. off awe the real people. off awe real people. like the migrant mother and dorthea lang's familiar photograph. and willie g, in a painting by robert henrie. >> of the son of freed slaves. a paperboy. in new york city and delivered papers to the artists studio. >> so the artist chose him? >> yes. i love this portrait because it exemplifies such empathy. such a tender portrayal. >> tender portrayals of difficult lives. >> these are the people who -- who are, out working, con stanlt stanlt -- constantly working in difficult circumstances. child laborers, people who tend
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gardens. people who are part of
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tesla having a difficult time for production line for mod prattly priced model three t gail king got a tour from elon musk. >> going to look at batteries.
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>> middle part where we put the battery pack and motor in. and so we call that carriage. >> what's the hardest part, premarriage. marriage. post marriage. >> right now marriage the hardest part. >> elon musk relationship with analysts and investors going through a rough patch these days. >> i am definitely under stress. if i seem like i am not. i am definitely under stress. >> in the past month. tesla issued voluntary recall of 123,000 of the older model s vehicles. dealt with a fatal crash of a vehicle equipped with a driving system and downgrade of credit status on wall street. >> the model 3 in your mind is the face and future of the company is it not? >> yes. absolutely. >> most important thing is soming, production delays for the model 3 sedan here at massive factory in silicon valley. >> you started saying doing 5,000 a week. then that didn't work out.
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do 2,500 a week. now a little over 2,000 a week. does that trouble you? >> yeah, that's true. i knead to figure out huh to be better. then we can be better at meeting goals. >> tesla's future is tied to the car. when musk introduced it last summer, model 3 was build as the company's first mid priced. mass produced car. accessible to middle class kus meshz n -- customers not just super wealthy. said to your team everybody get ready to meet the demand. we are going to be in production hell. you didn't expect this production hell or did you? >> no, worse than i thought. >> why is that? why is it harder what happened? >> we got complacent that we thought were core technology. we put too much new technology into the model 3 all at once. this should have been staged. >> high tech goes in the cars but also builds them. this its widely regarded as one of the most robotics driven auto
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assembly lines on the planet. >> elon. one thing i heard about model 3s, there is too many robots. >> i agree. >> you think so too. maybe you need more people in here working. >> we do. >> in some cases the robots slow production. >> yes they do. crazy complex knelt work of conveyor belts. it was not working. we got rid of the whole thing. >> this is cool, elon. >> realizing it needed an overhaul, musk took over the model 3 production line beginning of april. off awe really extreme levels uflt precision. more than any other vehicle in the world. >> he says he resorted to pulling all nighters at the plant. >> things get intense. don't have time to go home and shower, change. i sleep here. >> i want to see where is that? >> right here. >> it's pretty boring overall. really. >> it's actually cold in here too. >> yeah, i like it cold. >> you look it cold. >> i sleep on the couch over here. >> i want to see.
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>> elon, not comfortable couch either. >> no, terrible. not a good couch. >> what does the number say for seven days. what is the number. >> 2071. >> pleased with that? for the time being? >> yeah. musk feels like all the overtime is paying off. now he says model 3 line is back on track. >> i'm unlocked critical things holding us back. from reaching 2,000 cars a week. but since then we have continued to do 2,000 cars a week. >> do you think this is sustainable? this pace? >> yeah, yeah. so we will probably have -- i don't know, three, fourfold increase in model 3 output in the second quarter. >> musk critics have heard predictions like those before. a future the automaker has yet to reach. >> but elon you may be within of the few people to see it. a lot of people looking at you don't see it. >> probably have a, analysts look in the rearview mirror. >> what do you the mean? >> very frequently been, why
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people have -- underestimated tesla. they would look at tesla, what they have done in the past use that as the prks proxy. >> april fool's day, he mixed optimism with dark humor. on social media, in widespread concerns tesla may collapse. we are sad to record, tesl have? gaz aunaun -- has gone complete bankrupt. so bankrupt. you can't believe it. >> why would you do an april fool's joke you did? >> media articles tesla is going bankrupt. i thought i will do an april fools joke that we did go bankrupt. >> that's not funny when people are nervous. >> it is april fools. people should lighten up. okay. i'm feeling pretty optimistic about where tesla is at this point. this point, i have a clear understanding of the path out of
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hell. i did not until recently did not have
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thousands of americans who put downpayments on a tesla are waiting for their cars. ceo, elon musk says one of the issues he tried to cram too much technology into the car. one of the technologies is the so-called autopilot. musk took gail king along for a rid to check it out. >> you have this, you know, beautiful, like, glass roof. and a lot put into the roof. it's got infrared coatings, ultraviolet coatings. like a good pair of sunglasses. >> tesla model three, stands out for sleek design. one of the automakers key features. >> this is so creeping me out. so you are not turning the car is turning. >> right. >> that's getting renewed attention. autopilot system.
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the function aids driving task like staying within a lane. it is not supposed to replace a human driver. >> we can't expect. see, warning us. >> why did it do that? >> my hand are not on the wheel. >> what's the purpose of having autopilot if you have off to put your hands on the wheel, elon? >> because the probability of -- an accident with autopilot is yes. >> less likely, but not impossible. federal investigators are looking into last month's deadly crash in california. involving a model x. operating autopilot mode. >> was there a defect with the system. >> the system worked as described. a hands on system. it is not -- self driving system. off awe a week after the accident. tesla announced the driver had received several visual and one audible hands on warning earlier in the drive. and the driver's hands were not detected on the wheel for six second prior to the collision. releasing that information drew criticism from federal officials doing their own investigation.
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>> you do know that you ticked off the national transportation safety board releasing the results before the investigation was completed? why did you do that? >> well it is actually, we have always released. >> are you on autopilot. >> yes. >> the ntsb takes time to complete an investigation. take a year. so, we can't wait for a year to release information. that's way too long. >> i see. >> too long, especially for a company under such intense public scrutiny. >> it is important to emphasize it will never be perfect. >> auto pilot will never be perfect. >> nothing in the real world is perfect. but, i do think that, long term it can reduce accidents by a factor of 10. so there are 10 fewer fatalities and tragedies and serious injuries and that is a real huge difference. >> and that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano.
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, april 16th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." it's president trump versus former fbi director james comey in an ugly feud. >> who lies constantly about matters big and small and insists the american people believe it, that person's not fit to be president of the united states on moral grounds. plus, the arrests of two black men at a starbucks sparks outrage in philadelphia. protesters are calling for action. and surrounded by family, former first lady barbara bush makes a decision to stop medical treatment.

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